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International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change
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International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change

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International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change

International Conference On Adaption To Climate Variability & Change

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  • 1. 6 % $ , & ,QWHUQDWLRQDO &RQIHUHQFH RQ $GDSWDWLRQ WR &OLPDWH 9DULDELOLW DQG &KDQJH 7RZDUGV D 6WUDWHJLF $SSURDFK 'HFHPEHU Parallel Session: Activities and Programs of EU-India Cooperation on climate change and adaptation policies: Research Agenda on Impacts and Adaptation Sumana Bhattacharya and Aditi Dass Winrock International India
  • 2. 6 % $ , About BASIC Building And Strengthening Institutional Capacities in Climate Change A 2 yr project to: – support implementation of UNFCCC/Kyoto – assist DC negotiations on future climate policy Activities include – Policy analysis, workshops, networking, mentoring at national international level – Focused on major developing countries: India, China, Brazil South Africa Led by Institute of Development Studies, Sussex Supported by European Commission, Environment Directorate with co-financing from China, UK DEFRA, IDS WRI
  • 3. 6 % $ , Project Team Over 20 research policy institutions/40 individuals, mostly from BASIC countries, working with international experts on wide range of climate topics: – Vulnerability Adaptation (India Team) – Mitigation, SD Energy (China Team) – Carbon markets national institutional issues (S.Africa Team) – International negotiations on future climate regime (Brazil Team) – Setting up DC experts network (Full Team)
  • 4. 6 % $ , Project Activities The BASIC Project covers key issues likely to affect the development of the climate change regime at the domestic and international level - mitigation - adaptation - technology and - salient legal, institutional and procedural considerations through three core components: • Supporting in-country institutional capacity • Strengthening capacity to analyse and put forward future action proposals and understanding others’ • Strengthening the negotiation skills and expertise base for developing countries relating to climate negotiations
  • 5. 6 % $ , India Country Team Winrock International India (WII) Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Technology Innovation Forecasting Assessment Council (TIFAC) Energy Environment Analytics (E2A) Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology (MANIT)
  • 6. 6 % $ , 6 % $ , BASIC INDIA TEAM
  • 7. 6 % $ , China Country Team Division of Resources and Environment, Ministry of Science and Technology Agrometeorology Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science (CAAS) Research Centre for Sustainable Development, The Chinese Academy of Social Science (CASS) Global Climate Change Institute (GCCI), Tsinghua University
  • 8. 6 % $ , Country Team Brazil: Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Sao Paulo South Africa: Palmer Development Group Global Climate Change Sub-directorate Air Quality Management Directorate, Department of Environmental Affairs Tourism IMBEWU Enviro-Legal Consultants SouthSouthNorth The City of Cape Town
  • 9. 6 % $ , Outputs Analytical papers development of new methodological tools in-country workshops supporting national climate policy processes networking among national international experts S.Africa: National Climate Change Conference October, Oct. 2005 Beijing: Workshop on Economic Modelling and SD Policies, Feb 2006 Delhi: Workshop on Adaptation Practices Policy, May 2006 Brazil: Future Climate Policy, August 2006 Outreach workshops with OECD, Paris 2005 COP 11, COP12 etc.
  • 10. 6 % $ , Outputs of the India Team A briefing paper on lessons learnt from Indian’s Initial National Communication to UNFCCC (WII) A paper on current initiatives in the area of climate change adaptation research in India (WII) A paper on Next Generation Tools for Assessing Vulnerability and Adaptation (IITB) A paper on indicators for assessing vulnerability and adaptation capacity to droughts and floods(WII) A Handbook on Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation tools (E2A) Paper on Disaster Prevention, Preparedness and Management and linkages with climate change adaptation (TIFAC)
  • 11. 6 % $ , Next Generation Tools for Assessing Vulnerability and Adaptation This paper has developed a comprehensive framework of vulnerability assessment encompasses various dimensions, and suggests an index which can be quantified and compared over a period of time. Extends the framework to analyse the determinants of adaptations and develops an adaptive efficiency tool
  • 12. 6 % $ , A Conceptual Framework Exposure to climate change related events create uncertainties Uncertainty issues are addressed by Adaptation Vulnerability converting them into risks The inability to manage risk effectively due to a variety of factors results in vulnerability URVA Framework Adaptation essentially reduces vulnerability and more effectively manages risks through coping strategies which enhance adaptive Exposure – Risk capacity. Uncertainty
  • 13. 6 % $ , Dimensions and Sources of Vulnerability Vulnerability Index Agricultural Infrastructure Demographic Climatic Occupational Inequality Poverty •Literacy •Variance in •Variation in •Occupational •Combined •Gender Rate annual Cropping Concentration Infrastructure Inequality •Age •Employment Index •Income rainfall Intensity •Variance in •Ratio GNCA Specific Ratio Inequality •Variation in •Incidence of Mortality Peak season Rainfall Area under Poverty •Frequency •Transience in Cultivation •Variation in of extreme poverty events Irrigation •Temperature Intensity •Variation in Yield of Principal Crop
  • 14. 6 % $ , Framework for Assessing Adaptive Efficiency Risk Climate Change Outcomes / Scenarios Impact Demography Economy Poverty Infrastructure Adaptive Efficiency Final Impact on Population / Region Vulnerability Context of Population / Region
  • 15. 6 % $ , Indicators for Assessing Vulnerability and Adaptation Capacity to Droughts and Floods The paper focuses on understanding and quantifying the vulnerability of India to climate extremes such as drought, flood and cyclone. Vulnerability has been assessed using two aggregation procedures– one based on simple averaging of normalized indicators and another based on fuzzy inference system. Also two separate sets of indicators – one based on structured characterization of vulnerability with focus on specific stress and specific output sector, and another based on general vulnerability characterization – are developed and used The empirical analysis is carried out using state level data and vulnerability assessment is presented for three chosen states, namely Andhra Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Orissa The analysis is done over two time periods 1990-1991 and 1999-2000 to understand the transition in vulnerability and adaptation capacities
  • 16. 6 % $ , Selection of study area Droughts : Rajasthan, Gujarat and Andhra Pradesh are most severely affected states (based on various criteria). Andhra Pradesh is selected for analysis as the state – has initiated some innovative management practices in recent times to tackle the recurring problem of drought. – But the vulnerability of affected population in Andhra Pradesh is still considered high and hence it is considered useful to identify the potential impediments in the implementation of the programs. Floods: Analysis of damages due to floods in India across states over the period 1953-2000, indicates that Uttar Pradesh is the most severely affected region due to floods and is hence chosen for vulnerability analysis.
  • 17. 6 % $ , Selection of study area Cyclones The eastern states/districts in India are more adversely affected by the cyclonic storms than the western states/districts Among the eastern states Orissa is most frequently affected by cyclonic storms and is chosen for vulnerability analysis. During the period 1877 to 1990 the frequency of severe storms, storms and depressions was highest in the districts of Puri, Cuttak and Balasore (Patnaik and Narayanan, 2005), indicating the vulnerability of Orissa to cyclonic storms. Super cyclone in late 1990s exposed many mal-adaptation practices (such as destruction of mangroves) that severely affected the people of Orissa therefore worth analyzing the post-super cyclone response strategies that the state and people have undertaken.
  • 18. 6 % $ , Results Andhra Pradesh Between the two time periods considered the exposed population and exposed activity have both slightly increased leading to overall increase in exposure. In terms of sensitivity despite decrease in both socio-economic and technological sensitivity, the state witnessed increase in agricultural sensitivity (i.e., relatively lower commercialization in 1999-00 compared to 1990-91) and as a result the overall sensitivity only marginally decreased. In the adaptive capacity dimension, while human and government capacity have improved over the period, the coping options showed sharp decline resulting in a slight decrease in the overall adaptive capacity. Put together slight increase in exposure and decrease in adaptive capacity are countered partly by the marginal decrease in sensitivity and the vulnerability level remained almost static over the period. This seems meaningful given continuing concerns about the vulnerability of the state to drought. This concern is also reflected through more and more assistance given by the central government to the state government over the years for tackling drought problem.
  • 19. 6 % $ , Uttar Pradesh Slight increase in exposed population is compensated by decline in the exposed activity and the overall exposure decreased slightly. Marginal decline in socio-economic sensitivity and significant decline in technological sensitivity are negated slightly by the increase in the agricultural sensitivity. The overall sensitivity showed decline over the period. All components of adaptive capacity dimension contributed positively and overall adaptive capacity showed significant improvement over the period. Put together since all the three dimensions contributed towards reducing the vulnerability the state witnessed drop in its vulnerability to flood over the period.
  • 20. 6 % $ , Orissa In Orissa the exposure to cyclone remained high and in fact slightly increased as both exposed population and exposed activity have increased. Reasonable decline in socio-economic sensitivity coupled with a slight decline in technological sensitivity (the state however continues to be one of the technologically most backward states in the country), countered increased agricultural sensitivity to reduce the overall sensitivity marginally. Impressive strides made in improving the human capacity are negated by decline in government capacity and access to coping options and the overall adaptive capacity registered drop over the period. Put together the vulnerability of the state to cyclone remained more or less static over the period and at alarmingly high level.
  • 21. 6 % $ , A Handbook of Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Tools The tools described in the hand book have been taken form various sources and efforts have been made to refer to all possible reference. The hand book describes the tools in three different sections; 1. Impact and vulnerability (IV) assessment tools 2. Adaptation policy assessment tools 3. Integrated vulnerability assessment and adaptation tools 4. Assessment of tools and their applicability in India. 5. Next generation tools for assessing vulnerability and adaptation
  • 22. 6 % $ , Disaster Prevention, Preparedness and Management and Linkages with Climate Change Adaptation Climate change adaptation and disaster management frameworks have thematic as well as institutional linkages and there can be various approaches for mainstreaming adaptation to climate change in disaster management Integration of climate change adaptation concerns in disaster management will need to be taken up at three levels – integrating adaptation to longer term climate scenarios with the disaster mitigation and response interventions; regularising the network to take up climate change adaptation within the disaster management framework; and facilitating permeability among the parallel structures within the common actors in both frameworks. Robust policy measures to enhance the capacity of the interface institutions and also individuals who will be the carriers of knowledge from one framework to the other will be required strong legislative base, can be an effective entry point for integrating climate change adaptation concerns with the disaster management initiatives.

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