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Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan
Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan
Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan
Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan
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Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan

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Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan

Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan

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  • 1. Lesson Plan: Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan BY: Vivian Garofalo York Region District School Board Ontario, Canada
  • 2. FOR: Keizai Koho Centre 2
  • 3. Course: Topic/Lesson Title: Unit: International Business Fundamentals Corporation Social Responsibility in Japan Working in International Markets: (grade 12 – University/College) Ethical Issues Length: 3 class periods (225 min.) Overall Ministry Expectations:* analyse the ways in which ethical considerations affect international business decisions o assess the working environment in international markets o Specific Ministry Expectations:* evaluate the ethical issues that arise for companies competing internationally, in relation to the following groups: consumers o (e.g., safety, fair pricing, disclosure); stockholders (e.g., fair return, controlled risk); employees (e.g., fair wages, good working conditions, outsourcing, regulation of child labour); the host country (e.g., effects on local economy, respect for local laws and cultural preservation); and society (e.g., sustainability of development, practices to combat corruption) * Reference: The Ontario Curriculum: Grades 11 and 12 Business Studies, 2006 http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/business1112currb.pdf LESSON PLAN Day 1: 1. Ask students to complete definitions of key terms and questions on attached Student Worksheet #1 entitled Introduction to Business Ethics and Social Responsibility. 2. Take up Student worksheet #1 – use answers to lead into Lecture #1 (see below #3 & attached notes). 3. Activity: Organize students into groups of 3 or 4 and give them Student Worksheet #2 entitled Ethical Scenarios. Have them discuss each one by addressing the questions at the top of the page. Each group must choose a spokesperson as well as someone to record their discussion. At the end of the discussion, the teacher will choose one group at random to present each case. A class discussion will follow each group’s presentation. Day 2: 1. Ask students to complete Student worksheet #2 based on the article by Nobuo Tateisi, entitled Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan. 2. Take up Student worksheet #2 – use answers to lead into Lecture #2 (see below #3 & attached notes) on Corporate Social Responsibility. 3. Show attached PowerPoint Presentation #1 entitled Social Responsibility– Boycott Campaigns to show students examples of media campaigns by NGOs denouncing unethical practices by multinationals. 4. Discussion: Students give examples from their research of well-known examples of (particularly North American) multinationals that have demonstrated corporate social responsibility in Canada by supported various causes. Examples:  Tim Hortons – Children’s Foundation Camp for underprivileged children http://www.timhortons.com/en/goodwill/childrens_about.html  McDonalds – establishment of children’s charities such as Ronald McDonald House http://www.rmhc.com/  Body Shop – Campaigns for protection of the planet and against domestic violence & animal testing http://www.thebodyshop.ca/home.asp?Lang=EN&CName=Home Day 3: 1. Lecture #3: Introduction to Omron Corporation: - Who are they? - Products and Services - Corporation Social Responsibility Initiatives (see attached notes) 2. Show OMRON Video: The people at TAIYO- 30 Years at A Factory Run by Workers on Wheelchairs 3 3. Assignment: In groups students must research and prepare a PowerPoint presentation of 10-15 minutes on an example of a social marketing initiative
  • 4. Resources: Textbook Activity Sheets DVD Computer/Internet Multimedia Presentation Articles References: 1. Bartlett, Duncan, “Making Disabled Workers Welcome”, BBC News, 4 Aug. , 2004, 6 Aug. , 2008, <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/3534528.stm> 2. Hirose, Hiroshi, “Corporate Social Responsibility: The Strength of Japanese Corporations”, Nippon Keidanren, 6 Aug. , 2008, <http://www.keidanren.or.jp/english/policy/csr/economic-trend_200411_p60.html> 3. Nippon Keidanren, Charter of Corporate Behaviour, 6 Aug. , 2008, < http://www.keidanren.or.jp/english/policy/cgcb.html> 4. Omron Corporation, Corporate Citizenship, 6 Aug. , 2008, <http://www.omron.com/about/social/> 5. Omron Corporation, The people at TAIYO- 30 Years at A Factory Run by Workers on Wheelchairs (DVD) 6. Omron Corporation, Omron Kyoto Taiyo Co. Ltd., Kyoto Japan Sun Industries, Company Profile 7. Schultz, Notman, and Hernder, International Business: Canada and Global Trade, Thomson Nelson, Toronto, 2003 8. Tateisi, Nobuo, “Corporate Social Responsibility in Japan, Japan Economic Currents, Keizai Koho Centre, No. 55, Jul 2005, < http://www.keidanren-usa.org/publications/currents/archive/default.asp> 4

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