DAY 1
@ THE WORKPLACE
OBJECTIVES
Reduce Stress
Improve Change Management
Increase Communication Effectiveness
Eliminate "Silo" Mentality
Improve...
WHAT CAN YOU DO TO MAKE THIS WORKSHOP
SUCCESSFUL?
Start with forgiveness: I ask for your
forgiveness in advance for any mi...
Speak directly: I will speak directly to the person
I am addressing, I will be present, I will listen
actively and reflect...
Validate experience: I understand that even if I
disagree with the facts people present, their
feelings are real for them....
Be an advocate: If I feel someone needs
support, I will; with their permission; be an
advocate.
Protect confidentiality: I...
SO CAN I
HAVE YOUR
COMMITMEN
T?
YES!
!!
YES!
!!
ACTIVITY ONE
ACTIVITY TWO
PERSONALITY TEST
YOUR SCORE SHEET
1.Extraversion E [vs Introversion I] = ________
2.Sensing S [vs Intuiting N] = ________
3.Thinking T [vs ...
SCORES ANALYSIS
Scores should range between 14 and 70:
14 to 26 is very low.
27 to 37 is low.
38 to 46 is average.
47 to 5...
MODULE 1
INTRODUCTION TO
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
Emotional intelligence (EQ) is a different type of
intelligence. It‘s about being ―heart smart,‖ not
just ―book smart.‖
Th...
Emotional Intelligence Quotient(EQ) is defined as a
set of competencies demonstrating the ability one
has to recognize his...
A Brief History of Emotional Intelligence
1. 1930s – Edward Thorndike describes the concept of
"social intelligence" as th...
4. 1975 - Howard Gardner publishes The Shattered Mind, which
introduces the concept of multiple intelligences.
5. 1985 - W...
7. 1990 – Psychologists Peter Salovey and John Mayer
publish their landmark article, "Emotional Intelligence," in
the jour...
Some researchers suggest that emotional intelligence can
be learned and strengthened, while others claim it is an
inborn c...
 In their influential article "Emotional Intelligence,"
they defined emotional intelligence as,
John D. Mayer:
"An emotion occurs when
there are certain biological,
certain experiential, and
certain cognitive states
wh...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) VS.
INTELLECTUAL INTELLIGENCE (IQ)
Most of us have learned not to trust our emotions.
We've be...
On the other hand, our abilities to memorize and
problem-solve, to spell words and do mathematical
calculations, are easil...
 However, intellectual intelligence (IQ) is usually
less important in determining how successful we
are than emotional in...
Typically, "emotional intelligence" is considered to
involve the following:
Emotional empathy.
Attention to, and discrimin...
Response with appropriate (adaptive) emotions
and behaviors in various life situations
(especially to stress and difficult...
 In essence, EQ is the pattern of how people's
biases in their thinking leads them to think one
thing or choice is better...
Personality tests typically only distinguish four
categories of temperament but do not distinguish
which melancholy person...
 It is desirable for salespeople to have persistence,
which allows them to have the energy, drive, and thick
skin to deve...
 An employee with a "good" personality may be
fun, social, energetic, and outgoing. However,
having a "good" personality ...
 This is why people with varying personality
styles can successfully perform the same job.
 It boils down to their abili...
An employee with high emotional intelligence has
the following qualities:
Manage his or her own impulses.
Communicate with...
Empathy,
Remain optimistic even in the face of adversity.
Are gifted at educating and persuading in a sales
situation.
Are...
 This "clarity" in thinking and "composure" in
stressful and chaotic situations is what separates
top performers from wea...
As managers and business executives we have often
asked ourselves the following questions:
 Why do certain employees get ...
 Why do some people cause conflict while others
are so gifted at resolving it? Why do they put self-
interest ahead of th...
―Unmet
emotional needs
cause the
majority of
problems at
work." —EQI.org
ACTIVITY THREE
SCORES ANALYSIS
17 to 28 : Poor EQ
29 to 40 : Average EQ
41 to 52 : Good EQ
53 to 68 : Excellent EQ
EQ BY DR. CARL ROBINSON - VIDEO
MODULE 2
THE FOUR BRANCHES
OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
Salovey and Mayer proposed a model that identified
four
different factors of emotional intelligence:
1. The perception of ...
According to Salovey and Mayer, the four
branches of their model are, "arranged from
more basic psychological processes to...
1. Perceiving Emotions: The first step in
understanding emotions is to accurately perceive
them. In many cases, this might...
ACTIVITY FOUR
Pick any of the following emotions(refer to the list of emotions)
and demonstrate with emphasise on body lan...
2.Reasoning With Emotions: The next step involves
using emotions to promote thinking and cognitive
activity. Emotions help...
3. Understanding Emotions: The emotions that we
perceive can carry a wide variety of meanings. If
someone is expressing an...
For example, if your boss is acting angry, it might
mean
that he is dissatisfied with your work; or it could
be
because he...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE - VIDEO
4.Managing Emotions: The ability to manage
emotions effectively is a key part of emotional
intelligence. Regulating emotio...
ROLE PLAY SCENARIO – EXAMPLE
ROLE PLAY SCENARIO 1
YOUR BOSS HAS JUST INCREASED YOUR
WORKLOAD
AND YOU HAVE YET TO FINISHED YOUR PREVIOUS
ASSIGNMENT.
ROL...
―It is very important to understand that emotional
intelligence is not the opposite of intelligence, it is
not the triumph...
EMOTIONAL EXERCISE 1
―EMOTIONAL SELF DISCOVERY‖
MODULE 3
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
COMPETENCIES & ABILITIES
1.Emotional Self-Awareness:
Having the skill to focus your attention on your
emotional state – being aware, in-the-moment,...
ACTIVITY FIVE
―EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE EXERCISE:
INCREASE YOUR
SELF-AWARENESS‖
2.Emotional Self-Regulation:
Having the skill to be able to choose the
emotions you want to experience, rather than
being ...
3.Emotional Self-Motivation - The ability to use
your emotions to cause yourself to take
positive action to continue to pe...
4. Empathy - Not to be confused with sympathy -
possessing the ability to listen effectively and
accurately enough to put ...
ACTIVITY SIX
―BUILDING TRUST‖
5. Nurturing Relationships - The ability to
demonstrate sincere care (as contrasted with
"required courtesy") for others. ...
 Freedman et al.: "Emotional Intelligence is a way of
recognizing, understanding, and choosing how we
think, feel, and ac...
A. Social Competencies—Competencies that
Determine How We Handle Relationships
1.Intuition & Empathy. Our awareness of oth...
3.Customer service orientation: the ability to
anticipate, recognize, and meet customers' needs.
4.People development: abi...
6.Political Acumen & Social Skills. Our adeptness
at inducing desirable responses in others. This
competency is important ...
ACTIVITY SEVEN
―COMMUNICATION IN ACTION‖
9. Leadership: inspiring and guiding groups of
people.
10. Change catalyst: initiating and/or managing
change in the workp...
12. Building bonds: nurturing instrumental relationships
for business success.
13. Collaboration and cooperation: working ...
ACTIVITY EIGHT
―ACHIEVING TEAM GOALS‖
B. Personal Competencies—Competencies that
Determine How We Manage Ourselves
1.Self awareness. Knowing one's internal stat...
MOOD INFECTION QUIZ
―TAKE THE QUIZ TO DETERMINE HOW EASILY
OTHER
PEOPLE’S MOOD AFFECTS YOURS‖
SCORES ANALYSIS
12 to 22 : Excellent EQ - you have excellent EQ
and do not allow other people’s mood to
affect yours.
22 t...
4. Self-confidence: sureness about one's self-worth
and capabilities.
5. Self Regulation. Managing one's internal states,
...
ROLE PLAY SCENARIO 2
YOUR DEPARMENT IS FACING SOME CHALLENGES.
THERE IS TOO MUCH POLITICS, BACK BITING AND
ARGUMENTS.
RECE...
7.Trustworthiness: maintaining standards of honesty
and integrity.
8.Conscientiousness: taking responsibility and
being ac...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE CONSISTS OF
FOUR CORE ABILITIES:
1. Self-awareness – The ability to recognize your
own emotions and...
3. Social awareness – The ability to understand the
emotions, needs, and concerns of other people,
pick up on emotional cu...
Mayer & Cobb: ―The ability to process emotional
information, particularly as it involves the
perception, assimilation, und...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TIPS - VIDEO
ROLE PLAY SCENARIO 3
YOU ARE VERY HAPPY WITH YOUR CURRENT JOB.
SUDDENLY YOU ARE CONFRONTED BY ONE OF YOUR
COLLEAGUES THAT ...
MODULE 4
SIX WAYS TO IMPROVE
YOUR
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
1. Observe how you react to people.
 Do you rush to judgment before you know all of the
facts?
 Do you stereotype?
 Loo...
2. Look at your work environment.
 Do you seek attention for your accomplishments?
Humility can be a wonderful quality, a...
3. Do a self-evaluation.
 What are your weaknesses?
 Are you willing to accept that you're not perfect and
that you coul...
4. Examine how you react to stressful situations.
 Do you become upset every time there's a delay
or something doesn't ha...
THE GODFATHER - VIDEO CASE STUDY
―VIEW THE VIDEO AND DETERMINE
THE KEY LEARNING POINTS ON E.Q.‖
5. Take responsibility for your actions.
 If you hurt someone's feelings, apologize directly –
don't ignore what you did ...
6. Examine how your actions will affect others –
before you take those actions.
 If your decision will impact others, put...
MODULE 5
FIVE KEY SKILLS FOR
RAISING YOUR
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
Emotional intelligence (EQ) skill 1: The ability to quickly
reduce stress.
Emotional intelligence (EQ) skill 2: The abilit...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 1:
RAPIDLY REDUCE STRESS
When we‘re under high levels of stress, rational thinking and d...
STRESS BUSTING: FUNCTIONING WELL IN THE
HEAT OF THE MOMENT
Develop your stress busting skills by working through
the
follo...
2.Identify your stress response – Everyone reacts
differently to stress.
Do you tend to space out and get depressed?
Becom...
3.Discover the stress busting techniques that
work for you – The best way to reduce stress
quickly is through the senses: ...
ACTIVITY NINE
―SELF HYPNOSIS RELAXATION METHOD‖
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 2:
CONNECT TO YOUR EMOTIONS
The second key skill of emotional intelligence is
having a m...
Many people are disconnected from their
emotions–especially strong core emotions such
as anger, sadness, fear, and joy. Bu...
QUESTIONS WE MUST ASK OURSELVES
 What kind of a relationship do you have with
your emotions?
 Do you experience feelings...
 Do you experience discrete feelings and
emotions, such as anger, sadness, fear, joy, each
of which is evident in subtle ...
If any of these experiences are unfamiliar, your
emotions may be turned down or turned off.
In order to be emotionally hea...
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SKILL (EQ) 3:
NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
 Being a good communicator requires more than
just verbal sk...
 Nonverbal communication is the third skill of emotional
intelligence. This wordless form of communication
is emotionally...
Part of improving nonverbal communication involves
paying attention to:
1. Eye contact
2. Facial expression
3. Tone of voi...
EQ TEST: BODY LANGUAGE
1. This face is expressing:
Embarrassment
Fear
Sadness
Surprise
Answer: Fear
We express fear when we feel physically or
psychologically threatened.
The facial expression of fear is often...
2. This face is expressing:
Flirtatiousness
Interest
Happiness
Politeness
Answer: Happiness
This is a classic display of a genuine smile, called a Duchenne
smile, which signals happiness.
It‘s def...
3. This face is
expressing:
Sadness
Pain
Anger
Disgust
Answer: Anger
You see these muscle movements—in the lips,
around the eyes, and in the brow—when people
are feeling aggress...
4.This face is expressing:
Embarrassment
Sadness
Amusement
Shame
When people are embarrassed, they avert their
gaze, which means they move their head down and
to the side, exposing their ...
This face is expressing:
Pride
Contempt
Excitement
Anger
Answer: Pride
Pride involves signs of dominance. The corners of the lips rise
slightly, signaling that the person is happy...
This face is expressing:
Fear
Interest
Surprise
Compassion
Answer: Surprise
Surprise is often confused with fear. But when we‘re
afraid, our lower eyelids tighten and our eyebrows l...
This face is expressing:
Sadness
Shame
Disgust
Contempt
Answer: Contempt
Contempt is when you look down on somebody derisively or
suspiciously. What‘s important about the express...
This face is expressing:
Anger
Pain
Disgust
Sadness
Answer: Disgust
When we feel disgust, the muscles above the upper
lip pull up, raising the upper lip, wrinkling the nose,
...
This face is expressing:
Desire
Embarrassment
Flirtatiousness
Love
Answer: Flirtatiousness
This is a coy, flirtatious smile. What conveys flirtatiousness
is when someone turns his or her he...
This face is expressing:
Shame
Anger
Sadness
Pain
Answer: Pain
When we feel pain, our facial muscles move in ways that
contract the face and protect us from harm. In the up...
This face is expressing:
Compassion
Sadness
Anger
Interest
Answer: Compassion
When people feel sympathy or compassion, the
corrugator muscles pull the eyebrows in and up,
their lips...
This face is expressing:
Amusement
Desire
Surprise
Excitement
Answer: Amusement
The tell-tale signs of genuine amusement are the
open mouth and the backwards head movement.
And like a ...
This face is expressing:
Surprise
Interest
Desire
Happiness
Answer: Interest
When we‘re interested in something, the frontalis
muscles raise our eyebrows straight up, and our lip
cor...
This face is expressing:
Sadness
Shame
Disgust
Compassion
Answer: Sadness
Sadness is characterized by oblique eyebrows,
where the corrugator muscles pull the eyebrows in,
but the i...
This face is expressing:
Disgust
Love
Contempt
Desire
Answer: Desire
Desire is signaled through the mouth, with lip bites,
puckers, or (as in this case) lip licks. The mouth is...
This face is expressing:
Sadness
Pride
Embarrassment
Shame
Answer: Shame
Shame is a very simple display but a powerful one.
It simply involves gaze aversion, with the head
moving do...
This face is expressing:
Happiness
Desire
Politeness
Compassion
Answer: Politeness
This is a non-Duchenne smile—a smile that doesn‘t
signal true happiness. It suggests that the person is...
This face is expressing:
Sadness
Shame
Embarrassment
Love
Answer: Embarrassment
With about 30 percent of embarrassment episodes,
people touch their face, which is happening here.
S...
This face is expressing:
Guilt
Sadness
Pain
Disgust
Answer: Pain
When we feel pain, our facial muscles contract the face
and protect us from harm.
In the upper half of the fa...
This face is expressing:
Satisfaction
Flirtatiousness
Love
Compassion
Answer: Love
When we feel love, our facial expression often
resembles happiness: The zygomatic major muscle
pulls the lip ...
"People see what they want to see." —Red
Barber
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 4: USE
HUMOR AND PLAY TO DEAL WITH CHALLENGES
 Humor, laughter, and play are natural an...
 Take hardships in stride. By allowing us to view
our frustrations and disappointments from new
perspectives, laughter an...
 Simultaneously relax and energize ourselves.
Playful communication relieves fatigue and relaxes
our bodies, which allows...
RONALD REAGAN AND HIS SENSE OF HUMOUR
–VIDEO PRESENTATION
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 5:
RESOLVE CONFLICT POSITIVELY
 Conflict and disagreements are inevitable in
relationsh...
 The ability to manage conflicts in a positive, trust-
building way is the fifth key skill of emotional
intelligence. Suc...
Tips for resolving conflict in a trust-building way:
 Stay focused in the present. When we are not
holding on to old hurt...
 Forgive. If you continue to be hurt or mistreated,
protect yourself. But someone else‘s hurtful
behavior is in the past,...
Emotional Intelligence Tool:
Conflict Management Worksheet
This is a tool you can use with others or as a way to privately...
"When you (neutral event) , I
feel (emotions) and
I judge/interpret (opinion, not fact) .
What I need is (request from the...
Let's use an easy example. Perhaps you have a
work relationship with someone, maybe your boss,
who cuts you off when you c...
―Raise your emotional
intelligence by engaging
your emotions‖
―BE
EMOTIONALL
Y
INTELLIGENT
NOT STUPID‖
-FST
CASE STUDY ONE
―HYPOTHETICAL SCENARIOS‖
EMOTIONAL EXERCISE 2
―EMOTIONAL CLEARING‖
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE JOURNAL
___________________________________________________________
_______________________________...
END OF DAY 1
Thank You
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
Emotional intelligence at the workplace  day 1
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Emotional intelligence at the workplace day 1

  1. 1. DAY 1 @ THE WORKPLACE
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES Reduce Stress Improve Change Management Increase Communication Effectiveness Eliminate "Silo" Mentality Improve Personal Productivity Improve Teamwork Resolve Conflict Constructively Improve Team-to-Team Cooperation
  3. 3. WHAT CAN YOU DO TO MAKE THIS WORKSHOP SUCCESSFUL? Start with forgiveness: I ask for your forgiveness in advance for any mistakes, misstatements and hurt feelings- and I forgive each of you. Label actions, not people: I will comment specifically on words and deeds, rather than name calling and labelling. Own your words: I will use ―I-statements‖ and speak about my own experiences and feelings.
  4. 4. Speak directly: I will speak directly to the person I am addressing, I will be present, I will listen actively and reflectively. Compassionate truth: I will tell the truth of my experience, feeling, or point of view, I will be present, I will do so in a nonjudgmental, thoughtful manner that increases compassion. Active participation: I will participate in all activities and be open to ―new ways‖ of learning.
  5. 5. Validate experience: I understand that even if I disagree with the facts people present, their feelings are real for them. I will clarify what I meant or what I meant or what I saw rather than contradicting their experience or what they heard. Share the stage: I know each of us has important ideas to share, so I will share when it is my turn, and listen without side-talking when it is another‘s turn.
  6. 6. Be an advocate: If I feel someone needs support, I will; with their permission; be an advocate. Protect confidentiality: I will speak about our meeting only in general terms, and if I hear someone quoting another member of this group to someone who was not here, I will remind him/her of our confidentiality agreements.
  7. 7. SO CAN I HAVE YOUR COMMITMEN T? YES! !! YES! !!
  8. 8. ACTIVITY ONE
  9. 9. ACTIVITY TWO PERSONALITY TEST
  10. 10. YOUR SCORE SHEET 1.Extraversion E [vs Introversion I] = ________ 2.Sensing S [vs Intuiting N] = ________ 3.Thinking T [vs Feeling F] = ________ 4.Judging J [vs Perceiving P] = ________
  11. 11. SCORES ANALYSIS Scores should range between 14 and 70: 14 to 26 is very low. 27 to 37 is low. 38 to 46 is average. 47 to 57 is high. 58 to 70 is very high.
  12. 12. MODULE 1 INTRODUCTION TO EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
  13. 13. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is a different type of intelligence. It‘s about being ―heart smart,‖ not just ―book smart.‖ The evidence shows that emotional intelligence matters just as much as intellectual ability, if not more so, when it comes to happiness and success in life. Emotional intelligence helps you build strong relationships, succeed at work, and achieve your goals.
  14. 14. Emotional Intelligence Quotient(EQ) is defined as a set of competencies demonstrating the ability one has to recognize his or her behaviors, moods, and impulses, and to manage them best according to the situation.
  15. 15. A Brief History of Emotional Intelligence 1. 1930s – Edward Thorndike describes the concept of "social intelligence" as the ability to get along with other people. 2. 1940s – David Wechsler suggests that affective components of intelligence may be essential to success in life. 3. 1950s – Humanistic psychologists such as Abraham Maslow describe how people can build emotional strength.
  16. 16. 4. 1975 - Howard Gardner publishes The Shattered Mind, which introduces the concept of multiple intelligences. 5. 1985 - Wayne Payne introduces the term emotional intelligence in his doctoral dissertation entitled ―A study of emotion: developing emotional intelligence; self-integration; relating to fear, pain and desire (theory, structure of reality, problem-solving, contraction/expansion, tuning in/coming out/letting go).‖ 6. 1987 – In an article published in Mensa Magazine, Keith Beasley uses the term ―emotional quotient.‖ It has been suggested that this is the first published use of the term, although Reuven Bar-On claims to have used the term in an
  17. 17. 7. 1990 – Psychologists Peter Salovey and John Mayer publish their landmark article, "Emotional Intelligence," in the journal Imagination, Cognition, and Personality. 8. 1995 - The concept of emotional intelligence is popularized after publication of psychologist and New York Times science writer Daniel Goleman’s book Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ.
  18. 18. Some researchers suggest that emotional intelligence can be learned and strengthened, while others claim it is an inborn characteristic. Since 1990, Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer have been the leading researchers on emotional intelligence. Definition: Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions.
  19. 19.  In their influential article "Emotional Intelligence," they defined emotional intelligence as,
  20. 20. John D. Mayer: "An emotion occurs when there are certain biological, certain experiential, and certain cognitive states which all occur simultaneously." --From EQ Today, Spring 1999
  21. 21. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) VS. INTELLECTUAL INTELLIGENCE (IQ) Most of us have learned not to trust our emotions. We've been told emotions distort the more ―accurate‖ information our intellect supplies. Even the term ―emotional‖ has come to mean weak, out of control, and even childish. "Don't be a baby!" we say to the little boy who is crying on the playground. "Leave him alone! Let him work it out!" we admonish the little girl who runs to help the little boy.
  22. 22. On the other hand, our abilities to memorize and problem-solve, to spell words and do mathematical calculations, are easily measured on written assessments. Ultimately, these intellectual abilities dictate which company will accept us and which career paths we‗re advised to follow.
  23. 23.  However, intellectual intelligence (IQ) is usually less important in determining how successful we are than emotional intelligence (EQ).  We all know people who are academically brilliant and yet are socially inept and unsuccessful. What they are missing is emotional intelligence.
  24. 24. Typically, "emotional intelligence" is considered to involve the following: Emotional empathy. Attention to, and discrimination of one's emotions. Accurate recognition of one's own and others' moods mood management or control over emotions.
  25. 25. Response with appropriate (adaptive) emotions and behaviors in various life situations (especially to stress and difficult situations) And balancing of honest expression of emotions against courtesy, consideration, and respect (i.e., possession of good social skills and communication skills).
  26. 26.  In essence, EQ is the pattern of how people's biases in their thinking leads them to think one thing or choice is better than another, as well as their clarity in differentiating within those biases to exercise clear and sound judgment.  However, as EQ can identify both the biases and clarity in one's thinking patterns that allow them to make good sound decisions, personality only refers to the biases in the behaviors themselves
  27. 27. Personality tests typically only distinguish four categories of temperament but do not distinguish which melancholy person is actually high in ambition. For example, business people know that they want an extrovert to fill the sales position, but they cannot tell from a temperament test which ones will be persistent from those who will be insistent.
  28. 28.  It is desirable for salespeople to have persistence, which allows them to have the energy, drive, and thick skin to develop and close new business.  Less effective, however are insistent salespeople who: 1) Turn off prospective buyers because they are too pushy. 2) Cannot give up on a prospect who is not going to buy when they could be focusing their efforts on more promising opportunities.
  29. 29.  An employee with a "good" personality may be fun, social, energetic, and outgoing. However, having a "good" personality doesn't necessarily equate to success in the workplace.  A "good" personality tells you nothing about the fact that the employee can also make errors in judgment due to lack of "clarity" when making decisions within their own biases.
  30. 30.  This is why people with varying personality styles can successfully perform the same job.  It boils down to their ability to exercise clear and sound judgment in those situations their job/role presents on a regular basis.
  31. 31. An employee with high emotional intelligence has the following qualities: Manage his or her own impulses. Communicate with others effectively. Manage change well. Solve problems. Use humor to build rapport in tense situations.
  32. 32. Empathy, Remain optimistic even in the face of adversity. Are gifted at educating and persuading in a sales situation. Are talented at resolving customer complaints in a customer service role.
  33. 33.  This "clarity" in thinking and "composure" in stressful and chaotic situations is what separates top performers from weak performers in the workplace.
  34. 34. As managers and business executives we have often asked ourselves the following questions:  Why do certain employees get into accidents more often than others?  Why do they violate company ethics and policies?  Why do they ignore the rules of the organization?  Why do they use illegal drugs while on the job?
  35. 35.  Why do some people cause conflict while others are so gifted at resolving it? Why do they put self- interest ahead of the organizational values?  Why do some salespeople build large books of new business with ease while others struggle to do so even though they seem to be putting forth the required effort?  In many cases the answer to the above questions lies in "emotional intelligence" rather than the individual's "personality type."
  36. 36. ―Unmet emotional needs cause the majority of problems at work." —EQI.org
  37. 37. ACTIVITY THREE
  38. 38. SCORES ANALYSIS 17 to 28 : Poor EQ 29 to 40 : Average EQ 41 to 52 : Good EQ 53 to 68 : Excellent EQ
  39. 39. EQ BY DR. CARL ROBINSON - VIDEO
  40. 40. MODULE 2 THE FOUR BRANCHES OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
  41. 41. Salovey and Mayer proposed a model that identified four different factors of emotional intelligence: 1. The perception of emotion. 2. The ability to reason using emotions. 3. The ability to understand emotion. 4. The ability to manage emotions.
  42. 42. According to Salovey and Mayer, the four branches of their model are, "arranged from more basic psychological processes to higher, more psychologically integrated processes. For example, the lowest level branch concerns the (relatively) simple abilities of perceiving and expressing emotion. In contrast, the highest level branch concerns the conscious, reflective regulation of emotion" (1997).
  43. 43. 1. Perceiving Emotions: The first step in understanding emotions is to accurately perceive them. In many cases, this might involve understanding nonverbal signals such as body language and facial expressions.
  44. 44. ACTIVITY FOUR Pick any of the following emotions(refer to the list of emotions) and demonstrate with emphasise on body language and with a partner to the class. You may choose any of the topics below for the demonstration 1. POLITICS 2. SPORTS 3. OFFICE POLITICS 4. ECONOMICS 5. HISTORY 6. FOOD
  45. 45. 2.Reasoning With Emotions: The next step involves using emotions to promote thinking and cognitive activity. Emotions help prioritize what we pay attention and react to; we respond emotionally to things that garner our attention.
  46. 46. 3. Understanding Emotions: The emotions that we perceive can carry a wide variety of meanings. If someone is expressing angry emotions, the observer must interpret the cause of their anger and what it might mean.
  47. 47. For example, if your boss is acting angry, it might mean that he is dissatisfied with your work; or it could be because he got a speeding ticket on his way to work that morning or that he's been fighting with his wife.
  48. 48. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE - VIDEO
  49. 49. 4.Managing Emotions: The ability to manage emotions effectively is a key part of emotional intelligence. Regulating emotions, responding appropriately and responding to the emotions of others are all important aspect of emotional management.
  50. 50. ROLE PLAY SCENARIO – EXAMPLE
  51. 51. ROLE PLAY SCENARIO 1 YOUR BOSS HAS JUST INCREASED YOUR WORKLOAD AND YOU HAVE YET TO FINISHED YOUR PREVIOUS ASSIGNMENT. ROLE PLAY HOW ARE YOU GOING TO INFORM YOUR BOSS ABOUT THIS VIA TWO DIFFERENT SCENARIOS I.E. ONE WITHOUT USING EQ AND THE OTHER BY USING EQ.
  52. 52. ―It is very important to understand that emotional intelligence is not the opposite of intelligence, it is not the triumph of heart over head -- it is the unique intersection of both.‖ -- David Caruso: From (“Emotional What?”)
  53. 53. EMOTIONAL EXERCISE 1 ―EMOTIONAL SELF DISCOVERY‖
  54. 54. MODULE 3 EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE COMPETENCIES & ABILITIES
  55. 55. 1.Emotional Self-Awareness: Having the skill to focus your attention on your emotional state – being aware, in-the-moment, of what you're feeling. Are you happy, excited, worried, or angry? Given that information about your emotional state, what should (or shouldn't) you do or say next? Use that information to help you make effective decisions to achieve better outcomes for yourself and others.
  56. 56. ACTIVITY FIVE ―EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE EXERCISE: INCREASE YOUR SELF-AWARENESS‖
  57. 57. 2.Emotional Self-Regulation: Having the skill to be able to choose the emotions you want to experience, rather than being the victim of whatever emotions occur - not letting others "push your buttons." It is about possessing the ability to manage your emotional state. Do not confuse this with "burying" or "stuffing" your feelings. The skill to choose the emotions you want - typically to be able to transform negative draining emotional states into positive productive ones.
  58. 58. 3.Emotional Self-Motivation - The ability to use your emotions to cause yourself to take positive action to continue to persistently pursue goals even in the face of significant adversity or difficulty. This is about using your emotions to be positive, optimistic, confident, and persistent rather than negative, pessimistic and second-guessing yourself and your decisions.
  59. 59. 4. Empathy - Not to be confused with sympathy - possessing the ability to listen effectively and accurately enough to put yourself in the other person's shoes. This is not necessarily to agree with them, but to truly understand the situation from their point-of- view in order to improve communication, problem solving, and trust.
  60. 60. ACTIVITY SIX ―BUILDING TRUST‖
  61. 61. 5. Nurturing Relationships - The ability to demonstrate sincere care (as contrasted with "required courtesy") for others. Through word and deed, demonstrate appreciation for people's efforts and contribution. This is about setting a positive tone of cooperation no matter how difficult the situation or conversation and having other's best interests in mind while focusing on achieving goals to create win-win outcomes.
  62. 62.  Freedman et al.: "Emotional Intelligence is a way of recognizing, understanding, and choosing how we think, feel, and act. It shapes our interactions with others and our understanding of ourselves.  It defines how and what we learn; it allows us to set priorities; it determines the majority of our daily actions. Research suggests it is responsible for as much as 80% of the "success" in our lives." --From Handle With Care: Emotional Intelligence Activity Book
  63. 63. A. Social Competencies—Competencies that Determine How We Handle Relationships 1.Intuition & Empathy. Our awareness of others' feelings, needs, and concerns. This competency is important in the workplace for the following reasons. 2.Understanding others: an intuitive sense of others' feelings and perspectives, and showing an active interest in their concerns and interests.
  64. 64. 3.Customer service orientation: the ability to anticipate, recognize, and meet customers' needs. 4.People development: ability to sense what others need in order to grow, develop, and master their strengths. 5.Leveraging diversity: cultivating opportunities through diverse people.
  65. 65. 6.Political Acumen & Social Skills. Our adeptness at inducing desirable responses in others. This competency is important in the workplace for the following reasons. 7. Influencing: using effective tactics and techniques for persuasion and desired results. 8.Communication: sending clear and convincing messages that are understood by others.
  66. 66. ACTIVITY SEVEN ―COMMUNICATION IN ACTION‖
  67. 67. 9. Leadership: inspiring and guiding groups of people. 10. Change catalyst: initiating and/or managing change in the workplace. 11. Conflict resolution: negotiating and resolving disagreements with people.
  68. 68. 12. Building bonds: nurturing instrumental relationships for business success. 13. Collaboration and cooperation: working with coworkers and business partners toward shared goals. 14.Team capabilities: creating group synergy in pursuing collective goals.
  69. 69. ACTIVITY EIGHT ―ACHIEVING TEAM GOALS‖
  70. 70. B. Personal Competencies—Competencies that Determine How We Manage Ourselves 1.Self awareness. Knowing one's internal states, preferences, resources, and intuitions. This competency is important in the workplace for the following reasons. 2.Emotional awareness: recognizing one's emotions and their effects and impact on those around us. 3.Accurate self-assessment: knowing one's strengths and limits.
  71. 71. MOOD INFECTION QUIZ ―TAKE THE QUIZ TO DETERMINE HOW EASILY OTHER PEOPLE’S MOOD AFFECTS YOURS‖
  72. 72. SCORES ANALYSIS 12 to 22 : Excellent EQ - you have excellent EQ and do not allow other people’s mood to affect yours. 22 to 32 : Good EQ - you have good EQ but may sometimes allow other people’s mood to affect yours. 32 to 42 : Average EQ - you have average EQ as you often allow other people’s mood to affect yours. 42 to 60 : Poor EQ - you have poor EQ as you always allow other people’s mood to affect yours.
  73. 73. 4. Self-confidence: sureness about one's self-worth and capabilities. 5. Self Regulation. Managing one's internal states, impulses, and resources. This competency is important in the workplace for the following reasons. 6. Self-control: managing disruptive emotions and impulses.
  74. 74. ROLE PLAY SCENARIO 2 YOUR DEPARMENT IS FACING SOME CHALLENGES. THERE IS TOO MUCH POLITICS, BACK BITING AND ARGUMENTS. RECENTLY THERE WAS AN OUTBURST FROM ONE OF YOUR TEAM MEMBERS. ROLE PLAY HOW YOU WOULD HANDLE THESE 2 SITUATIONS BY USING E.Q.(I.E. MANAGING DISRUPTIVE EMOTIONS)
  75. 75. 7.Trustworthiness: maintaining standards of honesty and integrity. 8.Conscientiousness: taking responsibility and being accountable for personal performance.
  76. 76. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE CONSISTS OF FOUR CORE ABILITIES: 1. Self-awareness – The ability to recognize your own emotions and how they affect your thoughts and behavior, know your strengths and weaknesses, and have self-confidence. 2. Self-management – The ability to control impulsive feelings and behaviors, manage your emotions in healthy ways, take initiative, follow through on commitments, and adapt to changing circumstances.
  77. 77. 3. Social awareness – The ability to understand the emotions, needs, and concerns of other people, pick up on emotional cues, feel comfortable socially, and recognize the power dynamics in a group or organization. 4. Relationship management – The ability to develop and maintain good relationships, communicate clearly, inspire and influence others, work well in a team, and manage conflict.
  78. 78. Mayer & Cobb: ―The ability to process emotional information, particularly as it involves the perception, assimilation, understanding, and management of emotion." --From "Educational policy on emotional intelligence: Does it make sense?", 2000
  79. 79. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TIPS - VIDEO
  80. 80. ROLE PLAY SCENARIO 3 YOU ARE VERY HAPPY WITH YOUR CURRENT JOB. SUDDENLY YOU ARE CONFRONTED BY ONE OF YOUR COLLEAGUES THAT YOU HAVE INFORMED THE BOSS THAT YOU SAW HIM/HER AT THE SHOPPING MALL WHEN HE/SHE WAS ON M.C. USING E.Q.(THE FOUR CORE ABILITIES) ROLE PLAY HOW YOU WOULD DEAL WITH YOUR COLLEAGUE ON THIS MATTER.
  81. 81. MODULE 4 SIX WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
  82. 82. 1. Observe how you react to people.  Do you rush to judgment before you know all of the facts?  Do you stereotype?  Look honestly at how you think and interact with other people. Try to put yourself in their place, and be more open and accepting of their perspectives and needs.
  83. 83. 2. Look at your work environment.  Do you seek attention for your accomplishments? Humility can be a wonderful quality, and it doesn't mean that you're shy or lack self-confidence.  When you practice humility, you say that you know what you did, and you can be quietly confident about it.  Give others a chance to shine – put the focus on them, and don't worry too much about getting praise for yourself.
  84. 84. 3. Do a self-evaluation.  What are your weaknesses?  Are you willing to accept that you're not perfect and that you could work on some areas to make yourself a better person?  Have the courage to look at yourself honestly – it can change your life.
  85. 85. 4. Examine how you react to stressful situations.  Do you become upset every time there's a delay or something doesn't happen the way you want?  Do you blame others or become angry at them, even when it's not their fault?  The ability to stay calm and in control in difficult situations is highly valued – in the business world and outside it. Keep your emotions under control when things go wrong.
  86. 86. THE GODFATHER - VIDEO CASE STUDY ―VIEW THE VIDEO AND DETERMINE THE KEY LEARNING POINTS ON E.Q.‖
  87. 87. 5. Take responsibility for your actions.  If you hurt someone's feelings, apologize directly – don't ignore what you did or avoid the person.  People are usually more willing to forgive and forget if you make an honest attempt to make things right.
  88. 88. 6. Examine how your actions will affect others – before you take those actions.  If your decision will impact others, put yourself in their place. How will they feel if you do this?  Would you want that experience?  If you must take the action, how can you help others deal with the effects?
  89. 89. MODULE 5 FIVE KEY SKILLS FOR RAISING YOUR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
  90. 90. Emotional intelligence (EQ) skill 1: The ability to quickly reduce stress. Emotional intelligence (EQ) skill 2: The ability to recognize and manage your emotions. Emotional intelligence (EQ) skill 3: The ability to connect with others using nonverbal communication. Emotional intelligence (EQ) skill 4: The ability to use humor and play to deal with challenges. Emotional intelligence (EQ) skill 5: The ability to resolve conflicts positively and with confidence.
  91. 91. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 1: RAPIDLY REDUCE STRESS When we‘re under high levels of stress, rational thinking and decisio making go out the window. Runaway stress overwhelms the mind and body, getting in the w of our ability to accurately ―read‖ a situation, hear what someone else i saying, be aware of our own feelings and needs, and communicate clearly. The first key skill of emotional intelligence is the ability to quickly ca yourself down when you‘re feeling overwhelmed.
  92. 92. STRESS BUSTING: FUNCTIONING WELL IN THE HEAT OF THE MOMENT Develop your stress busting skills by working through the following three steps: 1.Realize when you’re stressed – The first step to reducing stress is recognizing what stress feels like. Many of us spend so much time in an unbalanced state that we‘ve forgotten what it feels like to be calm and relaxed.
  93. 93. 2.Identify your stress response – Everyone reacts differently to stress. Do you tend to space out and get depressed? Become angry and agitated? Freeze with anxiety? The best way to quickly calm yourself depends on your specific stress response.
  94. 94. 3.Discover the stress busting techniques that work for you – The best way to reduce stress quickly is through the senses: through sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch. But each person responds differently to sensory input, so you need to find things that are soothing to you.
  95. 95. ACTIVITY NINE ―SELF HYPNOSIS RELAXATION METHOD‖
  96. 96. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 2: CONNECT TO YOUR EMOTIONS The second key skill of emotional intelligence is having a moment-to-moment awareness of your emotions and how they influence your thoughts and actions. Emotional awareness is the key to understanding yourself and others.
  97. 97. Many people are disconnected from their emotions–especially strong core emotions such as anger, sadness, fear, and joy. But although we can distort, deny, or numb our feelings, we can‘t eliminate them. They‘re still there, whether we‘re aware of them or not. Unfortunately, without emotional awareness, we are unable to fully understand our own motivations and needs, or to communicate effectively with others.
  98. 98. QUESTIONS WE MUST ASK OURSELVES  What kind of a relationship do you have with your emotions?  Do you experience feelings that flow, encountering one emotion after another as your experiences change from moment to moment?  Are your emotions accompanied by physical sensations that you experience in places like your stomach or chest?
  99. 99.  Do you experience discrete feelings and emotions, such as anger, sadness, fear, joy, each of which is evident in subtle facial expressions?  Can you experience intense feelings that are strong enough to capture both your attention and that of others?  Do you pay attention to your emotions? Do they factor into your decision making?
  100. 100. If any of these experiences are unfamiliar, your emotions may be turned down or turned off. In order to be emotionally healthy and emotionally intelligent, you must reconnect to your core emotions, accept them, and become comfortable with them.
  101. 101. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE SKILL (EQ) 3: NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION  Being a good communicator requires more than just verbal skills. Oftentimes, what we say is less important than how we say it or the other nonverbal signals we send out.  In order to hold the attention of others and build connection and trust, we need to be aware of and in control of our nonverbal cues. We also need to be able to accurately read and respond to the nonverbal cues that other people send us.
  102. 102.  Nonverbal communication is the third skill of emotional intelligence. This wordless form of communication is emotionally driven. It asks the questions: ―Are you listening?‖ and ―Do you understand and care?‖  Answers to these questions are expressed in the way we listen, look, move, and react. Our nonverbal messages will produce a sense of interest, trust, excitement, and desire for connection–or they will generate fear, confusion, distrust, and disinterest.
  103. 103. Part of improving nonverbal communication involves paying attention to: 1. Eye contact 2. Facial expression 3. Tone of voice 4. Posture and gesture 5. Touch 6. Timing and pace
  104. 104. EQ TEST: BODY LANGUAGE 1. This face is expressing: Embarrassment Fear Sadness Surprise
  105. 105. Answer: Fear We express fear when we feel physically or psychologically threatened. The facial expression of fear is often confused with surprise. But when we‘re surprised, our eyes open wider than when we‘re afraid, and our mouth isn‘t pulled sideways, like it is here; instead, our jaw drops and the mouth hangs open. Plus, our eyebrows are relatively flat when we‘re afraid; they arch more when we‘re surprised.
  106. 106. 2. This face is expressing: Flirtatiousness Interest Happiness Politeness
  107. 107. Answer: Happiness This is a classic display of a genuine smile, called a Duchenne smile, which signals happiness. It‘s defined by two muscle movements. The movement common to all smiles is the zygomatic major muscle pulling the lip corners up. But, critically, what reveals this as a genuine smile is what happens around the eyes: The muscles tighten, making those wrinkles, or crow‘s feet, around the sides of the eyes and creating that pouching of the lower eyelid. When you see these signs, the person isn‘t just smiling politely; he‘s feeling genuine happiness.
  108. 108. 3. This face is expressing: Sadness Pain Anger Disgust
  109. 109. Answer: Anger You see these muscle movements—in the lips, around the eyes, and in the brow—when people are feeling aggressive, threatened, or frustrated. Researchers think we make this expression when we're angry because it could protect the face in a physical conflict—for example, the furrowed eyebrows could protect the eyes. People often confuse anger and disgust, but disgust involves a raised upper lip and a wrinkle in the nose that you don‘t see here.
  110. 110. 4.This face is expressing: Embarrassment Sadness Amusement Shame
  111. 111. When people are embarrassed, they avert their gaze, which means they move their head down and to the side, exposing their neck. And the embarrassed smile is different from other smiles: The lips press together tightly, reflecting feelings of restraint or inhibition. Embarrassment can look like shame, but when we're ashamed, our head moves straight down, not to the side, and we don't smile. Answer: Embarrassment
  112. 112. This face is expressing: Pride Contempt Excitement Anger
  113. 113. Answer: Pride Pride involves signs of dominance. The corners of the lips rise slightly, signaling that the person is happy. But what distinguishes this from happiness is that the head tilts back, with a slight jaw-thrust. Those are classic signs of power and dominance—they suggest that we‘re feeling strong. The expression of pride is also close to the expression of contempt. They both involve a backward head tilt, but contempt doesn't involve a slight smile like pride does; instead, with contempt the lip movement is asymmetrical—only one side tightens.
  114. 114. This face is expressing: Fear Interest Surprise Compassion
  115. 115. Answer: Surprise Surprise is often confused with fear. But when we‘re afraid, our lower eyelids tighten and our eyebrows look flat and tense; with surprise, our upper eyelids rise up and our eyebrows arch. Also, our jaws drop when we‘re surprised, but our lip corners go sideways when we‘re afraid, making the mouth look tighter. Some experts believe our eyes open wide like this because when we‘re confronted with something surprising—a long-lost friend, an unexpected award—we try to absorb as much of this new information as possible.
  116. 116. This face is expressing: Sadness Shame Disgust Contempt
  117. 117. Answer: Contempt Contempt is when you look down on somebody derisively or suspiciously. What‘s important about the expression of contempt is that the lips tighten on one side of the face but not the other. If the tightening were on both sides of the face, the person could be swallowing or salivating. People often confuse contempt with disgust. But disgust involves the raising of the upper lip, and the bridge of the nose wrinkles. We express disgust about noxious things, not those about which we‘re derisive or suspicious.
  118. 118. This face is expressing: Anger Pain Disgust Sadness
  119. 119. Answer: Disgust When we feel disgust, the muscles above the upper lip pull up, raising the upper lip, wrinkling the nose, and narrowing the eyes. People often confuse disgust and anger. But anger tightens the mouth and lowers the eyebrows more significantly, and raises the upper eyelid. With disgust, the mouth opens and the tongue comes out, just in case you need to throw up.
  120. 120. This face is expressing: Desire Embarrassment Flirtatiousness Love
  121. 121. Answer: Flirtatiousness This is a coy, flirtatious smile. What conveys flirtatiousness is when someone turns his or her head away to signal ‗I‘m not interested in you,‘ but simultaneously makes eye contact. That‘s a universal display that reflects the ambivalence of flirtation—the flirter avoids and approaches someone at the same time. Someone flirting gives off signals of pleasure, as indicated by the zygomatic major muscle pulling the lip corners up, which also raises the cheeks slightly. Plus, the eyes are narrower than in a neutral state because the orbicularis oculi muscles around the eyes contract, suggesting feelings of happiness.
  122. 122. This face is expressing: Shame Anger Sadness Pain
  123. 123. Answer: Pain When we feel pain, our facial muscles move in ways that contract the face and protect us from harm. In the upper half of the face, the orbicularis oculi muscles around the eyes contract, closing the eyes tightly, and the corrugator muscle lowers our eyebrows. In the lower half of the face, our lips tighten and press upwards. You'll see this particular expression especially when people are experiencing psychological pain, such as when they see other people suffer. It‘s an expression closely related to sadness. But rather than suffering in their own sadness, they experience the pain and suffering of others through empathy.
  124. 124. This face is expressing: Compassion Sadness Anger Interest
  125. 125. Answer: Compassion When people feel sympathy or compassion, the corrugator muscles pull the eyebrows in and up, their lips press together, and their head tilts forward slightly—a sign of social engagement. The expression of compassion is most often confused with sadness. The eyebrow movements are similar in sadness and compassion, but with compassion the lips press together; when we feel sad, our lips pull down.
  126. 126. This face is expressing: Amusement Desire Surprise Excitement
  127. 127. Answer: Amusement The tell-tale signs of genuine amusement are the open mouth and the backwards head movement. And like a genuine smile, you can tell a genuine laugh when you see the muscles contracting around the eyes, making crow‘s feet. Genuine laughter often relaxes all muscle movements in the body because of shifts in our respiration patterns that happen when we laugh. This rapid shift to a state of relaxation shuts off feelings of aggression or frustration—we‘re cooperating with other people, not competing.
  128. 128. This face is expressing: Surprise Interest Desire Happiness
  129. 129. Answer: Interest When we‘re interested in something, the frontalis muscles raise our eyebrows straight up, and our lip corners turn up in a slight smile, suggesting we‘re feeling pleasure. The expression of interest is related to the expression of happiness. But when we‘re happy, we‘ll show more exaggerated upward movements of our lip corners, and the muscles around the eyes will contract more, without the eyebrow raising
  130. 130. This face is expressing: Sadness Shame Disgust Compassion
  131. 131. Answer: Sadness Sadness is characterized by oblique eyebrows, where the corrugator muscles pull the eyebrows in, but the inner part of the frontalis muscle pulls them up. There‘s also a little pouching in the inner part of the forehead, and people will often look down. Plus, the corners of the lips are pulled straight down, giving the mouth a curved look. The expression of sadness is often confused with shame, and it shares the oblique eyebrow muscle movements of compassion.
  132. 132. This face is expressing: Disgust Love Contempt Desire
  133. 133. Answer: Desire Desire is signaled through the mouth, with lip bites, puckers, or (as in this case) lip licks. The mouth is probably so strongly linked to desire because of the connection to kissing. People often make this facial expression when they‘re interested in someone else sexually, but not necessarily romantically. Desire is obviously a relative of love, but when people feel loving and trusting and devoted to someone else, as opposed to sexually aroused, they won't necessarily make this kind of gesture with their mouth. Instead, they'll often smile in a way that suggests happiness, with a head tilt to the side.
  134. 134. This face is expressing: Sadness Pride Embarrassment Shame
  135. 135. Answer: Shame Shame is a very simple display but a powerful one. It simply involves gaze aversion, with the head moving down so that the chin tucks into the neck. It's the opposite of pride: Whereas with pride our head tilts back and our chin goes up, shame often constricts our posture as a sign of submissiveness. This expression is frequently confused with sadness. But shame doesn't involve the muscle movements of the sad face—the eyebrows pulled in and partly up, with the lip corners moving down.
  136. 136. This face is expressing: Happiness Desire Politeness Compassion
  137. 137. Answer: Politeness This is a non-Duchenne smile—a smile that doesn‘t signal true happiness. It suggests that the person is trying to seem polite and cooperative, but they don‘t genuinely feel happy. The zygomatic major muscle is pulling the lip corners up, but there are no signs of real joy around the eyes—no crow‘s feet around the sides, no pouching of the lower eyelid, no raising of the cheek.
  138. 138. This face is expressing: Sadness Shame Embarrassment Love
  139. 139. Answer: Embarrassment With about 30 percent of embarrassment episodes, people touch their face, which is happening here. Some experts believe the face touch is a defensive movement, to protect the face after the person violated some social rule. In some parts of the world, people make a similar hand gesture when they‘re ashamed. But with shame, the head moves straight down, not to the side, and there‘s no slight smile.
  140. 140. This face is expressing: Guilt Sadness Pain Disgust
  141. 141. Answer: Pain When we feel pain, our facial muscles contract the face and protect us from harm. In the upper half of the face, the orbicularis oculi muscles around the eyes contract, closing the eyes tightly, and the corrugator muscle lowers our eyebrows. In the lower half of the face, our lips tighten and press upwards. Especially when experiencing physical pain, people will sometimes contract their neck, as is happening here, making this
  142. 142. This face is expressing: Satisfaction Flirtatiousness Love Compassion
  143. 143. Answer: Love When we feel love, our facial expression often resembles happiness: The zygomatic major muscle pulls the lip corners up, and there‘s a tightening of the lower eyelid. But the distinct expression of love combines these muscle movements with a tilt of the head to the side. That‘s a sign of intimacy and connection beyond just happiness.
  144. 144. "People see what they want to see." —Red Barber
  145. 145. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 4: USE HUMOR AND PLAY TO DEAL WITH CHALLENGES  Humor, laughter, and play are natural antidotes to life‘s difficulties. They lighten our burdens and help us keep things in perspective. A good hearty laugh reduces stress, elevates mood, and brings our nervous system back into balance.  The ability to deal with challenges using humor and play is the fourth skill of emotional intelligence. Playful communication broadens our emotional
  146. 146.  Take hardships in stride. By allowing us to view our frustrations and disappointments from new perspectives, laughter and play enable us to survive annoyances, hard times, and setbacks.  Smooth over differences. Using gentle humor often helps us say things that might be otherwise difficult to express without creating a flap.
  147. 147.  Simultaneously relax and energize ourselves. Playful communication relieves fatigue and relaxes our bodies, which allows us to recharge and accomplish more.  Become more creative. When we loosen up, we free ourselves of rigid ways of thinking and being, allowing us to get creative and see things in new ways.
  148. 148. RONALD REAGAN AND HIS SENSE OF HUMOUR –VIDEO PRESENTATION
  149. 149. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ) SKILL 5: RESOLVE CONFLICT POSITIVELY  Conflict and disagreements are inevitable in relationships. Two people can‘t possibly have the same needs, opinions, and expectations at all times.  However, that needn‘t be a bad thing! Resolving conflict in healthy, constructive ways can strengthen trust between people.  When conflict isn‘t perceived as threatening or punishing, it fosters freedom, creativity, and safety in
  150. 150.  The ability to manage conflicts in a positive, trust- building way is the fifth key skill of emotional intelligence. Successfully resolving differences is supported by the previous four skills of emotional intelligence.  Once you know how to manage stress, stay emotionally present and aware, communicate nonverbally, and use humor and play, you‘ll be better equipped to handle emotionally-charged situations and catch and defuse many issues before they escalate.
  151. 151. Tips for resolving conflict in a trust-building way:  Stay focused in the present. When we are not holding on to old hurts and resentments, we can recognize the reality of a current situation and view it as a new opportunity for resolving old feelings about conflicts.  Choose your arguments. Arguments take time and energy, especially if you want to resolve them in a positive way. Consider what is worth arguing about and what is not.
  152. 152.  Forgive. If you continue to be hurt or mistreated, protect yourself. But someone else‘s hurtful behavior is in the past, remember that conflict resolution involves giving up the urge to punish.  End conflicts that can't be resolved. It takes two people to keep an argument going. You can choose to disengage from a conflict, even if you still disagree.
  153. 153. Emotional Intelligence Tool: Conflict Management Worksheet This is a tool you can use with others or as a way to privately help you take the charge or strong emotional reaction out of a situation. Many situations we consider a conflict are really just a conversation where two people trigger strong reactions in one or both. The goal is to neutralize the event and separate out what your feelings are, your judgment or interpretation and what you need to move forward. Fill in the blanks on the worksheet below as you learn new ways of thinking that will reduce conflicts.
  154. 154. "When you (neutral event) , I feel (emotions) and I judge/interpret (opinion, not fact) . What I need is (request from the other person) . (They may or may not be able to give it.)‖
  155. 155. Let's use an easy example. Perhaps you have a work relationship with someone, maybe your boss, who cuts you off when you come to share an idea or solution to a problem. Fill in the sentence above and sort out the pieces of your reaction. KEY! This is all about YOU, not them. The object here is to help you manage your emotions, get to the trigger, and cleanly ask for what you need without blaming others. This is great emotional intelligence tool to help you self- regulate and then respond vs. react. Your reactions are usually all about you!
  156. 156. ―Raise your emotional intelligence by engaging your emotions‖
  157. 157. ―BE EMOTIONALL Y INTELLIGENT NOT STUPID‖ -FST
  158. 158. CASE STUDY ONE ―HYPOTHETICAL SCENARIOS‖
  159. 159. EMOTIONAL EXERCISE 2 ―EMOTIONAL CLEARING‖
  160. 160. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE JOURNAL ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________
  161. 161. END OF DAY 1
  162. 162. Thank You
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