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Understanding Learning Problems
 

Understanding Learning Problems

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    Understanding Learning Problems Understanding Learning Problems Presentation Transcript

    • www.harpinstitute.com http://www.learning-aids.com
        NOURISHING MINDS ONE STEP AT A TIME
      • THE EPIDEMIC
      • 1 in 5 children in U.S. has dyslexia
      • 1 in 100 has autism
      • 1 million diagnosed with ADD
      • 2.9 million students in special education
      • 27% of students with learning disabilities drop out of school, compared to 11% of the general population
      • 13% of learning disabled attend college, compared to 53% of the general population
      • DYSLEXIA
      • One in five suffers from dyslexia
      • Students with dyslexia have normal to above normal intelligence
      • Until a dyslexic student is taught to still the images in the brain, learning will remain difficult
      • These are the kids being left behind at an alarming rate
      • Dyslexia is a neurological condition, so the brain and the senses must be dealt with to help the student learn
      • These kids are in a “fog”
      • They can see any image in up to 40 different ways
      • Their worlds are in constant motion and are often misdiagnosed as having ADD/ADHD
      • Our school systems are not dealing with dyslexia
      • Dyslexia is not just reversing letters and words
      • These kids have amazing gifts that are being overlooked
      • Our prisons are full of dyslexics
      • Orton-Gillingham approaches
        are over 75 years old ~ we can do better
      • DYSGRAPHIA
      • Students today are failing to write legibly
      • Gross motor skills must be addressed for success
        Accommodations and modifications don’t fix the problem
      • The larger skill of writing needs to be broken down into smaller pieces
      • We can’t excuse students from writing
        until society doesn’t expect them to write
      • RICKY’S BEFORE WRITING
      • RICKY’S AFTER WRITING
      • DYSCALCULIA
      • This is a math “dyslexia”
      • If you can’t “see” the numbers correctly, then how can you be expected to manipulate them?
        Math anxiety sets in and adds to problem
      • Very little is done to help this problem
      • Math is sequential and these kids have huge gaps in learning
      • Math is an important life skill,
        and these kids are failing
      • ADD/ADHD
      • Students are being diagnosed with ADD/ADHD at an alarming rate
        Students are being misdiagnosed There is no blood test or definitive measure to diagnose a student with ADD/ADHD
      • Medications can have harsh side effects
      • There is a holistic way to help kids with this problem
      • AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER
      • These are the most frustrated students of all
        Their parents have little hope or help If they are taught to use their senses correctly, then progress is made
      • They are grossly mis-wired
      • There is no cure, but these kids can be re-wired to help learning and life success
      • Once their eyes or ears are “plugged in” then progress can be made
      • It takes a long time to make progress
        Gross motor skills are usually weak
      • They use repetitive behaviors to cope
      • They live in a silent prison, as communication is our most basic need
      • It is painful for them to do the most basic visual or auditory activities, so they must retreat or act out to cope
      • They will be a burden on society if something isn’t done to help them now
      • NATHAN’S STORY
        About Nathan:
      • Poor school performance
      • 2-3 hours of homework each night
      • Illegible writing
      • High vocabulary
      • Socially gifted
      • HATED school
      • THE PROBLEM
      • Dyslexia
      • ADD
      • Severe auditory and visual processing problems
      • Low self-esteem in an academic setting
      • Traditional methods failed to help him
      • THE SOLUTION
      • One year of home-schooling
      • Intense cognitive, visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities
        Low pressure academics Use of color, music to keep right side of the brain busy
      • No special education or label
      • THE RESULTS
      • Returned to public school after one year
      • Honor roll student
      • Confident
      • Happy
      • Passed high school exit exam on first try
      • Graduated high school
      • Currently enrolled in college
      • WHEN LEARNING IS PAINFUL:
      • Students will avoid school work because it hurts
      • Other symptoms will appear
      • The entire family is affected
      • Traditional approaches treat the symptoms only
      • Traditional methods only add more academics
      • Learning continues to be painful without intervention
      • There is a reason for the pain
      • The student’s outlook is poor without help
      • More practice will not help
      • There is hope
      • THIS STUDENT:
      • Is fatigued
      • Learns differently than most
      • Is frustrated
      • Feels dumb
      • Is intelligent
      • Fails to learn with traditional methods
      • Will act out or retreat as coping mechanisms
      • Isn’t lazy
      • Is working at capacity
      • Is often misdiagnosed
      • Has exasperated parents who don’t know what to do
      • SIT AT THIS STUDENT’S DESK
      • An hour of school feels like eternity
      • Often misses recess because assignments are not done
      • Is aware that other kids do better
      • Wants desperately to feel normal and get good grades
      • “ Zones Out” because he can’t keep up
      • Is often held after school for intervention programs
        that don’t work
      • Feels his parent’s disappointment
      • Wants to please but can’t
      • Goes home to hours of homework
      • Feels enormous pressure to succeed
      • HOW THEY PERCIEVE
      • These kids view the world differently
      • We can’t expect them to perform well until we deal with the underlying problems
      • They might see the world upside down, tilted, moving, or some other inconsistent way
      • It might change from day to day
      • There are many inconsistencies in their perceptions
        These kids usually rely on verbal skills to get by
      • Since they are so verbal, people assume they can do better
      • Learn many coping tactics, but usually not enough for academic achievement
      • Wy bab is ton every happy. He things I shoulb go ot the store from him. I pon’t wont ot. His ton the boss of em. I ma my now boss. I work hard anb get goob grades. Mhy doe he od this ot me?
    •  
      • WHAT DOESN’T WORK:
      • More academics presented in the same way
      • Longer time to learn
      • Retaining the student
      • Telling the student to try harder
      • Labeling the student
      • Giving the student “crutches” and reasons not to do well
      • Expecting the schools to help the student
      • Ignoring the situation – thinking they will outgrow it
      • Special Education – IEP’s
      • Listening to books to read or using a computer to write
      • After school academic intervention programs
      • WHAT DOES WORK:
      • Giving the student tools for success
      • Using a multi-dimensional approach
      • Going back to the beginning and building a foundation
      • Thinking how we learn – through the senses
      • Strengthening what is weak
      • Sequential Steps
      • Teaching to Mastery
      • Taking the pressure off of the learner
      • Letting the student be a “normal” kid
      • Dealing with the whole student
      • THE BRAIN
      • Educators rarely take the brain into consideration when teaching students
      • Neurons that fire together wire together
      • The brain has plasticity at any age
      • Experience sculpts the brain
      • We know more about the brain now than ever yet are not using this information to effectively teach our students
      • BRAIN BALANCE
      • We need to access both hemispheres of the brain for successful learning
        The corpus callosum can act like a barrier instead of a bridge
      • If a developmental stage was missed, it is possible to go back and plug what is missing
      • Eye placement is important for accessing parts of the brain
      • Left Hemisphere
        Conscious Control Words Phonics Numbers Reasoning Math Lists Categories Analysis Linear Thought Auditory Bit by Bit
        Right Hemisphere
        Movement Rhythm Music Shapes Colors Pictures Emotions Daydreaming Expressions Synthesis Problem Solving
        Corpus Callosum
      • THE CHANGING BRAIN
      • Technology has changed how children learn and perceive the world
      • Children are not exposed to as much “free play”
      • Our children live in an instant society; they don’t have to make or keep images in minds
      • Colors, pictures, graphics of technology enhance right brain thinking – school stresses left brain thinking
      • Students are gifted with technology but can’t read, write, or follow directions in an efficient manner
      • FIGHT OR FLIGHT
      • Students cannot learn when they are frightened or scared in school
        Emotion becomes dominant over cognition The rational thinking part of the brain is less efficient School must be environmentally as well as psychologically safe for optimal learning
      • BRAIN RETRAINING
      • The brain can be retrained
      • The brain develops through stimulation
      • Children are not wired for all tasks at birth
      • Creeping, crawling, exploring, examining, looking, and listening are the activities that integrate the brain for academics later in life
      • Brain retraining is a step by step, sequential process
      • Physical movement along with eye placement builds new neural pathways in the brain
      • EYE PLACEMENT CHART
        Sensory Access to the Brain Through Eye Placement and Movement
        Kinesthetic Down
        Feelings, Eye/hand Coordination
        Auditory Construct
        Visual Construct
        Internal Dialogue
        Auditory Memory
        Visual Memory
        Visual
      • 5 STEPS TO LEARNING SUCCESS:
      • Motor Skills
      • Visual Processing
      • Auditory Processing
      • Memory Building
      • Multi-Sensory Academics
      • MOTOR SKILLS:
      • We learn from large to small
      • Gross motor skills must be addressed
      • Today’s child has changed
      • Motor Skills are the foundation for learning
      • Crossing the vertical midline is important
      • We increase the demand with activities
      • As the body comes together, so does
        the brain
      • SYMPTOMS OF MOTOR SKILLS PROBLEMS
      • Clumsy or uncoordinated
      • Forgetful
      • Poor posture when doing school work
      • Pushing hard on a pencil
      • Sloppy art and school work
      • Difficulty with copying
      • Illegible handwriting
      • Holding pencil, fork or spoon incorrectly
      • THE VISUAL SYSTEM
      • Our main learning sense is visual
      • 75 to 90% of what we take in is visual
      • Poor visual processing skills account for a vast majority of learning difficulties
      • The muscles in the eyes can be strengthened like any muscle in the body can
      • Glasses only help focusing issues not muscle balance
      • We see with our brains – we take in light with our eyes
      • SYMPTOMS OF VISUAL PROCESSING PROBLEMS
      • Reverse letters and/or numbers
      • Skip lines or words while reading
      • Headaches and/or neck aches
      • Turn or tilt head while doing school work
      • Fatigue from doing school work or reading
      • Trouble reading and spelling short, easy words
      • Switch words around (was for saw)
      • Words run together while reading
      • THE AUDITORY SYSTEM
      • Students with auditory processing problems fail school due to the lecture format
      • Auditory processing problems impede interpersonal communication
      • Students can have perfect hearing and may still not process auditory information correctly
      • Some students hear sounds more loudly than normal or fail to hear some sounds at all
      • Students can be taught to process auditory information
      • SYMPTOMS OF AUDITORY PROCESSING PROBLEMS
      • Difficult time following oral directions
      • Easily confused
      • Temper problems
      • Difficulty with mental math
      • Difficulty with multi-step directions
      • Existing label of ADD
      • Must look at you to understand directions
      • MEMORY
      • Most students who are struggling in school are weak in visual and auditory memory
      • Memory “muscle” can be stretched and strengthened
      • Learning is the act of making connections between neurons forming neural networks
      • Memory is the ability to reconstruct these connections
      • Struggling learners need meaningful information to remember
      • SYMPTOMS OF MEMORY PROBLEMS
      • Difficult time memorizing math facts
      • Learn spelling words for test, then forget
      • Reading comprehension problems
      • Asking directions to be repeated
      • Acting like previously taught facts are new
      • Seems lost most of the time
      • Fail to grasp grade level concepts
      • ACADEMICS
      • The bigger skill needs to be broken down into little, smaller components
      • These smaller components are taught sequentially
      • Skills mastery must take place before new skills are taught
      • Non-academic skills affect academic skills
      • Students can learn to learn
      • Can be taught in a multi-sensory
        fashion
      • READING: BREAKING IT DOWN
      • Fluid eye movement
      • Tracking across a page from left to right
      • Visual Discrimination
      • Auditory Discrimination
      • Visual Closure
      • Visual Memory
      • Auditory Memory
        Knowledge of letter sounds – phonemic awareness The ability to blend these sounds together into words Making the words turn into sentences and paragraphs
      • Decoding large words and making meaning from them
      • Remembering what was just read
      • Hearing that “silent voice” in your mind
      • Making inferences from what was read
      • Applying what was read to real life
      • Long term comprehension on what was read
      • YOU CAN’T FIX POOR ACADEMICS WITH MORE ACADEMICS
      • PROCESSING INFORMATION
      • Students need to take in information, process it, and then spit it back out with meaning
      • Students who struggle to learn process information either too slowly or too quickly
      • Most methods fail to consider that students can be taught to process information correctly
      • Processing information affects academics and life skills
      • TRADITIONAL METHODS
      • Do nothing to strengthen learning systems
      • Don’t teach the student to process information
      • Present the same material in the same way that didn’t work for the student
      • Blame the student for not learning/achieving
      • Make students hate school and learning
      • Are based on a classroom model that is ancient and archaic
      • Don’t take technology into consideration
      • Are not working
      • INSANITY: DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER AGAIN AND EXPECTING DIFFERENT RESULTS ~ALBERT EINSTEIN
      • THE SCHOOL SYSTEM
      • Is not equipped to help students overcome learning disabilities and differences
      • Waters down the curriculum for below grade level achievers but does little to bring them back up to grade level
      • Is only equipped to deal with academics
      • Should not be expected to do everything
      • Can only do what the laws allow
      • Is failing students at an alarming rate
      • Warehouses students instead of fixing them
      • YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO A FREE EDUCATION, BUT NOT NECESSARILY A GOOD EDUCATION
      • SPECIAL EDUCATION
      • Is not just some extra help for the student, but a legal, binding agreement
      • Students are rarely exited from program
      • Students are labeled
      • These students leave regular classroom and miss important instruction
      • Are still expected to pass high school exit exam
      • Receive a watered down curriculum
      • Are given accommodations and modifications, which prepare them for failure in life
      • The IEP Team can intimidate parents who don’t have the knowledge and vocabulary needed
      • Does not treat the child as a whole
      • You have the right to deny special education services
      • Schools receive extra funding for special education students
      • Pigeon hole these students so they can never catch up
      • Fail to treat dyslexia, dyscalculia, or dysgraphia
      • Fail to treat auditory and visual processing disorders
      • I WOULDN’T PUT MY DOG IN SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR A LEARNING DISABILITY
      • HOPE
      • Students can make tremendous progress
      • Never give up on your
        child
      • It’s up to you to help
        your child
      • There are no easy, quick fixes
      • You don’t have to spend a fortune to help your child
    • For more information and solutions please go to http://www.learning-aids.com http://www.harpinstitute.com