06 Exploring The Borderless Web 2.0 Era
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  • 1. Web 2.0 Basics
    1
  • 2. What Is Web 2.0?
    2
  • 3. Definition
    The term "Web 2.0" is commonly associated with web applications that facilitate interactive information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design and collaboration on the World Wide Web. – Wikipedia
    A WWW environment which allows users to interact and create new business models when WWW interaction is not possible – Wesley Shu
    3
  • 4. From Web 1.0 to Web 2.0
    4
  • 5. Internet Features for Web 2.0
    Long Tail: see the Presentation
    Ubiquity: Internet can reach everywhere
    Network Externality: Positive feedback makes large networks get larger – demand-side economies of scale
    Metcalfe’s law: The value of a network goes up as the square of the number of users.
    5
  • 6. Internet Features for Web 2.0
    Zero marginal cost
    Transaction cost – search, contract, coordination
    6
  • 7. Examples to Show Difference
    MapQuest vs. Google Maps
    Britannica vs. Wikipedia
    Alta Vista vs. Google Search
    Online Translation Sites vs. Google Translator
    7
  • 8. The world participates with us.
    The world is our market.
    8
  • 9. The World Participates with Us
    Wiki – Wikipedia
    Mass Collaboration
    Soft Security
    9
  • 10. Wikipedia Basic Principles
    Hawaiian “Wee Kee Wee Kee,” means fast
    The Interface is the web browser, cf. FrontPage or Dreamweaver
    Collaboration instead of protection
    Wiki Demonstration
    10
  • 11. Wikipedia Basic Principles
    Mass collaboration – everyone in the world is our collaborator.
    Simple editing
    Real Time
    Version preservation
    Rollback
    Discussion
    11
  • 12. Wikipedia Basic Principles
    Soft security
    Built on “Network Externality”
    12
  • 13. Wikipedia Basic Principles
    Soft security
    Nature * - comparing the accuracy of 42 science entries in Wikipedia with that of the online Encyclopedia Britannica.
    Each had four serious errors
    Wikipedia had 162 minor errors; Britannica 123
    Wikipedia can revise immediately
    13
    * Giles, J. " Jimmy Wales' Wikipedia comes close to Britannica in terms of the accuracy of its science entries, a Nature investigation finds," Nature, Volume 438, Number 7070, p900, December 15, 2005.
  • 14. Wikipedia Basic Principles – Soft Security
    14
  • 15. Wikipedia Basic Principles – Soft Security
    15
    Laozi, “天下莫柔弱於水,而攻堅強者莫之能勝,以其無以易之。”
    Under heaven nothing is more soft and yielding than water. Yet for attacking the solid and strong, nothing is better; For they can find no way of altering it.
  • 16. Security is achieved by hard-core protection.
    Soft-security protects us.
    16
  • 17. PC is a transactional platform, and the Internet is its extension.
    The Internet is a platform, and PC is only its interface.
    17
  • 18. Syndicator
    Jimbo Wales’ job: syndicator, not even a coordinator – to construct a platform for people to participate and collaborate.
    18
  • 19. How Can You Harness the Collaborative Intelligence?
    Blogging
    RSS
    Tagging
    Facebook
    Twitter
    19
  • 20. Significance of Blogging
    Chronological - feed-centric delivery protocol with RSS as the tool
    live web, sense of evolution
    Interactive marketing – deliver appropriate ads based on the nature of the blog. How? - Tagging
    20
  • 21. Folksonomy
    Versus Taxonomy
    Social bookmarking
    E.g., Delicious, Diigo
    Tagging, networking, sharing
    May hold the key to developing a Semantic Web, in which every Web page contains machine-readable metadata that describes its content. (cf., Web 3.0)
    Data about data.
    21
  • 22. RSS
    Really Simple Syndicator
    A tool for news feed.
    Microblog = blog + RSS
    22
  • 23. Global participation is not crucial for our business value.
    Our new business model facilitates global participation.
    23
  • 24. Our new business model facilitates global participation.
    Is Google a search engine?
    Yes, but more than that!
    Google wants to be the Architect of Participation and the search engine is only its important tool.
    24
  • 25. Google’s Mechanism – PageRank
    Page B has the highest rank because it has the most links with the most values.
    Page C has higher rank than Page E because the link it has is of much higher value.
    25
  • 26. Google’s Mechanism – PageRank
    Suppose A, B, C, and D – four pages and B, C, and D link to A
    If B, C, and D have no other links:
    If they have links:
    In General:
    The more links a page has, the less values do its links have.
    The more links a page has from important pages, the more values does it have.
    set Bu contains all pages linking to page u.
    26
  • 27. Google’s Participation
    Cf., Alta Vista, Yahoo! Search, etc.
    # of links
    # of keywords
    The more pages are on the Internet, the more effective would Google search be.
    27
  • 28. Google’s Participation
    Then, Google needs to call people to participate - AdSense, in addition to its powerful search
    AdSense
    AquiredDoubleClick
    Interactive Marketing (ad based on the content of the webpage)
    But more…
    28
  • 29. AdSense
    Strategic tool for becoming the architect of participation
    Making money by hosting Google Ads.
    More participation, more data, better ‘core competence’ – unique database!
    But the ‘core’ of Google is small – relying on ‘mass collaboration’
    But the boundary of Google thus is the whole world.
    29
  • 30. Google Philosophy
    “The most important thing in life is to learn how to give out love, and to let it come in.” – Morrie Schwartz
    「天長地久,天地所以能長且久者,以其不自生,故能長生。是以聖人後其身而身先,外其身而身存。非以其無私邪?故能成其私。」- Laozi
    30
  • 31. Google Philosophy
    Heaven is eternal, the Earth everlasting.
    How come they to be so? It is because they do not foster their own lives;
    That is why they live so long.
    Therefore the Sage puts himself in the background; but is always to the fore.
    Remains outside; but is always there.
    Is it not just because he does not strive for any personal end That all his personal ends are fulfilled?
    31
  • 32. Unique database is our core competence.
    Our database is one of our corporate assets.
    32
  • 33. Prosumer
    Webs hosting AdSense ads are Google’s production partners.
    Prosumer/Content Provider
    Website
    clicks
    Visitor
    Website + Ad
    Advertisement
    Advertiser
    AdSense
    Google/Architect
    33
  • 34. Prosumer
    Beyond Customer Centric
    Customer Centric: We create the market for customers based on our marketing research
    Prosumer: We let customers create markets.
    34
  • 35. Prosumer
    Lego’s Mindstorms
    With programmable bricks, controlled by software
    Upload to share
    Lego’s Mindstorms
    35
  • 36. Lego Mindstorms
    36
  • 37. Lego Mindstorms
    Introduced in 1998
    Lego threatened lawsuits first against tinkers
    Now, the company encourages them!
    Some users became their de facto designers
    37
  • 38. Lego Mindstorms
    Lessons learned from lego:
    Give users access to raw content such as interviews as a means of providing greater transparency and accountability.
    Provide tools and become a platform for user-generated rather than firm-generated content.
    38
  • 39. Lego Mindstorms
    Redesign all content to be a conversation rather than a corporate monologue.
    Treat advertising as content too.
    Use new distribution forms, including peer-to-peer networks.
    Adapt content forms and schedules to user demands.
    39
  • 40. Lego Mindstorms
    40
  • 41. Design Your Own Products
    Café Express
    Mini USA
    41
  • 42. The Internet is a content AND CONTEXT provider for our KM or CRM.
    The Internet is a platform for KM or CRM.
    42
  • 43. IP protection is the bottom-line.
    Open source is the bottom-line.
    43
  • 44. New business models are modified from previous ones.
    Business models are brand new.
    44
  • 45. Partners are within our supply chain, and the world consumes our provided value.
    Partners are from everywhere. It is mass collaboration, and the world creates value with us.
    45
  • 46. Open
    Google Maps is open, so
    Housingmaps.com = Google Maps + Graig’s List
    Lego Mindstorms
    Open Business Model – to be introduced
    46
  • 47. Network externality helps us enlarge market share.
    Network externality is everywhere.
    47
  • 48. Success is built on others’ failure.
    Success is achieved with everyone.
    48
  • 49. Companies are combat units to enlarge business size.
    Company boundaries are indistinguishable to benefit from network externality.
    49
  • 50. Alexander is our role model.
    Laozi is our role model.
    50
  • 51. 七律·人民解放军占领南京 毛泽东
    钟山风雨起苍黄,
    百万雄师过大江。
    虎踞龙盘今胜昔,
    天翻地覆慨而慷。
    宜将胜勇追穷寇,
    不可沽名学霸王。
    天若有情天亦老,
    人间正道是沧桑。
    一九四九年四月
    51
  • 52. Homework
    52
  • 53. Homework
    Stephen Hawking: Asking big questions about the universe
    Click ME!
  • 54. Homework
    Philips Eletronics Tattoo
    54
  • 55. Homework
    55
    Larry Lessig - How creativity is being strangled by the law
  • 56. Homework for Chinese Classes