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Special needs children with natural painting
 

Special needs children with natural painting

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Special needs children get tremendous benefits from art lessons. They are usually poor academically, but not with arts. This study is crucial to maximise these children’s involvement in arts because ...

Special needs children get tremendous benefits from art lessons. They are usually poor academically, but not with arts. This study is crucial to maximise these children’s involvement in arts because they are prone to diseases due to their weak immune system.
Most paints are labelled ‘non-toxic’ but they are not entirely safe. The ‘Volatile Organic Compounds’ that is found in common paints is actually hazardous.
This research was to find out ways to produce food grade paints to be used in special children's art classes. Experiments were done with variety of edible ingredients to produce the safest paint substance.

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  • Art plays an important role in the development of a society. It is as important as other academic subjects; it nurtures healthy social interactions and well-being culture in the society. In art and design, color is one of its core elements. Color can stimulate thinking, feeling and evoke emotion. Art lessons have greater roles in special children education, they give them freedom and r oom to express themselves and be creative.
  • Special needs children are often misunderstood, taken for granted and being alienated . Very few people realized that they are the same like other children.
  • Fully text
  • http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=453992
  • As articulated by Banks, Davis, Howard and McLaughlin, (1993), inclusion in the art therapy experiences created encouraging changes in the interpersonal behaviors and emotional affect of the participating special needs children.
  • Breaking up the silence. Gathering around in a circle. Grabbing their attention so that they listen to instructions. Not so easy to communicate. Had to ‘ win ’ their hearts by telling them a few short stories and made them part of the characters. Finger puppets session was part of the show. Managed to grab their attention without that much of difficulties. After about half an hour of ice breaking session, we started our experiment. The children put on their loose adult's t-shirt as art aprons and they also covered their working table with canvas.
  • Breaking up the silence. Gathering around in a circle. Grabbing their attention so that they listen to instructions. Not so easy to communicate. Had to ‘ win ’ their hearts by telling them a few short stories and made them part of the characters. Finger puppets session was part of the show. Managed to grab their attention without that much of difficulties. After about half an hour of ice breaking session, we started our experiment. The children put on their loose adult's t-shirt as art aprons and they also covered their working table with canvas.
  • As seen in the overall observations and interviews, it could be summarized that there is a need to produce a hazard free paints for the children; no matter whether they are normal or special needs children. Ordinary mass produced; store bought ‘ non-toxic ’ label paints are still being used in the majority of Malaysian schools (including special needs schools). Although these paints are label non-toxic, but still, the ‘ non-toxic ’ ness of these paints is somewhat a worrying factor.
  • http://www.clementineart.com/

Special needs children with natural painting Special needs children with natural painting Presentation Transcript

  • Experimenting and Introducing Food GradePaints to Children:A Case Study onPutrajaya Precint 9(2) Pre-school for SpecialChildrenJuhanita Jiman & Ling Siew WoeiMultimedia University,Cyberjaya, MALAYSIA
  • Introduction Art nurtures healthysocial interactions andwell-being culture inthe society. Color can stimulatethinking, feeling andevoke emotion. Art lessons have greaterroles in special childreneducation, they give themfreedom and room toexpress themselvesand be creative.
  • Harmful Ingredients Four main ingredients for paints are: binder,pigment, solvent and filler. All four main ingredients of these store-bought paints mostly have syntheticsubstances. Most of these syntheticingredients contain VOCs. A Johns Hopkins University study found thatmore than 300 toxic chemicals and 150carcinogens may be present in paint.
  • Danger of VOC These children are exposed to harmfulsynthetic dyes and paints during artclasses. The VOC (Volatile OrganicCompounds) that is found in common storebought paints have significant vaporpressures that can affect theenvironment and human health. Special needs children have greater riskcompared to normal children due to theirweak immune system.
  • Understanding children with special needs These children may have physical disabilities,speech problems, other developmental delays, orhave difficulty communicating and interacting withtheir surroundings. These special children may have specific needsbased on what they are capable or not capable of,therefore, understanding their basic needs iscrucial in helping them to cope with their learningenvironment. Special needs children deserve to be treatedequally. They need extra love and care to gothrough their challenging life.
  • Focus of the paper This study was to find out ways toproduce safe, fun, cheap andenvironmentally friendly(green)paints to be used by childrenespecially special needs children.Investigations and experiments wascarried out on edible organic materialsto create the base of the paints andfinding suitable color pigments.
  • Understanding ‘green’ and safe organic paints A safer choice is making home made paints fromnatural ingredients. Paint is not easy to make but it can be anenjoyable task. Planning is essential and need alot of room for experimentations. Recipes, ingredients, and proportions haveto be written down in detailed record so thepaints can be replicated Proportions of ingredients are the mostimportant; an incorrect ratio may reduce theability to adhere to a surface, durability, andquality.
  • The Olden Days Paint SubstitutesTraditional egg tempera recipe Traditionally, egg tempera can be used inside oroutside and can last for over 20 years. This paintdries in about an hour to a glossy finish. Customaryegg tempera consists of egg yolk, boiled linseedoil, water, and pigment. Egg tempera is a luminous, semi-translucent paintthat dries quickly. To avoid mold and bacterialgrowth on the painting, only sterile water is usedto mix with the paint.
  • Old recipeMethods for egg tempera base•Separate an egg, leaving the membrane around theyolk intact.•Discard the white and remove the remaining eggwhite by gently wash the yolk under lukewarm water,or carefully pat with a paper towel.•Hold the intact yolk over a glass or ceramiccontainer, and puncture the membrane to let theliquid out. Discard the membrane.•Stir this egg yolk with a whisker or a fork. Add 2tablespoons water plus 1/3 teaspoon white householdvinegar to two parts of yolk, and stir again. The slightacidity of the diluted vinegar helps to emulsify theegg yolk and extends the life of the paint.
  • Egg Tempera Painting Demo by Alex Garciahttp://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=453992
  • The old-style pigments Colors and pigments follow a symbolic and artisticprogression from dark and "earthy" for base colors to"spiritual" or "heavenly" for final layers. Base layers are more coarsely ground, darker andless expensive pigments. The most beautiful, costly, and finely groundpigments are reserved for top floats and finishingtouches. Blue was particularly rare and precious, used selectivelyfor the most exalted subjects. Gold leaf is typicallyused for subdued and subtle icon colors.    Some pigments are taken from rocks and ground intonatural red and brown ochre. There are also otherpigments such as the iridescent white that is made ofground seashells.
  • Experimental Egg Tempera base paint Traditional egg tempera recipe has thinnerconsistency and it is translucent. In history, a lot of tempera layers were needed to getdesired effect and color. For this experimental purpose, thicker and moreopaque paint is needed for children to work moreeffectively. The same basic egg yolk base ingredients are used tomake an improvised version of egg tempera, one partplain flour is mixed to add extra consistency to thepaint. Because of egg yolk has an unpleasant odor,grated lemon rind is added to add fresh scent to thepaints.
  • Experimental Egg Tempera: The pigments The pigments are taken mostly from plants andedible sources. The plants (mostly leaves) areprocessed and strained to get the juice. Thejuice is then boiled rapidly and left to evaporateleaving a thick almost powdery color paste. However, afterlongexperiments,the help of avery tiny dropof liquid foodcoloring isneeded to geta dominanteffect.
  • Experimental Egg: YellowYellow is the easiestcolor to get becausethe base temperaitself is yellow.However, one part ofturmeric and saffronpowder is added toget a better andbrighter color.
  • Experimental Egg: Red, Green, PurpleThe pigments Red is extracted from redspinach, hibiscus and mixedwith paprika powder. Green is derived fromscrewpine leaves (pandan) anda few different kinds of grassand leaves. Purplish blue is taken frompurple dragon fruit. This fruithas the strongest pigment.
  • The Experiment : Situation Putrajaya Precint 9(2) Integration School waschosen because of its readiness for specialneeds pre-school education; being the onlyschool in Putrajaya that has special needs childrenat pre-school level. Special needs children from pre-school level arechosen to participate in this research because atthis level, these special children are exposed to alot of art activities as part of their therapy. These special children were invited to have artlesson experimenting with the freshly made organicpaints. Four basic colors were pre-mixed for thechildren to use. They are red, yellow, green andpurplish blue.
  • The Art Activity: Warming Up sessionBreaking up the silence with circle time.After about half an hour of ice breaking session, wegot their attention.
  • The Art Activity : Warming Up sessionThe children puton their looseadults t-shirt asart aprons andthey alsocovered theirworking tablewith canvas.
  • The Observation : The teachersDuring the first few minutes of the activity, thechildren were quite nervous and not quite know whatto do with the paints in the cute bottles.The teachers had to helpthem poured the paints intohomemade palette made outof empty egg containers. Itwas observed that theteachers are very creative byrecycling used items to beused in art classes i.e. theegg containers palettes, oldadult t-shirt as aprons andused cloths, fruits,vegetables and sponges asart tools.
  • The Observation cont…This initial step was quite intense. Theywere probably shy and not used tobeing watched and observed. Theyfinally got used to us and started to dotheir usual art lesson. They seemed tobe very eager to use the paints. Thechildren starting to loosen up, relaxedand looked more happy andenthusiastic.
  • These children were given an art block each.We briefly explained to the children that theybasically can draw anything they want. Theywere encouraged to be as creative using thepaint and materials provided.The Observation cont…laying out paper
  • The children spentabout an hour makingand finishing theirpaintings.We were amazed onhow these childrenmanaged to employ allthe methods they knowto create their craft.The Observation cont…self-expression
  • So how did they expressthemselves?They used brushes,sponges, old dabbingclothes and even theirhands and fingers.
  • The Observation cont…laying out paperSome of them even managed to finish morethan one painting. They were very happywith their artworks.
  • enjoying the art activity
  • Beautiful results of brushes, sponges, olddabbing clothes, hands and fingers…
  • The teachers wereextremely pleased withthe results. Accordingto them, these childrenwere seen unusuallyenthusiastic andattentive to the classthat day.This is probably due tothe new faces theywere seeing or the cutebottles of paints thatthey were using.The Observation cont…excitements
  • Interview reportA few children (who are able to talk) were casuallyinterviewed and asked about their opinion on the art lessonthat day and about the new paints that they used.All of them positively said that theyliked the paints especially thefresh scent of the paints. Theycould not describe about the lemonscent but they did notice that the paintssmell good. They also said that thepaints feel good to the touch and thecolors were attractive.
  • Teachers interviewWhen the two teachers were interviewed, both of themagreed that these paints are seen more child-friendlyand safer than the ordinary ‘non-toxic’ acrylic paintsthat they normally used.According to them, the so-called ‘non-toxic’ paints thatthey usually used have some kind of unpleasant odorthat was earlier explained as VOC. Even though theodor is not that strong, it is very much noticeable. Theyalso believe that in a long term run, this odor will behazardous to the children during prolong inhalation.These teachers were also commented, during theirlessons using normal acrylic paints, these childrenwere seen to lick their fingers. This is even moredangerous because the chemical base of the paints isnon-edible and could cause health risks to thesechildren.
  • Future research: Awareness and educationUnfortunately, organic and natural paints arequite new to the Malaysian society. Theculture to ‘nurture the nature’ for better livingis still an alien concept for most Malaysians.It is actually a big task to first educate theteachers and parents. There are someparents who are concerned about whatmaterials their children are using at school,but due to lack of resources, their concernsare not taken any further.
  •  Organic and natural paints available in the overseas marketmay not be the parents choice due to the hefty price,although they may have heard about the hazards normalpaints may cause to their children. There is no knownMalaysian store that sells these natural art products. Even inthe global market, only very few stores are available sellingthis kind of materials. These stores are basically started bypeople who are concerned about the hazardous children artmaterials. Clementine Arts is one of the examples of thosepeople who started their business out of their concerns onchildren’s health risks. Because or there are only a handful ofnatural paints stores globally, the cost of natural and organicpaints is really high.Future research:
  • teachers and parents are too busy to make these paintsthemselves. These paints require tedious process andpatience. It is seen that further research and investigationson organic natural art paints are beneficial for the society.the method of producing the paints’ body or base materialsand methods of preservation. It is seen that, to prolong shelflife with less effective natural preservatives, powderedpaints are probably the answer. Thus, the research mayinclude how can the powder be produced and later mixedinto desired consistency. The solvent or solution to mix thepaint should also be investigated.get stronger color pigments from varieties of edible sources.Future research: Preparing the paints
  • THANK YOU !juhanita@mmu.edu.myAcknowledgement Photos courtesy of Ling Siew WoeiSpecial thanks to The Head Mistress of Putrajaya Precint 9(2) School (Pn. Hjh Khamisah Noor bt Md. Zin)  Two teachers from  Pre-school for Special Children : (Puan Siti Nordiyana and Puan Normaliza)Special Children from Putrajaya Precint 9(2) School