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Public Relation Skills

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Public Relation Skills

Public Relation Skills

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Public Relation Skills Public Relation Skills Presentation Transcript

  • HOW RUDE
    • The findings are reported below with the percentage of
    • respondents replying. Numbers add up to more than 100%
    • due to respondents providing multiple answers.
    • Is rudeness in business:
    • Increasing - 80%
    • Decreasing - 11%
    • Same - 9%
    • The most rude behaviors reported be respondents are:
    • Telephone rudeness - 62%
    • Long, Abrupt holds - 27%
    • Unreturned calls - 24%
    • Voice mail mazes - 11%
    • Indifference, in attentiveness, “Don’t care” attitude
    • of employees - 39%
    • Ignoring customers and conducting private conversations in person or over phone while others are waiting – 36%
    • Time abuses, such as long waits, long lines, employee lateness to work, slow response - 34%
    • Interruptions, cutting off conversations or dismissing discussion - 22%
    • Abrupt voice tone and rude language - 19.5%
    • Lack of appreciation for employees or customers, no “Thank You’s”.
    • What is your response to rude behavior?
    • Take business elsewhere even if out of way or higher price – 58%
    • Write letter or document - 42%
    • Talk to supervisor or manager - 25%
    • Ignore it either because don’t want to confront – 21%
    • What are the behaviors you most admire, appreciate, and respect?
    • Friendly, Quick greeting - 60%
    • Helpful, even if not your job - 39%
    • Appreciation of customer, coworkers, employees - 38%
    • Honesty, Integrity, Sincerity 22%
    • 5. What is your response to these behaviours?
    • Go out of way to conduct business – 42%
    • Work harder at job – 31%
    • More loyal as customer and employee – 25%
    • Refer others – 18%
  • YOU AND YOUR CO WORKERS
    • Navigating the day-in-day-out of the workplace can be an adventure fraught not only with questions but with hazards.
    • As the modern office becomes both more technical and more egalitarian, the rules of conduct have changed. Etiquette is the secret that enables you to get through difficult situations at work with both your professional reputation and sanity intact.
  • GETTING AHEAD IN BUSINESS
    • Good manners, work ethics, conscientious attitude and overall performance contribute to future promotions.
    • ACCURACY - spelling and punctuation errors, misspelled names, incorrect addresses, faulty grammar, incoherent sentences and paragraphs should be avoided.
    • ATTITUDE - assignment, complete it or complain about it.
    • DEADLINES - turn in reports when they are due, be prompt for meetings.
    • GOOD USE OF TIME - do not let people use you as an excuse to waste time , both theirs and yours.
    • SPEECH - C orporates will not place personnel with poor speech in positions where they come into contact with outsiders. Poor speech is an handicap in business.
    • TAKING INITIATIVE - motivates developing leadership towards group achievement.
    • THOUGHTFULNESS - can go long way towards creating a pleasant atmosphere. It is answering needs before they are asked.
  • THINGS TO AVOID
    • Absence
    • Borrowing
    • Breaking confidences
    • Criticism
    • Drinking
    • Gossip
    • Messiness
    • Obscene language
    • Romance
    • Shouting
    • Temper
    • Smoking
    • Privacy
    • Wasting time
    • Reprimands
    • Personal problems
    • THE SAME SOUP
    • Whether you swim or sink has a great deal to do with your ability to treat your work mates with courtesy and respect. It pays to have allies rather than enemies and to assume that everyone you work with can give you a boost up the corporate ladder.
    • Appreciate the contributions your co worker make instead of focusing on their failures. Recognize that you all are a part of larger company culture with its own rules, standards, and eccentricities.
    • A corporate culture is a culture that shares beliefs, interests, values, goals and living styles. In business, culture hierarchical. Success depends on how quickly you master the company culture.
    • Personal space of your co worker should be respected.
    • In business rank is power so be conscious of the position of the person with whom you are talking.
    • Requesting and offering help- best way to get help is to give it. Thank you is very essential.
    • Giving and accepting compliments- saying ‘Well done’ Or ‘Good job’.
    • Animosities and squabbles- first rule is not to avoid disagreeing when you feel strongly about an issue. You have an ethical obligation to state your case as strongly as you can. Ideally disagreement between co workers should be resolved in private. But during brainstorming session- pay attention to the reaction of others.
    • Don’t make it personal
    • Stick to the subject
    • Be open to compromise
    • Don’t gloat
    • Gossip and Rumors- becomes malignant when it does someone harm no matter how slight or unintended
    • Squelching offensive comments- like being defamed, insulted or patronized, blatant racist remarks- confront the remark rather than the speaker
    • Other odours- co workers’ bad breadth, body odour, smelly feet are extremely touchy issues.
    • Almost any topic is up for grabs as long as it is not malicious, derogatory, inflammatory or indiscreet.
    • Don’t over stay your welcome
    • Avoid subject that are too personal
    • Small talk- is an important part of building business relationships
    • Be careful not to repeat yourself
    • Keep abreast of the world issues
    • Be aware of the impact of small talk on those working around you.
    • To end small talk , leave after you , not the other person , has made a statement.
    • Customer is the king
    • Here to please the customer
    • What pleases you / normal human being?
    • E.g.: a yatch, a hilltop house, CEO of a company, money etc.
    • PLEASING THE CUSTOMER
    • The first rule is to treat everyone with full respect.
    • Be there - whether it’s a important call, attending a session where valuable information will be exchanged even if at a inconvenient time.
    • Listen carefully - every word, every pause, every tone, take notes.
    • Hear- absorbing what the speaker is saying, why he is saying it and what it means for your future association.
    • Asking the right questions - sets you on the road to success.
    • Gentle guidance - move the conversation along with gentle intelligent questions.example - “ I hope you don’t mind my asking but…..”
  • SOCIAL GRACES
    • How people relate to
    • you in business is based on the conscious and unconscious statements you make about yourself.
  • SOCIAL GRACES
    • Everyday manners
    • Dress and Grooming
    • Courtesy between genders
    • Dating manners
    • Defining sexual harassment
    • Language of flowers
    • Gifts
    • Dancing etiquette
    • Bar etiquette
    • Cocktail etiquette
    • Billiard room etiquette
    • Club etiquette
    • Golf etiquette
    • Gambling etiquette
    • Courtroom etiquette
    • Telephone etiquette
    • Driving etiquette
    • Swimming etiquette
    • Tea etiquette
    • Funeral etiquette
    • Hospital etiquette
    • There is no accomplishment so easy to acquire as politeness and none more profitable.- BERNARD SHAW
    • Manners are natural ways of living – cannot be donned like a suit to impress.
    • Real courtesy should be a part of a person as natural as breathing.
    • Manners differ from country to country and from region to region.
    • Etiquette is the name to the rules of conduct- observed and accepted by polite society.
    • Rules of etiquette are generally accepted as being the benchmark of good form.
    • Our social behaviour is the visible fraction of the iceberg of our personality, by which people judge us.
    • Etiquette has fascinating derivations-
    • Through time it became one which legislated all the rules for correct deportment, eventually it became a singular word that carries instant definition of courteous, thoughtful behaviour, impeccable manners, dignity and civility.
    • The concept of courtesy is also rooted in the chinese culture called ‘Li’.
    • As society progresses rules of etiquette become obsolete and new ones evolve.
    • Etiquettes guiding code-
    • Enables us to practice manners to celebrate our tradition and ceremonies.
    • To be flexible enough to value and hold in esteem the rights, traditions and beliefs of others at the same time.
    • Why are good manners important in business?
    • Helps stay ahead in competitive business.
    • Helps to gain goodwill.
    • Promote business excellence for customer service.
    • Fruitful and rewarding relationships.
    • Bad manners due to ignorance or insensitivity will contribute to loss of clients / friends.
  • Ps and Qs
    • ANGER. PRIVACY
    • APOLOGISING. QUARRELLING.
    • ABSENCE & TARDINESS. SMOKING.
    • BORROWING. SHARING.
    • BREAKING CONFIDENCE. SWEARING.
    • COMMUNITY MANNERS PERSONAL CALL
    • CRITICISM REPRIMAND
    • COMPLIMENTS. SWEARING
    • CREDIT. WASTING
    • DRINKING.
    • DEADLINES.
    • EATING IN PUBLIC.
    • FAMILY VISIT.
    • GOSSIP.
    • GUM CHEWING.
    • MESSINESS.
    • OBSCENE LANGUAGE.
    • PAYING DISCREETLY.
    • PERSONAL QUESTIONS.
    • THOUGHTFUL.
    • POINTING.
  • THINGS EVERY WELL-SPOKEN GENTLEMAN/LADY KNOWS
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOWS HOW TO BEGIN A CONVERSATION
    • A GENTLEMAN ALWAYS THINKS BEFORE HE SPEAKS. HE ALSO THINKS AFTER HE SPEAKS, IN ORDER TO BUILD UPON THE RIGHTNESS, OR CORRECT THE WRONGNESS, OF WHAT HE MIGHT HAVE SAID.
    • IF A GENTLEMAN IS SUBJECTED TO A RUDE REMARK OR RUDE BEHAVIOR, HE DOES NOT OFFER RUDENESS IN RETURN.
    • A GENTLEMAN ALLOWS OTHERS TO FINISH THEIR SENTENCES. EVEN IN HIS MOST BRILLIANT MOMENTS, HE DOES NOT INTERRUPT OTHER ,NO MATTER HOW DULL THEIR OPINIONS MIGHT BE.
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT TALK WITH HIS MOUTH FULL-EVEN OVER THE PHONE.
    • A GENTLEMAN IS SLOW TO JUDGE THE ACTIONS OF OTHERS, EITHER IN THEIR PUBLIC OR PRIVATE AFFAIRS.
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT TAKE PART IN MAJOR ARGUMENTS OVER MINOR ISSUES.
    • WHEN A GENTLEMAN LEARNS THAT TWO FRIENDS ARE TO BE MARRIED , HE TELLS THE GROOM-TO-BE, “CONGRATULATION,” AND SAYS, “BEST WISHES” TO THE SOON-TO-BE BRIDE.
    • UNLESS HE IS TEACHING AN ENGLISH CLASS, A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT CORRECT ANOTHER PERSON’S GRAMMAR.
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT USE FOREIGN PHRASES, UNLESS HE IS ABSOLUTELY SURE OF THEIR MEANING- AND THEIR PRONUNCIATION.
    • EVEN WHEN SPEAKING HIS OWN LANGUAGE, A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT USE WORDS THAT HE CAN DEFINE ONLY BY LOOKING THEM INTO THE DICTIONARY.
    • A GENTLEMAN NEVER ASKS A WOMAN THAT SHE IS PREGNANT.
    • EVEN IN THE MOST HEATED DISCUSSION, A GENTLEMAN AVOIDS RAISING HIS VOICE. HE DOES NOT SHOUT OTHERS DOWN.
    • WHEN A GENTLEMAN INCONVENIENCES ANOTHER PERSON BY ASKING HIM OR HER TO SHIFT SO THAT HE CAN MOVE THROUGH A CROWDED ROOM, HE SAYS, EXCUSE ME,” HE DOES NOT SAY, “I’M SORRY ,” UNLESS HE HAS GIVEN OFFENSE.
    • A GENTLEMAN NEVER BEGINS A STATEMENT WITH “I DON’T MEAN TO EMBARRASS YOU BUT . . .”
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT ASK ANYONE-MALE OR FEMALE- TO DIVULGE HIS OR HER AGE.
    • WHEN A GENTLEMAN INITIATES A TELEPHONE CONVERSATION, HE KNOWS IT IS HIS RESPONSIBILITY TO END THAT CONVERSATION.
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT USE HIS CELL PHONE WHEN HE IS AT A TABLE WITH OTHERS.
    • WHEN A GENTLEMAN RECEIVES A NUMBER OF INVITATIONS ON HIS ANSWERING SERVICE, HE ACCEPTS THE FIRST ONE. EVEN IN THE WORLD OF VOICE MAIL , IT IS RUDE TO WEIGH ONE INVITATION AGAINST ANOTHER.
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT ENGAGE IN ARGUMENTS, OF ANY SORT, AT THE DINNER TABLE.
    • WHEN A GENTLEMAN IS CONFRONTED BY ARGUMENTS THAT HE CONSIDERS FOOLISH, HE DOES NOT ATTEMPT TO REFUTE THEM WITH REASON.INSTEAD, HE KEEPS SILENT, KNOWING THAT LOGIC IS USELESS IN THE WAR AGAINST IRRATIONALITY.
    • A GENTLEMAN GIVES DIRECT ANSWERS, ESPECIALLY TO CONTROVERSIAL QUESTION. BEING DIRECT, HOWEVER , IS NOT THE SAME THING AS BEING RUDE.
    • A GENTLEMAN NEVER CLAIMS TO HAVE SEEN A MOVIE HE HAS NOT SEEN OR TO HAVE READ A BOOK ABOUT WHICH HE HAS ONLY READ REVIEWS. HE KNOWS HOW TO SAY, “I HAVEN’T READ (OR SEEN) THAT YET , BUT FROM WHAT I HEAR ABOUT IT, IT SOUNDS VERY INTERESTING. WHAT DO YOU THINK?”
    • A GENTLEMAAN DOES NOT BRAG , ESPECIALLY ABOUT HIS OWN ACCOMPLISHMENTS.
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOWS THAT THE BEST KIND OF SMALL TALK CONSISTS OF ASKING QUESTION , NOT VOLUNTEERING INFORMATION ABOUT HIMSELF.
    • A GENTLEMAN NEVER SAYS , “I TOLD YOU SO.”
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOWS HOW TO MAKE THE APOLOGY- AND HOW TO ACCEPT ONE.
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOWS HOW TO EXTEND A COMPLIMENT- AND HOW TO RECEIVE ONE.
    • A GENTLEMAN AVOIDS LEFT-HANDED COMPLIMENTS AT ALL COSTS.
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOWS HOW TO MAKE AN INTRODUCTION.
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOWS HOW TO SHAKE HAND AND IS READY TO DO SO .
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT SPREAD RUMOURS. HE IS EVEN CAREFUL ABOUT WHERE HE SPREADS SENSITIVE FACTS.
    • A GENTLEMAN ALWAYS ATTEMPTS TO MAKE SURE HIS BREATH IS FRESH, ESPECIALLY IF HE EXPECTS TO BE IN CLOSE CONVERSATION WITH OTHERS. IF NECESSARY , HE CARRIES – AND USES- BREATH MINTS.
    • A GENTLEMAN ALWAYS CARRIES A CLEAN HANDKERCHIEF AND IS READY TO OFFER IT IN TIMES OF GREAT GRIEF-OR GREAT JOY.
    • WHENEVER A GENTLEMAN REQUESTS ANY SERVICE OR FAVOUR, HE REMEMBERS TO SAY, “PLEASE.” HE IS QUICK TO SAY, “THANK YOU,” WHENEVER A SERVICE OR FAVOUR HAS BEEN OFFERED TO HIM.
    • A GENTLEMAN UNDERSTANDS THE MEANING OF THE WORD no .
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOW HOW TO LISTEN.
    • WHEN A GENTLEMAN FEELS THAT HE HAS SUBJECTED TO AN INSULT , HE IMMEDIATELY KNOWS THE RIGHT RESPONSE . HE RESPONDS BY SAYING NOTHING AT ALL.
    • A GENTLEMAN HAS DEFINITE BELIEFS, BUT HE THINKS BEFORE VOICING HIS OPINIONS. HE RECOGNIZES THAT OTHER PEOPLE’S BELIEFS ARE VALID. HE ARGUES ONLY OVER AN ISSUE THAT COULD SAVE A LIFE.
    • A GENTLEMAN DOES NOT OPENLY ATTEMPT TO CORRECT THE BEHAVIOR OF HIS FRIENDS. INSTEAD HE TEACHES BY EXAMPLE.
    • AGENTLEMAN TAKES NO PART IN PETTY ARGUMENTS OVER IMPORTANT TOPICS. INSTEAD , HE TAKES ACTION TO BRING ABOUT CHANGE.
    • A GENTLEMAN KNOWS HOWS TO END A CONVERSATION
  • CONDUCT IN PUBLIC PLACES
    • The key note of good manners is unobtrusiveness. When you are out in public , keep in mind three principles :
    • The first is to treat everyone you meet with kindness .
    • The second is to to take no one for granted .
    • The third is to respect others.
  • Dress Etiquette
    • Coco Channel once said that if a woman is poorly dressed you notice her dress and if she’s impeccably dressed you notice the woman.
    • Same advice to business executives – male and female. As a general rule it is desirable to have your business dress say nothing about you – other than perhaps that your clothes fit.
  • DRESS AND GROOMING
    • In business world clothes send instant messages about your status , profession , professionalism , self image , self confidence , even work habits and work place.
    • Dressing to fit your company / service.
    • Dressing to meet the expectation of those with whom you do business. It is situational.
    • First people judge you by your clothes. A vital ingredient in making a good first impression and significant for ever.
    • Dress as your peers- but with little more style.
    • Clothes should be chic.
    • Vulgar clothes - No matter what the fashion of the moment may be , they are always too elaborate for the occasion , too exaggerated in style or have accessories out of proportion.
    • Each new season fashion is defined.
    • Clothes too plain can also be out of proportion.
  • CLOTHES OF A GENTLEMAN
    • Suits - Formal - Wedding , Funerals , Ball , Operas and certain state functions .
    • Style and Cut - Suit cut falls into 3 categories i.e. American , Italian and British cut . All cuts come in 2 or 3 buttons .
    • Suit fabric - Wool , Cotton , Microfibers . Wash and wear material should be matte fabric worsted material. The weight of the fabric should the season e.g. Spring and Summer - cotton gabardine . Fall and Winter - worsted crepe wool.
    • Tuxedo - Evening dress of a gentleman for theatre, dinner, formal parties, dinning at home, restaurants etc .
    • Business suit - every day garment.
    • Achkan - garment should fit comfortably across the chest, close fitting till waist and loose down to fall in line with the knee.
    • Jodhpur coat - Length is shorter , till the seat with slit or vent at the back.
    • Avoid - loud colours , bold patterns and trimmings.
    • Trousers - should break on the shoes in the front and have flat fronts.
    • Shirts.
    • Socks
    • Overcoat.
    • Shoes - traditional business shoes are oxford plain or wing tipped or tasseled loafer. Shoes should harmonize with the outfit and not contrast.
    • Accessories:
    • Tie - wear a safe tie.
    • Hats
    • Briefcase.
    • Belts - 1 1/4” of fine grade leather.
    • Suspenders - to hold the pants but more of style.
    • Jewelry - minimum and subtle .
    • Watches.
    • Eye glasses.
    • Sun glasses.
    • 3 items that make statement - Umbrellas, Wallets and Pens.
    • Cologne - No element of wardrobe requires more subtlety than cologne.
  • Correct tie length - Up to belt level / waist
  • Correct sleeve length of shirt
  • Correct length of Trousers
  • Wrong pattern of shoes
  • CLOTHES OF WOMEN
    • Approach to office attire should be the same as men, the unique culture of her work place and expectation of her people whom she is doing business with , defines the border of what is acceptable. Some have written codes and some do not . So how do you stay on safe ground ?
    • Designer clothes pictured after the major fashion shows are intended to push designs to the limit .
    • For the average working women , simply let what looks good on you be the deciding factor .
    • The traditional code ?
    • Colour consideration : When it comes to what is considered appropriate varies by general perception of various colours as much as the professional field .
    • Darker hues are worn in winter .
    • Neutral colours or tonals are preferred to pure colour e.g. seagreen over kelly green and peach over orange.
    • Coordinating colour - in an outfit is equally important.
    • Patterns and prints - floral , stripes , plaids . Bold prints stay away !
    • What is your best colour ?
    • Accessories:
    • Belts : classic style 1/2” to 3/4” wide. Harmonize with shoes and garments .
    • Handbags : Focus on neatness and functionality .
    • Scarves : Can heighten focus on face or provide relief in a monochromatic outfit. Scarf softens a tailored look .
    • Jewelry : Rings , earrings , necklace , brooches and pins .
    • Watch .
    • Eyeglass .
    • Foot wear : Traditional taboos - open toed shoes , backless shoes , extreme patterns e.g. Zebra, metallic , gold are inappropriate. 1 1/2” heels -are appropriate . No athletic shoes.
  • Hair do for an interview
  • SIX TIMELESS AXIOMS
    • 1. KEEP IT UNDERSTATED
    • 2. REPRESENT YOUR COMPANY
    • 3. KEEP IT NEAT AND CLEAN
    • 4. DON’T REVEAL TOO MUCH.
    • 5. DRESS FOR THE TIME OF THE DAY
    • 6. DON’T BE A FASHION VICTIM.
  • GROOMING
    • GENERAL
    • Avoid razor burn
    • Clean eye glasses
    • Shave your face
    • 5 o’ clock shadow and mustache
    • Soothe itchy legs
    • Get rid of unwanted hair
    • Hair - nothing deforms a man more than a bad cut and unwanted deformity of wearing it
    • Body odour
    • Perfume
    • Well healed shiny shoes
    • Ironed clothes
    • Clean clothes
  • GROOMING
    • HANDS AND FEET
    • Care for your finger nails - trimmed across with 1/16 of white showing
    • Clip toe nails
    • Stop biting finger nails
    • Treat ingrown toe nails
    • Treat thick, discoloured toe nails
    • Give yourself a manicure
    • Prevent hang nails
    • Treat warts on hands and feet
  • GROOMING
    • Hygiene
    • Avoid Getting Canker Sores
    • Care for Pinkeye
    • Choose Dental Floss
    • Control Perspiration
    • Prevent Sweaty Palms
    • Treat Bad Breath
    • Wash Your Hands
    • Whiten Your Teeth
  • GROOMING
    • SKIN CARE
    • Camouflage a scar
    • Camouflage a tattoo
    • Exfoliate oily skin / face
    • Exfoliate your body
    • Protect against sunburn
    • Reduce acne naturally
    • Make up deficiencies
    • No extra lip colours
    • Concealers - areas of darkness or discolouration
    • No bathroom surgery
  • GROOMING KIT
    • Towelettes
    • Spot remover
    • Safety pins
    • Small sewing kit
    • Extra knit top ( B/W)
    • Brushes-Hair,Clothes
    • Nail polish
    • Lipstick&Compact
    • Deodorants
    • Spray gel, Brush ,Comb
    • Dental floss
    • Headbands, Gloves
    • Tooth paste& brush
    • Razor, Soap, Tissues
    • Sun glasses
    • Cleanser, Toner
    • Moisturizer
    • Lip balm
    • 100%Cotton balls
    • Tweezers, Filer
    • Small scissors&Sand paper
    • Body lotion
    • Belts
    • Jewelry
  • COURTESIES BETWEEN GENDERS 1. COURTESIES BETWEEN THE SEXES. 2. TOKEN GESTURES. 3. DATING MANNERS. 4. COURTSHIPS.
  • GENDER – FREE CHIVALRY
    • HOLDING A DOOR
    • GETTING OFF AN ELEVATOR
    • HELPING PUT ON A COAT
    • PAYING FOR A MEAL
    • STANDING
    • WALKING ON THE OUTSIDE
    • HELPING TO SEAT
    • HELPING TO CARRY SOMETHING
  • HARASSMENT
    • Harassment is said to occur if all four of the following things happen:
    • Remarks are made about your gender or sexuality.
    • Offensive behaviour is intentional and/or repeated.
    • The behaviour is unwanted and not returned.
    • Your work is being interfered with, or your office environment becomes uncomfortable.
  • SEXUAL HARASSMENT
    • Sexual harassment occurs in three forms:
    • Quid Pro Quo - This translates as “this for that” harassment in which a supervisor 1) offers a job, promotion, or raise in return for a date or sexual favours, or 2) a supervisor threatens negative consequences if his or her advances are not succumbed to.
    • Hostile Environment Claims – More of a catch-all, this section of the law refers to cases of flirting, touching, unwanted e-mail, nudie pinups, inappropriate comments, lewd gestures, foul language, and comments on one’s dress or appearance.
    • Actionable Harassment – Having more serious criteria is actionable (illegal) harassment, which demands a more serious response. Anyone subjected to it should bring the matter to the attention of a supervisor or HR.
    • Harassment is action in these cases:
    • If it is conveyed, explicitly or implicitly, that obtaining or keeping a job is contingent on your submission to the behaviour.
    • If any employment decisions are based on your response to the behaviour.
    • If the behaviour creates a hostile or abusive work atmosphere that alters the conditions of your job.
    • SEXUAL HARASSMENT
    • 1. Any uninvited touches.
    • 2. Sexual remarks or jokes directed at that person.
    • 3. Eyeing someone up and down with sexual
    • innuendo.
    • 4. Staring or suggestive looks at key parts of someone's anatomy.
    • 5. Sexual remarks or conversion in presence of opposite sex.
    • 6. Attempt to kiss or bed some one when it is obviously unwelcome.
    • 7. Trying to date someone after such overtures have been clearly rejected.
  • WE ARE LIKE THIS
    • 28% of India’s work force are women, up from 13% in 1987.
    • 3% of senior management posts in corporate India are held by women.
    • 1 million have been elected to panchayats since 1983.
    • 9 women MP’s in the 13th Lok Sabha.
    • 16,496 rapes in 2000, up from 15,468 in 1999. Every 15 minutes, a women is raped.
    • 374 rapes in 2000, make Delhi the most unsafe metro, followed by Mumbai (124), Kolkata (35) and Chennai (24)
    • 1,651 rape cases pending in Delhi courts. 350 cases are added every year. All India conviction rate 29.8%.
    • 488 molestation cases in Delhi. At 23.6%, it’s the highest in India.
    • 512 dowry deaths in 23 cities in 2000, Delhi’s share 19.9%
    • 80% women say sexual harassment exists in the work place, says Sakshi survey.
    • 53% say women don’t get equal opportunities and are treated unfairly by superiors, employers and co-workers.
    • 70% respondents in the survey said women in general face inappropriate behaviour. Verbal abuse is the most commonly reported form of sexual abuse.
  • LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS
    • Is it important?
    • The Origin of language predates victorian times .
    • Victorians created and elaborate mode of communication using flowers.
    • Flowers afforded them a silent language that allowed them to communicate many sentiments that the propriety of the times would not normally allow.
    • Floriography -Assigning meaning to flowers,expressing the feelings within the boundries of strict etiquette.
    • Flowers have always had symbolic , religious and mythological meanings.
    • Snowdrops -
    • Peppermint -
    • Fieldlilacs -
    • Brambles -
    • Striped Carnation -
    • Yark and Lancaster rose
    • Deep red rose -
    • White rose -
    • White rose bud -
    • Red rose bud -
    • Hope
    • Warmth of feeling
    • Humility
    • Remorse
    • Refusal
    • War
    • Bashful Shame
    • I am worthy of you
    • Indicates Girlhood
    • Pure and lovely
    • White and red mix -
    • Cabbage Rose -
    • Demask Rose -
    • White Rose -
    • Yellow Rose -
    • Violet -
    • Orchid -
    • Unity
    • Ambassador of love
    • Brilliant complexions
    • Sympathy ,support ,fond
    • memories
    • Friendship
    • Beseech, the recipient not
    • to forget the donor
    • Exquisite , precious , rare
    • Acacia -
    • Apple Blossom -
    • Azalea -
    • Bachelor’s Button -
    • Basil -
    • Carnation (Pink) -
    • Chamomile -
    • Morning glory -
    • Myrtle -
    • Narcissus -
    • Nightshade -
    • Secret love
    • Preference
    • Temperance
    • Celibacy
    • Hatred
    • A Woman’s love
    • Energy in adversity
    • Affection
    • Love and marriage
    • Egotism
    • Secrets
    • Oak -
    • Oleander -
    • Orange Flowers -
    • Daffodil -
    • Daisy -
    • Dogwood -
    • Fennel-
    • Forget-Me-Not
    • Goldenrod -
    • Holly-
    • Honeysuckle -
    • Iris -
    • Ivy -
    • Hospitality
    • Beware
    • Chastity
    • Regard
    • Innocence
    • Durability
    • Strength
    • True love
    • Precaution
    • Foresight
    • Generous and devoted
    • Affection
    • Fidelity
    • Jasmine -
    • Lavender -
    • Lily -
    • Marigold -
    • Periwinkle -
    • Primrose -
    • Quince -
    • Rhododendron -
    • Rose , single -
    • Sage -
    • Stephanotis -
    • Amiability
    • Distrust
    • Purity
    • Sorrow
    • Friendship
    • Consistency
    • Temptation
    • Danger
    • Simplicity
    • Domestic Virtue
    • Bridge’s good look forever
    • Sweet William -
    • Thistle -
    • Tulip -
    • Violet (Blue) -
    • Water-lily -
    • Wisteria -
    • Zinnia -
    • Gallantry
    • Defiance
    • Fame
    • Faithfulness
    • Purity of heart
    • I cling to thee
    • Thoughts of absent friends
    • Appropriate occasions
    • No artificial flowers
    • Flower arrangement
    • Elements of design - consists of shape, line, space, colour, texture & artist material
    • Principles of design - are scale proportion, balance , rhythm ,lighting , contrast and variety, emphasis on harmony
    • Shape- When looking at a flower arrangement the
    • eye concentrates on the whole shape of the design
    • and the various shape of the plants and material
    • Form - may be regular or irregular. Individual parts and design as a whole have shape and form.
    • Line - is a n expressive element giving movement and rhythm to the design.
    • Gentle curves suggest slow movement.
    • Straight line speeds the eye along.
    • Zigzag gives a jerky feeling.
    • Thick horizontal line gives stability to an arrangement.
    • Space - when planning a flower arrangement consider the setting or the space in which it will stand .The correct size of arrangement to fill a given space is important .Generally it should be one and half times of the vase.
    • Seven basics shapes for flower arrangement
    • 1. Vertical
    • 2. Crescent
    • 3. Horizontal
    • 4. Triangular
    • 5. Dome
    • 6. Asymmetrical
    • 7. ‘S’ shaped
  • GIFTS
    • BASICS OF GIFT PRESENTATION
    • 1. Gift giving is merely a case of common sense and good manners.
    • 2. Give the gifts in person.
    • 3. Always wrap gifts.
    • 4. Choose correct colour of wrapping paper :
    • WHITE - Wedding in USA
    • - Funeral in CHINA (No white ties also)
    • PURPLE - Bad luck in ITALY
    • YELLOW - Considered bad colour in most countries.
    • Do not gift cheese to Asians - are lactose intolerant.
    • In many Asian countries and some European countries, knives, broaches or hankies indicate sadness and severing relationship.
    • Storks and Cranes are associated with death in China.
    • Present and receive gifts with both hands.
    • Follow local customs while unwrapping gifts.
    • Gifts giving is very important in Japan. Avoid giving pricey gifts.
    • Try not to surprise people with gifts in a business environment to avoid embarrassment.
  • GIFT PRESENTATION : CORPORATE WORLD
    • 1. Used to express friendship, common purpose, hope
    • of future business success and prosperity.
    • 2. Large gift to companies reflect bond.
    • 3. Presented to senior most person at the end of meeting or dinner.
    • 4. Gift of equal value to individuals of a company except senior executives receive little more expensive gifts.
    • 5. On a trip / visit give gifts to everybody you deal with personally.
    • Special assistance personal to be given personal nature items, viz. cigarette lighters, carton of foreign cigarettes, pens, calculators, perfume or cologne etc.
    • Never choose a gift which may cause embarrassment e.g. underwear.
    • Presenting individuals with expensive gifts smacks of bribery.
    • It is proper etiquette for a boss to reciprocate with a return gift to a employee but not vice-verse.
  • CORPORATE OCCASIONS FOR GIFTING
    • 1. New Employee welcome.
    • 2. Secretary’s day.
    • 3. Employee of the month.
    • 4. Employee anniversaries.
    • 5. Major promotion.
    • 6. Wedding.
    • 7 New baby- congratulations.
    • 8. Client appreciation.
    • 9. Travel / conference.
    • 10. New contact
    • 11. Closing the deal.
    • 12. Thank you and Reminders.
    • 13. Forgotten a promise or engagement.
    • 14. Offended someone.
    • 15. Sympathy gifts/ suffering/accidents.
  • TYPES OF GIFTS
    • 1. Gourmet treats.
    • 2. Wine gifts.
    • 3. Fruit basket.
    • 4. Balloons.
    • 5. National flags.
    • 6. Bonsai trees for office.
    • 7. Magazine subscriptions.
    • 8. Music CDs ( Your country or classical music of famous orchestras )
    • 9. Executive Gifts
    • a) Fine leather.
    • b) Gift certificate.
    • c) Porter music box
    • d) Picnic time.
    • 10. Corporate gifts with / without company logos:
    • - Tie pins.
    • - Coffee mugs.
    • - Cuff link’s
    • - Golf balls
    • - T-shirts.
    • - Paper weights
    • - Key chains.
    • - Scarves.
    • - Calendars and Diaries.
  • GIFTING : SOME DON’TS
    • 1. Avoid presents the receiver can not afford.
    • 2. Chocolates to someone who has to watch weight.
    • 3. Cigarettes to a non smoker / given up smoking.
    • 4. Presents to a child who makes demands on
    • parents e.g. puppy
    • 5. Presents as sympathy / hard up state.
    • 6. Token or vouchers which cannot be used by receiver.
    • 7. Avoid presenting money.
  • DANCE ETIQUETTE
    • PROTOCOL.
    • WHOM TO ASK.
    • DECLINING A DANCE.
    • ON THE DANCE FLOOR.
    • DEMEANOR.
    • INCREASING YOUR CHANCES OF
    • BEING ASKED TO DANCE.
  • BAR ETIQUETTE
    • ALWAYS BE FRIENDLY.
    • NEVER TALK TOO LOUDLY.
    • NEVER INSULT YOUR FELLOW BAR GOER.
    • ALWAYS KNOW YOUR LIMITS.
    • NEVER INSTIGATE ARGUMENTS OR FIGHTS.
    • NEVER FALL ASLEEP AT THE TABLE OR BAR.
    • NEVER DO ANYTHING YOU WILL REGRET.
  • COCKTAIL ETIQUETTE
    • 1 . Cocktails and Cocktails Party . Guests are mostly standing and dress attire range from business to casual.
    • 2. Cocktail Buffet. Small tables and chairs are set up for guests after they fill up their plates. The attire is usually formal or business attire.
    • 3. Cocktail Reception . Most formal event. Attire is very dressy for woman and usually black tie for men.Champagne is always served.
    Note: Some research on the guests makes `small talk’ easy.
  • COCKTAIL ETIQUETTE
    • Det e rmine what your goals are social or business networking.
    • Circulate before you head for the bar.
    • Do not get drunk.
    • Do keep conversations away from sex, politics and religion.
    • Keep drinks and food in your left hand.
    • In a private home do avoid personal or special requests to the staff.
    • Anything passed on a tray is to be picked up with a napkin.
    • Caviar- serve a teaspoon onto your plate.
  • THOSE EMBARRASSING MOMENTS
    • Spinach stuck in the front teeth
    • An open fly
    • An unbuttoned blouse
    • A dangling false eye lash
    • Dandruff
    • A hair piece that looks like a shag rug
    • Raccoon-eyes makeup
  • OFFICE PARTY PITFALLS
    • People who drink too much at office parties risk serious harm to their professional careers.
    • Drug use or possession at the office or a business-related social function is grounds for both instant dismissal and legal action.
    • An eternal danger for office party goers is becoming too intimate with colleagues or superiors – Stay in control, starting with strict limits on your drinking.
    • If you and your coworkers decide to party on after the office party has ended, keep the previous warnings about alcohol, drugs, and intimacy firmly in mind.
  • BILLIARD ROOM ETIQUETTE 1. RESPECT THE EQUIPMENT. 2. RESPECT OTHER PLAYERS. 3. RESPECT THE ROOM.
  • BILLIARD ROOM ETIQUETE
    • 1. Respect the Equipment
    • - Hold the cue vertically.
    • - Do not turn the chalk upside down on the rails.
    • - Do not bring cigarette to the table.
    • - Do not bring drinks or food to the table.
    • - Do not slide the rack all over the table.
    • - Do not sit on the edge of table to make a shot.
    • - Avoid using hand powder.
    • 2. Respect other players
    • - Don’t shark.
    • - Avoid unsolicited coaching.
    • - Do not turn lights on or off while someone is shooting.
    • - Don’t criticize someone’s game.
    • - Do not hustle.
    • 3. Respect the Room
    • - When finished playing, return all equipment to where you got it.
    • - Avoid littering the floors with trash and cigarettes.
    • - Keep pool room clean.
  • CLUB ETIQUETTES
    • 1. Membership - For Gentlemen only by
    • invitation or by making a application; Honorary, Life member, Resident or non resident. New born are enrolled on birth.
    • 2. Reading room or Library - no conversation.
    • 3. Least interference when two people are by themselves.
    • 4. New member- no right to talk to strangers but vice versa.
    • 5. Fundamental role is same as in drawing room of a private house.
    • 6. Visitors to a club- do follow the club policy.
  • GOLF ETIQUETTE You can tell more about how someone is likely to react in a business situation from one round of golf than you can from a hundred hours of meetings. It’s astonishing how so simple a game can reveal so much.May be golf cuts more directly to the psyche than other games and situations.
  • GOLF ETIQUETTE 1. TEE. 2. SPEED OF PLAY. 3. CART USE. 4. GIMMIES AND MULLIGANS. 5. SAND TRAPS. 6. ON THE GREEN. 7. WHEN ANOTHER PLAYER IS ADDRESSING THE BALL. 8. CLEARLY STATE YOUR SCORE WHEN HOLED OUT. 9. SETTLING UP. 10. TEMPRAMENT.
    • GOLF ETIQUETTE
    • 1. Courtesy on the course
    • Safety
    • Consideration for other players
    • 2. Priority on the course
    • Be nice and considerate
    • 3. Take care of the course
    • Holes in Bunkers
    • Replace Divots
    • Repair ball- marks and damage by spikes
    • Damage to Greens
    • Movement of golf carts.
  • GAMBLING ETIQUETTE
    • 1. Understand the rules before you sit down.
    • 2. Only buy or cash in chips between hands.
    • 3. Know the colour of the denomination of the chips.
    • 4. Dealers prefer to trade in smaller denomination of
    • chips.
    • 5. In some games the cards are dealt face up - Never
    • touch your cards.
    • 6. If cards are dealt face down then touch your cards
    • with one hand.
    • 7. Never touch your bet once the first card has been
    • dealt until after the hand is over.
    • 8. Do not drink excessively.
    .
    • Try to maximize the time between cigarettes.
    • Do not ask the dealer for advice.
    • Do not ask for pity if you have a bad hand.
    • Tipping.
    • Where necessary know hand signals viz. game
    • of Blackjack
  • COURTROOM ETIQUETTES
    • 1. Addressing the court-Your Honour.
    • 2. Be like a statue - Nodding or shaking your head, talking,
    • reading or otherwise distracting yourself or others is a
    • discourtesy. 3. Dress - business suit with polished shoe, your
    • appearance broadcasts your attitude.
    • 4. Comportment.
    • CORRECT WRONG
    • The court’s attention The court’s attention
    • is invited to …… is directed to . . .
    • May it please the court The court will note . . .
  • TELEPHONE ETIQUETTES 1. Callers draw many conclusions from the impressions received from a phone conversation about the person’s and company’s :- -Efficiency -Communication Skills -Friendliness -Expertise 2. Be prepared to handle calls. 3. Answer calls promptly (in three rings or less) 4. Avoid unnecessary call screening
    • Take messages (cheerfully & accurately
    • Plan your outgoing calls carefully.
    • Place your own calls.
    • Always ask “Is this a convenient time to talk”
    • Use courtesy titles viz. “Our service manager,Mrs. Shinde
    • will personally review the problem”.
    • Speak clearly and distinctly.
    • Don’t let ‘dead air’ happen.
    • Like smiling, to end a conversation, standup.
  • Emotion Management
    • None of us has the luxury of doing one thing at a time, and it is very easy to allow the emotions attached to one activity to spill over into another.If a big deal has just fallen through, it is hard not to convey some feeling of disappointment to the next person you talk to.Or if you are feeling particularly harassed, impatience or irritation can often creep into a phone call or meeting.
    • Compartmentalizing is mostly a conscious process of putting some emotional distance between yourself and the situation.
    • PHONE CALL FAUX PAS
    • Following are telephone errors made by even the best behaved business people. Most apply to phone calls in general, not just those from the office:
    • Don’t do other things at your desk while talking on the phone. Typing and shuffling papers suggests your attention is elsewhere.
    • Eating while on the phone is not only
    • distracting but subjects the other
    • person to unnerving smacks and
    • crunches , because sounds are
    • magnified over the telephone; even a
    • cough drop in the mouth can make its
    • presence known.
    • Don’t leave a radio playing or office equipment
    • running in the background. These sounds, too, are
    • magnified over the phone.
    • Never chew gum while talking on the phone. While
    • gum chewing may not be offensive to some people,
    • you have no way of knowing whether your phone
    • mates considers it unprofessional and careless.
    • Don’t sneeze, blow your nose, or cough directly into
    • the receiver. Either excuse yourself for a moment or
    • turn your head away.
    • If you have to put the receiver down during the
    • conversation, set it gently on the desk to avoid startling your
    • phone mate with a sudden bang.
    • Don’t address a business associate by his or her first name in
    • sentence after sentence. It sounds insincere and patronizing.
    • If you’re holding a meeting in your office and phone rings,
    • don’t answer unless you are expecting an important call.
    • Then apologizes to those present for the interruption.
    • For practical reasons, some executives have assistants stay
    • on the line for the entire call. Even if the conversation is
    • about business and business only, letting your phonemate
    • know that some else is listening in, is without doubt, the
    • best thing to do.
    • POINTS OF POLITENSS
    • As you mind the more obvious P's and Q's of telephone manners, adopting the three practices below help you make an even better impression:
    • Hold back on first names.
    • Go easy on “YOU”.
    • Listen carefully.
  • INTERNET ETIQUETTE
    • NEVER FORGET THAT THE PERSON ON THE OTHER SIDE IS HUMAN.
    • BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU SAY ABOUT OTHERS.
    • BE BRIEF.
    • USE DESCRIPTIVE TITLES.
    • BE CAREFUL WITH HUMOR AND SARCASM.
    • ONLY POST A MESSAGE ONCE.
    • PLEASE ROTATE MESSAGES WITH QUESTIONABLE CONTENT.
    • SUMMARIZE YOUR FOLLOW UP.
    • USE MAIL, DON’T POST A FOLLOW UP.
    • READ ALL FOLLOW-UPS AND DONT REPEAT WHATS BEEN SAID.
    • 11. CITE APPROPRIATE REFERENCES.
  • DRIVING ETIQUETTE
    • Follow the rules of driving sincerely of each country.
    • Escort and open the door for elders and ladies.
    • Make the elders comfortable in the car-ask them their choosing of seat.
    • If a lady is alone it is customary for her to sit in the front seat.
    • If you are a passenger in a car , ask permission to open or close windows and to regulate the AC / HEAT.
    • Avoid tailgating - discourteous and unsafe .
    • Avoid taking up two parking spaces .
    • It does not hurt to give in .
    • 9. Do not smoke.
    • 10. Play music, only it others do not object.
    • 11. Do not take hard drinks while driving.
    • 12. Front passengers must put on seat belts.
    • 13. Never bang the door.
    • 14. Do not read in the front seat it might distract the driver.
    • 15. Use correct lights while approaching any site e.g. astronomers site , hospital etc..
  • ON PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
    • The same guide lines apply when you ride in a bus , a train , a plane or a ferry.
    • Avoid talking or laughing loudly .
    • Noise is amplified in enclosed spaces .
    • Give up your seat when an older person , a mother with a child , a pregnant woman or a handicapped person enters the bus
    • Do not rush to get ahead of the others or push your way out .
  • SWIMMING ETIQUETTE
    • Be conversant with rules of each swimming pool.
    • Ensure good health and hygiene.
    • Do not touch.
    • Do not stare.
    • Do not over weight yourself with equipment.
    • No bikinis – for beaches generally .
    • Follow the rules of lane swimming while with your team mates / lane mates.
  • FUNERAL ETIQUETTE 1. CONDOLENCES. 2. DRESS. 3. FLOWERS. 4. SYMPATHY CARDS. 5. PERSONAL NOTE. 6. TELEPHONE CALL. 7. VISITATION. 8. SYMPATHY EXPRESSIONS - CLASPING HANDS , AN EMBRACE OR A SIMPLE STATEMENT : (a) I AM SORRY. (b) MY SYMPATHY TO YOU. (c) IT WAS GOOD TO KNOW RAM. 9. FUNERAL ETQUETTE DO’s & DONT’s.
  • TRAVEL TIPS
    • DON’T OVER PACK.
    • WEAR DARK / BLACK CLOTHES.
    • CARRY MEDICINES.
    • AVOID CHEWING GUM.
    • JET LAG.
    • MOTION SICKNESS - LAND AND SEA.
  • CIVILIANS AT SERVICE FUNCTIONS AND INSTITUTIONS
    • OFFICERS MESS.
    • GUARDS OF HONOUR.
    • STATE FUNCTIONS.
    • ON LEAVING A NAVAL SHIP.
    • THE QUARTER - DECK.
    • GUN SALUTE.
    • SALUTATION BY CIVILIAN VIPs.
  • SALUTATIONS OF COURTESY
    • WHEN A GENTLEMAN TAKES OFF HIS HAT.
    • WHEN TO BOW.
    • WALKING ON THE STREET.
    • GENTLEMEN AND BUNDLES.
    • A GENTLEMAN OFFERS HIS ARM.
    • A LADY NEVER “ON THE LEFT”.
    • AWKARD QUESTIONS OF PAYMENT.
    • THE ESCORT.
    • THE RESTAURANT CHECK.
    • 10. REGARD FOR OTHERS.
  • SHRINE ETIQUETTE
    • CHRISTIAN ETIQUETTE.
    • HINDU ETIQUETTE.
    • BUDDHIST ETIQUETTE.
    • MUSLIM ETIQUETTE.
  • HOSPITAL ETIQUETTE
    • Keep your visit short and upbeat when visiting a friend in the hospital.
    • Do not disturb the doctor when he is examining the patient.
    • Relatives should stay away when examination is going on to avoid breach of confidentiality.
    • No unwanted and unasked discussion regarding the nature of diseases , its complications and treatment should be done in front of patient.
    • Relatives and friends should use areas only for them , rather than block the corridors , car parking areas , porch etc.
    • Do not sit on patient’s bed - the sufferer needs rest.
    • Avoid taking children as visitors to hospitals. They not only visit their patient but practically visit all patients after which they start playing in the corridor - disturbing every body.
    • Children could be exposed to various diseases or they could transfer their own infections to ill patients.
    • Do not disturb / sleeping patient.
    • Restrict movement to ICU.
    • Do not eat or drink in the patient room.
    • Visitors should restrict themselves to scheduled visiting hours.