Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Education Career Profiles
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Education Career Profiles

2,490

Published on

Education Career Profiles

Education Career Profiles

Published in: Education, Career
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,490
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
49
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Education Career Profiles<br />Educators are a critical part of the world’s future. They help to shape the minds of our children and provide the spark for all of us to explore our dreams. Always in demand, teachers enjoy great benefits, flexible schedules and summer vacations. <br />The field of education is vast and so are the careers that it offers. If you want to be in education, but haven’t quite narrowed your search to a specific career, you’ll want to read our popular career profiles. Each career profile gives detailed information about the education necessary to become qualified, the average salary expectations, and a description of what the job entails.<br />Preschool Teacher<br />Teacher’s Aid<br />Elementary School Teacher<br />Middle School Teacher<br />High School Teacher<br />ESL/ELL Teacher<br />Science Teacher<br />Math Teacher<br />Computer Teacher<br />Music Teacher<br />Art Teacher<br />Health Teacher<br />Career / Technical Educator<br />Special Education Teacher<br />Gifted Education Teacher<br />Principal<br />Assistant Principal<br />Professor/Post-Secondary<br />Counselor<br />Librarian<br />Speech-Language Pathologist<br />Occupational Therapist<br />School Psychologist<br />Paraprofessional/Teaching Assistant<br />Social Worker<br />Pre-School Teacher<br />Job Description<br />A Preschool Teacher is a type of early childhood educator who instructs children from infancy to age 5 The term “preschool” refers to instruction in non-public areas such as licensed preschools, childcare centers, family day care centers, home day care centers, center-based programs, federal programs like Head Start, and full or part-day private child centers/day care centers sponsored by religious bodies. These teachers nurture and care for children who have not yet entered formal schooling. Helping children grow, learn, and gain new skills can be very rewarding. Pre-School Teachers help to improve children’s communication, learning, and other personal skills.<br />Average Hourly Wage<br />$8.00/$25,900 per year<br />Job Requirements<br />Each state has its own licensing requirements that regulate training for preschool teachers; these range from a high school diploma to community college courses to a college degree in child development or early childhood education. Pre-School teachers generally can obtain some form of employment with a high school diploma and little or no experience, but certain private firms and publicly funded programs have more demanding training and education requirements. Some employers prefer to hire child care workers who have earned a nationally recognized Child Development Associate (CDA) credential or the Certified Childcare Professional (CCP) designation, have taken secondary or postsecondary courses in child development and early childhood education, or have work experience. Other employers require their own specialized training. An increasing number of employers require an associate degree in early childhood education.<br />Job Outlook Employment of schoolteachers is expected to grow by 26 percent before 2016.<br />Teacher’s Aid<br />Job Description Teacher assistants provide instructional and clerical support for classroom teachers, allowing teachers more time for lesson planning and teaching. They support and assist children in learning class material using the teacher’s lesson plans and providing students with individual attention. Teacher assistants also supervise students in the cafeteria, schoolyard, and hallways, or on field trips; they record grades, set up equipment, and help prepare materials for instruction.<br />Median Salary (May 2006) $20,740<br />Educational Requirements Many teacher assistants need only a high school diploma and on-the-job training. A college degree or related coursework in child development improves job opportunities. In fact, teacher assistants who work in Title 1 schools those with a large proportion of students from low-income households must have college training or proven academic skills. They face new Federal requirements as of 2006: assistants must hold a 2-year or higher degree, have a minimum of 2 years of college, or pass a rigorous State or local assessment.<br />Job Outlook Employment of teacher assistants is expected to grow by 10 percent before 2016.<br />Elementary School Teacher<br />U.S. Department of Labor<br />Job Description<br />Elementary school teachers instruct one class of children in several subjects. In some schools, two or more teachers work as a team and are jointly responsible for a group of students in at least one subject. In other schools, a teacher may teach one special subject—usually music, art, reading, science, arithmetic, or physical education—to a number of classes. A small but growing number of teachers instruct multilevel classrooms, with students at several different learning levels.<br />Median Annual Salary (2006-2007)<br />$47,870<br />Educational Requirements<br />All 50 States and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensure is not required for teachers in private schools in most States. Usually licensure is granted by the State Board of Education or a licensure advisory committee. Teachers may be licensed to teach the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education subject area (usually grades 7 through 12); or a special subject, such as reading or music (usually grades kindergarten through 12).<br />Job OutlookThe employment of schoolteachers is expected to grow by 14 percent before 2016.<br />Middle School Teacher<br />U.S. Department of Labor<br />Job Description<br />Middle school teachers and secondary school teachers help students delve more deeply into subjects introduced in elementary school and expose them to more information about the world. Middle and secondary school teachers generally specialize in a specific subject, such as English, Spanish, mathematics, history, or biology. They also can teach subjects that are career oriented. Vocational education teachers, also referred to as career and technical or career-technology teachers, instruct and train students to work in a wide variety of fields, such as health care, business, auto repair, communications, and, increasingly, technology. They often teach courses that are in high demand by area employers, who may provide input into the curriculum and offer internships to students. Many vocational teachers play an active role in building and overseeing these partnerships. Additional responsibilities of middle and secondary school teachers may include career guidance and job placement, as well as follow-ups with students after graduation.<br />Median Annual Salary (2006-2007)<br />Middle School Teachers: $49,470<br />Educational Requirements<br />All 50 States and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensure is not required for teachers in private schools in most States. Usually licensure is granted by the State Board of Education or a licensure advisory committee. Teachers may be licensed to teach the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education subject area (usually grades 7 through 12); or a special subject, such as reading or music (usually grades kindergarten through 12).<br />Job Outlook Employment of middle school teachers is projected to grow 11 percent before 2016, with particularly good prospects for teachers in high-demand fields like math, science, and bilingual education, or in less desirable urban or rural school districts.<br />High School Teacher<br />By: BLS.gov<br />Job Description High school or secondary school teachers help students delve more deeply into subjects introduced in middle school. They specialize in a specific subject, such as English, Spanish, mathematics, history, or biology, and also can teach subjects that are career oriented. Vocational education teachers (also referred to as career and technical or career-technology teachers) instruct and train students to work in a wide variety of fields, such as healthcare, business, auto repair, communications, and technology. They often teach courses targeting the industries of area employers, who may provide input into the curriculum and offer internships to students.<br />Median Annual Salary (2006-2007) $51,150<br />Educational Requirements All 50 states and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensing is not required for private school teachers in most states. Different licenses cover the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education subject area (usually grades 7 through 12); or a special subject, such as reading or music (usually grades kindergarten through 12).<br />Job Outlook Employment of high school teachers is projected to grow 6 percent before 2016, with particularly good prospects for teachers in high-demand fields like math, science, and bilingual education, or in less desirable urban or rural school districts.<br />ESL/ELL Teacher<br />Job Description:<br />ESL stands for English as a Second Language. ELL stands for English Language Learners. These two labels and even the term “bilingual education” are used in schools to recruit and hire teachers specifically for teaching students whose first language is not English. The number of non-English-speaking students in the U.S. continues to grow every year, creating demand for bilingual teachers and for those who teach English as a second language. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that 133,000 new middle and high school teachers will need to be hired in the next 7 years.<br />Bilingual teachers are an asset to a school, and generally focus working with students whose first language is not English. Teachers may instruct ELL or ESL classes, or may instruct general education classes where students who speak English as a first language are combined with students whose first language is not English. The activities of a bilingual teacher are similar to the typical activities of a teacher, but also include planning for the needs of English Language Learners and communicating with their parents.<br />Median Salary:<br />Elementary School: $47,870<br />Middle/High School: $49,470<br />Job Requirements<br />All states require teachers to meet their basic teaching credentials which is usually a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. Though each state is different, to qualify for bilingual education, you should be able to speak a second language to provide instruction in both English and your student’s native language. Additional training and certification may be required by your state to fill a vacancy in a bilingual position.<br />Job OutlookEmployment of schoolteachers is expected to grow by 26 percent before 2016.<br />Science Teacher<br />Currently, many school districts have difficulty hiring qualified science teachers, especially chemistry and physics. Before 2016, there will be more than a 12% increase in science teachers in public schools. Teachers with science credentials willing to work in less desirable urban or rural school districts are in even higher demand. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that 133,000 new middle and high school teachers will need to be hired in the next 7 years.<br />Job Description:<br />Science teachers can be trained to teach different grade levels, such as elementary, middle or high school grades. In the elementary grades, science teachers lay the foundation for concepts by teaching the introduction to science. By middle and high school, leading experimentations plays a large role in science teaching. Different areas of science could include biology, chemistry, physics or even Earth science.<br />Median Salary:<br />Elementary School: $47,870<br />Middle/High School: $49,470<br />Job Requirements:<br />A minimum of a bachelor’s degree is required to become a science teacher. Additional certification tests may be required to prove competency in the subject of science. All 50 states and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensing is not required for private school teachers in most states. Different licenses cover the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education subject area (usually grades 9 through 12.)<br />Job OutlookEmployment of schoolteachers is expected to grow by 26 percent before 2016.<br />Math Teacher<br />Currently, many school districts have difficulty hiring qualified math teachers. Math concentrations, like geometry, algebra, and calculus, are some of the math professions that are the highest in demand. Teachers with qualifying math credentials willing to work in less desirable urban or rural school districts are in the highest demand. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that 133,000 new middle and high school teachers will need to be hired in the next 7 years.<br />Job Description<br />In the U.S., most students are instructed through their elementary grades by a general education teacher. In the middle and high school grades, teachers usually instruct students in classes that are subjecting specific, like math. Math offers a wide variety of focuses, including geometry, algebra, and calculus. Teachers of these subjects are expected to be proficient in these areas. Math classes for middle and high school students in the U.S. range from 45 to 90 minute periods, and can occur daily or weekly depending on the school’s schedule. Teachers should use a wide array of techniques to convey lessons, including whole group instruction, small groups, and even technology.<br />Median Salary:<br />Elementary School: $47,870<br />Middle/High School: $49,470<br />Job Requirements<br />All states require general education teachers to have a bachelor’s degree and to have completed an approved teacher training program with a prescribed number of math and education credits, as well as supervised practice teaching. Some states also require technology training and the attainment of a minimum grade point average. A number of states require that teachers obtain a master’s degree in education within a specified period after they begin teaching.<br />Almost all states require applicants for a teacher’s license to be tested for competency in basic skills, such as reading and writing, and in teaching. Almost all also require teachers to exhibit proficiency in math.<br />Computer Teacher<br />Job Description<br />As a computer teacher, you’ll teach classes to students of various ages. Topics will vary based on the age group taught, starting with typing basics, utilizing the internet for research, and software introductions. Advances classes may include computer programming, computer ethics, graphics, website development, and career guidance.<br />Median Salary<br />Elementary School:<br />Middle/High School:<br />Job Requirements:<br />Computer teachers will need to complete both the necessary requirements to become a teacher and have a background in technology. An advanced degree in technology may be preferred in some districts. All 50 states and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensing is not required for private school teachers in most states. Different licenses cover the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education (usually grades 9 through 12.)<br />Job Outlook<br />The employment of schoolteachers is expected to grow by 14 percent before 2016.<br />Music Teacher<br />Job Description:<br />Music teachers instruct students how to read music and play instruments. General music teachers lay the foundation for music reading, rhythm, and composing and music history. Music teachers may also teach group classes, such as choir, band, orchestra, guitar or music theatre.<br />Median Annual Salary:<br />Elementary School: $47,870<br />Middle/High School: $49,470<br />Educational Requirements:<br />Music teachers must complete a bachelor’s degree at minimum. Additional certification tests may be required to prove competency in music instruction. All 50 states and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensing is not required for private school teachers in most states. Different licenses cover the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education (usually grades 9 through 12).<br />Art Teacher<br />Job Description<br />Art teachers instruct students in many areas of art, such as drawing, sketching, painting, designing and sculpture. An art teacher creates lesson plans and selects art supplies. Art teachers are responsible for demonstrating methods to students. An art teacher may be required to accompany students to museums and galleries. Art teachers may specialize in one area, such as illustration or art history.<br />Median Salary:<br />Elementary School: $47,870<br />Middle/High School: $49,470<br />Job Requirements:<br />At minimum, all art teachers in public school will need to have a bachelor’s degree, preferably with a focused degree in art. In order to apply for state certification, prospective art teachers may have to take additional tests to prove competency in the field of art. All 50 states and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensing is not required for private school teachers in most states. Different licenses cover the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education subject area (usually grades 9 through 12.)<br />Job Outlook<br />Employment of school teachers is projected to grow 11 percent before 2016.<br />Health Teacher<br />Job Description<br />Health teachers help students develop knowledge and a skills base to pursue a healthy lifestyle though out their life. Health teachers may work closely with physical education teachers to promote a school-wide program of healthy living. Health teachers focus on the importance of nutrition and how students can make healthy choices for proper development and growth.<br />Median Salary<br />Elementary School: $47,870<br />Middle/High School: $49,470<br />Job Requirements:<br />A minimum of a bachelor’s degree is required to become a health teacher. Additional certification tests may be required to prove competency in the subject of health. All 50 states and the District of Columbia require public school teachers to be licensed through the state board of education, though specific requirements vary. Licensing is not required for private school teachers in most states. Different licenses cover the early childhood grades (usually preschool through grade 3); the elementary grades (grades 1 through 6 or 8); the middle grades (grades 5 through 8); a secondary-education subject area (usually grades 9 through 12.)<br />Job Outlook<br />The employment of schoolteachers is expected to grow by 14 percent before 2016.<br />Career / Technical Educator<br />Job Description Career and technical educators, also known as postsecondary vocational teachers, provide instruction for occupations that require specialized training but not usually a 4-year degree. They may teach classes in welding, dental hygienic, x-ray technician techniques, auto mechanics, or cosmetology, for example. Classes often are taught in an industrial or laboratory setting where students are provided hands-on experience. Career and technical educators often help to establish internship programs for students and facilitate contact between students at community colleges and technical schools and prospective employers.<br />Annual Median Salary $53,750<br />Educational Requirements Training requirements for career and technical educators vary by state and subject. In general, career and technical education teachers need a bachelors or graduate degree, plus at least 3 years of work experience in their field. In some fields, a license or certificate may be the only requirement. These teachers may need to update their skills through continuing education to maintain certification, and they must also maintain ongoing dialogue with businesses to determine the skills most needed in the current workplace.<br />Job Outlook Employment of postsecondary teachers, including career and technical educators is expected to increase by 23 percent before 2016, which is much faster than the average for all occupations.<br />Special Education Teacher<br />U.S. Department of Labor<br />Job Description<br />Special education teachers work with children and youths who have a variety of disabilities. A small number of special education teachers work with students with mental retardation or autism, primarily teaching them life skills and basic literacy. However, the majority of special education teachers work with children with mild to moderate disabilities, using the general education curriculum, or modifying it, to meet the child’s individual needs. Most special education teachers instruct students at the elementary, middle, and secondary school level, although some teachers work with infants and toddlers.<br />Median Salary (2006-2007)<br />Average for All Special Education Teachers: $51,503<br />PreK-5: $49,710<br />Middle School: $52,550<br />High School: $ 52,520<br />Educational Requirements<br />All 50 States and the District of Columbia require special education teachers to be licensed. The State board of education or a licensure advisory committee usually grants licenses, and licensure varies by State. In some States, special education teachers receive a general education credential to teach kindergarten through grade 12. These teachers then train in a specialty, such as learning disabilities or behavioral disorders. Many States offer general special education licenses across a variety of disability categories, while others license several different specialties within special education.<br />Bottom of Form<br />For traditional licensing, all States require a bachelor’s degree and the completion of an approved teacher preparation program with a prescribed number of subject and education credits and supervised practice teaching. However, many States require a master’s degree in special education, involving at least 1 year of additional course work, including a specialization, beyond the bachelor’s degree. Often a prospective teacher must pass a professional assessment test as well. Some States have reciprocity agreements allowing special education teachers to transfer their licenses from one State to another, but many others still require that experienced teachers reapply and pass licensing requirements to work in the State.<br />Gifted Education Teacher<br />Gifted Education teachers play a vital role in school's success.<br />Job Description<br />Gifted education is a broad term for special practices, procedures and theories used in the education of children who have been identified as gifted or talented. Programs providing such education are sometimes called Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) or Talented and Gifted (TAG) programs.<br />Are you a gifted education teacher? Please share your thoughts about a career in gifted education in the comment box below.<br />Median Annual Salary<br />$47,000<br />Educational Requirements<br />It is necessary that Gifted Education teachers receive specific training and certification in their field. Each state has its own requirements for becoming a licensed public school teacher.<br />Principal<br />U.S. Department of Labor<br />Are you the next great principal?<br />Job Description<br />Principals set the academic tone and hire, evaluate, and help improve the skills of teachers and other staff. Principals confer with staff to advise, explain, or answer procedural questions. They visit classrooms, observe teaching methods, review instructional objectives, and examine learning materials. They actively work with teachers to develop and maintain high curriculum standards, develop mission statements, and set performance goals and objectives. Principals must use clear, objective guidelines for teacher appraisals, because pay often is based on performance ratings.<br />Principals also meet and interact with other administrators, students, parents, and representatives of community organizations. Decision-making authority has increasingly shifted from school district central offices to individual schools. School principals have greater flexibility in setting school policies and goals, but when making administrative decisions they must pay attention to the concerns of parents, teachers, and other members of the community.<br />Bottom of Form<br />Principals prepare budgets and reports on various subjects, including finances and attendance, and oversee the requisition and allocation of supplies. As school budgets become tighter, many principals have become more involved in public relations and fundraising to secure financial support for their schools from local businesses and the community.<br />Principals must take an active role to ensure that students meet national, State, and local academic standards. Many principals develop school/business partnerships and school-to-work transition programs for students. Increasingly, principals must be sensitive to the needs of the rising number of non-English speaking and culturally diverse students. In some areas growing enrollments also are a cause for concern because they are leading to overcrowding at many schools. When addressing problems of inadequate resources, administrators serve as advocates for the building of new schools or the repair of existing ones. During summer months, principals are responsible for planning for the upcoming year, overseeing summer school, participating in workshops for teachers and administrators, supervising building repairs and improvements, and working to be sure the school has adequate staff for the school year.<br />Median Annual Salary (2006-2007)<br />Average for All Principals: $87,748<br />Senior high school $92,965<br />Jr. high/middle school $87,866<br />Elementary school $82,414<br />Education Requirements<br />In most public schools, principals, assistant principals, and school district administrators need a master’s degree in education administration or educational leadership. Some principals and central office administrators have a doctorate or specialized degree in education administration. Most States require principals to be licensed as school administrators. License requirements vary by State, but nearly all States require either a master’s degree or some other graduate-level training. Some States also require candidates for licensure to pass a test. Increasingly, on-the-job training, often with a mentor, is required or recommended for new school leaders. Some States require administrators to take continuing education courses to keep their license, thus ensuring that administrators have the most up-to-date skills. The number and types of courses required to maintain licensure vary by State. In private schools, which are not subject to State licensure requirements, some principals and assistant principals hold only a bachelor’s degree, but the majority have a master’s or doctoral degree.<br />Job Outlook The employment of educators is expected to grow by 12 percent before 2016.<br />Assistant Principal<br />By: BLS.gov<br />Job Description Assistant principals help set the academic tone for their schools and hire, evaluate, and help improve the skills of teachers and other staff. Assistant principals, along with principals, confer with staff to advice, explain, or answer procedural questions. They visit classrooms, observe teaching methods, review instructional objectives, and examine learning materials. They actively work with teachers to develop and maintain high curriculum standards; develop mission statements, and set performance goals and objectives.<br />Median Annual Salary (2006-2007) <br />Average for All Assistant Principals: $71,958<br />Senior high school $75,121<br />Jr. high/middle school $73,020<br />Elementary school $67,735<br />Educational Requirements In most public schools, assistant principals need a master’s degree in education administration or educational leadership. Some principals and central office administrators have a doctorate or specialized degree in education administration. Most states require principals to be licensed as school administrators. License requirements vary by state, but nearly all require either a master’s degree or some other graduate-level training. Some also require candidates to pass a test. Increasingly, on-the-job training, often with a mentor, is required or recommended for new school leaders. Some states require administrators to take continuing education courses to keep their license, thus ensuring that administrators have the most up-to-date skills. Some private school principals and assistant principals hold only a bachelor’s degree, but the majority has a master’s or doctoral degree.<br />Job Outlook The employment of educators is expected to grow by 12 percent before 2016.<br />Counselor<br />U.S. Department of Labor<br />Job Description<br />Educational, vocational, and school counselors provide individuals and groups with career and educational counseling. In school settings—elementary through postsecondary—they usually are called school counselors, and they work with students, including those with academic and social development problems and those with special needs. They advocate for students and work with other individuals and organizations to promote the academic, career, personal, and social development of children and youths. School counselors help students evaluate their abilities, interests, talents, and personality characteristics in order to develop realistic academic and career goals. Counselors use interviews, counseling sessions, interest and aptitude assessment tests, and other methods to evaluate and advise students. They also operate career information centers and career education programs. High school counselors advise students regarding college majors, admission requirements, entrance exams, financial aid, trade or technical schools, and apprenticeship programs. They help students develop job search skills, such as resume writing and interviewing techniques. College career planning and placement counselors assist alumni or students with career development and job-hunting techniques.<br />Annual Median Salary<br />Elementary and secondary schools $53,750<br />Junior colleges $48,240<br />Colleges, universities, and professional schools $41,780<br />Educational Requirements<br />All States require school counselors to hold a State school counseling certification and to have completed at least some graduate course work; most require the completion of a masters degree. Some States require public school counselors to have both counseling and teaching certificates and to have had some teaching experience before receiving certification. For counselors based outside of schools, 48 States and the District of Columbia have some form of counselor licensure that governs their practice of counseling. Requirements typically include the completion of a master’s degree in counseling, the accumulation of 2 years or 3,000 hours of supervised clinical experience beyond the master’s degree level, the passage of a State-recognized exam, adherence to ethical codes and standards, and the completion of annual continuing education requirements.<br />Counselors must be aware of educational and training requirements that are often very detailed and that vary by area and by counseling specialty. Prospective counselors should check with State and local governments, employers, and national voluntary certification organizations in order to determine which requirements apply.<br />Job Outlook Overall employment of counselors is expected to increase by 13 percent between before 2016, which is much faster than the average for all occupations.<br />Librarian<br />U.S. Department of Labor<br />Job Description<br />Librarians assist people in finding information and using it effectively for personal and professional purposes. Librarians must have knowledge of a wide variety of scholarly and public information sources and must follow trends related to publishing, computers, and the media in order to oversee the selection and organization of library materials. Librarians manage staff and develop and direct information programs and systems for the public, to ensure that information is organized in a manner that meets users. Most librarian positions incorporate three aspects of library work- User services, technical services, and administrative services.<br />Annual Median Salary (2006-2007)<br />$50,860<br />Education Requirements<br />A master’s degree in library science (MLS) is necessary for librarian positions in most public, academic, and special libraries and in some school libraries. The Federal Government requires that the librarians it employs have an MLS or the equivalent in education and experience. Many colleges and universities offer MLS programs, but employers often prefer graduates of the approximately 56 schools accredited by the American Library Association. Most MLS programs require a bachelor’s degree, but no specific undergraduate program is required.<br />Speech - Language Pathologists<br />Job Description<br />Speech-language pathologists, sometimes called speech therapists, assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent speech, language, cognitive-communication, voice, swallowing, fluency, and other related disorders.<br />Speech-language pathologists work with people who cannot produce speech sounds, or cannot produce them clearly; those with speech rhythm and fluency problems, such as stuttering; people with voice disorders, such as inappropriate pitch or harsh voice; those with problems understanding and producing language; those who wish to improve their communication skills by modifying an accent; and those with cognitive communication impairments, such as attention, memory, and problem solving disorders. They also work with people who have swallowing difficulties.<br />Speech-language pathologists in schools collaborate with teachers, special educators, interpreters, other school personnel, and parents to develop and implement individual or group programs, provide counseling, and support classroom activities.<br />Median Annual Salary<br />$60,840<br />Education Requirements<br />In 2005, 47 States required speech-language pathologists to be licensed if they worked in a health care setting, and all States required a master’s degree or equivalent. A passing score on the national examination on speech-language pathology, offered through the Praxis Series of the Educational Testing Service, is needed as well. Other requirements typically are 300 to 375 hours of supervised clinical experience and 9 months of postgraduate professional clinical experience. Forty-one States have continuing education requirements for licensure renewal.<br />Bottom of Form<br />Only 11 States require this same license to practice in the public schools. The other States issue a teaching license or certificate that typically requires a master’s degree from an approved college or university. Some States will grant a temporary teaching license or certificate to bachelor’s degree applicants, but a master’s degree must be earned in 3 to 5 years. A few States grant a full teacher’s certificate or license to bachelor’s degree applicants.<br />Occupational Therapist<br />Job Description<br />Occupational therapists (OTs) help people improve their ability to perform tasks in their daily living and working environments. They work with individuals who have conditions that are mentally, physically, developmentally, or emotionally disabling. They also help them to develop, recover, or maintain daily living and work skills. Occupational therapists help clients not only to improve their basic motor functions and reasoning abilities, but also to compensate for permanent loss of function. Their goal is to help clients have independent, productive, and satisfying lives.<br />In schools, they evaluate children’s abilities, recommend and provide therapy, modify classroom equipment, and help children participate as fully as possible in school programs and activities. A therapist may work with children individually, lead small groups in the classroom, consult with a teacher, or serve on a curriculum or other administrative committee. Early intervention therapy services are provided to infants and toddlers who have, or at the risking of having, developmental delays. Specific therapies may include facilitating the use of the hands, promoting skills for listening and following directions, fostering social play skills, or teaching dressing and grooming skills.<br />Median Annual Income<br />$54,660<br />Educational Requirements<br />Currently, a bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy is the minimum requirement for entry into the field. Beginning in 2007, however, a master’s degree or higher will be the minimum educational requirement. As a result, students in bachelor’s-level programs must complete their coursework and fieldwork before 2007.<br />To obtain a license, applicants must graduate from an accredited educational program and pass a national certification examination. Those who pass the exam are awarded the title Occupational Therapist Registered (OTR). Some States have additional requirements for therapists who work in schools or early intervention programs. These requirements may include education-related classes, an education practice certificate, or early intervention certification requirements.<br />Persons considering this profession should take high school courses in biology, chemistry, physics, health, art, and the social sciences. College admissions officers also look favorably at paid or volunteer experience in the health care field. Relevant undergraduate majors include biology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, liberal arts, and anatomy.<br />School Psychologist<br />Job Description:<br />School psychologists work with teachers, parents, school staff to support learning, social, emotional and behavior development of students. They develop education programs on management strategies for teachers, parenting skills, and substance abuse. They research and evaluate existing school programs and services provided in schools. The use various techniques to solve conflicts related to learning and adjustment among students.<br />Median Annual Salary<br />$53,500 (with Master’s Degree)<br />$60,000 (with PhD)<br />Educational Requirements<br />A bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 15 hours in psychology is required to continue on to pursue a graduate degree in psychology. A higher degree or additional course work is required to become a certified school psychologist.<br />To qualify for national certification, a school psychologist must meet established standards of the National Association of School Psychologist (NASP): Standards for Training and Field Placement Programs in School Psychology, Standards for the Credentialing of School Psychologists, and Standards for the Provision of School Psychological Services and Principles for Professional Ethics.<br />Professor/Postsecondary Educators<br />U.S. Department of Labor<br />Job Description<br />Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a wide variety of academic and vocational subjects beyond the high school level that may lead to a degree or to improvement in one’s knowledge or career skills. These teachers include college and university faculty, postsecondary career and technical education teachers, and graduate teaching assistants. College and university faculty make up the majority of postsecondary teachers. They teach and advise more than 16 million full- and part-time college students and perform a significant part of our Nation’s research. Faculty also keeps up with new developments in their field and may consult with government, business, nonprofit, and community organizations.<br />Median Annual Salary<br />Average Median Salary for all Post-Secondary Educators in 2006-2007 is $73,207<br />Professors - $98,974<br />Associate professors - $69,911<br />Assistant professors - $58,662<br />Instructors - $42,609<br />Lecturers - $48,289<br />Job Requirements: <br />The education and training required of postsecondary teachers varies widely, depending on the subject taught and educational institution employing them. Educational requirements for teachers are generally the highest at 4-year research universities while experience and expertise in a related occupation is the principal qualification at career and technical institutes.<br />Training requirements for postsecondary career and technical education teachers vary by State and by subject. In general, teachers need a bachelor’s or higher degree, plus at least 3 years of work experience in their field. In some fields, a license or certificate that demonstrates one’s qualifications may be all that is required. Teachers update their skills through continuing education, in order to maintain certification. They must also maintain ongoing dialogue with businesses to determine the most current skills needed in the workplace.<br />Four-year colleges and universities usually consider doctoral degree holders for full-time, tenure-track positions, but may hire master’s degree holders or doctoral candidates for certain disciplines, such as the arts, or for part-time and temporary jobs. Most college and university faculty are in four academic ranks—professor, associate professor, assistant professor, and instructor. These positions usually are considered to be tenure-track positions. Most faculty members are hired as instructors or assistant professors. A smaller number of additional faculty members, called lecturers, are usually employed on contracts for a single academic term and are not on the tenure track.<br />Paraprofessional/Teaching Assistant<br />Job Description<br />Teacher assistants provide instructional and clerical support for classroom teachers, allowing teachers more time for lesson planning and teaching. Teacher assistants tutor and assist children in learning class material using the teacher’s lesson plans, providing students with individualized attention. Teacher assistants also supervise students in the cafeteria, schoolyard, and hallways, or on field trips. They record grades, set up equipment, and help prepare materials for instruction. Teacher assistants also are called teacher aides or instructional aides. Some assistants refer to themselves as Para educators or paraprofessionals.<br />Median Annual Salary<br />$19,500<br />Job Requirements<br />Educational requirements for teacher assistants vary by State or school district and range from a high school diploma to some college training, although employers increasingly prefer applicants with some college training. Teacher assistants with instructional responsibilities usually require more training than do those who do not perform teaching tasks. Federal regulations require teacher assistants with instructional responsibilities in Title I schools—those with a large proportion of students from low-income households—to meet one of three requirements: hold a 2-year or higher degree, have a minimum of 2 years of college, or pass a rigorous State or local assessment. Many schools also require previous experience in working with children and a valid driver’s license. Some schools may require the applicant to pass a background check.<br />Social Worker<br />Job Description<br />School social workers provide social services and assistance to improve the social and psychological functioning of children and their families and to maximize the family well-being and academic functioning of children. In schools, they address such problems as teenage pregnancy, misbehavior, and truancy and advice teachers on how to cope with problem students. Increasingly, school social workers are teaching workshops to an entire class.<br />Annual Median Salary<br />$44,000<br />Education Requirements<br />A bachelor’s degree in social work (BSW) degree is the most common minimum requirement to qualify for a job as a social worker; however, majors in psychology, sociology, and related fields may qualify for some entry-level jobs, especially in small community agencies. Although a bachelor’s degree is sufficient for entry into the field, an advanced degree has become the standard for many positions. A master’s degree in social work (MSW) is typically required for positions in health settings and is required for clinical work as well. Some jobs in public and private agencies also may require an advanced degree, such as a master’s degree in social services policy or administration. Supervisory, administrative, and staff training positions usually require an advanced degree. College and university teaching positions and most research appointments normally require a doctorate in social work (DSW or Ph.D.).<br />

×