Creating Critical Classrooms
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Creating Critical Classrooms

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  • -this is a key quote from the first chapter-it is something that we need to consider when we are planning lessons with texts that address big ideas-this chapter addresses these terms in more detail and we will investigate this briefly in this session
  • -refer to page 6 in the textThis is a graphic of the Instructional Model of Critical Literacy. (critical literacy curriculum)When teaching critical literacy it is not enough to introduce provocative texts alone. Students must be encouraged to develop a critical stance and to engage in social and personal practices within their own personal and cultural resources. The model captures the movement and interactivity of the 3 major components of the model: Personal and Cultural ResourcesCritical Social PracticesCritical Stance. The model demonstrates that critical literacy curriculum is active and cannot be taught via passive pedagogy. The spiral captures how each component spins in and out, up and down and back and forth. Reference to the model is found on pages 5 and 6 in our texts and book talk participants may wish to tab these pages..
  • -refer to page 6-the outer circle
  • Photocopy and distribute to 3 or 4 tables for group discussions. During whole group debrief display the appropriate add so all participants can see the advertisement in question.
  • Photocopy and distribute to 3 or 4 tables for group discussions. During whole group debrief display the appropriate add so all participants can see the advertisement in question.
  • Photocopy and distribute to 3 or 4 tables for group discussions. During whole group debrief display the appropriate add so all participants can see the advertisement in question.
  • Photocopy and distribute to 3 or 4 tables for group discussions. During whole group debrief display the appropriate add so all participants can see the advertisement in question.

Creating Critical Classrooms Creating Critical Classrooms Presentation Transcript

  • CREATING CRITICALCLASSROOMS K-8READING ANDWRITINGWITH AN EDGEChapter OneWhy do we need aninstructional theory in criticalliteracy?
  • WHAT IS CRITICAL LITERACY?CRITICAL LITERACY PRACTICESENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO : use language to question the everydayworld interrogate the relationship betweenlanguage and power analyze popular culture and media understand how power relationships aresocially constructed consider actions that can be taken topromote social justice
  • A CRITICAL CURRICULUMSimply reading [a big idea] book does notguarantee that the teacher is enacting acritical curriculum. ..unless the teacher andstudents areinvolved in critical social practices andworking from a critical stance,there is no assurance that there willbe anything critical about[the big idea] read aloud. p.5
  • AN INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL OF CRITICAL LITERACYA CRITICAL CURRICULUMPersonal and CulturalResourcesCriticalSocialPracticesCritical StanceCritical LiteracyCurriculumLewison,lelandandHarste2008,p.6
  • PERSONAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCES what students and teachers draw on tocreate the content of the curriculum start with students’ personalknowledge, interests, and issues
  • PERSONAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCESExamples: personal experiences social issues books popular culture media home literacies textbooks oral texts student desires and interests community, national and international issues competence in a language other than English
  • CRITICAL SOCIAL PRACTICE1. Disrupt the commonplace challenge beliefs andassumptions, routines, habits, beliefs and theories abouthow the world works see everyday issues through a new lens visualize how things might be different question classroom and environmental texts ask questions about authors’ intentions and what theywant readers to believe create a problem-posing curriculum rather than aproblem-solving curriculum issues are directly related to classroom communityrather than a prescribed curriculum real-life issues and popular culture become topics ofstudy students have a role in planning, gathering resourcesand assessing learning goal for teachers is to become partners with students inmeaningful inquiry
  • CRITICAL SOCIAL PRACTICE (CON’T)2. Consider Multiple Viewpoints look for books that present the voice of those who havebeen silenced or marginalized juxtapose multiple accounts of events3. Focus on the Sociopolitical investigate oppression and power relationships how is language used to maintain domination?
  • CRITICAL SOCIAL PRACTICE (CON’T)4. Take Action to Promote Social Justice get things done become actors and not spectators create “products” to promote social changes use the arts to express critical understandings
  • CRITICAL STANCEA WAY OF THINKING AND TEACHING1. Conscious Engagement we do not just respond to events in our lives, but wethoughtfully decide how to respond without it, we simple respond to events using ourunconscious, commonsense frames, which make itchallenging to assume a critical stance2. Engaging alternate ways of being come to an understanding that parts of what webelieve about teaching, learning and curriculummay not be working
  • CRITICAL STANCE (CON’T)3. Taking Responsibility to Inquire ask lots of questions ask questions that make a difference understand that all knowledge is constructed fromparticular perspectives consider multiple and contradictory viewpoints to enrichour perceptions of the world interrogate the everyday understand that knowledge is not something static to belearned “knowledge is beliefs at rest” “Too often we develop…memorize what others havealready found out” (p.17)
  • CRITICAL STANCE (CON’T)4. Being Reflexive always questioning being aware of our ownrole in maintaining statusquo or systems of injustice
  • LET’S BE CRITICALLY LITERATE In table groups, read, deconstruct and analyze theMcDonald’s advertisement placed at your table. Consider the questions recorded on the colouredsheet. Be prepared to briefly share your thoughts with thewhole group.
  • ANALYZING ADVERTISEMENTSPersonal and Cultural Resources What personal experiences, social issues, popularmedia, oral texts , community concerns and personaldesires are addressed in this poster?Multiple Viewpoints Which voices are heard ? Which voices are absent? Whatmight an alternative point of view be?Critical Stance What is the critical stance of the poster? How does the authorposition the viewer and or consumer?Action to Promote Social Justice What are some ways that students can respond tothis advertisement?
  • WHATISTHEAUTHOR’SMESSAGE?What personalexperiences, socialissues, popularmedia, oral texts, communityconcerns andpersonal desiresare addressed inthis poster?Which voices areheard ? Whichvoices are absent?What might analternative point ofview be?What is the criticalstance of theposter? How doesthe author positionthe viewer and orconsumer?What are someways that studentscan respond to thisadvertisement?
  • WHATISTHEAUTHOR’SMESSAGE?What personalexperiences, socialissues, popularmedia, oral texts, communityconcerns andpersonal desires beaddressed in thisposter?Which voices areheard ? Whichvoices are absent?What might analternative point ofview be?What is the criticalstance of theposter? How doesthe author positionthe viewer and orconsumer?What are someways that studentscan respond to thisadvertisement?
  • WHATISTHEAUTHOR’SMESSAGE?What personalexperiences, socialissues, popularmedia, oral texts, communityconcerns andpersonal desires beaddressed in thisposter?Which voices areheard ? Whichvoices are absent?What might analternative point ofview be?What is the criticalstance of theposter? How doesthe author positionthe viewer and orconsumer?What are someways that studentscan respond to thisadvertisement?
  • WHATISTHEAUTHOR’SMESSAGE?What personalexperiences, socialissues, popularmedia, oral texts, communityconcerns andpersonal desires beaddressed in thisposter?Which voices areheard ? Whichvoices are absent?What might analternative point ofview be?What is the criticalstance of theposter? How doesthe author positionthe viewer and orconsumer?What are someways that studentscan respond to thisadvertisement?
  • THANK YOU . . .. . . Now on to Chapter 2