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Sustainability Opportunities from a North Central Region Perspective

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Sustainability Opportunities from a North Central Region Perspective. Rob Myers, Ph.D. …

Sustainability Opportunities from a North Central Region Perspective. Rob Myers, Ph.D.
USDA-SARE, University of Missouri. Presentation to UW-Extension, Cooperative Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension (ANRE) annual professional development meeting and conference. October, 2011. Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin. Thank you Dr. Myers!

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  • 1.
    • ROB MYERS, PH.D.
    • USDA-SARE
    • University of Missouri
    SUSTAINABILITY OPPORTUNITIES FROM A NORTH CENTRAL REGION PERSPECTIVE
  • 2. Presentation Overview
    • Federal budget picture
    • 2012 Farm Bill
    • Support from USDA-SARE for extension
    • Sustainability challenges
  • 3. Federal Funding Picture for Extension
    • Budget Control Act of 2011
      • First round of deficit reduction
      • Super Congress action pending
    • 2012 Farm Bill action
    • FY2012 Ag Appropriations
  • 4. Federal Funding Picture for Extension
    • Budget Control Act of 2011
      • First round of cuts - $917 billion over 10 years
      • Super Congress – reducing deficit over 10 years
        • Minimum of $1.2 trillion or automatic cuts kick in
        • Target goal of $1.5 trillion
        • Deficit savings can be mix of cuts and revenue
        • Plan due by Nov. 23, Congress votes by Dec. 23
    • Focus is on federal “discretionary” budget
  • 5. Budget Control Act of 2011
    • Federal discretionary budget FY2011 - $1.05 trillion (passed in spring of 2011)
      • Does not include entitlement programs
    • Budget Control Act set budget targets:
      • FY 2012 - $1.043 trillion
      • FY 2013 - $1.047 trillion
      • FY 2014 - $1.066 trillion
      • FY 2015 - $1.086 trillion
      • FY 2016 - $1.107 trillion
  • 6. What if Super Congress Fails?
    • Mandatory cuts to discretionary spending of $1.2 trillion over 10 years
      • FY 2012 - $1.043 trillion
      • FY 2013 - $954 billion
      • FY 2014 - $974 trillion
      • FY 2015 - $994 trillion
      • FY 2016 - $1.016 trillion
      • FY 2017 - $1.041 trillion
  • 7. What if Super Congress Succeeds?
  • 8. Super Congress Deal?
    • House and Senate Ag Committee leadership
      • Ag committees agree to $23 billion in cuts over 10 years
      • In return, Super Congress accepts the $23 billion* in cuts and leaves the rest of ag budget alone
    • 2012 Farm Bill would be included in the bill put forth by the Super Congress for passage in December
      • *2008 farm bill was $288 billion over five years
  • 9. Current Changes to Ag Budget
    • Cuts of $25-27 billion (over 10 years)
      • $15 billion from commodity programs
      • Most of remainder from conservation and nutrition assistance to low income families
    • Net cut of $23 billion, but $2-4 billion added
      • Some programs would get an increase
    • Impact on extension and research?
      • Could be a mix of cuts, increases, and level funding, with some merger of programs
  • 10. 2012 Farm Bill
    • Current farm bill expires September 30, 2012
      • Many agriculture programs have a fixed period of authorization so must be reauthorized
    • Normal process of developing a farm bill
      • Hearings around the country, DC hearings, multiple bills introduced, subcommittee action (amendments), full committees, House, Senate, conference process
      • Typically 12-18 months
      • This time – two weeks?!!!
  • 11. Comments by Secretary of Agriculture
    • U.S. agriculture secretary says next Farm Bill must improve disaster aid, funding for research
    Washington Post headline, Oct. 24, 2012
  • 12. FY2012 Ag Appropriations
    • Congress technically should have passed FY2012 Ag Appropriations by September 30
      • House passed bill with 15% cut to most extension and research programs
      • Senate is working on a “mini-bus” bill that has mostly level funding for extension and research
      • Final agreement tangled up with Super Congress
    • Bottom line?
      • Probably level or close to level extension funding in FY2012; prospects for level funding after that are unclear
  • 13. Grants and outreach to advance sustainable innovations to the whole of American agriculture. What is SARE?
  • 14. North Central Region SARE • Since 1988, SARE has invested in 4,000 projects nationwide • SARE in the North Central Region offers grants for:
    • Research & Education
    • Professional Development
    • Graduate Student
    • Farmer/Rancher
    • Youth and Youth Educator
    www.northcentralsare.org Photo by Carol Flaherty
  • 15. The SARE Model
    • Four regional councils set priorities and make grants
    • SARE Outreach produces practical info
    • USDA-NIFA supports SARE
    • Other USDA agencies and land-grant universities are partners
  • 16. The SARE Model
      • Successful SARE grantees are engaged in projects that simultaneously guided by the 3 principals of sustainability…
    Photo by Ted Coonfield Profit over the long term Stewardship of our nation ’s land and water Quality of Life for farmers, ranchers and their communities
  • 17. SARE has education partnerships with Extension and other ag professionals in every state and island protectorate. Photo by Bob Nichols, USDA NRCS The SARE Model
  • 18. SARE Outreach a library of practical, how-to books (in print or download for free) media outreach a portfolio of in-depth reports on current topics conference sponsorships countless online resources, including project reports
  • 19.
    • Sustainable pest and weed mgmt
    • Clean energy
    • Marketing
    • Stewardship of land and water
    • Systems research
    • Community development
    • Crop diversification
    • Soil quality
    • Nutrient management
    • Rotational grazing
    • … and much more
    Photo by Troy Bishopp The SARE Portfolio
  • 20. SARE Grants in Wisconsin (1989-2010) $5.5 million in funding for Wisconsin, 165 total grants
  • 21. Research & Education (R&E) Program Photo courtesy Wayne Martin
    • Grants for up to $200,000 for up to 3 yrs
    • Can be research or education projects
    • Grants go primarily to organizations
    • Fund 10 to 12 grants per year
    • Coordinator is Beth Nelson
  • 22. R&E Timeline
    • Preproposals due June 9, 2011
    • Invited full proposals due in October 2011
    • Funding decisions made in March 2012
    • Funds available late fall 2012
  • 23. Stakeholder Involvement Problem identified by farmer and researcher Farmers involved in research and outreach
  • 24. Graduate Student Grants
    • Grants can be for up to $10,000
    • Currently enrolled graduate students must write proposal and lead work on project
    • Proposals are due in January
    • 12 to 16 grants are funded per year
    • Funds are available in the Fall
    • Coordinator is Beth Nelson
  • 25. Professional Development Program (PDP)
    • Competitive grants
      • Preproposals typically due in May; up to $75,000/grant
      • Full proposals due in August, approved in November
    • State activities organized by state coordinators
      • Wisconsin SARE State Coordinator is Diane Mayerfield
      • Face of SARE – communicating about SARE programs
      • Initiatives – some change in topics from year to year
        • Workshops, webinars, mini-grants, travel scholarships funded
        • by $50,000 in annual support from the SARE program
  • 26. Farmer/Rancher Grants
    • Directly funds farmers and ranchers
    • Up to $7500 for individual farm, $15,000 for partnerships, and $22,500 for groups of 3 or more
    • Applications due on December 2 this year
    • Can try out new production methods or marketing approaches for their farm
    • Encouraged to link with university or NGO partners
    • Required to have an outreach component
    • Coordinator is Joan Benjamin
  • 27. Youth/Youth Educator Grants
    • Youth educator grants
      • Appropriate for vo-ag teachers or other youth educators
      • Applications can be for up to $2000
    • Youth grants
      • Appropriate for FFA, 4-H, or other youth projects
      • Encourages youth to learn about sustainable agriculture
      • Can apply for up to $400
    • Both types of applications are due Jan. 12, 2012
    • Coordinator is Joan Benjamin
  • 28.
      • “ Ratcheting up” with a proposed federal-state matching grants program
      • Broadening outreach to the whole of American agriculture – sponsoring conferences, tailoring information
      • Regional extension training on “Carbon, Energy, and Climate”
      • September 26-28, 2012
      • Kellogg Biological Station, Kalamazoo, Michigan
    New and Future Directions for SARE Photo by Mary Kempfert
  • 29.
      • Bioenergy
      • Climate change
      • Nutrient management
      • Conservation
      • Training new farmers
      • Scaling up local food
    Photo by Helenna Bratman Some Sustainability Challenges
  • 30. What About Bioenergy?
  • 31. Perennial Grasses
  • 32. Nutrient Management
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36. Tillage Radishes
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40. www.sare.org

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