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Government CIO Panel
 

Government CIO Panel

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In this session you will hear leading government CIOs share their perspectives of cloud in government and what it means for their respective agencies. We will discuss the state of procurements ...

In this session you will hear leading government CIOs share their perspectives of cloud in government and what it means for their respective agencies. We will discuss the state of procurements (current and future) for which the agencies are seeking cloud/saas capabilities, their primary goals and objectives for each agency's cloud initiative, and the metrics for evaluating the ROI.

Moderator:
Michael Binko, President and CEO, kloudtrack

Panelists:
Thomas Bayer, Chief Information Officer, Securities and Exchange Commission
Henry Sienkiewicz, Chief Information Officer, DISA
Kevin Smith, Deputy Chief Information Officer, United States Patent & Trademark
Keith Trippie, Executive Director of Enterprise System Development , Department of Homeland Security
Stephen Warren, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Department of Veterans Affairs

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  • To give a peek into how agencies are looking at cloud computing, we asked them drivers and obstacles, potential impact, and current state of cloud computing adoption. What we see is that: Cloud is still very much in the early stages But most realize that it will have a major impact on how they meet IT objectives The potential cost savings is the main benefit, But security concerns must be resolved before they will consider broader adoption. 02/18/11 Confidential & Proprietary For Internal Use Only
  • This is a pull market in many ways, in which vendors must be market makers in the federal space. It’s not really a “build it and they will come” type environment right now. But the better and more mature the solutions are, the more comfortable agency leadership will be to increase adoption. Within the IT market, M&A activity in the cloud computing sector saw a sharp increase in 2010, with technology heavyweights CA and IBM leading the charge. In 2010, CA made 6 purchases in the cloud arena, while IBM made three acquisitions. Top-tier companies entering and boosting their presence in the cloud computing space is no surprise; the cloud market is slated to be one of the most attractive growth markets for IT firms over the next several years. In 2011, we expect top-tier IT firms to continue their foray into the cloud market, targeting smaller companies providing unique or distinctive solutions. Within the Federal cloud computing space, we believe Terremark Worldwide, Savvis and RightNow Technologies could be attractive takeover targets for larger IT firms looking to expand their footprint in the federal cloud computing space.  These firms could garner attention from a host of A-list technology firms, including IBM, HP, Oracle, Microsoft, Google, Dell, and an EMC/Cisco/VMware partnership. SIs like Northrop, Lockheed and Unisys might also be interested. Currently, IT vendors are starting to collaborate with one another to integrate or converge components of the IT infrastructure, including network, server, storage, virtualization, and systems management and automation. Under the concept of “unified computing,” the compute and storage platform is architecturally unified with the network and the virtualization platform. This creates a converged IT infrastructure stack or platform. Through vendor collaboration, coalitions, and partnerships this converged infrastructure can be pre-built or packaged and sold to agencies as physical data center infrastructure-in-a-box or, in the cloud computing paradigm, it can be offered it up as a pool of cloud resources to be used whenever needed. Agency data centers can use it as a low maintenance stack that can be rapidly deployed as an internal service (private cloud) or it can be accessed by agencies through a public cloud service provider. Vendors are starting out by offering packaged Infrastructure-as-a-Services which makes server, storage, and network resources and associated provisioning like accessing a dial tone or a utility, like electric or water. Vendors are forming collaborative alliances, joint ventures, and partnerships to bring to market complete, pre-built infrastructure packages or offerings. Since virtualization is the linchpin of consolidation and the evolution to cloud, expect alliances to coalesce primarily around and be heavily promoted by the two main rivaling virtualization players, VMware and Microsoft. VMware and its partners have a head start and are taking maximum advantage of the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative to market their solution to federal agencies. In time, look for collaborating vendors or their ecosystem partners to offer these pre-built converged infrastructure platforms or packages in any or all of the following ways: Selling to agencies as an integrated data center platform for new application development Selling to agencies as infrastructure upon which to build an (internal) private cloud Selling this to cloud service providers upon which they will build their cloud IaaS or SaaS service offering Using it to build their own IaaS, PaaS, or SaaS service offering to subscribing companies Eventually, federal agencies will be able to access pre-built converged infrastructure packages in the forms listed above through the major system integrators in the federal market, many of which will themselves, as the market evolves, host federal community and public clouds based on these standardized and tested packages or platforms. 02/18/11 © 2010 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • The idea here is that, rather than waiting (possibly years) for formal standards to be developed by consensus, NIST would conduct use tests to validate the viability of cloud computing against specific requirements and share test results with agencies and the public. "One of the things we see strategically for not only government users but for all cloud adopters is the interoperability and portability piece. We talk so much about security we sometimes forget those two.“ (Dawn Leaf, Exec. Program Manager) Weekly meetings and collaboration site where NIST can engage with anyone interested 02/18/11 © 2010 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • The Defense Information Systems Agency is "uniquely positioned" to become the leading provider of cloud computing services to the Defense Department for both unclassified and classified data, Dave Mihelcic, the agency's chief technology officer, told Nextgov. Cloud computing is gradually replacing the current structure built on accessing data and applications locally with a networked system that stores data in remote centers. As reported, the OMB recently directed all federal departments to follow a "cloud first" policy to meet their computing needs, rather than buy new hardware and software. Army - Army email users will migrate to a Microsoft 2010 Enterprise Exchange managed email service—hosted by the Defense Information Systems Agency’s cloud. All part of efforts to create a Common Operating Environment (COE). The U.S. General Services Administration selected more than a dozen companies to provide cloud-based IT products for federal agencies last month, signaling a concrete investment in the cloud environment and underscoring the federal commitment to using the technology. GSA said it would make a total of $122 million available for two programs. The Treasury Department rolled out a new design of its website at Treasury.gov, which incorporates a cloud computing infrastructure and other emerging technologies. “For the first time, the new Treasury.gov will use advanced technologies like cloud computing, an official blog, and data visualizations to better communicate and connect with citizens,” said a Treasury official.  The step into the cloud is the first from a cabinet-level U.S. agency - Treasury is using Amazon’s EC2 cloud service to host the site and associated data applications. The FDCCI could amount to a crack in the otherwise traditionally slow-moving federal technology evolution path that could more quickly move the federal market to the tipping point of adoption of cloud computing, than would otherwise be the case. 02/18/11 © 2010 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • FedRAMP works with agencies to develop government-wide baseline security requirements and works with the cloud computing vendors to assess and authorize their systems based on those requirements. Vendor products would be listed as "FedRamp authorized." Rather than complete the entire end-to-end certification process themselves, agencies would have the option of leveraging the work already completed by FedRAMP, and add any incremental steps needed to address agency-specific requirements. Allows for joint authorizations and continuous security monitoring services for Government and Commercial cloud computing systems intended for multi-agency use Vendor responsibilities Implementation of government-wide baseline security requirements Create and vet system security plan with FedRAMP Arrange for an independent assessment Prepare proposed authorization package Iteratively work with FedRAMP to prepare package for authorization Perform continuous monitoring and periodically provide FedRAMP evidences and artifacts 02/18/11 © 2010 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Economies of scale – will be difficult to achieve if private cloud are the norm and we end up with cloud stovepipes Funding – must reprogram dollars to comply due to tight budgets Cultural – cultural environment often driven by control. Agencies must adjust to loss of control to vendors. Security – agencies are coming under much more scrutiny and requirements for securing their IT environments, with many feeling that cloud only complicates the issue. The security answer must be simply enough to make agencies believe it doesn’t require much more activity than they were already prepared to conduct to meet new requirements on the way. Licensing - central to standards and portability challenges is software licensing.  Because cloud computing provides a large group of users with on-demand network access to a shared pool of applications and other technology resources, conventional software licensing agreements are problematic. As the cloud model matures, agencies will expect vendors to offer more flexible alternatives that save money and simplify the acquisition process. 02/18/11 © 2010 by INPUT. All rights reserved.
  • Economies of scale – will be difficult to achieve if private cloud are the norm and we end up with cloud stovepipes Funding – must reprogram dollars to comply due to tight budgets Cultural – cultural environment often driven by control. Agencies must adjust to loss of control to vendors. Security – agencies are coming under much more scrutiny and requirements for securing their IT environments, with many feeling that cloud only complicates the issue. The security answer must be simply enough to make agencies believe it doesn’t require much more activity than they were already prepared to conduct to meet new requirements on the way. Licensing - central to standards and portability challenges is software licensing.  Because cloud computing provides a large group of users with on-demand network access to a shared pool of applications and other technology resources, conventional software licensing agreements are problematic. As the cloud model matures, agencies will expect vendors to offer more flexible alternatives that save money and simplify the acquisition process. 02/18/11 © 2010 by INPUT. All rights reserved.
  • Economies of scale – will be difficult to achieve if private cloud are the norm and we end up with cloud stovepipes Funding – must reprogram dollars to comply due to tight budgets Cultural – cultural environment often driven by control. Agencies must adjust to loss of control to vendors. Security – agencies are coming under much more scrutiny and requirements for securing their IT environments, with many feeling that cloud only complicates the issue. The security answer must be simply enough to make agencies believe it doesn’t require much more activity than they were already prepared to conduct to meet new requirements on the way. Licensing - central to standards and portability challenges is software licensing.  Because cloud computing provides a large group of users with on-demand network access to a shared pool of applications and other technology resources, conventional software licensing agreements are problematic. As the cloud model matures, agencies will expect vendors to offer more flexible alternatives that save money and simplify the acquisition process. 02/18/11 © 2010 by INPUT. All rights reserved.

Government CIO Panel Government CIO Panel Presentation Transcript

  • Cloud/Gov CIO Panel Gain … A Clearer Perspective on Cloud Computing Moderator: Michael Binko , President & CEO, kloudtrack® Panelists: Thomas Bayer , CIO, SEC Henry Sienkiewicz , CIO DISA Kevin Smith , Deputy CIO, United States Patent & Trademark Office Keith Trippie , Executive Director of Enterprise Systems, DHS Stephen Warren , Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, VA
  • Five Indicators That Federal Cloud Computing is Here to Stay February 2, 2011 Presented by Deniece Peterson Manager, Industry Analysis
  • INPUT Survey: Cloud Computing 19% 54% Have cloud computing solution(s ) in place Anticipate cloud computing having a major impact on agency IT objectives 55% See cost savings as the primary driver of cloud computing adoption 70% Believe security is the primary obstacle to broader adoption n=37 Margin of Error: +/-3%
  • #5: Vendor Solutions Poised to Meet Agency Demand
    • Vendor solutions continue to evolve
    • Expanding vendor pool from large-scale market leaders to small, niche players
    • Cloud computing continues to spur M&A activity
    • Interesting partnerships emerging to drive/support cloud computing (e.g. converged infrastructure stacks)
    Vendor Sol.
  • #4: Standards and Portability Tackled with SAJACC Standards Portability
      • NIST-led initiative to validate and interim specifications to agencies in the areas of security, interoperability and data portability
    • Numerous working groups open to vendors
      • Use cases
      • Reference architecture and taxonomy
  • #3: Numerous Models of Success Pave the Way
    • Defense
      • Army – email (DISA), CRM
      • Air Force – personnel services, CRM/case mgmt
      • DISA – RACE PaaS (SW testing/dev)
    • DOE - Email
    • DHS – SharePoint as a Service, email
    • GSA – Apps.gov, email
    • HHS – EHR, IT inventory mgmt
    • Interior – Email, Cloud Service Provider (National Business Center)
    • NASA – Nebula
    • SSA – online knowledge base
    • Treasury – Treasury.gov website
    Early Adopters
  • #2: Certification Program Underway to Address Security Concerns
    • Centralized cloud computing security certification service
    • GSA-led initiative, in collaboration with OMB (policy) and NIST (technical)
    • Allows agencies to leverage FedRAMP authorization
    • Goals:
      • Improve overall security posture
      • Reduce duplication of effort
      • Enable rapid acquisition of cloud services
    Security Certification Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP)
  • #1: OMB Policy Putting “Teeth” into Cloud Strategy
      • By September 2011 : for all newly planned or performing major IT investments
      • By September 2012 : for all IT investments making enhancements to an existing investment
      • By September 2013 : for all IT investments in steady-state
    25 Point Implementation Plan to Reform Federal Information Technology Management
    • “ Cloud-First” Policy
      • Identify 3 “must move” systems within 3 months; move 1 to the cloud within 12 months
    Cloud Computing Alternatives Analysis - Budget Submissions Policy Enforcement
    • Vendor Opportunities
      • “ Low risk” solutions, such as email, collaboration and CRM
      • Private and Hybrid Private-Public clouds
      • TBD - more to come in the FY2012 Budget Request!
    • Vendor Challenges
      • New competition as most major vendors develop cloud solutions
      • Required changes to business models
      • Gaining customer buy-in
      • Moving Quickly to Cloud 2.0™
    Cloud Computing in 2011
    • Agency/Department Challenges Ahead (INPUT)
      • Reaching Economies of Scale
      • Funding Issues/Licensing Models
      • Security
      • Cultural Factors
      • Agency/Department Challenges Ahead ( PANEL )
      • Discussion Topic 1: Workforce Management
      • Discussion Topic 2: Who Owns the Data and IP (Business Rules)
      • Discussion Topic 3: Acquisition Shifts (Licensing, Procurement)
      • Discussion Topic 4: Platform/Vendor Interoperability
      • Discussion Topic 5: ROI Factors (Prioritization/Measurement)
    Cloud Computing in 2011
    • Moderator:
    • Michael Binko , President & CEO, kloudtrack®
    • Panelists:
    • Thomas Bayer , CIO, SEC
    • Henry Sienkiewicz , CIO DISA
    • Kevin Smith , Deputy CIO, United States Patent & Trademark Office
    • Keith Trippie , Executive Director of Enterprise Systems, DHS
    • Stephen Warren , Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, VA
    Panel Participants
  • Cloud/Gov CIO Panel Gain … A Clearer Perspective on Govt. Cloud Computing Q & A
  • Cloud/Gov CIO Panel Gain … A Clearer Perspective on Govt. Cloud Computing Thank You for Attending!!