Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Cultura japonesa,contenido
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Cultura japonesa,contenido

9,949

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
9,949
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
45
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. CAPITULO PRIMERO 1. LOS JAPONESES Y EL IDIOMA JAPONES1.1. AlphabetA little before 3,000 B.C., a system of writing was invented by the Sumerians, who inhabited theland we now call Iraq. Separate words and concepts were each given a particular sign, so thatthere were several thousand different signs. Naturally, such a written language was hard to learn,and those who could read and write were regarded much as we regard college professors in ourown culture.About 1,400 B.C., however, some Phoenician had a brilliant idea. Why not work out a sign foreach different sound, and then build up words out of those sounds? Only about two dozendifferent signs would be needed, and they would suffice for any number of different words,millions if necessary. It seems a simple idea to us now, but as far as we know it was thought uponly once in man’s history. All systems of signs for sounds in the entire world since seem to havebeen developed from that one Phoenician notion.For their signs, the Phoenicians used some marks that were already being used to represent words.The sign for an ox (“aleph” in Phoenician) was used to represent the sound “ah”, with which theword for ox began. The word for house (“beth”) represented “b”, the word for camel (“gimel”)represented “g”, and so on. These signs became what we call “letter”.The Greeks adopted the notion, and even the letters, modifying them somewhat. However, theydistorted the names, which made no sense in Greek, anyway. “Aleph” became “alpha”, “beth”became “beta”, “gimel” became “gamma”, and so on. The Romans adopted the system, too, againwith distortions, and their alphabet became the basis of our own, the familiar A, B, C.........We can call the list of letters the “A-B-C’s” and sometimes do, but it is much more common, forsome reason, to use the Greek names for the letters and speak of the “alpha-beta” or alphabet.1.2. The Birth of a Pictographic Script Until recently it was believed that the earliest examples of Chinese characters were those found in oracle bones used in divination rites
  • 2. 2dating back to the eighteenth century B.C. were simple pictures of things. PictographsHowever, excavations made in China in may be combined to form new characters,1986 have shown that at that time Chinese especially characters that express complex orcharacters had already had a history of 1200 abstract ideas. Thus 木 “tree” is combinedyears, which means that the Chinese script with 木 to give 林 “ wood” while threefirst appeared almost 5000 years ago. trees give 森 “ forest”; a line added to theThe earliest characters were simple pictures bottom of a tree gives 本 , which meansof the things they represented. Although all “root” or “origin”; and so on.the pictorial writing systems of the worldbegan with pictures, these were in almost all The shapes of the characters underwent acases simplified to abstract symbols that great deal of change over the severalwere eventually used for their sound values, thousand years of their history. Manygiving rise to the major alphabet systems of calligraphic styles, character forms, andthe world. This happened everywhere but in typeface styles have evolved over the years;China, where the primary function of the furthermore, the character forms werecharacters has always been to express both simplified as a result of various languagemeaning and sound, rather than just sound. reforms in China and Japan. 1.2.1. Formation of Chinese Characters Traditionally, Chinese characters are classified into six categories known as 六書 Typical Pictographs rikusho. Introduced some 1900 years ago in the Chinese classic dictionary 説 文 解 字 setsumon kaiji, these have placed a central role in Chinese lexicography. The first four categories are based on the character formation process; the last two are based on usage. 1. Pictographs ( 象 形 文 字 shookei moji) are simple hieroglyphs that are rough sketches of the things they represent. Example: (modern 目 moka “eye”. 2. Simple ideographs ( 指 事 文 字 shiji moji) suggest the meanings of abstract ideas, such as numerals and directions. Examples: 三 san “three”. 3. Compound ideographs (会意文字 kaiji moji) consist of two or more elements each of which contributesThe table shows examples of early character to the meaning of the whole.forms and their modern counterparts. The Examples: 休 kyuu “rest” (personearliest characters were pictographs, which 人 resting under a tree 木).
  • 3. 3 now used in the borrowed sense of 4. Phonetic-Ideographic Characters “bean”. (形声文字 keisei moji) consist of one element that roughly expresses The great majority of characters are meaning (usually called the phonetic-ideographic (type 4 above). 民、for radical), and another element that example, originally a picture of an eye represents sound and often also pierced by a needle ( ), represented a slave meaning. Examples: 茎   kei blinded by his master to keep him from “item, stalk” consists of “plant” escaping, but later changed to “ignorant and “straight”, i.e., the straight masses” or “people” in general. As a part of a plant. phonetic-ideographic element in the formation of other characters, it represents 5. Derivative Characters ( 転 注 文 字 the sound min and has a basic meaning of tenchū moji) are characters used in an “sightlessness” or “blindness”. For example, extended, derived, or figurative 民 (abbreviated to 氏) is combined with 日 sense. Example: 令 rei changed from “ sun” to give 昏 “ darkness, dusk”; 眠 its original meaning “command, “sleep” consists of an eye (目) in a state of order” to “person who gives orders” sightlessness (民). An interesting example is to “administrator, governor”. 婚 “ marriage”, which consists of 女 “woman” + 昏 “darkness”. According to 6. Phonetic Loans ( 仮 借 文 字 one theory, this is because wedding kashaku moji) are characters ceremonies were held at night. In this way, a borrowed to represent words phonetically without direct relation to basic unit like 民 contributes its shape, its their original meanings, or to reading, and its meaning to the formation of characters used erroneously. other characters. Example: 豆 too originally referred to an ancient sacrificial vessel, but is1.3. Origin of the Japanese People and LanguageThe author states that this post is not a definitive piece of work, but presented more to satisfysome curiosity among readers of the sci.lang.japan group. The origins of the Japanese people andlanguage are usually difficult to trace, but this post makes a good beginning overview to the issuesand periods involved. Thanks to muchan for taking the time to present this to us! From: muchan (muchan@promikra.si) Subject: The Origin of the Japanese People & Language Date: Mon, 23 Mar 1998 13:16:53 +01001.3.1. PrefaceWe can read the oldest written form of Japanese from the 7th century. Since that time, theJapanese language has changed, but we can see the continuity very clearly, and we can safelyconclude that this is basically the same language that is spoken now on the same islands. Callingthis oldest known form “Old Japanese”, this message is about the time before that, how this
  • 4. 4language was formed and where the people who spoke this language came from--about the originand prehistory of the Japanese people and language.Because it is about a time before the written history, studies and even many guesses in the fieldsof archeology, anthropology, mythology, etc., together with linguistical analysis, are alsoimportant to knowing the past.This message does not give the definitive answer to the question, but is just to illustrate the imageof prehistory that we can have from the studies that have been done up till now. Most ofinformation here is based on the Book ‘Nihongo-no kigen’ (Origin of the Japanese Language) bySusumu Oono, Iwanami. I’d be happy to hear if there are some newer findings to replace orconfirm the basic image of prehistory that I’m presenting here.1.3.2. LegendsIn Chinese classical literature, at least two texts mention the prehistory of Japan. Wei Zhi - Dong Yi Chuan (Official history of Wei, about Eastern Strangers, /Gishi-touiden/ -- jp, or known as /Gishi-wajinden/) reports about Japanese in AD 3c. Beside adescription of the female governor and the tattooed faces of men, there is a part that says, “Whenasked, everyone answered they were descendants of TaiBo of Wu (/taihaku/ of /Go/ -- jp )”.Sima Qian (/Shibasen/ -- jp) wrote that Xu Fu (/Johuku/ -- jp) said to Shi Huang Di of Qin(/Shikoutei/ of /Shin/), that he was leaving for the Eastern Sea to search for a medicine for eternallife in Fenglai (/Hourai/ -- jp) islands, which the Chinese people consider to be Japan. He left withabout 3000 people, but didn’t come back because he became the king there.From these texts, still many people seem to believe Japanese is just a branch of Chinese. It’s tooarrogant to ignore these texts, but too naive to believe the legend blindly...1.3.3. TimetableTo illustrate the prehistory of Japan, I’d put two lines on the timetable. The first line comesaround 400 to 300 BC. This is the time when wet rice culture and iron processing came to theJapanese Islands, and the way of life there changed. Yet an older form of the Japanese languagestarted to be spoken from that time. I’d call this phase of the language “proto-Japanese”, whichlater evolved to our Old Japanese.The second line comes around 200 to 300 AD. By this time, the transformation of people, culture,and language is almost complete, and we see the Yamato people, who will later reign over all theislands of Japan. From this time on until the 7th century, about 2/3 of Japan was under theYamato people, who spoke Old Japanese.The historical time between these two lines is called the Yayoi era, named from the name of placewhere the typical wheel-turned pottery of this time was found.1.3.4. Pre-Rice Culture EraStudies of archeology and anthropology suggest that there were at least three groups of peoplewho lived in the Japanese islands before the wet rice culture came.
  • 5. 51.3.4.1. The Ainu PeopleIn the Hokkaido islands and the northernmost part of Honshu, there were the Ainu people.Biological study suggests that the Ainu people are closer to the people who form Europeannations. Linguistically, the Ainu language has similar syntax structure to Japanese, but differs inthe use of pronouns used as verbal prefixes. Some linguists consider the Ainu language as adistant family of the Finno-Ugric subgroup of Ural-Altaic language group. Some archeologicalfindings and anthropological studies suggest that the Ainu people are probably a branch of agroup of people who originally came from the North Ural mountains, and spread from Finland toNortheast Siberia between 700 BC and 700 AD. This is from the cultural & religious similarityfound in old ruins, but culture can be transferred by contact of people, so the origin of Ainupeople is still not known for sure.1.3.4.2. Azuma-hito, People of the Northeast region of JapanThere still remains a sharp distinction of people, culture, language (dialect) northeast andsouthwest of a line across the Honshu, the Japanese main land. The line is almost identical to thesouthwest borders of Niigata, Nagano, and Aichi prefectures now. Northeast of this line, therelived people who probably called themselves Emchu, Enju, or Enzo as a word for man (humanbeing). Probably this word was transformed to Emisi or Ezo in the Japanese language, which laterjust meant ‘northern strangers’, so the same word is used to name Hokkaido and the Ainu peoplea thousand years later. From this word “Ezo”, some people wonder if the Ainu people lived inhalf of Honshu before, but this wasn’t the case. These people had a culture with beautiful earthenvessels, which normally are called “Jomon-style vessels”. Jomon-style vessels were made in theSouthern part of Japan, too, but the center of this culture was more in the north, and later, whenthe southern people started to use a more advanced style of vessels, these people continued to useJomon vessels. Here we can see the continuity of the people to a later time.Most of what are now the Hokuriku, Chubu, and Kanto regions were under the Yamato people’scontrol until the late 6th century. Natives of the seized land were then called ‘tori-no saezuruAduma-hito’ or “Bird-song Easterners”, who spoke Old Japanese with strange accents. (/Adzuma/in modern Japanese means “East”, as does the word /higashi/, but East as direction in OldJapanese was /himugashi/ “the wind to the sun”, /Aduma/ was used to refer to the region). Manymales of the Aduma region were sent to Kyushu as a guard force.From the 10th century, the Yamato people tried to seize the Northern part of Honshu, Michinoku,but here the native people, then called Ezo, maintained their autonomy until the end of the 12thcentury.The origin of these people (for prehistory they are called Jomon- jin) is not well known. Theyseem to be a Northern branch of the ‘Mongolian’ race, and their language is more consonantoriented than the languages of their Southern neighbors. But the language they spoke beforecontact with the Yamato people is not known. Someone has suggested that Mt.Fuji meant “FireMountain” in their language, but we don’t have any evidence.1.3.4.3. People of the Southwest Coastal RegionThe rest of Japan, before the wet rice culture, was populated by people who probably came fromthe south by sea. Some cultural characteristics of the Japanese are thought to be from these groupsof people. Males had tattoos on their faces, and there was a widespread custom of removing the
  • 6. 6canine teeth. Women’s teeth were dyed black when they married. Marriage and families followedmaternal lines, the husbands visiting their wives. The young members of the society wereorganized into groups of same generations, etc.Their language, though we don’t know what syntax structure it had, must have had the openvowel syllables which remain in the Japanese language today. Modern Japanese still conservemany of the words for body parts from this time.As a conclusion, these people probably belong to the Malay-Indonesia-Polynesia group, and theirclosest relations are now found on some islands in Polynesia and Micronesia. I’m interested, but Idon’t know where these people originated, or how they spread over the Pacific Ocean.1.3.5. Rice Culture, Shock Wave from KoreaHere we will see about how the wet rice culture was introduced into Japanese life. It changed lifeand language, and surely we imagine there was a movement of people who came with rice andstarted to live on the Japanese islands. But before that, we’ll look around to see who near Japanhad wet rice culture at that time.1.3.5.1. The Origin of Rice, and the Mon-Khmer PeopleWet rice culture is started in the area around the current border between Myanmar and China. Inaround 400 BC, it spread widely over the lower Yangtze region, where the Han (Chinese) peoplehad not yet come. Here in the region, now the southern part of China (Zhejiang, Fujian, etc.),many kinds of people seem to have been living. Chinese literature of the time describes the peoplein this southern region as strangers, with customs like tattooing, dying and removing teeth, etc.Among them, people called “Mon” attract our attention. The Mon people were widespread overthe lower Yangtze and had their peak in about the 7th century AD. Now they are living as aminority nationality in China and Myanmar. One of 1996 issues of the Japanese edition ofNational Geographic had an article on visiting this people. The reporter was impressed by theirhaving faces very similar to Japanese, and found customs similar to some commonly found inJapan, such as carrying babies on the mothers’ backs, etc. Their language, belongs to the Mon-Khmer language group. However, it is not considered to be close to Japanese, except some of thewords for body parts and the system of indexing pronouns, known as ko-, so-, a-, idu(do) inJapanese. This pronoun system for distinguishing near, near (common), far, and indefinite thingsare common to Korean and Japanese but not in northern neighbors of Altaic languages.1.3.5.2. Rice Moving to the Southern Part of the Korean PeninsulaIt was still during the time that the Han people considered these southern parts of China as a landof strangers, so we don’t know exactly which of the people among those who were here with ricestarted to move out. It seems that they didn’t go directly to Japan, but settled first in the southernpart of the Korean peninsula until 300 BC. The reason for their moving is unknown, but I imagineit was the time of war between countries in the ancient world of China, and people may havemoved out seeking a peaceful land.Takashi Akiba studied the ethnology of the Korean people, and wrote about the custom of bindingrope as a religious ceremony (“shimenawa” in Japanese). This culture must be bound to rice
  • 7. 7culture, and it can be found widely in the half of today’s Korea on the south side of 38 degreeline. It indicates that this was the boundary of rice culturing people.1.3.5.3. South Korea, Where the North and South Waves MetThe fact that rice culture didn’t come directly to Japan, but it was buffered in the KoreanPeninsula, is an important thing. The rice as southern culture didn’t come alone, but it wasimported to Japan with many factors of northern Tungusic cultures together. This mixing of northand south occurred in southern Korea just before it started to move to Japan.Northern factors: They had a paternal family system. (ul, kara in Korean, udi, kara in Japanese),“5” as a religious number, a three-layered idea of the universe: Heaven (ama)-middle (nakatu)-earth (ne), the belief that gods descended from Heaven to a mountain, etc. These factors arecommon to Tungusic culture and Japanese Shintoism. Many linguistical characteristics ofJapanese, common to most of Altaic language groups, are of course among those we count asnorthern factors.1.3.5.4. The Wave from KoreaAn interesting study shows that the average Korean (163 cm) was taller than the average Japanese(160 cm) throughout history. (Now the younger generation of both countries is taller than that.This is a historical average). The study shows that the average Japanese before rice culture wasabout 160 cm, but this increased to about 163 cm, but later, in the 5th century AD, it came back to160 cm. The interpretation is that there was a wave of immigration from Korea, which was bigenough to change the average height of the Japanese, but not enough to change the nature of thegene pool on the Islands entirely, and that wave was not followed by any more waves. As timewent by, these immigrant people were mixed and assimilated in the sea of native people.1.3.5.5. After the Rice CameFrom a cultural point of view, this wave was a shock that changed the way of life entirely. Wetrice culture requires organization of people in a village to make collective work effective. Thepossession of land and the accumulation of wealth lead to wars and bigger political forces. Riceculture and new technologies changed life in the southern half of Japan, then this new waygradually influenced the eastern Azuma people’s life. From a linguistical point of view, this wavechanged the syntax of the language, and replaced many of the basic words.1.3.5.6. Proto-Japanese and KoreanDuring the early Yayoi era, probably the language of South Koreans and our proto-Japanese wereidentical. But as time went by, the language on the island started to be influenced by the phoneticsof native islanders. Island people didn’t have consonant ending syllables so they couldn’t hearthem clearly. Susumu Oono shows many examples to corresponding words.mil -> midu (water), nunmil -> namida (tear),nat -> nata (hatchet), pat -> pata (farm),kot -> kusi (spit), sal -> sa (arrow) -- /sa/ of /ikusa/kama = kama (sickle), mail -> mura (village)
  • 8. 8(Bart mentioned here that the evidence is getting pretty strong that early Korean didn’t haveconsonant-final syllables either.)Between Ancient Korean and Ancient Japanese, over 20 phonetically corresponding rules werefound:k-k, s-s, s-ch, t-t, n-n, P(F)-p, m-m, s.z-r.l, etc.The basic vocabulary of body part names from Korea didn’t replace Japanese words, but it wastransformed into verbs, related to the part of body originally in ancient Korean.ip (mouth) -> ipu (to say)ko (nose) -> kagu (to smell)kui (ear) -> kiku (to hear)al (egg) -> aru (to be born), etc.(examples are from "Origin of the Japanese Language" by Susumu Oono)As for syntax structure, Japanese and Korean are very close, and Japanese, especially in itsancient form, can be thought of as an Altaic language.1.3.6. The Yamato ExpansionYamato is the name of a place where the people settled who later seized all of Japan. When thesepeople came to the Yamato region (in Nara prefecture) is not yet known clearly, but their orallyinherited myths talk about the war when they came east to settle in Yamato. I think these peoplewere the last wave from the Korean Peninsula, who organized politically and started to conquerpeople who had wet rice culture from former waves. Their myths talk about the war against Izumoin the West, Kumaso (or Hayate) in the south, and later Ezo or Azuma people in the East. As theyexpanded their territory, their language prior to Old Japanese became the common language onthe island.Ryukuian, or the language of the Okinawa Islands separated from Old Japanese somewherebetween the 3rd and 5th centuries. So, it is either the closest language or the most distant dialectof Japanese.1.3.7. CivilizationChinese civilization had one of its peaks in the 6th century. The Yamato people learned from themost advanced civilization of the time by bringing scholars and artisans from Korea. Half of theclans in Yamato were considered to be native clans of this place, and the rest of the clans, whichgot stronger and stronger later, were those who settled as conquerors and still had stronger tieswith the Korean people. Many Korean people immigrated to Japan during this time, bringingtechnologies and thought like Confucianism and Buddhism, and, yes, knowledge of Chinesecharacters, too. Later, Japan sent intellectuals to China, to study and absorb their civilizationdirectly. As a result, Japanese borrowed many words from Chinese, but it didn’t change thelanguage. The Japanese language is not related to Chinese.1.3.8. End of Altaic Vowel AccordancesIn 1909, Shinkichi Hashimoto found that Old Japanese had two groups of the vowels /i/, /e/, and /o/, so there were 8 vowels and everyone could distinguish them clearly, except those from the
  • 9. 9distant Azuma people in the East. Further studies on the usage and distinction of these vowelsindicate that Old Japanese had vowel accordance, something close to vowel harmony, which ischaracteristic of Altaic languages like Turkish, Mongolian, and Tungusic languages. It’s one ofimportant aspects that indicates the relation of Altaic languages and Japanese, but this vowelaccordance and even the distinction of two groups of vowels disappeared by the 10th century.Isn’t this a linguistic version of same phenomena, that the average Japanese became 160 cm tallhundreds of years after the shock wave from Korea? As time passes, the Japanese language hasbeen losing the characteristic Altaic part of its origin.Phonetically speaking, Japanese belongs to the Southern Islanders languages.Japanese and Korean thus separated about 1800 to 2300 years ago. Korean seems to have beenlosing its southern elements, and Japanese has been losing its northern elements. So, it’s not easyfor students of today’s forms of both languages to find similarities between the two, except forsyntax structure and common borrowed words from Chinese.
  • 10. 10
  • 11. 11
  • 12. 121.3.9. Loan WordsPOD:Bonze, daimio, geisha, goban, hara-kiri, japan, jinricksha, rickshaw, ju-jutsu, kimono, Mikado,netsuke, samurai, Shinto, soy, tycoon, yenRandom House Dic:Bushido, chanoyu, daimyo, fusuma, haori, hibachi, hiragana, ikebana, jinja, judo, judoka, kabuki,kakemono, kaki, kamikaze, karate, katakana, kendo, Mikado, moxa, netsuke, No(h), obi, sake,samisen, samurai, sayonara, sen, seppuku, Shinto, shintoism, shogun, shoji, soi, sukiyaki, sumo,tabi, tatami, tempura, tsuba, tsunami, tsurugi, yen, zazen, zen
  • 13. CAPITULO SEGUNDO 2. HISTORIA2.1. Los iniciosNo se sabe a ciencia cierta la procedencia de los primeros colonizadores del archipiélago japonés,aunque se supone que fueron los ainu los primeros en asentarse en esta zona, alrededor del año3000ac. Otras teorías sostienen que las corrientes inmigratorias procedieron mayormente deSiberia oriental o de las islas polinesias.Los períodos históricos se resumen en la siguiente tabla:Jomon 10.000ac - 300ac 縄文Yayoi 300ac - 300 弥生Kofun 300 - 710 古墳Nara 710 - 794 奈良Heian 794 - 1185 平安Kamakura 1185 - 1333 鎌倉Muromachi 1333 - 1568 室町Azuchi momoyama 1568 - 1600 安土桃山Edo 1600 - 1868 江戸Meiji 1868 - 1912 明治Taisho 1912 - 1926 大正Showa 1926 - 1989 昭和Heisei 1989 - 平成
  • 14. Dinastías de ChinaHsia, Xia    2205-1766 ac           夏Shang 1766-1122 ac           商Chou 1111-255 ac           周Ch’in, Qin, Kin 221-206, a.c capital:Yen-ching   秦Han 202 ac-220 dc, capital: Ch’ang-an   漢Sei dinastías 220-581           六朝Sui 581-618 capital: Ch’ang-an   隋Tang 618-907 capital: Ch’ang-an   唐Sung, Song 960-1279 capital: Hang-chow  宋Yuan 1206-1368 capital: Beijing    元Ming 1368-1644 capital: Beijing    明Ch’ing 1644-1911 capital: Beijing    清2.2. Jomon (10000-300ac)Las culturas paleolíticas del Japón prehistórico dieron paso hacia el 10000ac a la cultura neolíticadenominada Jomon. Tenían habilidades en la fabricación de cerámicas muy decoradas, modeladasa mano y cocidas a temperaturas bajas, cuyos restos se han encontrado por todo Japón, yviviendas sofisticadas o chozas. Su economía estaba basada aparentemente en la caza, en la pescay en la recolección, quizás con técnicas muy primitivas. La sociedad del período Jomon era, alparecer, bastante igualitaria, con pocas divisiones sociales.2.3. Yayoi (300ac - 300)Al finalizar el período Jomon, una nueva cultura, que comenzó en Kyushu, se fue extendiendolentamente hacia el este e imponiéndose de forma gradual. La cultura Yayoi era más avanzada,introdujo la técnica del cultivo encharcado del arroz, el tejido, cerámicas cocidas a altastemperaturas y herramientas de hierro. La mayoría de las innovaciones Yayoi, especialmente elhierro y el bronce, fueron introducidas probablemente desde China a través de Corea. La sociedadYayoi era más compleja y socialmente estratificada que la Jomon. El advenimiento de la culturaYayoi no implicó cambios raciales, por lo que, probablemente, fue más un proceso de difusióncultural que una conquista étnica. Las crónicas oficiales chinas de la dinastía Han contienen laprimera mención registrada de Japón. Indican que en el año 57 d.C. “el estado de Nu en Wo”envió emisarios a la corte imperial y recibió un sello de oro (después encontrado en Japón en1748). Nu era aparentemente uno de los numerosos estados que ocupaban el archipiélago japonés(denominado Wo en las crónicas chinas). Las crónicas también muestran una sociedad bastantedesarrollada con una organización jerárquica, marcada por un comercio de intercambio y unosescribas profesionales que escribían en chino. La mención de una reina llamada Himiko -tambiénnombrada en las crónicas japonesas, que extendió su autoridad desde la capital (denominadaYamatai) sobre numerosos estados, alrededor del año 200 d.C.- hace suponer que el Japón de la
  • 15. cultura Yayoi podría haber tenido una sociedad matriarcal con reinas sacerdotisas que reunían unpoder considerable.2.4. Kofun (300 - 710)El período Kofun recibió este nombre por el “gran kofun” (en japonés, ‘túmulo’) que marcaba lastumbas de los emperadores y nobles japoneses, lo que demuestra que el principal rasgo de esteperíodo fue la unificación de Japón bajo la casa imperial. De acuerdo con las crónicas, elemperador Jimmu, con su poder establecido en Kyushu, dirigió a sus ejércitos hacia el norte yextendió sus dominios hasta Yamato, una provincia en el centro de Honshu, que dio su nombre ala casa imperial y después a todo el antiguo Japón; sin embargo, los restos históricos yarqueológicos contradicen las fechas tradicionales que reciben estas hazañas.2.5. Nara (710 - 794)Tradicionalmente, las capitales imperiales niponas se trasladaban después de la muerte delsoberano siguiendo rituales sintoístas. En el año 710, la capital cambió de Asuka a Heijo-kyo(actual Nara) y la costumbre desapareció. Bajo el emperador Shomu (reinó desde el 715 hasta el756) y su consorte Fujiwara, Japón experimentó un gran florecimiento cultural. El Gran Buda(finalizado en el 752), construido en el que es todavía el mayor templo de madera del mundo,simbolizó la devoción al budismo del Japón Nara. Se establecieron conexiones extensivas con ladinastía Tang de China y Japón se convirtió en el extremo oriental de la Ruta de la Seda.Posteriormente, el sistema ritsu-ryo fue modificado en el 743 para alentar el desarrollo de lasnuevas tierras de labor mediante la concesión de los derechos completos de propiedad acualquiera que los explotara. Esta medida permitió que las grandes familias y templos vieran elcamino abierto para asegurar su independencia y poder. El período Nara fue prolífico en hitos detradiciones nativas: la realización de dos historias nacionales, Kojiki y Nihon shoki, lacompilación de la primera gran antología poética, el Man-yoshu (‘Antología de InnumerablesHojas’) y la proliferación del arte budista. El sistema ritsu-ryo funcionó bien, pero el podersecular de los grandes templos fue incrementándose de forma gravosa para la casa imperial. Porúltimo, en el 784, el emperador Kammu (reinó desde el 781 hasta el 806) se separó de lainfluencia de los templos de Nara al trasladar la capital imperial primero a Nagaoka-kyo y tresaños después a Heian-kyo (posteriormente Kyoto), que hasta 1868 fue la capital de Japón.2.6. Heian (794 - 1185)Denominado así por la nueva capital, este período llevó a Japón a 350 años de paz y prosperidad.Hacia el siglo IX, la corte de Yamato gobernaba todas las islas principales de Japón exceptoHokkaido, aunque las campañas de pacificación prosiguieron para someter a los habitantesaborígenes del norte de Honshu. Sin embargo, durante el siglo IX, los emperadores comenzaron aretirarse del gobierno activo; delegando los asuntos de gobierno a sus subordinados, se retiraronde la vida pública y, a la vez, se les consideró más como abstracciones que directores de la vidanacional, en parte debido a los onerosos deberes rituales impuestos al emperador como cabeza delculto estatal sintoísta. El retiro de los emperadores estuvo acompañado por el aumento de poder
  • 16. de la familia Fujiwara cuyos miembros , en el año 858, se convirtieron en los amos virtuales deJapón y mantuvieron su poder durante los tres siglos siguientes monopolizando los altos cargoscortesanos y controlando a la familia imperial mediante el matrimonio de sus hijas conemperadores generación tras generación, a los que se les animaba a retirarse pronto en favor delos sucesores infantiles dominados por los regentes Fujiwara. En el 884, Fujiwara Mototsune pasóa ser el primer dictador civil oficial (kampaku). El más destacado de los dirigentes Fujiwara fueFujiwara Michinaga, cuyas cinco hijas se casaron sucesivamente con emperadores y desde el 995hasta 1028 dominó la corte.El período de supremacía Fujiwara estuvo marcado por el gran florecimiento de la culturajaponesa y por el crecimiento de una civilización muy influenciada, pero no dominada, por lachina, que fue su origen. El Kokinshu (Antología de poemas antiguos y modernos), primera delas grandes antologías poéticas imperiales, fue compilado en el 905. Se considera que la dictadurade Michinaga fue la época de esplendor de la literatura japonesa en la que destacaron lascortesanas Murasaki Shikibu y Sei Shonagon, dos de las grandes escritoras de la época. Lasprincipales sectas del budismo, el Tendai y el Shingon, consiguieron una inmensa riqueza y podery se convirtieron en mecenas de las artes. El carácter del gobierno también cambió bajo losFujiwara aumentando la centralización de la administración al tiempo que el país se dividió engrandes estados nobiliarios de carácter hereditario, libres de impuestos o unidos a los grandestemplos budistas. La mayoría de los campesinos estaban dispuestos a unir sus tierras a estosestados para escapar de los impuestos excesivos sobre las tierras públicas que se les habíanrepartido, por lo que los grandes dominios privados se extendieron por todo el país.La hegemonía Fujiwara decayó después de la muerte de Michinaga en el 1028. A mediados delsiglo XI, los Fujiwara perdieron el monopolio de las consortes imperiales y los emperadoresretirados se convirtieron en el núcleo de un nuevo sistema de gobierno de claustro, por el que losemperadores abdicaban después de realizar votos budistas y dejaban la administración en favor delos emperadores reinantes. Mientras tanto, en las provincias surgieron grupos locales de guerreroso samurai que defendían a sus dueños aristocráticos favoreciendo la creación de un sistemaprofeudal. Los dirigentes de estos grupos solían ser miembros de los clanes Taira y Minamoto,ambos fundados por príncipes imperiales, o de grupos aristocráticos similares que habían buscadonuevas riquezas y oportunidades fuera de Kyoto. Los guerreros Taira adquirieron su fama y poderen el suroeste; los Minamoto, en el este. En el siglo XII, los dos grandes clanes militaresextendieron su poder a la corte, iniciando una lucha por el control de Japón.En 1156, una guerra civil (el Disturbio Hogen), estalló entre los emperadores retirados y reinantesy las ramas asociadas de la familia Fujiwara, dando entrada a los clanes militares. Después de lasegunda guerra, en el Disturbio Heiji (1159-1160), los Taira aplastaron a los Minamoto y tomaronel control de Japón, antes en manos de los Fujiwara. El dirigente Taira, Taira Kiyomori, fuenombrado ministro jefe en 1167 y, basando sus políticas en las de los Fujiwara, monopolizó loscargos de la corte con los miembros de su familia y casó a su hija con un príncipe imperial; suhijo pequeño Antoku se convirtió en emperador en 1180. En el mismo año, un dirigentesuperviviente Minamoto, Minamotono Yoritomo, erigió su cuartel en Kamakura, en el este deJapón, y comenzó un levantamiento que después de cinco años de guerra civil, en la batalla navalde Dannoura (1185), cerca de lo que hoy en día es Shimonoseki, en el mar Interior, derrotó yexpulsó a los Taira. Yoritomo se convirtió en el dirigente de Japón, finalizando la era de
  • 17. administración imperial e inaugurando una dictadura militar que dirigió Japón los siete siglossiguientes.2.7. Kamakura (1185-1333)Enfatizando la casi completa ruptura entre las formas de gobierno civil y militar, Yoritomopermaneció en Kamakura, y utilizó su cuartel de campo, el bakufu (en japonés, ‘gobierno detienda’), como núcleo de su nueva administración. En adelante, el feudalismo japonés sedesarrolló hasta que fue más fuerte que la administración imperial. Yoritomo nombró guardias yadministradores que dirigieran las provincias y los estados hacendados en paralelo con losgobernantes y propietarios oficiales. En 1192 creó el cargo del Seiitaishogun (‘gran generalbárbaro dominado’), por lo general abreviado como shogun, el comandante militar en jefe, conautoridad para actuar contra los enemigos del emperador en cualquier momento. Mediante estared militar, Yoritomo era ya el dirigente virtual de Japón, así como dirigente titular de susogunado, ante el que el emperador y su corte carecían de poder. Kamakura se convirtió en sededel poder real, gobierno verdadero, mientras que Kyoto permaneció como la corte titular sinningún poder.En 1219, la familia Hojo, mediante una serie de conspiraciones y asesinatos que eliminaron a losherederos Minamoto y a sus seguidores, pasaron a ser los dirigentes militares de Japón. NingúnHojo fue shogun; en su lugar, la familia nombró sogunes figurados, a veces niños pequeños,mientras un dirigente Hojo gobernaba como shikken (regente), con poder real.A pesar de la conclusión violenta de la larga paz Heian, el Japón Kamakura fue fértilculturalmente. La trágica caída de los Taira se inmortalizó en una epopeya bélica, el Heikemonogatari (‘Los relatos del clan Taira’, c. 1220). La tradición poética clásica quizás alcanzó supunto más alto con la compilación realizada en 1205 del Shin kokinshu (‘Nueva antología depoemas antiguos y modernos’) por Fujiwara Teika bajo el emperador Go-Toba. Las nuevasformas de budismo, especialmente las escuelas de la Tierra Pura y Zen, se extendieron yalcanzaron mayor popularidad que las sectas más antiguas. Las sectas Zen y los dirigentesmilitares honrados estimularon la escultura vigorosa de Unkei y sus sucesores.2.8. Muromachi (1333-1568)Desde 1333 hasta 1336, Daigo II Tenno intentó restaurar la administración imperial. Sus ideasreaccionarias predestinaron su fracaso y Ashikaga Takauji se sublevó, instaló su propio candidatoa emperador y expulsó a Daigo de Kyoto, que se refugió en Yoshino; sus seguidores setrasladaron a Yoshino, una región al sur de Nara, en Honshu, y establecieron una corte rival. En1338, Takauji se convirtió en shogun y erigió su propio bakufu en Kyoto. El distrito Muromachide Kyoto (que pasó a ser la sede del shogunado de Ashikaga), dio su nombre al período de sugobierno. La guerra civil entre Daigo y sus sucesores y los emperadores controlados por losAshikaga continuó durante 56 años. Por fin, en 1392, un enviado Ashikaga persuadió alemperador verdadero en Yoshino para abdicar y renunciar a las insignias imperiales sagradas.Con sus candidatos reconocidos como emperadores de derecho, los shogunes Ashikaga fueron, enteoría, los dirigentes legítimos de todo Japón, aunque nunca pudieron ejercer el control absolutosobre los poderosos daimio. El tercer shogun Ashikaga, Yoshimitsu, se distinguió por su enérgico
  • 18. gobierno y por patrocinar la obra Zeami de teatro no. En general, el período Muromachi fue unode los más refinados temas artísticos y literarios. Esta época también vio el desarrollo del budismocomo fuerza política; durante algunos siglos, los monasterios budistas habían sido tan ricos ypoderosos que fueron grandes fuerzas en el país, cambiando la tendencia de los enfrentamientosmedievales con sus ejércitos fuertes y sus monasterios fortificados.2.9. Azuchi-Momoyama (1568-1600)El vibrante pero caótico Japón del período de los Estados Opuestos fue finalmente reunificado enel siglo XVI, en el período Azuchi-Momoyama, una época corta de intenso cambio, que recibióeste nombre por los magníficos castillos (aunque pronto destruidos) de las dos figuras principales,Oda Nobunaga y Toyotomi Hideyoshi. Su esplendor, realzado por las brillantes pinturas de KanoEitoku, representa el vigor de la época. Oda, un general descendiente de los Taira, inauguró elperíodo sometiendo a otros daimio y entrando en Kyoto en 1568 para nombrar un shogún afín,que fue expulsado de Kyoto en 1573 cuando intentó adquirir mayor autonomía. Oda acabó con elpoder de los monasterios entre 1570 y 1580 y anuló el budismo como fuerza política; combinó lasabia administración de las tierras sojuzgadas con la persecución implacable a sus oponentes. En1582 Oda murió a manos de un vasallo agraviado y Toyotomi Hideyoshi -un campesino que sehabía convertido en uno de los comandantes de Oda- tomó el poder y hacia 1590 unió todo Japónbajo su mandato. El último shogun Ashikaga abdicó en 1588, y Hideyoshi aseguró su gobiernomediante una administración sistemática: las tierras se midieron y los impuestos se racionalizaronen función a la producción de arroz; los campesinos fueron confinados a sus poblaciones ydesarmados. Convencido de que el cristianismo ponía en peligro su régimen, Hideyoshi comenzóa perseguir a los cristianos japoneses. Sin embargo, nunca estableció el control completo sobre losdaimios y fracasó en sus intentos de ocupar Corea en 1592 y en 1597. Hideyoshi murió en 1598 ysus vasallos pronto rompieron su juramento de lealtad a su hijo menor y comenzaron a pelearsepor la sucesión. Finalmente, en 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu venció a sus rivales en la batalla deSekigahara, y se convirtió en el dirigente indiscutible de todo el país.2.10. Edo (1600-1868)Ieyasu se nombró shogun en 1603, redujo al heredero de Hideyoshi a un humilde cargo provincialy estableció su capital en Edo (después Tokio) que se convirtió en un corto período de tiempo enla ciudad más grande de Japón y experimentó un gran desarrollo cultural, económico y político.Ieyasu se retiró como shogun titular en 1605 para concentrarse en consolidar el gobierno de sudinastía que culminó en 1615 cuando tomó el castillo de Osaka de la familia Toyotomi. En 1615,Ieyasu promulgó también nuevos códigos legales, que establecieron la organización feudalplaneada por Hideyoshi y proporcionaron a Japón unos 250 años de paz.Según los códigos de Ieyasu (el denominado sistema bakuhan), los feudos daimio (han) y susadministradores, así como el emperador y su corte, se pusieron bajo el estricto control Tokugawa.Cada daimio estaba dirigido por un gobernador supremo dentro de su feudo, que debía jurarfidelidad al shogun, dejar a su familia como rehenes en Edo y asistirle personalmente en añosalternativos. Las confiscaciones de tierra realizadas después de la batalla de Sekigaharaconvirtieron a la familia Tokugawa en la más rica de Japón, ya que pasó a controlar la cuarta parte
  • 19. de la tierra del país, bien de forma directa o a través de sus vasallos inmediatos. Se estableció unajerarquización de los daimio de acuerdo con sus relaciones con los Tokugawa y los mássospechosos de estos, como los grandes feudos occidentales de Satsuma y Choshu, fueronvigilados por feudos fieles estratégicamente localizados. El derecho de confirmar la propiedad decada daimio en lo sucesivo fomentó el poder del shogunado. Las clases sociales se estratificaronde forma rígida en cuatro grupos principales: guerreros, campesinos, artesanos y mercaderes. Lossamurai componían la aristocracia guerrera y gozaban de varios privilegios mientras que loscampesinos se organizaron en grupos y poco a poco quedaron fijados a la tierra, pagandoimpuestos en dinero o especias y otros servicios feudales. La forma de feudalismo establecida porIeyasu y los sucesivos sogunes Tokugawa se mantuvo hasta el final del período feudal a mediadosdel siglo XIX.Otro resultado de la dominación Tokugawa fue el aislamiento impuesto a Japón respecto aOccidente. Los comerciantes portugueses, españoles y holandeses habían visitado Japón cada vezmás a menudo en el siglo XVI; los sogunes Tokugawa consideraron el cristianismo comopotencialmente subversivo y, desde 1612, se persiguió a los cristianos. A los españoles se lesdenegó el permiso de desembarcar en Japón después de 1624 y, en la década siguiente, una seriede edictos prohibieron el comercio exterior, e incluso la construcción de grandes barcos.Solamente se permitió permanecer en Japón a un pequeño grupo de holandeses, restringidos a laisla artificial de Dejima en el puerto de Nagasaki y limitando sus actividades. Continuó elcomercio con China, aunque con una regulación ajustada.Durante los dos siglos siguientes las formas del feudalismo se mantuvieron estáticas. El bushido,el código de los guerreros feudales, se convirtió en el estandarte de la conducta para los grandesseñores y la clase acomodada de los samurais que actuaron como sus partidarios yadministradores. La cultura de Edo, cerrada a la influencia exterior, fue muy activa y produjo elteatro kabuki, el arte de Honami Koetsu y la escuela Ukiyo-e, y la literatura de Ihara Saikaku yMatsuo Basho. El confucionismo pasó a ser la nueva ideología del gobierno, lo que provocó unafuerte reacción tradicionalista y una defensa del nacionalismo proimperial. A pesar de esto, lasnuevas condiciones sociales y económicas de las islas durante el siglo XVIII comenzaron aindicar el inevitable colapso del rígido feudalismo. La población creció rápidamente y agotó hastael límite los recursos agrícolas. Las comunicaciones internas, el comercio y la economíamonetaria aumentaron y se desarrollaron gracias al aumento de la riqueza de los daimio, mientrasque los mercaderes ricos aumentaron su poder social y político, constituyendo el grupo másimportante de la jerarquía social Tokugawa. Durante el siglo XVIII, Edo, con un millón dehabitantes, era la mayor ciudad del mundo, centro de una de las economías más avanzadas yprósperas del mundo preindustrial. A la vez, los disturbios del campesinado se hicieron másfrecuentes bajo la presión de la carencia de alimentos.El nacimiento de la conciencia japonesa del mundo exterior se reconoció en 1720, cuando elshogun Yoshimune revocó la proscripción de los libros europeos. A principios del siglo XIX, lasvisitas de los europeos, en su mayoría comerciantes y exploradores, se hicieron cada vez másfrecuentes, aunque la prohibición era todavía oficial. Los libros y las ideas extranjeros seempezaron a filtrar en Edo, como el pigmento azul de Prusia y el sistema de perspectiva utilizadopor los artistas Ukiyo-e. Estados Unidos estaba ansioso por firmar un tratado de amistad y, sifuera posible, de comercio con Japón, con el fin de asegurar la liberación de los ballenerosestadounidenses retenidos en la costa japonesa y abrir los mercados japoneses. En 1853, el
  • 20. gobierno estadounidense envió una misión formal a Japón, dirigida por el comodoro MatthewGalbraith Perry al mando de una escuadra de guerra. Después de extensas negociaciones, y ante laamenaza militar estadounidense, Perry y los representantes del emperador firmaron el Tratado deKanagawa (1854), que abría varios puertos a Estados Unidos y admitía la presencia de un cónsulestable en la capital. En 1858, se alcanzó un acuerdo comercial al que siguieron otros con variaspotencias occidentales bajo presión.Los tratados daban considerables privilegios a los occidentales, como la extraterritorialidad, y ladebilidad del shogunado al realizar esas concesiones fue causa de gran resentimiento entre lapoblación. Los jefes militares japoneses comprobaron lo anticuado de su armamento encomparación con el occidental y no presentaron, en principio, ninguna resistencia. No obstante,inmediatamente se desarrolló un sentimiento contra los extranjeros y los ataques a loscomerciantes foráneos empezaron a ser comunes en la década de 1860. Los dirigentes de estemovimiento xenófobo y antioccidental eran jóvenes samurai de Satsuma, Choshu y de otrosgrandes feudos occidentales, simpatizantes de la restauración del poder imperial bajo el lemasonno joi (‘venerad al emperador, expulsad a los bárbaros’). Con el apoyo del emperador queresidía en Kyoto, iniciaron ataques militares y navales a los barcos extranjeros fondeados en lospuertos japoneses; los intentos del shogunado para contenerlos fueron inútiles, pero estemovimiento fue sofocado por la propia reacción occidental, que en 1864 bombardeó Shimonosekicomo represalia. La evidencia de la hegemonía militar occidental hizo que los señores de Choshuy Satsuma tomaran la iniciativa y propusieran nuevas estructuras gubernamentales paraenfrentarse a la amenaza imperialista de Occidente. Según un plan de compromiso, el últimoshogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu, dimitió en 1867 mientras que los radicales proimperialesdecidieron forzar la situación, rodearon el palacio imperial de Kyoto el 3 de enero de 1868 yproclamaron la restauración imperial.2.11. Meiji (1868-1912)Los ejércitos de los feudos de Satsuma, Choshu y Tosa, que ahora componían las fuerzasimperiales, sometieron a los seguidores de los Tokugawa, poco después aseguraron laRestauración Meiji. El joven emperador, Mutsuhito, recuperó la posición de verdadero dirigentedel gobierno y adoptó el nombre de Meiji Tenno (‘gobierno ilustrado’) para designar su reinado,aunque su función principal consistió en actuar como talismán de la soberanía mientras variosdirigentes de Choshu y Satsuma monopolizaron las posiciones ministeriales alrededor del tronoque legitimaba la transformación de Japón. La capital real fue transferida a Edo, denominadaahora Tokio (‘capital oriental’). En 1869, los señores de los grandes clanes de Choshu, Hizen,Satsuma y Tosa rindieron sus feudos al emperador y, después de varias entregas realizadas porotros clanes, un decreto imperial de 1871 abolió todos los feudos y en su lugar creó prefecturasadministrativas centralizadas, con los antiguos señores como gobernadores.Durante este período, Japón logró mantenerse al margen del imperialismo europeo que, en esaépoca, había engullido a otros países asiáticos. Mediante una imitación concertada de lacivilización occidental en todos sus aspectos, se propusieron hacer de Japón una potenciamundial, bajo el lema fukoku kyohei (“enriqueced el país, fortaleced el Ejército”); oficialesfranceses se encargaron de la remodelación del Ejército, los marinos británicos reorganizaron laArmada y los ingenieros holandeses supervisaron las nuevas construcciones en las islas. Se
  • 21. enviaron varios especialistas japoneses para analizar los gobiernos extranjeros y para seleccionarsus mejores características que se aplicarían en Japón; se redactó un nuevo código penal a imagendel francés, se estableció un Ministerio de Educación en 1871 para desarrollar un sistemaeducativo basado en el de Estados Unidos, que fomentaría una ideología nacionalista y laexaltación del emperador a partir del desarrollo del sintoísmo. El país experimentó un rápidocrecimiento industrial bajo la supervisión del gobierno. En 1872, se decretó el servicio militaruniversal y, unos años después, en 1877, un decreto abolió la clase de los samuráis, no sin untrágico enfrentamiento entre los soldados y los samuráis en Satsuma.La oligarquía Choshu-Satsuma impuso cambios desde arriba en el sistema político y no fueron elresultado de las demandas políticas del pueblo. El campesinado continuó sufriendo la mayoría delos gravosos impuestos estatales y las revueltas continuaron en el siglo XX. No obstante, seintentó crear un régimen constitucional que reforzara el país y mejorara su situación general. Seorganizó un gabinete a imagen del alemán en 1885, con Ito Hirobumi como primer ministro, y secreó un consejo privado en 1888, ambos responsabilidad del emperador. La nueva Constitución,redactada por Ito tras una investigación de las constituciones de Europa y Estados Unidos, sepromulgó en 1889 y establecía una Dieta bicameral formada por la Cámara de Pares con 363miembros y una cámara baja con 463 miembros elegidos por los ciudadanos que pagabanimpuestos anuales directos no inferiores a 15 yenes. Se salvaguardaron cuidadosamente lospoderes del emperador al que se le permitía promulgar decretos leyes, tener la potestad paradeclarar la guerra o alcanzar la paz y disolver o suspender la actividad de las cámaras. LaConstitución ofrecía más libertad y seguridad a los propietarios que el sistema Tokugawa, ademásde posibilidades para discusiones políticas, pero no dejó claros los límites del poder ejecutivo.Posteriores ordenanzas confirmaron la importancia de los ministros del Ejército y de la Armada,cuyos titulares debían ser oficiales en servicio, los cuales, de forma paulatina, adquirieronderechos de veto sobre la formación de gabinetes y una gran influencia política.El Imperio también se embarcó en una política exterior expansiva. En 1879, Japón había tomadolas islas Ryukyu, protectorado japonés desde 1609, y las designó como prefectura de la isla deOkinawa. La lucha por el control de Corea fue el siguiente paso en la expansión japonesa. Losconflictos con China en Corea finalizaron en la Guerra Chino-japonesa (1894-1895), en la que lasmodernizadas fuerzas niponas derrotaron pronto a los chinos. Según los términos del Tratado deShimonoseki de abril de 1895, China cedía a Japón Taiwan (Formosa) y Pescadores, además deuna gran indemnización monetaria. El tratado otorgó la península de Liaodong, en el sur deDongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria), a Japón, pero la intervención de Rusia, Francia y Alemaniaobligó a Japón a aceptar una indemnización adicional en su lugar.El decisivo triunfo japonés indicó al mundo que estaba emergiendo una nueva y fuerte potencia enel Lejano Oriente. Como preliminares para establecer negociaciones de plena igualdad con lasgrandes potencias, Japón, en 1890, había revisado sus códigos criminal, civil y comercialsiguiendo modelos occidentales desde donde demandar la revocación de las cláusulas deextraterritorialidad de sus tratados, lo que se consiguió en 1899. En 1894, Estados Unidos y GranBretaña fueron las primeras naciones en reconocer la libertad comercial del Imperio Japonés.2.12. Taisho (1912-1926)
  • 22. El emperador Meiji falleció en 1912 y le sucedió el emperador Taisho. En agosto de 1914, tras elestallido de la I Guerra Mundial, Japón envió un ultimátum a Alemania, solicitando la evacuacióndel territorio de Jiaozhou (Kiaochow), en el noreste de China. Cuando Alemania se negó acumplirlo, Japón entró en la guerra del lado de los aliados. Las tropas niponas ocuparon lasposesiones alemanas de las islas Marshall, Carolinas y Marianas en el océano Pacífico. En 1915,el Imperio presentó las Veintiún Demandas a China, que solicitaba privilegios industriales,mineros y ferroviarios y que obligaba a China a no alquilar ni ceder ningún territorio costerofrente a Taiwan a ningún país que no fuera Japón. Estas peticiones, algunas de las cuales fueronrápidamente garantizadas, fueron la primera declaración de una política de dominación sobreChina y el Lejano Oriente. Un año después, en 1916, China cedió los derechos comerciales deMongolia interior y el sur de Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) a Japón.Como resultado del acuerdo de paz de la I Guerra Mundial, Japón recibió las islas del Pacíficoque había ocupado como mandato de la Sociedad de Naciones, organización de la que elemperador nipón fue uno de los miembros fundadores. Japón también recibió el territorio deJiaozhou, pero fue devuelto a China como resultado del Tratado de Shandong (Shantung),realizado durante la Conferencia de Washington en 1922. Esta conferencia también dio comoresultado el cambio de la alianza anglo-japonesa por el Tratado de las Cuatro Potencias, por el queJapón, Francia, Gran Bretaña y Estados Unidos se comprometían a respetarse los territorios delocéano Pacífico y consultarse si se amenazaban sus derechos territoriales, y el Tratado de lasNueve Potencias (Bélgica, Gran Bretaña, Países Bajos, Portugal, Japón, Francia, Italia, China yEstados Unidos), en el que los signatarios respetaban la integridad territorial y la soberanía deChina. Un tratado adicional entre Gran Bretaña, Estados Unidos, Japón, Francia e Italia acordólimitar los efectivos navales: la Armada japonesa se limitó a 315.000 toneladas. Con la adopciónde los tratados de Shandong y de las Nueve Potencias, Japón demostró una actitud conciliadorahacia China, a pesar de los intereses comerciales japoneses en ese país. Las relaciones con Rusia,que se habían vuelto tirantes tras la Revolución Rusa de 1917 y la posterior invasión de Siberia yel norte de Sajalín por los japoneses en 1918, se hicieron más amistosas después de que Japónreconociera el régimen soviético en 1925. Esta actitud menos agresiva por parte de Japón se debióen parte al éxito de grupos liberales en la política interior, estimulados por la victoria de lasnaciones en la I Guerra Mundial.El primer ministro de uno de estos partidos políticos recién creados, Hara Takashi, tomó posesiónde su cargo en 1918 y, a pesar de su asesinato en 1921, la era Taisho se recuerda como la época deexperimentos democráticos. Las demandas para establecer el sufragio universal masculinoobligaron al gobierno a promulgar en 1919 una ley que duplicaba el electorado, alcanzando lacifra de 3 millones. En 1923, la región de Tokio y Yokohama se convulsionó por un gran seísmo,pero la rapidez con que se reconstruyó la zona demostró el vigor de la nueva sociedadindustrializada. Las protestas democráticas aumentaron su intensidad y, en 1925, se garantizó elsufragio universal masculino, de manera que el electorado creció repentinamente a 14 millones devotantes. Reflejando el interés creciente en el establecimiento de un régimen democrático, durantela década de 1920, la tendencia política se orientó hacia gabinetes donde no se encontrabanmiembros de la oligarquía o dirigentes militares. Sin embargo, este movimiento tuvo una cortaduración.2.13. Showa (1926-1989)
  • 23. En 1926, Hiro-Hito, nieto del emperador Meiji, subió al trono. Adoptó el nombre de Showa(‘brillante armonía’) como designación oficial de su reinado, pero cuando el general barón TanakaGiichi se convirtió en primer ministro en 1927, se reanudó la política agresiva hacia China. Lafuerza que impulsó este cambio de política residía en la expansión de la industria japonesa, cuyorápido crecimiento desde el inicio de la I Guerra Mundial (1914) requería nuevos mercados parauna producción cada vez mayor. Además, la población de Japón se había duplicado desde 1868 ycada vez era mayor la necesidad de ampliar espacio y recursos. El colapso del mercado de la sedaestadounidense en 1929 arruinó a muchos campesinos e incrementó la presión para realizar unaacción drástica.2.13.1. La ocupación de Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria)A finales de la década de 1920 Japón consiguió dominar la administración y los asuntoseconómicos de Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria), a pesar de las protestas chinas. El 18 deseptiembre de 1931 tropas japonesas, alegando que los saboteadores chinos habían causado unaexplosión en el Ferrocarril de Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) del Sur de propiedad japonesa,embargaron los arsenales de Shenyang (Mukden) y de varias ciudades vecinas, obligando a lastropas chinas a retirarse del área. Actuando sin la aprobación oficial del gobierno japonés y bajo lainfluencia de sociedades secretas que consideraban que los intereses nacionales estaban porencima de directrices políticas, el ejército de Guangdong extendió sus operaciones hacia elinterior de Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) y, en cinco meses aproximadamente, invadió toda estaregión. Se estableció entonces en Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) un Estado títere conocido comoManchukuo; Puyi, último emperador de China, fue coronado emperador de Manchukuo en 1934como Kang De.La ocupación de Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) permitió a los derechistas radicales hacerse conel gobierno e imponer un régimen represivo contra los sectores más liberales; el vizconde SaitoMakoto formó el denominado gabinete nacional compuesto principalmente por hombres sinafiliación política. Las repercusiones internacionales de la ocupación de Dongbei Pingyuan(Manchuria) hicieron que la Sociedad de Naciones, actuando con la autoridad del Pacto Briand-Kellogg, creara una comisión para determinar si había que imponer sanciones como potenciaagresora; la respuesta de Japón fue abandonar la organización en 1935. Para consolidar supresencia en China, Japón desembarcó tropas en Shanghai, en el norte, el Ejército japonés deDongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) se anexionó la provincia de Chengde (Jehol) e intentó ocupar lasciudades de Pekín y Tianjin. Incapaz de resistir la superioridad de las fuerzas japonesas, Chinafirmó una tregua en mayo de 1933 en la que se reconocían las conquistas japonesas.La acción del Ejército mostró el poder que las autoridades militares tenían en la política japonesa.En 1936, el Imperio firmó un acuerdo anticomunista con Alemania y, un año después, un pactosimilar con Italia. El establecimiento de un gobierno casi completamente militar, con lacooperación de los zaibatsu (trusts industriales familiares), supuso el desarrollo de una políticaexterior agresiva.2.13.2. La guerra con ChinaEl 7 de julio de 1937, una patrulla china se enfrentó a las tropas japonesas, cerca de Pekín.Utilizando el accidente como pretexto para comenzar las hostilidades, el Ejército japonés deDongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) se desplazó hacia esta área, reiniciando las hostilidades con
  • 24. China, aunque la guerra nunca se declaró formalmente. Después de que una fuerza japonesaocupara con rapidez el norte de China y que, a finales de 1937, la Armada nipona bloqueara casitoda la costa china, el ejército avanzó hacia el interior del este y del sur de China en 1937 y 1938,y capturó Shanghai, Suzhou (Soochow), Nanjing (Nanking), Qingdao (Tsing-tao), Cantón(Guangzou) y Hankou (Hankow), obligando a los chinos a replegarse hacia el oeste. Las protestasde gobiernos extranjeros y por los maltratos de las tropas japonesas a los residentes extranjeros enChina y la usurpación de sus propiedades privadas fueron ignoradas por el Imperio. A finales de1938, los japoneses fueron frenados en las montañas del centro de China, donde los chinosrealizaron una lucha de guerrilla contra los invasores.Mientras tanto, en Japón se había establecido una economía de guerra dirigida por el gobierno. En1937, un gabinete encabezado por el príncipe Konoe Fumimaro concedió toda la dirección de laguerra a los dirigentes del Ejército y de la Armada.2.13.3. El estallido de la II Guerra MundialEl comienzo de la II Guerra Mundial, en septiembre de 1939, dio a Japón una nueva oportunidadpara extenderse por Sureste asiático, después de haber alcanzado varios acuerdos diplomáticos.En septiembre de 1940 Japón estableció una alianza tripartita con Alemania e Italia, eldenominado Eje Roma-Berlín-Tokio, que aseguraba ayuda mutua y total durante un periodo dediez años. Sin embargo, Japón consideró que el pacto firmado en 1939 entre Alemania y la URSShabía liberado al Imperio de cualquier obligación contraida en la alianza anticomunista de 1936.Por tanto, en septiembre de 1941, Japón firmó un pacto de neutralidad con la URSS, quegarantizaba la protección del norte de Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria). Un año antes, con elconsentimiento del gobierno francés de Vichy, controlado por los alemanes, las fuerzas japonesasocuparon la Indochina francesa. Al mismo tiempo, Japón intentó obtener acuerdos económicos ypolíticos en las Indias Orientales Holandesas.Estas acciones provocaron el embargo de petróleo estadounidense e incrementaron la hostilidadentre ambos países, bastante fuerte desde la invasión japonesa de China en 1937. En octubre de1941 el general Tojo Hideki se convirtió en el primer ministro japonés y ministro de Guerra, loque no favoreció la normalización de las relaciones.2.13.4. El ataque a Pearl HarborEl 7 de diciembre de 1941 sin aviso y mientras todavía se estaban celebrando negociaciones entrelos diplomáticos estadounidenses y japoneses, varias oleadas de aviones japoneses bombardearonPearl Harbor, en Hawaii, la principal base naval estadounidense en el Pacífico; poco después selanzaron ataques simultáneos contra Filipinas, las islas de Guam, isla Wake y Midway, HongKong, Malasia británica y Tailandia. El 8 de diciembre, Estados Unidos declaró la guerra a Japón,al igual que el resto de los poderes aliados, excepto la URSS.Un año después del éxito de estos ataques por sorpresa Japón mantenía la ofensiva en el Suresteasiático y en las islas del Pacífico Sur. El Imperio designó el Este asiático y sus alrededores comola Gran Esfera de Coprosperidad de Asia Oriental e hizo efectiva la propaganda del lema Asiapara los asiáticos. Además, los elementos nacionalistas en la mayoría de los países de Asiaoriental daban apoyo tácito, y en algunos casos real, a los japoneses, porque vieron un caminoaparente para liberarse del imperialismo occidental. En diciembre de 1941, Japón invadió
  • 25. Tailandia, a cuyo gobierno obligó a firmar un tratado de alianza. Las tropas japonesas ocuparonBirmania, Malasia británica, Borneo, Hong Kong y las Indias Orientales Holandesas. En mayo de1942, las Filipinas cayeron en manos japonesas. Volviéndose hacia Australia y Nueva Zelanda,las fuerzas japonesas desembarcaron en Nueva Guinea, Nueva Inglaterra (ahora parte de Papúa-Nueva Guinea) y las islas Salomón. Un destacamento especial japonés también invadió y ocupóAttu, Agattu y Kiska en las islas Aleutianas frente a la costa de Alaska, en Norteamérica. Al final,la guerra se convirtió en una lucha naval por el control las vastas extensiones del océano Pacífico.2.13.5. El cambio de tendenciaLa marcha de la guerra comenzó a cambiar en 1942, cuando una fuerza naval y aérea aliadacontuvo la invasión de la flota japonesa en la batalla del Mar del Coral entre Nueva Guinea y lasislas Salomón. Un mes después, una gran flota japonesa fue derrotada en la batalla de Midway.Utilizando operaciones combinadas de unidades de tierra, mar y aire bajo el mando del generalestadounidense Douglas MacArthur, las fuerzas aliadas avanzaron hacia el norte y expulsaron alos japoneses de las islas del Pacífico Sur. En julio de 1944, después de la caída de Saipan, la basenipona más importante en las islas Marianas, los dirigentes japoneses fueron conscientes de quehabían perdido la guerra. Tojo fue obligado a dimitir y se debilitó así la influencia de la oligarquíamilitar. En noviembre de 1944, Estados Unidos comenzó una serie de importantes ataques aéreossobre Japón. A principios de 1945, después de la batalla de Iwo Jima los estadounidenses llegarona 1.200 km de Japón. Durante ese mismo periodo, las fuerzas aliadas al mando del almiranteinglés Louis Mountbatten, primer conde Mountbatten, vencieron a los ejércitos japoneses en elSureste asiático. En los siguientes cuatro meses, desde mayo a agosto, los bombardeosestadounidenses devastaron las ciudades niponas, sus comunicaciones y su industria, culminandoel 6 de agosto de 1945, con el lanzamiento de la primera bomba atómica sobre la ciudad deHiroshima; dos días después, el 8 de agosto, la URSS declaró la guerra a Japón, y, el 9 de agostoEstados Unidos lanzó una segunda bomba atómica sobre Nagasaki, mientras que las fuerzassoviéticas invadieron Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria), el norte de Corea y Karafuto. Los poderesaliados habían acordado durante la Conferencia de Potsdam que sólo se podría aceptar delgobierno japonés la rendición incondicional. Venciendo la parálisis del gobierno, el emperadorHiro-Hito insistió en la rendición. El 14 de agosto, Japón aceptó los términos aliados y elemperador se dirigió a la nación por primera vez en un mensaje radiofónico comunicando larendición japonesa, a pesar de un intento de los militares de sabotear la emisión en el últimominuto. La rendición formal se firmó a bordo del acorazado estadounidense Missouri, en la bahíade Tokio, el 2 de septiembre.2.13.6. La disolución del ImperioLos aliados designaron a los estadounidenses para mantener tropas de ocupación en las islasjaponesas. Japón fue despojado de su Imperio; Mongolia interior, Dongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria),Taiwán y Hainan fueron devueltas a China, la URSS, retuvo las islas Kuriles y Karafuto (que denuevo se denominó Sajalín) y el control de Mongolia Exterior; Port Arthur y el Ferrocarril deDongbei Pingyuan (Manchuria) del Sur se colocaron bajo el control conjunto de la URSS yChina. Estados Unidos, bajo el fideicomiso de las Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU),ocupó todas las islas que habían sido antiguos mandatos japoneses del Pacífico Sur.
  • 26. El 11 de agosto de 1945, después de que los japoneses se rindieran, Douglas MacArthur fuenombrado comandante supremo de las tropas que ocupaban Japón. Representantes de China, laURSS y Gran Bretaña formaron el Consejo Aliado para Japón, con sede en Tokio, para asistir aMacArthur. De las cuestiones exteriores de la política de ocupación se pasó a ocupar la Comisióndel Lejano Oriente, con sede en la ciudad de Washington, representada por Estados Unidos, GranBretaña, la Unión Soviética, Australia, Canadá, China, Francia, la India, los Países Bajos, NuevaZelanda y Filipinas. Un cierto número de antiguos dirigentes japoneses fueron juzgados porcrímenes de guerra por un tribunal en el que había representantes de once países, que se reunió enTokio el 3 de mayo de 1946 y se cerró el 12 de noviembre de 1948.2.13.7. El final de la era ShowaNo hubo resistencia a la ocupación estadounidense de las islas japonesas. Se estableció que losobjetivos de la política de ocupación eran, básicamente, la democratización del gobierno japonésy el restablecimiento de una economía industrial de tiempo de paz que cubriera la demanda de lapoblación japonesa. MacArthur ejerció su autoridad a través del emperador y de la maquinaria degobierno existente estableciendo la disolución de los grandes trusts industriales y bancarios, cuyosfondos fueron embargados en 1946; en 1947, se puso en marcha un programa de reforma agraria,diseñado para dar a los campesinos la oportunidad de adquirir la tierra que trabajaban, y seorganizó un programa educativo siguiendo modelos democráticos. Las mujeres consiguieron elderecho a voto en las primeras elecciones tras la guerra (en abril de 1946), y 38 de ellas fueronelegidas para la Dieta japonesa. Posteriormente, la Dieta acordó un borrador de una nuevaConstitución inspirada en la estadounidense, que en mayo de 1947 se hizo efectiva.La rehabilitación de la economía japonesa fue más difícil que la reorganización del gobierno. Laescasez de alimentos se había suplido con importaciones de productos de los aliados, en particularde Estados Unidos, y los severos bombardeos durante la guerra casi anularon la capacidadindustrial de Japón. A principios de 1949, la ayuda dada a Japón costó a Estados Unidos más de 1millón de dólares al día.A comienzos de mayo de 1949, varias industrias niponas sufrieron varias huelgas, en especial laindustria minera del carbón. El gobierno y MacArthur acusaron al Partido Comunista, que habíaconseguido 3 millones de votos en las recientes elecciones nacionales, de instigar los paroslaborales con fines políticos, por lo que el gobierno realizó una investigación a gran escala de lasactividades comunistas ante la protesta del delegado soviético del Consejo de Control Aliadomientras MacArthur acusaba a la URSS de fomentar el desorden en Japón a través del PartidoComunista y de una "indiferencia cruel" en la repatriación de los prisioneros de guerra japoneses.La Unión Soviética anunció en abril de 1950 que, excepto 10.000 criminales de guerra, todos losprisioneros (94.973) habían sido devueltos a Japón; de acuerdo con las cifras japonesas más de300.000 prisioneros permanecían todavía bajo la custodia de la URSS.Las negociaciones aliadas durante 1950 para llegar a un tratado de paz con Japón estuvieronmarcadas por diferencias básicas entre Estados Unidos y la Unión Soviética en varios aspectos,especialmente si China participaría en la redacción del documento. En mayo, se eligió al estadistaestadounidense John Foster Dulles, consejero del secretario de Estado, para preparar los términosdel tratado. Después de un año de consultas y negociaciones con todos los países afectados, el 12de julio de 1951 se alcanzó un tratado preliminar. La URSS mantuvo que el documento favorecíala reaparición del militarismo japonés. El gobierno estadounidense invitó a asistir a la conferencia
  • 27. de paz a 55 países, entre los que no se encontraban ni la China Nacionalista ni la RepúblicaPopular China.La conferencia de paz comenzó en San Francisco a principios de septiembre, con la ausencia de laIndia, Birmania y Yugoslavia que sí habían sido invitadas. Después de varias discusiones, 49países, entre ellos Japón, firmaron el tratado; la URSS, Checoslovaquia y Polonia se negaron ahacerlo.2.13.8. El Tratado de Paz, 1951Según los términos del tratado, Japón renunció a todos sus derechos sobre Corea, Taiwán, las islasKuriles, Sajalín y las islas que fueron antiguos mandatos y abandonó cualquier reivindicaciónsobre China y Corea; se reconoció el derecho de Japón a defenderse y a entablar acuerdos deseguridad colectivos, y Japón aceptó en principio la validez de las reparaciones de guerra, quepagaría en bienes y servicios en vista de la insuficiencia de los recursos financieros del país.Al mismo tiempo, Estados Unidos y Japón firmaron un acuerdo que establecía la permanencia delas bases militares estadounidenses en territorio nipón para proteger al país desarmado deagresiones externas o disturbios internos de importancia.Mientras tanto, MacArthur había sido relevado de su cargo en abril de 1951, aunque se mantuvola ocupación del país. Estados Unidos cesó su ayuda económica a Japón a finales de junio, pero elefecto perjudicial de esta acción sobre la economía nipona fue compensado en gran parte por elpedido de material militar para la guerra de Corea por parte estadounidense. Los problemaseconómicos del país procedían en parte de la pérdida de mercados exteriores después de la guerra,en especial en China. Estados Unidos reconoció la importancia del mercado chino y, en octubre,permitió a Japón desarrollar un comercio limitado con China.El 28 de abril de 1952 entró en vigor el tratado de paz y se restableció la soberanía completa enJapón. Según los términos del tratado, las tropas estadounidenses permanecieron en Japón comofuerzas de seguridad. El gobierno japonés estableció tratados de paz y renovó las relacionesdiplomáticas durante 1952 con Taiwán, Birmania, la India y Yugoslavia.En 1952 se debatió ampliamente la cuestión del rearme. El gobierno se mostró poco dispuesto acomprometerse en favor de la reconstrucción de las defensas del país, debido a las dificultadeseconómicas y los obstáculos legales; la Constitución de 1947 establecía la renuncia a la guerrapara siempre.Ese mismo año, la Dieta aprobó un proyecto de ley para suprimir las actividades subversivas degrupos organizados. En las elecciones generales del 1 de octubre, las primeras desde el final de laocupación, Yoshida Shigeru, dirigente del Partido Liberal, que había encabezado el gabinetedesde 1949, fue nombrado primer ministro de nuevo.2.13.9. Las relaciones exteriores de posguerra: Estados Unidos
  • 28. En abril de 1953, el primer ministro Yoshida, tras perder el voto de confianza de la Dietaimperial, convocó elecciones anticipadas, que fueron ganadas por los liberales, lo que permitió aYoshida ser reelegido primer ministro.Durante 1953 el gobierno estadounidense intentó además asegurar el país contra una posibleagresión comunista y animó activamente el rearme de Japón. En agosto, los dos países firmaronun tratado de ayuda militar que estipulaba las provisiones para la fabricación de armas japonesasde acuerdo con especificaciones estadounidenses. En una declaración conjunta en septiembre, elprimer ministro Yoshida y Shigemitsu Mamoru, dirigente del Partido Progresista, recomendaronoficialmente el rearme japonés con carácter defensivo. Las negociaciones con el gobiernoestadounidense permitieron en marzo de 1954 la firma de un pacto de defensa mutua.La política de colaboración próxima con Estados Unidos del primer ministro Yoshida estuvosujeta a una fuerte crítica por los disidentes del Partido Liberal durante la segunda mitad de 1954,que crearon el Partido Democrático de Japón, cuyo dirigente, Hatoyama Ichiro, fue elegido primerministro gracias al apoyo socialista, a cambio de celebrar en febrero de 1955 eleccionesnacionales.El Partido Democrático no consiguió la mayoría parlamentaria en esas elecciones, pero con elapoyo liberal, Hatoyama volvió al cargo de primer ministro. El Partido Democrático y el PartidoLiberal se fusionaron en noviembre de ese año, dieron al gobierno la mayoría absoluta en la Dietae inauguraron el monopolio del poder del Partido Liberal Democrático (PLD).2.13.10. Las relaciones exteriores de posguerra: URSSEn octubre de 1956, la Unión Soviética y Japón acordaron finalizar el estado técnico de guerraque existía entre los dos países desde agosto de 1945. El acuerdo estipulaba el restablecimiento derelaciones diplomáticas normales, la repatriación de los prisioneros de guerra japoneses quepermanecían en la URSS, la firma de tratados de pesca negociados a principios de año, el apoyosoviético a la entrada de Japón en la ONU y la devolución a Japón de ciertas islas pequeñas en lacosta meridional. El 18 de diciembre, la Asamblea General de la ONU votó por unanimidad laadmisión de Japón en las Naciones Unidas. Dos días después, Ishibashi Tanzan, ministro deIndustria y Comercio Internacional, sustituyó a Hatoyama como primer ministro. A la vez quemantenía relaciones estrechas con Estados Unidos, Ishibashi intentó extender el comercio con laURSS y China como medida para reducir el desempleo.En febrero de 1957 el primer ministro Ishibashi dimitió de su cargo y fue sustituido por el antiguoministro de Asuntos Exteriores, Kishi Nobusuke. En el mismo mes, se firmaron varios acuerdospara finalizar con el estado de guerra con Checoslovaquia y Polonia. En noviembre, Japón acordópagar 230 millones de dólares a Indonesia como reparaciones de la II Guerra Mundial y cancelarla deuda comercial indonesia.Japón se convirtió en miembro no permanente del Consejo de Seguridad de la ONU, en enero de1948. El primer ministro Kishi disolvió la Cámara de Representantes en abril, y se celebraronelecciones al mes siguiente.
  • 29. 2.13.11. Política interiorEn octubre de 1958 el Partido Socialista propuso una huelga para protestar por un proyecto de leygubernamental que estipulaba el incremento de poder de la policía y que fue retirado después que4 millones de trabajadores apoyaran la huelga de protesta. Las elecciones de junio de 1959 para lamitad de los escaños de la Cámara de Consejeros dieron la victoria al PLD.En enero de 1960, y pese a las numerosas protestas populares, se firmó un nuevo tratado deseguridad con Estados Unidos en Washington y se anunció que en junio de ese mismo año elpresidente estadounidense Dwight David Eisenhower realizaría una visita a Japón. Sin embargo,el aumento de las protestas obligó a cancelar la visita, porque se temía por la seguridad deEisenhower.El primer ministro Kishi dimitió el 15 de julio y le sucedió Ikeda Hayato, el nuevo presidente delPLD, cuyos miembros obtuvieron la mayoría en las elecciones a la Cámara de Representantescelebradas en octubre.En 1963 el gobierno intentó enmendar una disposición constitucional para aumentar elpresupuesto de las Fuerzas Armadas japonesas; al no obtener la aprobación mayoritaria, el primerministro Ikeda disolvió la Dieta y convocó elecciones para el 21 de noviembre. La mayoría de supartido se redujo a 13 escaños.2.13.12. Crecimiento económicoLa economía japonesa ocupó el primer puesto mundial por su tasa de crecimiento en 1964. En sudesarrollo comercial, el gobierno japonés estableció un acuerdo con China por el que cada paísestablecería oficinas de enlace comercial no oficiales en la capital del otro; mientras, se acordócon la URSS la venta de una planta de fertilizantes como pago a los créditos soviéticos. El primerministro Ikeda dimitió como primer ministro a finales de octubre por razones de salud y fuesucedido por el antiguo ministro de Estado Sato Eisaku (hermano del anterior primer ministroKishi Nobusuke), también perteneciente al PLD. Los XVIII Juegos Olímpicos se celebraron enTokio en octubre, lo que supuso una mejora de sus infraestructuras.En marzo de 1965 el ministro de Asuntos Exteriores de Corea del Sur pasó a ser el primer coreanoque obtuvo una audiencia con el emperador japonés desde la II Guerra Mundial. Durante su visitalos gobiernos de Japón y Corea del Sur alcanzaron un importante acuerdo de relaciones mutuas. Afinales de la década de 1960, Japón fue el escenario de manifestaciones generalizadas y a vecesviolentas llevadas a cabo por los estudiantes radicales que protestaban por el apoyo nipón a lapolítica exterior de Estados Unidos. Las relaciones entre ambos países entraron en un periodo deestancamiento en 1971, en 1972 Okinawa fue devuelta a Japón.En la década de 1960 Japón superaba a todas las naciones de Europa Occidental en el productonacional bruto y seguía a Estados Unidos como potencia industrial mundial. La ExposiciónMundial de Osaka, que tuvo lugar en 1970, demostró que el país había restablecido su posición enel comercio internacional: en 1971 Japón era el tercer país exportador más importante del mundo,después de Estados Unidos y de Alemania Occidental (ahora parte de la unificada RepúblicaFederal de Alemania), y el quinto en importaciones.
  • 30. 2.13.13. Cambio de gabineteAunque el PLD continuó sosteniendo las riendas del gobierno, a lo largo de toda la década de1970 fueron muy frecuentes los cambios de gobierno, consecuencia de la aparición de faccionesdentro de los partidos. En 1972, Tanaka Kakuei, que sucedió al primer ministro Sato en julio,tomó medidas para mitigar el desequilibrio comercial con Estados Unidos. También realizó unavisita a China y acordó reanudar las relaciones diplomáticas con ese país inmediatamente, al igualque con Taiwán. En noviembre de 1974 Tanaka dimitió en favor de Miki Takeo, cuyo gobiernosufrió la recesión económica mundial que se produjo en 1973 al dejar de recibir el petróleoprocedente de países árabes; la economía de Japón, muy dependiente del petróleo y de otrasmaterias primas, mostró entre 1974 y 1975 un crecimiento cero.Ese mismo año, la lucha entre facciones desgarró al PLD, que no consiguió aprobar la mayoría desus principales proyectos de ley en la Dieta. El partido recibió un nuevo golpe en 1976 cuando sedescubrió que la Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, una compañía estadounidense, había pagado almenos 10 millones de dólares en sobornos y honorarios a los políticos e industriales japonesesdesde la década de 1950. Miki convocó elecciones para diciembre, en las que su partido perdiópor primera vez su tradicional mayoría en la cámara baja. Miki dimitió y Fukuda Takeo fueelegido primer ministro. En diciembre de 1978 le sustituyó Ohira Masayoshi, también miembrodel PLD. Tras el fallecimiento de Ohira durante la campaña electoral de 1980, Suzuki Zenko fueelegido para sucederle. Acosado por el faccionalismo existente en las filas del PLD, Suzukidimitió de forma inesperada en noviembre de 1982. Nakasone Yasuhiro le sustituyó como primerministro y como dirigente del partido. El PLD, que sufrió un revés en las elecciones a la Dieta de1983, consiguió en cambio una mayoría abrumadora en 1986; Takeshita Noboru fue elegido ennoviembre de 1987 para sustituir a Nakasone.A principios de la década de 1980 Japón hizo frente a la congestión urbana, a la contaminaciónambiental y la improductividad de la agricultura, a pesar de lo cual tuvo la mayor tasa decrecimiento económico y la menor inflación de las naciones industrializadas. El crecimientoeconómico comenzó a estabilizarse a mediados de la década de 1980, debido en parte a que lafuerza del yen frente al dólar estadounidense había encarecido las exportaciones, quedisminuyeron.2.14. Heisei (1989 - )El emperador Hiro-Hito falleció en enero de 1989 y le sucedió su hijo Aki-Hito inaugurando elperíodo denominado Heisei (de la paz conseguida), que pronto se mostró como una época deconvulsión y reforma. En abril Takeshita dimitió a causa de un escándalo por soborno; su sucesor,Uno Sosuke, también dimitió por el mismo motivo en julio y fue sustituido por Kaifu Toshiki.Los demócratas liberales ganaron las elecciones parlamentarias de febrero de 1990 a pesar de quela Bolsa de Tokio había empezado un descenso que duraría hasta mediados de 1992, cuyo índiceNikkei perdió casi dos tercios de su valor. Incapaz de hacer frente al malestar económico y sin laconfianza de los miembros conservadores del partido, Miyazawa Kiichi, otro político veterano,sustituyó a Kaifu a finales de 1991, mientras que el Partido Socialista cambió su nombre por el dePartido Socialdemócrata. En 1992, se aprobó una legislación que permitía la participación de lastropas japonesas en las operaciones de paz de la ONU, antes considerado como inconstitucional.Sobre un fondo de tensión continua con Estados Unidos por cuestiones comerciales, la confianzaen el gobierno continuó su descenso mientras que los japoneses se vieron frustrados con elestancamiento de la economía nipona y la corrupción gubernamental. En junio de 1993 variosmiembros del PLD, dirigidos por Hata Tsutomu y Ozawa Ichiro se escindieron para formar el
  • 31. Partido Renovador de Japón. En las elecciones de julio los demócratas liberales perdieron sumayoría y finalizó así un dominio sobre el gobierno japonés que duró 38 años. Se formó unafrágil coalición de siete partidos, mientras que el PLD pasó a ser el principal partido de laoposición. Hosokawa Morihiro, un antiguo demócrata liberal y dirigente del Nuevo Partido deJapón, fue elegido para encabezar el gobierno, llevando a cabo un programa de reforma electoral,que en enero de 1994 entró en vigor.Perseguido por las acusaciones de aceptar un préstamo ilegal en 1982 y acosado por la tensión demantener a los demócratas liberales en la coalición, Hosokawa dimitió en abril de 1994; esemismo mes, la coalición de los siete partidos eligió a Hata como primer ministro. Poco despuéslos demócratas liberales se retiraron de la coalición y dejaron a Hata sin la mayoría necesaria en lacámara baja de la Dieta, por lo que Hata dimitió a finales de junio. El dirigente del PartidoSocialdemócrata, Murayama Tomiichi, fue elegido primer ministro, en coalición con sus antiguosenemigos, los demócratas liberales, de manera que se convirtió en la primera figura de izquierdaque dirigía Japón desde 1948. Los partidos reformistas de la oposición se reagruparon en elPartido de la Nueva Frontera, de centro derecha.El 17 de enero de 1995 un terremoto devastó la ciudad de Kobe, con un balance de 5.000 muertosy cientos de miles de damnificados. El 20 de marzo el metro de Tokio se vio afectado por ladifusión indiscriminada de gas sarín: murieron doce personas y resultaron afectados miles deciudadanos. Las investigaciones comprobaron la culpabilidad de la secta Aun Shinri Kyo. Lacoalición gubernamental sufrió un revés importante en las elecciones locales de abril; por otrolado, el Partido de la Nueva Frontera consiguió los gobiernos de varias provincias importantes.Mientras, se mantenían los problemas económicos provocados por el fuerte valor del yen, queamenazó la recuperación económica y desató una fuerte deflación de los precios.En las elecciones legislativas celebradas en octubre de 1996, cuyo nivel de participación nosuperó el 60%, la más baja en la historia reciente del país, el PLD obtuvo 239 actas, a tan sólo 12escaños de la mayoría absoluta. Los otros dos partidos que habían formado la coalición degobierno con el PLD sufrieron severos reveses (el Partido Socialdemócrata pasó de 30 a 15escaños y el pequeño Sakigake de 9 a tan sólo 2 diputados. Entre los partidos de la oposición, elPartido de la Nueva Frontera (Shinshinto) perdió 4 de los 160 asientos con los que contaba, elrecién formado Partido Demócrata mantuvo sus 52 diputados, y el Partido Comunista casi duplicósu número de representantes en la Dieta, pasando de 15 a 26 diputados. En estas elecciones seintrodujo la nueva normativa electoral incorporada en 1994; mediante ella, y con el fin de acabarcon la gran fragmentación partidista existente e incorporar el bipartidismo en la política japonesa,se establecía la posibilidad de elegir a 300 miembros de la Dieta mediante el sistema mayoritario,votando a un candidato, no a una lista de partido. Los 200 diputados restantes se eligieronmediante el sistema proporcional.
  • 32. CAPITULO TERCERO 3. HISTORIA CULTURAL DEL JAPON UNA PERSPECTIVA3.1. Vida y Cultura en la Eda Arcaica La vida japonesa en la Edad Arcaica era la propia de una sociedad primitiva, es decir, unacolectividad en la cual aún no existía claramente una estructura de clase o de poder.Tradicionalmente en la historia japonesa, sin embargo, la expresión "edad primitiva" se aplicalibremente al período que comienza en la edad prehistórica -- hace unos 300.000 años, cuando elarchipiélago japonés estuvo geográficamente separado del continente surasiático -- hasta lacreación del Estado Imperial, hacia el Siglo VI D.C.. Las subdivisiones indicadas anteriormente -- Joomon (neolítico), Yayoi (Edad del Bronce) yperíodos Kofun -- se derivan de las variaciones culturales observadas en las reliquiasarqueológicas de estos períodos. Hace unos 10.000 años, los habitantes del Japón abandonaron sus viviendas en cuevas y seestablecieron en casas toscamente cubiertas con tejados, conocidas como "tate-ana-juukyo"(viviendas-foso), soportadas por pilares, construidas sobre cavidades huecas excavadas en elsuelo. Estos seres primitivos vivían de la pesca y de la caza, o bajo lo que se ha dado en llamaruna “economía de acopio de alimentos”. El término “sociedad primitiva”, al implicar una ausenciade poder y estructuras de clase, es el que se puede aplicar con más exactitud a este períodoJoomon, que continuó durante varios miles de años hasta los Siglos IV-III A.C. La creatividad y sencillez del pueblo Joomon quedan reflejadas con toda claridad en lasvasijas de loza conocidas como cerámica Joomon. La impresión nada sofisticada y a veces inclusollamativa de estas vasijas es también una señal de la palpitante vitalidad del pueblo, que vivía enconstante lucha contra las fuerzas implacables de la naturaleza. Tanto en la forma como en la ornamentación, las vasijas Joomon son profusamenteabigarradas, lo que indica el alto nivel de artesanía ya existente en esta época. Irónicamente, sinembargo, pese a esta sofisticación, el pueblo Joomon estaba muy atrasado como fabricante, siconsideramos que la agricultura y el uso de utensilios de bronce ya eran prácticas establecidas enChina desde el Siglo XIII A. C.
  • 33. 3.1.1. Vida de la Comunidad Agrícola La separación geográfica del archipiélago japonés fue uno de los factores que impidió quedurante mucho tiempo la cultura japonesa se desarrollase más allá de la etapa Neolítica. En algunaetapa entre los Siglos III y II A.C., una cultura de origen chino, que ya poseía una destreza delmetal altamente desarrollada, llegó al Japón. Su influencia impregnó la isla y los antepasados delos japoneses fueron introducidos en el arte de la agricultura así como al uso de los utensilios demetal. Estos últimos incluían tanto el bronce como el hierro, y esto determinó la entrada un tantobrusca de Japón en la Edad del Hierro. El advenimiento de una agricultura centrada en el cultivo del arroz utilizando arrozaleselevados, llevó a una mejor calidad de vida del pueblo, que eventualmente empezó a adoptar unaforma de vida en comunidad. Se determinaron medios para valorar la calidad y cantidad detrabajo aportado por cada miembro de la comunidad, y junto con esto nacieron distinciones deriqueza entre ricos y pobres, principio de una estructura de clases. Luego, aparecieron lasdistinciones políticas y sociales entre el dominante y el dominado, produciendo con el tiempounos 100 pequeños estados. Después de dos siglos y medio de fieras luchas por el poder, el estadode Yamato surgió victorioso y unificó los numerosos estados más pequeños bajo su dominio. La cultura de la fase primaria de este período, durante el cual se utilizaron los utensilios demetal, se llama Yayoi, distinguiéndose de la anterior cultura Joomon por sus vasijas de cerámicagris rojizo. La marcada preferencia por la sencillez revelada en esta última, se halla en marcadocontraste con la calidad altamente ornamental de las vasijas tipo Joomon. Otra característica de este período fue la aparición de utensilios de madera tales comocucharones, martillos, arados y morteros. Los artículos de bronce incluían espadas, lanzas ydootaku, o sea, objetos en forma de campana cilíndrica con lados y rebordes planos, empleadospara rituales.3.1.2. El Desarrollo del Poder Político Recientes expediciones arqueológicas han excavado cierto número de túmulos sepulcrales(kofun) por todo el Japón, pero especialmente en el Distrito de Kinki. Estos túmulos tienen suorigen en el período comprendido entre los Siglos IV y VI D.C., y son, en su versión más típica,de la forma conocida como zenpoo koen fun, literalmente “túmulos sepulcrales rectangulares en laparte delantera y circulares en la parte trasera” (en forma de ojo de cerradura). Cada uno de estoskofun estaba en su origen rodeado por un foso, y su escarpado desnivel sugiere que se ha debidoemplear una cantidad inmensa de mano de obra para su construcción. Otra indicación de lamagnitud del poder y la influencia ejercidos son los exquisitos objetos de arte que se hanencontrado al excavar las tumbas. Estas sepulturas, desde luego, estaban reservadas a losmiembros de la clase dirigente, y su existencia indica que el Estado Imperial de Yamato quesurgió en el Distrito de Kinki, podía jactarse, de extenderse hasta Kyushu, en el sur.Acompañando a los restos humanos encontrados en las tumbas hay artículos tales como espejos,espadas, armaduras, adornos y zapatos. En algunos casos, los caballos habían sido enterradosvivos con sus amos. Lo más característico de los objetos encontrados en las tumbas son haniwa ofiguritas de terracota, que generalmente estaban dispuestas en círculo alrededor de la superficiedel túmulo. Por representar seres humanos, animales, muebles, utensilios de uso diario, etc., lashaniwas son una importante fuente de información sobre la cultura y modos de vida de estetiempo. Durante el Período Kofun, la costumbre de vivir en casas con plantas elevadas construidassobre altos pilares llegó a ser una práctica establecida, al principio entre las clases más altas y
  • 34. gradualmente entre el pueblo llano. Estas casas tenían aristas en el tejado coronadas por bloquesornamentales de madera, y estaban equipadas con porches y ventanas apropiadas, había tambiénalmacenes o graneros de elevada planta. Algunos de los más refinados ejemplos de este tipo dearquitectura se conservan hasta nuestros días en los estilos Taisha, Sumiyoshi o Shimei de lossantuarios Shinto. La religión de aquellos tiempos era ampliamente animística y consistía en la adoración de lanaturaleza. No había distinción clara entre lo divino y lo humano, entre la naturaleza y ladivinidad. Los sentimientos religiosos del pueblo reflejaban su dependencia y consiguiente temora la naturaleza, cuya santidad era promovida por tabús y hechizos. Algunos estudiosos de lareligión primitiva del Japón sostienen que el culto de la hechicería, que era parte del ritualagrícola, llegó a ser la base del posterior culto nacional del Shintoismo. Queda claro, sin embargo,que estos cultos primitivos de la adoración de la naturaleza se transformaron gradualmente en losde adoración de las deidades ancestrales durante el Período Kofun, como lo testimonian losnumerosos santuarios construidos.3.2. ESTABLECIMIENTO DE UN GOBIERNO CENTRAL Y ASIMILACION DE LACULTURA BUDISTA3.2.1. Introdución del budismo El Siglo VI fue testigo de la introducción del budismo en el Japón. (La fecha tradicional de laintroducción oficial desde Paekche, uno de los tres estados coreanos que mantenía relaciones conel Japón, es el año 538 D.C.). Para los japoneses de aquella época, los dioses eran considerados no solamente comoprotectores de la especie humana y donantes de felicidad, sino que también eran fuerzas malvadasy vengadoras capaces de traer la destrucción cuando las plegarias y rituales de las gentes no eransatisfactorios. En acusado contraste con estas deidades japonesas, el dios extranjero, Buda,llegaba con un evangelio de clemencia y de salvación para la especie humana en una segundavida. Los intelectuales japoneses dieron la bienvenida a esta doctrina extranjera con una mezclade temor y de júbilo. El pueblo llano, sin embargo, no observaba distinciones entre las prácticas religiones budistasy las de su culto nativo de brujería y de adoración de la naturaleza, de modo que nuncaconsideraron una contradicción el ofrecer plegarias en los santuarios para aplacar la ira de susdioses y al mismo tiempo recitar oraciones pidiendo la gracia salvadora de Buda. Hubo un hombre que realmente captó la esencia del budismo como una religión queproclamaba la necesidad humana de librarse de las "ilusiones" de la vida mundana, antes que unsimple culto con fórmula mágica para alejar las calamidades. Esta persona era el PrincipeShootoku. Existe una creencia tradicional, imposible de comprobar, según la cual se planteó unacontroversia entre los aristócratas acerca de si el budismo debía adoptarse o rechazarse. Durante este período de entrada del budismo en el Japón, la nación Yamato comenzó aevolucionar desde una estructura de poder compuesta de clanes influyentes hacia un gobiernocentralizado. La decisión de la Corte de utilizar al budismo como herramienta política, junto conla ferviente adopción y patrocinio de la nueva religión por parte del Príncipe Shootoku,aseguraron un floreciente éxito en su nuevo ambiente. Fue de ese modo que el budismo durante este período dio lugar a algunos de los másesplendorosos logros culturales japoneses en el campo de la arquitectura, la escultura, la pintura ylas artes decorativas. Estos esfuerzos fueron patrocinados por la poderosa Corte Yamato con el finde impresionar al pueblo y extender el poder del Gobierno.
  • 35. 3.2.2. Cultura budista El período de aproximadamente un siglo entre la llegada del budismo y el establecimiento deun gobierno central bajo la Reforma Taika (645 D.C.) se conoce como el Período Asuka. Este fueuna etapa de asimilación de la cultura budista extranjera, efectuada a través del estudio detraducciones chinas de los sutras y de las técnicas escultóricas coreanas aprendidas de China. Lacultura china y la coreana con las que el Japón entró en contacto contenían influencias culturalesde la India y de países aún más hacia el Oeste, de modo que podría decirse que la cultura Asuka seha derivado de la herencia cultural de virtualmente el Oriente entero. El budismo de nuestros días ya no cumple las plenas funciones sociales que le eran usuales:los templos budistas tienden a identificarse meramente con servicios funerarios o deconmemoración. Pero en los tiempos de la Corte Yamato, los templos budistas eran símbolos delpoder y de la riqueza de la clase dominante, y como tales constituían el centro de una nuevacultura. Las columnas pintadas de bermellón, los magníficos edificios de origen continentalcaracterizados por aleros-soportes adornados (conocidos como masu-hijiki), las imágenes de lasdeidades budistas esculpidas en “lacado en seco” o en bronce dorado, las pinturas religiosasbrillantemente coloreadas, todo ello producto del arte continental, impresionaron profundamentela conciencia estética japonesa, la cual, no obstante, encontró su total expresión en los logrosartísticos que finalmente, tomaron su inspiración de lo que era nativo y particular del espíritujaponés. La arquitectura del templo budista constituía un nuevo arranque cultural en la arquitecturajaponesa. Contrastaba fuertemente con las toscas cabañas del pueblo llano. Ninguna pieza dearquitectura original que pueda fecharse en el Período Asuka se ha conservado hasta nuestrosdías. Nuestras nociones de estos templos dependen de los planos de construcción que se hanconservado. Estos últimos sugieren la existencia de dos tipos predominantes de modelos, el tipoShitennooji y el tipo Hooryuuji. Quizá lo más indicativo de la naturaleza de la cultura Asuka sea el edificio del temploHooryuuji. Aunque la estructura original, que databa de principios del Siglo VII, fue destruida porun incendio en 670, todavía existe en la actualidad el edificio reconstruido que data del final delmismo siglo, y que revela las características distintivas de la arquitectura Asuka en su método deconstrucción. Existen igualmente numerosas obras de escultura budista del Período Asuka que se hanconservado en el Hooryuuji. Las principales entre ellas son la Tríada Shaka (Shakiamuni y dossirvientes) realizada por Kuratsukuribe-no-Obito Tori en 623 que se encuentra en el Kondo(Galería Principal) y la estatua de Kannon (en sánscrito, Avalokteshvara) en el Yumedono(Galería de los Sueños). Creado en conmemoración del Príncipe Shootoku, se dice que elsemblante de la Tríada Shaka emite una “sonrisa arcaica” y el acompañamiento de su traje da uncontorno triangular (isósceles) a la figura. El simbolismo artístico de la Tríada Shaka evidenciaclaramente las características de la escultura Asuka, que refleja la técnica disciplinada yorganizada de la cultura china del último Período Wei Septentrional. La estatua del Kudara Kannon en el Hooryuuji es otro ejemplo de cultura Asuka. En contrastecon la Trinidad Shaka, este Kannon causa una impresión más suave y amable. Las técnicas queintervienen aquí difieren de las empleadas por Tori, el creador de la Tríada Shaka, sugiriendo laexistencias de un grupo de artistas que no eran de la escuela Tori, y cuyas técnicas parecenderivarse de los maestros del Chou Septentrional y del Chi Septentrional, unas dinastías chinas definales del Siglo VI. Muchos de los artístas del período Asuka eran naturalizados japoneses, de origen chino ocoreano, o descendientes suyos. No cabe la menor duda que habían quedado totalmente
  • 36. asimilados en lo que respecta a su psicología y actitudes sociales, ya que su trabajo era netamentejaponés, pese a haber aprendido de modelos chinos o coreanos.3.2.3. Florecimiento de la cultura budista Con la reforma Taika (645), la Corte suprimió la fuente de su inestabilidad expulsando a lafamilia Soga, la más poderosa de una coalición de clanes que había controlado al gobierno, yestableció un gobierno central dotado de una estructura legislativa según el modelo de la ChinaTáng. El período desde la Reforma Taika hasta el establecimiento de la capital en Nara en 710 seconoce como el período Hakuhoo en la historia de arte japonés. Como el budismo continuabafloreciendo bajo la protección del gobierno, la tendencia cultural de este período también fuemanifiestamente budista. Durante el período Hakuhoo también se inició el intercambio oficial con la China de Tang y seenviaron emisarios al Continente de vez en cuando. Este mayor contacto con el continentecontribuyó en gran medida a la formación de la cultura de este período. En la escultura Hakuhoo,por ejemplo, son evidentes unas fuertes influencias chinas de Sui y de comienzos de Tang. La másrepresentativa de las obras artísticas de esa época es la cabeza de Buda en bronce en el temploKoofukuji. Tiene fama por su hermosa expresión infantil, especialmente en los ojos. La cultura Hakuhoo refleja la confianza de la clase dominante tras el establecimiento de estanueva estructura legislativa. La cultura del período desborda riqueza, vitalidad afirmativa, nosolamente en el terreno del arte sino también en la literatura del período, como por ejemplo en elManyooshu, una colección de poemas que reflejan un alto grado de arte y refinamiento.
  • 37. Igualmente durante ese período, el entusiasmo por construir templos budistas y crear estatuasde Buda se extendió de la capital a las provincias, donde los artistas dieron un fuerte color local amuchas de las estatuas de bronce dorado que fabricaban. Puede evidenciarse que la cultura budistade esa época se había extendido a todos los rincones de la nación. La obra de arte que habla más elocuentemente del alto nivel de refinamiento alcanzado porla cultura Hakuhoo era probablemente la pintura mural en el Kondoo, del templo Hooryuuji. Esuna pena que esta pintura mural se perdiera en un incendio en 1949, ya que era un ejemplo deexcepcional originalidad a pesar de la influencia técnica que los artistas habían recibido de laIndia. La pérdida es tanto más lamentable cuanto que se trata de una herencia culturalirreemplazable y claramente indicativa de la armonización entre la cultura nacional japonesatradicional y las culturas extranjeras que constituían la peculiaridad del arte japonés.3.2.4. Características de la cultura clásica El período Tempyoo, bajo el reinado del Emperador Shoomu, comenzó en 720, con elestablecimiento de la sede del gobierno en la capital de Nara, y finalizó en 794 cuando la capitalfue trasladada a Kioto. El progreso de la nación era dirigido por la política del gobierno de activaasimilación de la cultura china y la coreana, y la cultura japonesa de ese período mostró unamagnitud proporcionada a la prosperidad nacional y al avanzado nivel de cultura de estasnaciones que influenciaban al Japón. Con el progresivo entusiasmo de la Corte por el budismo, los principales poderes religiosos sedesplazaron a la nueva capital de Nara. Los magníficos templos y edificios religiosos construidosen esa época marcaron el cenit de la cultura budista en el Japón. La política de fomento delbudismo siguió adelante con rigor durante el mandato del Emperador Shoou, quien decretó que seerigieran templos provinciales (conocidas como Kokubunji) en cada provincia por todo el país, yordenó la construcción del colosal templo Toodaiji, cabeza de los templos provinciales en Nara,para albergar al gigantesco Daibutsu (Gran estatua de Buda). El entusiasmo de la clase dirigentepor los asuntos budistas en esa época se acercaba a lo que podríamos actualmente calificar dedelirio. Los resultados artísticos de este período siguen siendo, en nuestros días, una maravilla paralos amantes del arte. Se acepta generalmente que los cánones conseguidos por los artistasTempyoo resultaban no solamente de su determinación de sobresalir en su arte, sino también delos profundos sentimientos religiosos que prevalecían entonces. La asimilación de la cultura continental no significó, sin embargo, la adopción concomitantede las filosofías y líneas fundamentales de la estructura social, que eran las fuentes generadoras deesos productos culturales. Por lo tanto, las culturas extranjeras no dieron como resultado unatransformación importante de la vida y pensamiento japoneses, ni aplastaron la cultura tradicionaljaponesa. Desarrollaron más bien una especie de coexistencia mutua de los tipos de cultura. Lafuerza persistente de la cultura japonesa nativa queda testimoniada por el ya mencionado
  • 38. Manyooshuu, una voluminosa colección de 4.400 poemas cuyos autores iban desde losaristócratas hasta los plebeyos. La colección es rica en poemas que testimonian la sana psicologíay la firme vitalidad del pueblo japonés. Por ello, es indudable que fueron estas características lasque generaron la grandeza y el poder de la cultura Tempyoo. La cultura china de la dinastía Tang asimiló varias culturas de Oriente, confiriéndole unanaturaleza cosmopolita y al mismo tiempo exótica. Una de las características del arte Tang fue sumarcada tendencia ornamental, que al criterio estético japonés parecía excesivamente decorativasuperficial y falta de gracia interior y de sutilidad. Esta orientación estética del pueblo japonés es visible en obras de arte tales como la estatua deKannon en el templo Shoorinji, y las de Nikko (Suryaprabha--luz del sol) y Gakkoo (ndraprabha-luz de la luna), en el Hokkedoo del templo Todaiji. Estas obras sugieren el peculiar sentidojaponés de la armonía a través de su carácter sereno y profundamente espiritual. El arte delperíodo Tempyoo puede realmente ser llamado la cristalización del arte clásico japonés. Entre los ejemplos existentes de arquitectura budista de este período, el Hokkedoo del temploToodaiji y el Kondoo del templo Tooshoodaiji son los más dignos de mención. La producciónconsiderable de estatuas religiosas resaltó las hechas de arcilla o "lacado seco" (capas de tela decáñamo pegadas unas sobre otras y cubiertas con laca). Entre las principales obras representativasde esa época se encontraban la Tríada Yakushi (Ghaisajyaguru y dos asistentes), conservada comoreliquia en el templo Yakushiji, el Hachibu-shoo (ocho guardias sobrenaturales de Buda) y el Juu-dai-deshi (diez grandes discípulos de Buda) del templo Koofukuji, y la imagen del Fuku Kensakukannon (Amoghapasa), a la cual se dedica el Hokkedoo del templo Toodaiji. Todas estas obrasdan una idea de juvenil vitalidad y son notables por su estilo realista. Fue precisamente en esos momentos cuando el arte budista japonés recibió un nuevo estímuloa través de la visita del monje chino Ganjin. El templo Tooshoodaiji, que erigió Ganjin, contienenumerosas esculturas de madera que se suponen creadas por artistas chinos que le acompañaban.Estas obras iban a influenciar fuertemente el subsiguiente estilo escultórico Joogan. Varios objetos, que se dice eran utilizados por el Emperador Shoomu en su vida diaria, seconservan en el Shoosoo-in (Depósito del Tesoro Imperial) en Nara, y son útiles para ayudarnos acomprender la relación, entre el arte Tempyoo y la cultura china de la época. Aunque algunos dedichos objetos son de origen chino, claramente se ve que muchos otros fueron hechos en Japónsiguiendo modelos chinos, lo que sugiere hasta qué punto la clase dirigente japonesa se mostrabaatraída por la cultura china. Al mismo tiempo, la exquisita artesanía de estas piezas hablaelocuentemente del alto grado de refinamiento técnico logrado por los artistas japoneses, así comodel alto nivel de vida cultural alcanzado por la aristocracia de esa época.3.3. VIDA EN LA CORTE Y DESARROLLO DE LA CULTURA NACIONAL3.3.1. Asimilación del budismo El período Heian, que siguió al Período Nara, se extendió a lo largo de cuatro siglos a partirdel momento del establecimiento de la capital en Heian-kyo (hoy día Kioto) en el año 794, hastala caída de la familia Taira (también conocida como Heike) en 1185. La cultura japonesa duranteese tiempo fue de constante transición. Sin embargo, puede considerarse que durante este período,enfocado en su conjunto, los diversos componentes de la vida cultural estaban siendo moldeadospara darles una forma claramente japonesa. En otras palabras, fue un período de asimilación ojaponización de la cultura china importada.
  • 39. Aunque la primitiva sociedad Heian se basaba teóricamente todavía en la estructura legislativade su modelo chino, ya empezaban a aparecer tendencias en las esferas políticas y sociales queeran distintas de las del Período Nara. Las clases privilegiadas, es decir, el clero y la aristocracia, hicieron todo lo posible poradquirir terrenos públicos para transformarlos en pertenencias privadas. El consiguiente aumentode tierras privadas a costa de disminuir las tierras públicas puso cargas insostenibles a loscampesinos, obligándoles a entregar sus propiedades a los señores locales y transformarse engranjeros arrendatarios de la hacienda local (Shoen), que florecía debido a ello. La reluctancia dela masa en hacer que el sistema funcionase dio lugar a que la propiedad pública de la tierra seviese condenada a ser un ideal, un sistema nominal solamente. Al mismo tiempo, una dictadura aristocrática empezó a tomar raíces con la poderosa familiaFujiwara. La estructura burocrática del gobierno central dejó así de funcionar en la práctica,mientras la totalidad de la estructura legislativa no era más que una fachada. En el área de la cultura, también, la aristocracia era la que dominaba con sus influencias. Pocodespués del cambio de capital, dos sacerdotes, Saichoo y Kuukai, que habían estudiado en China,volvieron trayendo consigo los cultos altamente metafísicos del budismo esotérico. Saichoo fundóla secta Tendai del budismo, mientras que Kuukai fundó la secta Shingon, cada una de las cualesempezó a tomar raíces como órdenes religiosas ideológica y económicamente autónomas, aunqueambas se centraran en el concepto budista de la fe. La nobleza dio abiertamente la bienvenida a este nuevo tipo de budismo, no tanto por suprofunda y solemne doctrina como por sus plegarias destinadas a gratificar los deseos mundanosdel hombre. El budismo esotérico floreció durante los primeros años del Período Heian, en granparte debido a su capacidad de agradar a los nobles de la Corte que acostumbraban a esforzarse enla búsqueda de los placeres mundanos. Su inseguridad se debe al hecho que sus deseos de gloria yprosperidad se veían constantemente frustrados en la realidad por la lucha constante por el poder.Acogieron con entusiasmo este nuevo culto como un modo de conseguir la liberación y seguridadpsicológica en la agotadora lucha de la vida. Existe incluso la evidencia de que los propios líderesreligiosos tomaban a veces la iniciativa de acercarse a la aristocracia con el fin de promover sussectas. Dado el éxito de estas nuevas religiones, era natural que el arte budista empezara a estardominado por el budismo esotérico. Y realmente los logros artísticos de ese período señalabanmarcadamente las características místicas que no se observaron con anterioridad en ningún otrositio en el arte budista. En la historia del arte, esta etapa se conoce como el Período Joogan, muy notable por suspinturas religiosas de Mandala (panteón budista; diagrama pictórico esquemático de lasdivinidades budistas) que comunicaban los preceptos budistas a través de la pintura, y por susefigies de deidades individuales, que se utilizaban en rituales exorcistas. El Ryokai Mandala, quesigue existiendo en el templo Jingoji, es notable por su gracia ondeante conseguida mediante finaslíneas audaces. Estas efigies se caracterizan por su precisión y técnica para producir un efectocúbico con líneas solamente, haciendo de éstas unas obras maestras del "arte lineal". Las esculturas de esa época se hacían principalmente en madera. Una estatua se sacaba de unsolo bloque grande. El trabajo agudo y poderoso del cincel era más apropiado al espíritu delbudismo esotérico. Dos ejemplos sobresalientes son el Yakushi Nyorai en el templo Jingoji y alNyoirin en el templo Kanshinji. En general, la escultura y la pintura budista esotérica eran muy místicas en su naturaleza,sugiriendo la presencia de una fuerza espiritual latente. Podría decirse que producían un efecto deimponente dignidad.3.3.2. Florecimiento de la cultura nacional
  • 40. El Período Heian alcanzó su madurez en el Siglo X, y la cultura japonesa también dio señalesde un carácter más genuinamente japonés. Dos factores clave de este desarrollo fueronindudablemente la suspensión del intercambio oficial con el continente a finales del Siglo IX y eldesarrollo del silabario kana. En el terreno de la política, la familia Fujiwara siguió ejerciendo una dictadura completa através de su monopolio de las posiciones de Sesshoo (Regente) y Kampaku (Consejero Principaldel Emperador). En esa época la Corte se había vuelto virtualmente un escenario para desarrollarrituales y ceremonias públicas. Los cortesanos vivían unas vidas de extravagancia y de ocio con su bienestar materialasegurado por los ingresos de sus siempre florecientes haciendas. Con la excepción de losfuncionarios de nivel medio o bajo que servían en provincias, la mayoría de los nobles estabanbien atrincherados como clase privilegiada ociosa en la capital. Pasaban su tiempo aprendiendo elarte, la poesía y la belleza de la naturaleza, al mismo tiempo que cultivaban las relaciones con lasdamas de la Corte y buscaban mejorar sus posiciones en la Corte. Estas personas privilegiadasdesarrollaron de este modo una cultura altamente refinada, como sabemos por sus obras maestras,tales como el famoso Genji Monogatari (El Cuento de Genji), las pinturas budistas, y el Yamato-e(pintura de estilo japonés), que representaban un mundo estético peculiarmente japonés. Esta cultura aristocrática, sin embargo, estaba estrechamente limitada en su visión. Social yeconómicamente era más bien una carga que un beneficio para la nación. Esta circunstancia eraprobablemente inevitable, dadas las circunstancias históricas del momento: internacionalmente, elJapón estaba aislado de toda influencia directa exterior, mientras que a nivel nacional, laaristocracia constituía una unidad de clase hermética sin contacto con las vidas del pueblo llano.Fueron esos nobles, sin embargo, quien merced a ese tipo de ociosidad en una existencia retirada,comprendieron el potencial cultural del Japón, y gracias a sus esfuerzos liberaron la culturanacional de la influencia del continente. Fueron ellos los que dieron a la cultura japonesa susensualidad y gracia singular. La cultura nativa floreció en primer lugar dentro del campo de la literatura, y este desarrollose debe principalmente al invento del silabario kana, porque fue éste el que permitió a losjaponeses dar una expresión más completa y más exacta de sus sentimientos y pensamientos de loque había sido posible en chino. Waka, la forma poética clásica japonesa, llegó a ser rápidamenteel medio de expresión más apropiado para la perceptividad y sensibilidad aristocrática refinada.Al mismo tiempo, hubo una creciente diversificación de actividades dentro de la clasearistocrática, y algunos pronto sintieron que su expresión quedaba restringida por la forma waka.Esto dio lugar a una nueva forma de narrativa en prosa nativa. Ejemplos de la narrativa literaria incluyen el Taketori Monogatari y el Utsubo Monogatari,aunque la obra más destacada es sin duda el Genji Monogatari, por la dama de la corte ShikibuMurasaki. Grande en su concepción y graciosa en su expresión, esta obra detalla la magnificenciay la gloria que rodea los asuntos amorosos del mundo de la aristocracia. Bajo la narración de los acontecimientos, está la filosofía de la vida, profundamente religiosa,de la dama Murasaki, basada en el conocimiento de lo transitorio de la vida. El estado emocionalasociado con este concepto se describe como mono-no aware (pathos de la naturaleza). El fenómeno de la transición cultural en el Japón de aquella época también se evidencia en losestilos arquitectónicos, en particular uno nuevo conocido como shinden-zukuri, un estilo dearquitectura de vivienda, popular entre la nobleza por su aspecto natural y armonioso. Secaracterizaba este estilo por espaciosos jardines arreglados imitando escenarios, y edificios contejados hechos con finas capas de corteza de cipreses japoneses. En los biombos y paneles dentrode los edificios había obras de los mejores pintores, representando paisajes japoneses durante lasdiversas estaciones.
  • 41. En esta época también hubo mucha experimentación artística, buscando una técnica apropiadapara pintar motivos nativos japoneses. El resultado de estas investigaciones fueron los Yamato-e,un estilo puramente nativo japonés. Algunos jardines de este período se conservan todavía, tales como los jardines de Sento Goshen Kioto y del templo de Motsuji en Iwate. En la arquitectura, el Kioto Gosho (el Palacio Imperialde Kioto) y el Hoo-oo-doo (Galería Fénix) en el templo Byoodoo-in, en Uji, ambos con loselementos característicos del edificio Heian.3.3.3. Nacimiento de la secta budista En este último Período Heian, en que el budismo esotérico siguió con creciente influencia comoreligión de la aristocracia, nació un culto popular nuevo. El culto Joodo, como se le llamó,enseñaba que podía esperarse el volver a nacer en el paraíso invocando a Amida Buda (Amitaba),mediante la recitación del Nembutsu, una simple fórmula, y que mientras que el mundo presentedebía reconocerse como vacío para el hombre, existía la posibilidad de salvación en la otra vida.La naturaleza escatológica de esta religión contrastaba enormemente con la del budismo esotéricoque prometía gratificar los deseos en este mundo. El culto Joodo también empezó gradualmente a penetrar en la clase aristocrática, que encontróatractiva la promesa de la nueva religión de felicidad en la vida futura. Los aristócratas devotos dela nueva fe erigieron magníficos santuarios (Amida-doo) a Amida Buda, en los cuales empezaronlas técnicas artísticas y arquitectónicas más avanzadas. Relativamente pequeños en escala, lossantuarios fueron diseñados con suficiente espacio para que el fiel caminase alreadedor de laimagen reposada de Amida Buda. Un exterior simple contrastaba con un interior profusamenteadornado y coloreado. Entre las principales estructuras supervivientes de este tipo se encuentranel Amida-doo del templo Byoodo-in en Kioto y el Konjiki-doo del templo Chuusonji enHiraizumi. La escultura del Período final del Heian, notable por su gracia aristocrática y su sensualidad,alcanzó un grado de refinamiento que marcaba la culminación de su forma japonesa. Durante eseperíodo, la primitiva técnica de esculpir una estatua en un solo bloque de madera dio paso a unanueva técnica (yosegi-zukuri) de montar cierto número de bloques de madera, dando comoresultado probablemente una división del trabajo y una producción en serie. La estatua de AmidaBuda por el famoso artista Jocho, que se conserva en el Hoo-oo-doo del templo de Byoodoo-in, esla obra maestra más fina que se conserva en nuestros días. Considerada como modelo por losescultores posteriores, su belleza y forma armoniosa hacen de ella el objeto ideal para lameditación de los aristócratas que buscan renacer en el paraíso Joodo.3.3.4. El mundo de emaki Emaki son las pinturas Yamato-e en rollo de papel. El rollo de papel se utiliza con lasmáximas ventajas para representar movimiento y acción a través de una sucesión de escenas. Elefecto es similar al de una cinta de película. Este tipo de pintura fue probablemente originario delJapón, desarrollándose como una respuesta a una demanda de representaciones pictóricas de obrasde literatura narrativa. Emaki generalmente ilustra con textos (kotoba-gaki) de historias de amor,cuentos legendarios, biografías, o relatos sobre el origen y la historia de los templos Shinto obudistas. La gran mayoría de los rollos de emaki tratan de relatos históricos o cuentos legendarios. Lostemas son generalmente trágicos o cómicos y representan asuntos amorosos, guerras, fe, milagroso acontecimientos místicos o grotescos. Frecuentemente las pinturas contienen ricos colores
  • 42. brillantes, a menudo de trazo poderoso. Algunas de las obras maestras representativas son GenjiMonogatari Emaki, Shigisan Engi, Bandainagon Ekotoba y Choojuu Giga. Aunque producidas y disfrutadas por los miembros de la aristocracia, estas pinturas tambiénincluían escenas de la vida ordinaria. Sin embargo, la imagen de este período legada hasta hoydía, tiende a representar a la nobleza desenrollando esos rollos y quedando inmersos en un mundode novela compuesto tanto por elementos imaginarios como reales. Fue de este modo como Japón pasó a la edad Media.3.4. NACIMIENTO DE LA CLASE GUERRERA Y CULTURA MEDIEVAL3.4.1. Establecimiento de un shogunato La clase dirigente de los aristócratas, cuyo poder y legitimidad se derivaba de su proximidadal Emperador, vio cambiar gradualmente sus bases de apoyo económico hacia una nueva clasenaciente de guerreros procedente de los ricos granjeros y aristócratas que se habían establecido enlas provincias y que habían desarrollado bases sanas de poder a través de la administraciónagrícola. Derivando su fuerza de vínculos contraídos con los estratos más bajos de la sociedad, enforma de contratos de señor feudal-vasallo, estos últimos terminaron por derribar a la clasedominante tradicional y establecieron una nueva sociedad feudal. La Edad Media de Japón, quecomenzó en este punto, se extendió a lo largo de cuatro siglos, incluyendo tanto el PeríodoKamakura como el Muromachi, el primero de los cuales duró aproximadamente un siglo y mediodesde la fundación del Shogunato Kamakura, a finales del Siglo XII, hasta que desapareció en1333. En el Período Heian, los guerreros tenían que mostrar -- al menos nominalmente --subordinación a la nobleza. Además, los líderes guerreros tenían que ser descendientes de nobles,de las familias Taira o Minamoto. Sin embargo, en las provincias, este estado nominal de cosas sehabía desgastado rápidamente por el traspaso del poder hacia propios guerreros. Fueron lasguerreros civiles de las eras Hogen (1156) y Heiji (1159) las que abrieron el camino para que losguerreros entraran en el gobierno central. Taira-no-Kiyomori, el victorioso de estas luchas, fue el primero en establecer un poder degobierno realmente militar. La familia Taira, sin embargo, tras ganar el poder, cayó víctima de lamisma debilidad que el antiguo gobierno aristocrático y fue a su vez derrocada por la familiaMinamoto. Minamoto-no-Yoritomo estableció su shogunato en la ciudad de Kamakura en 1185, ytomó las medidas para que el gobierno militar estuviese seguro. El centro del gobierno, por lo
  • 43. tanto, se desplazó a Kamakura, pero el centro cultural siguió radicado en Kioto con la familiaimperial, donde la cultura continuó siendo la prerrogativa de la nobleza. Sin embargo, unatransformación social de esta magnitud no podía dejar de traer grandes cambios en las ideas yconciencia de la nación. Gradualmente, se produjo una desviación de la sensibilidad delicada,graciosa y femenina de la aristocracia. La nueva tendencia fue en la dirección de la apreciación delo prosaico, lo nada pretencioso y lo poderoso. El nuevo espíritu de sencillez y de virilidad semanifestó en la reconstrucción de los templos Todaiji y Kofukuji, que habían sido incendiadosdurante las guerras (en 1180). La Galería del Gran Buda de Todaiji, el mayor alarde de construcción de la época, se terminóen 1195 tras un período de 20 años. Todos los escultores de las obras budistas que vivían en Naray en Kioto fueron llamados a trabajar en el proyecto. Sus diseños sólidos y poderosos, conocidoscomo Daibutsu-yo o el estilo del Gran Buda, proporcionaron a la galería terminada un carácterheróico. Vivían por aquellos tiempos en Nara tres de los más grandes maestros de la escultura budista,Unkei, Kaikei y Tankei. Disfrutando de cierto grado de libertad artística, cada uno de ellos fuecapaz de absorber el espíritu de la nueva era y reflejarlo con sus características individuales deestilo. La primera obra representativa de Unkei fue la estatua de Dainichi Nyorai en Enjoji, querealizó en 1176. Después de este éxito, Unkei y sus descípulos produjeron las estatuas de Niwo enNandaimon (Gran Puerta del Sur) de Todaiji y de Mujaku y Seshin en Kofukuji. Estas, junto aotras numerosas obras maestras, contribuyeron al establecimiento de un estilo Unkei, influyente ypeculiar, basado en principios realistas definidos. De las muchas obras famosas que nos ha dejadoKaikei, debemos mencionar su interpretación del Miroku Bosatsu (actualmente en el Museo deBellas Artes de Boston, en los Estados Unidos), su estatua del dios Shinto Hachiman en forma demonje budista, y un Jizo Bosatsu en Todaiji. Estas reflejan la preocupación de Kaikei por ladelicadeza y la suavidad, que conseguía mediante un equilibrio entre la belleza realista y la real.3.4.2. Popularidad de los retratos y de las pinturas en rollos La tendencia hacia el realismo en la era Kamakura se reflejó en varios aspectos de la sociedad.Dio lugar a lo que habría de llamarse la cultura explicatoria o descriptiva. En la literatura, estatendencia tomó la forma de narrativa y en el arte apareció en retratos y en pinturas en rollos. Lacaracteríastica distintiva de la pintura de retratos en ese período fue su énfasis sobre laindividualidad y el detalle realista, dando especial importancia al retrato. El origen del desarrollode esta modalidad puede encontrarse en la formación de la sociedad feudal en sí. El ShogunatoKamakura estaba basado en los vínculos de mutua lealtad existentes entre señores y vasallos. Encontraste con la rígida estratificación tradicional de clases y vasallaje, el pueblo desarrollaba cadavez más el conocimiento de sí mismo como personas, y por consiguiente les preocupaban y lesinteresaban los demás seres humanos. El desarrollo de la pintura retratista puede verse como unaexpresión del cumplimiento de estas necesidades y deseos. La expansión de la pintura en ellos dependía de la existencia de un mayor sector de públicoque pudiera disfrutar de aquéllos. El rápido aumento de la oportunidad de dichos rollosseguramente fue debido en gran parte al hecho que incluso los analfabetos podían recrearse conellos. Los rollos de pintura del Período Kamakura mostraban una mayor variedad que suspredecesores, que estaban relacionados predominantemente con las historias narrativas. Ahora lareligión y la guerra habían llegado a ser temas frecuentes para esta forma de arte. Tanto el númerocomo la variedad de pinturas en rollos aumentaron. Las nuevas sectas budistas que aparecieron enesa época ilustrarían la historia de un templo o de un santuario o la biografía del fundador de lasecta, como parte de sus actividades de proselitismo religioso. La clase guerrera, por su parte,
  • 44. utilizaría los rollos para afirmar el espíritu guerrero. Factores como éstos, por lo tanto, ayudaron aexplicar la calidad épica y explicativa de los rollos, así como la individualidad que caracterizaalgunas de las figuras de los rollos. Existen numerosos ejemplos de finas obras religiosasproducidas en esa época, como Kokawadera Engi, Taima Mandara Engi, Kegon Engi y IppenShonin Eden. De particular importancia en el desarrollo de rollos de pintura religiosa eran las nuevas sectasbudistas tales como Jodo y Hokke (o Nichiren). Estas sectas aparecieron en medio de condicionessociales turbulentas que tuvieron lugar a principios del Período Kamakura. En contraste con elbudismo más antiguo de la era Heian, que tendía a ser escolástico y aristocrático, además de sertanto una religión orientada hacia la plegaria como hacia el estado, estas nuevas sectasproporcionaban una nueva base teórica para la fe. Queda claro, por el hecho de que el budismo es una religión fundada por el PríncipeShiddhartha (Shakya) que renunció al poder temporal, que esta religión trasciende del poder delEstado. Lo cierto es que el budismo es una religión universal que promete la salvación de toda lahumanidad. Es también digno de mención el que los principales budistas de este período en Japón,Honen y Shinran, se vieron en condiciones de cortar todo vínculo con el Estado y asegurar laindependencia de su religión. El período dio nacimiento a muchas sectas nuevas, todas ellaspopulares en su orientación y con las características de ser prácticas e individualistas. La apariciónde estas nuevas sectas y sus actividades también actuaban con fuerte ímpetu en favor de lasantiguas sectas budistas, al igual que para la religión nativa Shinto. El resultado fue unmovimiento de restauración entre las antiguas sectas budistas y un frenesí de actividad por partede los santuarios Shinto. Pese a que el Japón no tenía relaciones formales con la dinastía Sung, que gobernaba en Chinapor aquel tiempo, los intercambios entre los dos países florecieron, en parte como resultado de losesfuerzos por parte de Taira-no-Kiyomori para aumentar el comercio entre Japón y China.Muchos fueron los monjes japoneses que viajaron a China y volvieron después de estudiarbudismo Zen allí. De éstos, los dos nombres más famosos asociados con la introducción del Zenen el Japón son Eisai, que estableció la Secta Rinzai del Zen, y Dogen, que fundó la Secta Sodo.La presencia del Zen, con su enseñanza según la cual solamente renunciando a todo yconcentrándose con todos los esfuerzos de uno mismo en el Zazen o meditación se puede alcanzarla luz espiritual, iba a ser de gran importancia en los años sucesivos.3.4.3. Budismo zen y cultura guerra La clase guerrera, que fortaleció notablemente su poder después del conflicto civil entre lascortes del norte y del sur, empezó a contribuir con sus propias innovaciones a la culturaesencialmente aristocrática. La influencia del budismo Zen también contribuyó a desarrollar lacultura guerrera, que alcanzó su punto culminante durante el Período Muromachi (que duró desdela desaparición del Shogunato Kamakura en 1333 hasta finales del Shogunato Muromachi en1573), durante cuya época el centro del gobierno volvió a Kioto. El budismo Zen difería de las demás sectas budistas en el énfasis sobre la disciplina yadiestramiento individual. El arte de las dinastías Sung y Yuan que los monjes Zen trajeron alJapón junto con la religión, estaba más orientado hacia la apreciación que hacia la adopción. Estasnuevas características asociadas al Zen fueron fácilmente adoptadas por la cultura guerrera. El budismo Zen gozaba del patrocinio del Shogun Ashikaga y de la clase dominante. La sectaestableció el sistema de Gozan Jissatsu, en virtud del cual fueron proyectados cinco templos deprimer rango y diez templos de segundo rango. Los monjes Zen de estos cinco templos actuabancomo consejeros políticos ante el Shogunato Muromachi, no solamente participando en lapolítica, asuntos extranjeros y comercio, sino también desempeñando un papel principal en el
  • 45. campo del arte y del saber. Puede decirse que el florecimiento de la "literatura Gozan", queconsiste esencialmente en juegos intelectuales pedantes practicados por los monjes Zen, es unaseñal de la secularización de la cultura Zen. Otra indicación de la tendencia a la secularización semanifestó fuertemente en la arquitectura. El toko (especie de hornacina), tana (estantería contigua al toko) y shoin (estudio), que siguensiendo considerados como instalaciones básicas de las casas japonesas, son características delestilo arquitectónico Shoin, aparecido al final de era Muromachi y derivado del estilo de las salasde estudio de los monjes.3.4.4. El zen y la naturaleza La pintura característica de esta época se hacía, desde luego, con tinta de la India, es decir, loque se conoce como suiboku-ga, que formaba una parte vital de la cultura Zen. Mientras que elatractivo emocional y el color eran la vida y el alma del estilo pictórico Yamato-e, la pinturanegra monocroma suiboku-ga era típicamente abstracta y sugestiva. El Zen valoraba mucho elsansui-ga o pintura de paisajes por la posibilidad de un contacto espiritual con la naturaleza dedonde provenía. Los monjes mismos pintaban como advocación espiritual, y algunos de ellosllegaron a ser expertos profesionales (conocidos como sacerdotes pintores). Dos artistas que empezaron siendo monjes fueron Josetsu, que pintó el Hyonen-zu (Tratandode Coger un Bagro con una Calabaza) y Shobun, que refinaron y perfeccionaron el estilo japonésde sansui-ga. Aunque estos dos eran maestros por derecho propio, fue Sesshu, a su regreso de laChina de Ming en 1469, el que produjo la primera obra maestra original japonesa de un paisajepintado con tinta. Sesshu no pertenecía al círculo pictórico de la capital, sino que vivía en elcampo, mezclándose con gentes de todas clases, y dedicándose a crear obras de suiboku-ga, quereflejaban genuinamente el espíritu japonés. Sus obras representativas son Amanohashidate-zu,Sansui Chokan (Paisajes de las cuatro estaciones), Shuto Sansui-zu (Paisajes de otoño e Invierno)y Haboku Sansui-zu (Paisajes). Desde tiempos antiguos, los japoneses habían tenido preferencia por los jardines creados por el hombre que imitaban a la naturaleza. El amor a la naturaleza preconocido por el Zen seguramente contribuyó a ello, ya que numerosos monjes Zen, entre ellos Muso Kokushi, llegaron a ser expertos en el arte de la jardinería del paisaje. Estos monjes desarrollaron un nuevo estilo de jardinería, confinando la amplitud de lanaturaleza de un modo simbólico. Un número limitado de árboles y de rocas eran suficientes parasugerir toda la naturaleza en sí, al igual que las pinturas de paisajes monocromas que esos mismosmonjes tanto apreciaban. El jardín de Saihoji es un buen ejemplo. También aparecían jardines queexpresaban la gran extensión de la naturaleza solamente con rocas y arena. Llamados jardines deroca o kare sansui (paisaje seco), pueden verse ejemplos de ellos en el Daisen-in de Daitoku-ji yen Ryoanji.3.5. ARTE Y SENSIBILIDAD JAPONESES EN LA EDAD PRE-MODERNA
  • 46. 3.5.1. La cultura de la ciudad-castillo y los castillos Después de la Rebelión Onin de 1467, Japón entró en su Período de Guerras Civiles. Variosdaimyo o señores feudales establecieron feudos, que eran en realidad entidades políticasindependientes. En lugar del antiguo sistema de estado, formaron organizaciones feudales en lascuales el daimyo del Período de las Guerras Civiles era en su mayoría advenedizos de familiasprovincianas anteriormente poderosas. La Edad Pre-Moderna del Japón puede decirse queempieza cuando los tres héroes Nobunaga Oda, Hideyoshi Toyotomi y Ieyasu Tokugawa,establecieron sucesivamente un dominio unido sobre esos numerosos daimyo y sus aliados. En elaspecto artístico, la Edad Pre-Moderna en Japón incluye tanto el período Momoyama como elEdo. El Período Momoyama, que fue el comienzo de la Edad-Premoderna, es el períodosubsiguiente a la unificación del país por Nobunaga Oda en 1573 -- que marcó la caída delShogunato Muromachi -- hasta la caída de la Familia Toyotomi en 1615. En este período, junto con la estabilización política, se registró un desarrollo industrial yeconómico, factores que se reflejaron directamente en la cultura. Se destruyeron viejas formas y elpueblo desarrolló nuevas fuerzas que produjeron un fenómeno cultural real, positivo y fresco. Elespíritu de mente abierta de los nuevos gobernantes también se reflejó en el resplandor sinprecedente de esa edad. La creatividad japonesa empezó a desempeñar un papel en nuevas áreasde la vida. El contacto con el Occidente, que había sido casi inexistente, también aumentó,trayendo consigo cambios en la vida de las gentes. Por primera vez, los japoneses se dieron cuentade la situación del Japón en el globo terrestre y en el mapa mundial, y empezaron a ensanchar suvisión del mundo. Su sentido de lo maravilloso y del misterio se estimuló con la cultura materialde Occidente, incluyendo las armas de fuego, al igual que con la cultura espiritual de laCristianidad con su fe en un Dios Absoluto. La madurez de la sociedad feudal y el desarrollo del comercio urbano vio surgir ricosmercaderes con enorme poder financiero. Mientras los líderes guerreros trataban de controlar elmovimiento de estos mercaderes en las ciudades bajo su gobierno, éstos tenían a su vez laposibilidad de aumentar su influencia a través de una estrecha relación con los líderes feudales.Bajo ese sistema especial, el castillo y la ciudad a su alrededor fomentaron una cultura vigorosa ymuy creativa sobre el fondo del comercio urbano y de ultramar. Al establecer un feudo, un daimyo construía un castillo semipermanente en el centro de sufeudo, en terreno llano, donde el tráfico era más fácil, y edificaba una ciudad alrededor delcastillo. Un castillo era una instalación militar natural, pero durante las largas guerras civiles ycon la introducción de las armas de fuego, los señores feudales habían hecho sus castillos mássofisticados militarmente y mayores en tamaño que antes. Los castillos también servían demuestra del poder de un señor feudal; esta función, sin embargo, requería la edificación de torresque se elevaran muy por encima del nivel del suelo. La torre japonesa (tenshukakusto)era unsingular edificio de muchos pisos, inventado por la creatividad japonesa. Como símbolo del poderde un líder, un castillo no solamente estaría provisto de una torre, sino que también tenía quellegar a ser un verdadero centro de artes plásticas tales como arquitectura, escultura, artesindustriales, pintura y jardinería, todo ello contribuyendo estéticamente al conjunto. De ese modo,el castillo a menudo perdía su carácter militar, en favor de otro más político y espiritual. El castillo de Azuchi respondía a ese tipo de estructura. Construido por orden de NobunagaOda en 1576, era un gran palacio donde todas las variedades de las artes plásticas se combinabanpara producir un despliegue de magnificencia política., financiera y militar. Se dice que la torretenía hasta siete pisos. El estilo de grandes alturas del castillo de Azuchi fue adoptado porHideyoshi Toyotomi, que lo aplicó al castillo de Osaka, al palacio Jurakudai, y al castillo Fushimien Kioto. El período fue de Edad de Oro para la construcción de castillos. El castillo Himeji,construido por Terumasa Ikeda y terminado en 1609, es representativo de la era. Su torre sigueintacta.
  • 47. Cuando un señor guerrero construía un castillo de este tipo o una gran residencia, deseabagrandes pinturas para embellecer el interior y contrataba artistas para decorar los biombosdeslizantes, las puertas de paneles de madera, los biombos plegables y los revestimientos deparedes. Estas pinturas se llamaban shokeki-ga (pinturas de tabique). La Escuela Artística Kanóera famosa por su estilo, que incorporaba rico colorido y líneas audaces y vigorosas. Trataban decombinar el color del Yamato-e con la composición de estilo Suiboku-ga. Aproximadamente poraquella época, un nuevo vigor y frescura se infundieron a lo que se había convertido en unaformalidad deslustrada. La Escuela Kano pintó frecuentemente magníficas flores y aves, quedibujaban con líneas firmes en tinta de la India y que luego pintaban con vistosos colores. Sucomposición a gran escala era nueva en la pintura japonesa, la cual hasta ese momento solamentehabía apreciado la sencilla elegancia y la delicadeza. Las pinturas decorativas en el castilloAzuchi, el castillo de Osakas y el palacio Jurakudai se atribuyen al más hábil artista de la época,Eitoku Kano; lo cierto es que se trata de una labor de grupo de los discípulos de Kano bajo sudirección. Las pinturas murales del templo Chishakuin y el biombo plegable "Pinos" por ToohakuHasegawa también son obras maestras de este período.3.5.2. Dos reflejos de la cultura japonesa: la ceremonia del té y el arreglo floral El té fue introducido en el Japón por monjes budistas, durante el Período Kamakura, comobebida medicinal. La ceremonia del té que se desarrolla alrededor de esta bebida es exclusiva delJapón. Fue ideada por Juko Murata, que sirvió al Shogun Yoshimasa (muerto en 1490), Juko eraun creyente que abogaba por llevar la vida de un recluso en armonía con la naturaleza y losfenómenos naturales. Durante el Período Muromachi, los señores guerreros y los ricos mercaderes, cuando sereunían para entablar discusiones políticas o comerciales, a menudo aprovechaban la ocasiónpara servir té. Era considerado un placer refinado el sentarse ociosamente en una tranquila sala deté, alejado de las preocupaciones de la vida del exterior, y escuchar el sonido del agua hirviendoen el hogar. Fue Sen-no-Rikyu, ciudadano de Sakai, quien elevó el acto de beber té a la categoríade arte. Sin embargo, debe tenerse en cuenta que pudo desarrollar el arte de la ceremonia del técomo lo hizo, en parte debido a sus antecedentes sociales. La ceremonia del té tenía dos características notables, desarrolladas bajo el patrocinio deHideyoshi Toyotomi y que reflejaban su propia vida y carácter. La conquista de la nación porHideyoshi constituyó el sometimiento del viejo gobierno central y de su arte a un poder provincialy agrícola. De ese modo, los magníficos palacios resplandecientes de oro y el decorado de la salade té, que sugería una humilde casa de campo con el tejado cubierto de paja, eran al mismotiempo heterogéneos y, sin embargo, dos caras de una misma moneda. Los señores guerreros y losricos mercaderes desplegaban magnificencia y esplendor en un ambiente de calma y demeditación. Si puede afirmarse que el alma de la ceremonia del té reside en "un momento dedescanso arrebatado a la presión del trabajo", o en la armonía de fuerzas centrífugas y centrípeta,la sala de té era, por consiguiente, un lugar de paz, confianza y donde reinaba la amistad. Una sala de té diseñada por Sen-no Rikyu podría parecer a primera vista muy simple inclusodemasiado pequeña, pero lo cierto es que estaba diseñada con la más cuidadosa y profundadeliberación, incluso en el detalle más mínimo. Tenía puertas corredizas cubiertas con papeljaponés traslúcido, blanco como la nieve. Los pilares eran en su mayor parte de madera quetodavía conservaba su corteza natural. El techo estaba hecho de bambú o de junco, y la estructuradesnuda de las paredes era altamente apreciada. Con el fin de crear el efecto de una cabaña deermitaño en la sala de té, se había suprimido toda ornamentación externa y toda decoración. Paradar una sensación wabi (gusto total) y de shibumi (sobriedad), se colocaban setos, escalones depierda, una palangana para las manos y linternas de piedra a lo largo de estrechas sendas que
  • 48. llevaban a la sala. Se tenía que preparar el espíritu para entrar en la sala de té, caminando por esepaso lineal. La habitación en sí era un espacio donde el espíritu tenía que llenarse. El Taian en elMyokian de Yamazaki es un buen ejemplo del ideal de Rikyu. La cerámica se fabricó en varias localidades, particularmente en la zona de Seto. La loza deSeto era un resultado de la fuerte influencia de la porcelana de la dinastía Sung. Impulsada por lapopularidad de la ceremonia del té, se inició la producción de utensilios de té en grandescantidades, especialmente en el distrito de Mino. Los tipos representativos son Seto guro (o negrode Seto) Shino, Kiseto (o Seto amarillo) y loza Oribe. Sus diseños y formas son magníficamentesofisticados y variados; y el avance técnico que representaban era extraordinario. Fue en Kioto,bajo la dirección de Sen-no-Rikyuu, que Chojiro desarrolló un nuevo arte de producción decerámica. Desarrolló un cuenco de té original japonés, el Rakuchawan, cuya forma es totalmentediferente de los tradicionales cuencos chinos (Tenmoku chawan) y los cuencos coreanos (Koraichawan). El arte de arreglo floral también empezó a prosperar por esta época. Había ya una tradición dearreglo de flores en jarrones, pero ahora las flores empezaban a arreglarse para enaltecer el valordel jarrón. Fue Senkei Ikenobo el que introdujo el arreglo floral en la sala de té. La EscuelaIkenobo obtuvo el apoyo total de las masas y se convirtió en la escuela representativa de este arte.Como podría esperarse, la decoración floral de la sala de té no debía aspirar a producir un efectode elegante belleza, sino que debía expresar pureza y sencillez en su esfuerzo por penetrar en lasprofundidades de la naturaleza. El mundo natural del Japón siempre ha proporcionado hermosas flores en todas las estacionesdel año, y su belleza ha decorado la sencilla vida cotidiana del pueblo japonés; esta belleza llegó atener un significado espiritual. A comienzo del Período Edo, el arreglo floral había ganado elnombre de Kadoo (el camino de la flor), con su connotación de disciplina espiritual. Desdeentonces, el arte del arreglo floral ha perdurado y florecido, dando nacimiento a muchas escuelas.3.5.3. Pintura costumbrista La estabilidad y la expansión urbana y comercial supuso el que los ciudadanos ordinariospudiesen desempeñar un papel más amplio en la sociedad. El biombo plegable Rakuchu Rakugaki (Vistas de Kioto y sus alrededores) por Eitoku Kano,probablemente pintado hacia el año 1574, representa la vida del pueblo llano en la bulliciosaciudad de Kioto. Las muchas pinturas costumbristas de aquellos tiempos describen la vida delibertad y de ocio de las gentes de la ciudad y el entretenimiento de los campesinos. La pinturacostumbrista se destacó también porque abrió un nuevo campo en el arte japonés. Fue en la primera parte del Período Edo que tuvo lugar una gran transición en la pinturacostumbrista: los temas retratados empezaron a ser elegidos no de la vida del exterior sino de ladel interior, y el número de personas pintadas empezó a disminuir gradualmente. La pinturacostumbrista empezó a representar jóvenes de ambos sexos (como el Biombo Plegable Hikone),cortesanos cuya belleza fisica era el foco de interés (el Biombo Plegable Matsuura y otros) ychicas de casas de baño (que trabajaban en casas de baños públicos). Más adelante se llegó apintar hermosas mujeres solas.3.6. DESARROLLO DE LAS CIUDADES Y NACIMIENTO DE LACULTURA CIUDADANA
  • 49. La Familia Tokugawa, que sucedió en el poder a la familia Toyotomo, trasladó el Shogunato aEdo (la actual Tokio). Con su estímulo al saber y a las artes, el centro de la cultura también sedesplazó a Edo. El Período Edo siguió desde la caída de los Toyotomi en 1615 hasta larestauración del poder al Emperador en 1867, cubriendo una etapa de casi 300 años. En tiempodel tercer Shogun Tokugawa, Iemitsu, el Shogunato había consolidado firmemente su poder yconstituido el gobierno central del Japón. El confucianismo Chu Hsi sentó las bases teóricas delgobierno Tokugawa. La metafísica del confucianismo proponía la oposición de las fuerzascósmicas, cielo y tierra, lo positivo y lo negativo, cuya presencia en la naturaleza trata de justificarun orden jerárquico en el mundo humano. De este modo, la distinción de clases sociales en lasesferas militar, agrícola, industrial y comercial se estableció como el orden básico de sociedad nosujeto a cambios. No obstante, a medida que se expansionaba la economía comercial, la clase agrícola yguerrera que dependía del producto de la tierra empezó a padecer la pobreza, mientras que elpoder de la clase mercantil en cuyas manos descansaba el capital comercial, siguió aumentando.Sin embargo, podía considerarse que, en conjunto, los niveles de todas las clases habían subido enlos anteriores períodos, y una indicación de ello estaba en la expansión de la cultura entre lasmasas.3.6.1. Nacimiento del kabuki El prototipo del Kabuki era una modalidad de danza en la cual aparecían mujeres vistiendotrajes insólitos. Nacida en Kioto a principios del Período Edo, la danza fue llamada Kabuki Odoriy se caracterizaba por su estilo libre, su innovación y su sensualidad. Estos primitivos bailes yfolletines se transformaron en obras de teatro con una estructura dramática concreta. Finalmente,las mujeres fueron suprimidas de los escenarios por temor a posibles desórdenes civiles quepudieran provocar los hombres que rivalizaban por conseguir los favores de aquéllas, y loshombres mayores se transformaron en intérpretes serios de lo que se dio en llamar Kabuki. Laobras de teatro trataban de historia, leyendas y vida contemporánea, y predominaban los temas dehumanidad, lealtad y amor. Hacia mediados del Período Edo, surgieron numerosas obras decalidad, gracias a las cuales el Kabuki llegó a ser el drama tradicional del Japón. El escenario Kabuki heredó la forma del escenario No (el No es una danza dramática con susmás remotos orígenes en el Período Heian)que en sus principios el auditorio presenciaba sentandoen el suelo, al aire libre. Más adelante, sin embargo, los teatros Kabuki, de dos plantas contejados, hicieron su aparición y el escenario desarrolló su propia forma, equipado con una estrechaprolongación del escenario en el auditorio, conocida como "hanamichio" (camino florido) y untelón. En la segunda mitad del Siglo XVIII, se ideó una elaborada tramoya, incluyendo partesgiratorias y elevadoras. El programa para la representación de un día adquirió una forma definidaen la que se incluían una obra histórica, una obra de la vida y la manera de ser contemporáneas, yuna obra adicional de baile. La prioridad de actuación por encima de cualquier otra consideraciónen el Kabuki ha hecho que se preste un gran importancia a la herencia del nombre familiar y a latradición representativa.3.6.2. Arte en el período de madurez cultural A medida que la sensibilidad artística se extendía entre las masas, los artistas del Período Edodisfrutaban de una prosperidad sin precedentes. La Escuela Kano se había establecido en un ambiente de bienestar, convirtiéndose en escuelaoficial patrocinada por el gobierno, y como resultado, su arte se hizo banal. Los artistas que no
  • 50. estaban al servicio del gobierno reaccionaron contra el dominio de la Escuela Kano, y crearonmuchos grupos nuevos, tales como las escuelas Sootatsu-Koorin y Maruyama-Shinjo, Bunjin-ga,Nuevo Yamato-e, Ukiyo-e y el estilo occidental. La Escuela Sootatsu-Koorin trató de reencarnar la tradición del Yamato-e, dándole una nuevafaceta decorativa. Los biombos plegables de Sootatsu Tawaraya representando el “Cuento deGenji”, “Danza Bugaku” y “Dios del Viento y Dios del Trueno”, así como los de Koorin Ogata“Iris” y “Flores Rojas y Blancas de Ciruelo” son un a muestra del fresco estilo de esta escuela. El Bunjin-ga, que tomó como modelo la escuela meridional de la pintura china de las dinastíasMing y Ching, fue notable por su individualidad y su falta de espíritu mundano. El pueblo calificóeste tipo de pintura como algo diferente de las obras tipo artesano de los pintores profesionales.Los maestros de este tipo de pintura fueron muchos, entre otros, Taiga Ikeno, Yosa-no-Buson,Gyokudoo Uragami, Mokubei Aoki, Chikuden Tanomura, Bunchoo Tani y Kazan Watanabe. OOkyo Maruyama y Goshun Matsumura pusieron énfasis en las imágenes realistas de lanaturaleza. En cuanto a la técnica, perseguían exactamente lo contrario de la Escuela Kano, yprodujeron un estilo ligero y fácil. El Período Edo es desde luego significativo por el hecho de que en esta nueva etapa tuvo lugarel primer contacto con el arte occidental. A finales del Siglo XVIII y principios del XIX, KokanShiba, un protegido de Gennai Hiraga, estudioso de lo holandés, obtuvo libros sobre pintura alóleo y aguafuerte en Nagasaki, ampliando de este modo el panorama del arte japonés. Shibarealizó trabajos en el campo de la medicina ilustrativa, de la astronomía y de la geografía, y almismo tiempo introdujo notables innovaciones en la pintura de paisaje tridimensional utilizandola perspectiva y el sombreado de estilo occidental.3.6.3. Renacimiento clásico y el hermoso maki-e (laca oro) Paralelamente al desarrollo de la cultura de masas sentimental y popular, se desarrollaronesfuerzos para elevar el nivel de las artes clásicas, tradicionales y decorativas. Al aumentar elnivel vida, también creció la demanda de una gran variedad de artesanía industrial. En una épocaen que la maquinaria estaba todavía en una fase primitiva, los artesanos diestros en trabajosminuciosos eran requeridos incluso para la producción de artículos tales como objetos de laca,cerámica y porcelana, así como artículos tejidos y teñidos. Esta necesidad llevó al desarrollo delas artes manuales tradicionales. La figura central en el campo de la artesanía fué Kooetsu HonAmi (1558 - 1637). Nacido en el seno de una familia de especialistas en la valoración de espadas,mostró unas aptitudes poco comunes en las artes visuales, caligrafía, lacado en oro y cerámica. Sumeta consistía en integrar todas las artes decorativas en una. Un grupo de artesanos dirigidos porKooetsu estableció sus talleres en una montaña al noroeste de Kioto, Takagamine. Aquí llegaron aedificar un pueblo de artesanos, creando de ese modo un grupo unido por su devoción a laocupación artística. Kooetsu era realmente el primer artista decorativo japonés del que se puedadecir que difería de un artesano profesional. Los ideales de Kooetsu pueden apreciarse en sus objetos de laca. La historia del lacado en oroes muy antigua, remontándose hasta el Período Nara. Lleva implícita la técnica más desarrolladade toda la obra de lacado en oro incluso para los muebles de sus habitaciones y la decoración delinterior de los templos. Desde ese período, han ido produciéndose muchas obras excelentes, lacaja lacada en oro "Puente de Barcas", audaz y refinada, de Kooetsu, y la caja lacada en oro"Puente de las Ocho Tablas", de Koorin Ogata, del mismo estilo, son las más nobles y pertenecena la categoría de las mejores.
  • 51. 3.6.4. Cerámica El arte de la cerámica, que floreció en el Período Momoyama gracias a la popularidad de laceremonia de té, siguió desarrollándose aún después del final de esa era. A comienzos del PeríodoEdo (en 1616), se descubrió una mina de caolín en Arita, en la actual prefectura de Saga, y seprodujeron las primeras obras japonesas de porcelana. Esta loza blanca se hizo pronto popular.Fue después de que Kakiemon Sakaida creara la primera pieza de porcelana decorada conesmalte, a finales del Período Kanei (1624 - 1644), que los hornos de porcelana de la región deHizen hicieron rápidos progresos. Como la porcelana de Hizen se transportaba desde el puerto deImari a otras ciudades del Japón, también se les llamó artículos de Imari. La técnica aplicada aquíse transmitió a otras zonas y dio origen a la loza Kokutani. En Kioto, Ninsei Nomura añadió sus propias ideas creadoras a la técnica de fundir oro y plataen superficies de cerámica y empezó a producir hermosas cerámicas esmaltadas en color, quesirvieron de base para el desarrollo y la popularidad de la loza Kyo. El discípulo de Ninsei,Kenzan Ogata, llegó aún más lejos en su creación de cerámica elegante y añadió mayor renombrea la loza Kyo. Por esta misma época, aproximadamente, también comenzó a producir la lozaNabeshima, con técnicas y gusto puramente japoneses.3.6.5. Popularidad del ukiyo-e "Ukiyo-e" significa la vida y costumbres de las masas contemporáneas. El Ukiyo-e es el estilode pintura creado por Moronobu Hishikawa alrededor del año 1681. Moronobu, que vivía entre elpueblo llano y que sentía como él, consiguió enaltecer el valor estético de esta pinturacostumbrista hasta merecer lacalificación de verdadero arte popular. Lacaracterística del Ukiyo-e, sin embargo, residía enque sus obras se vendían baratas bajo la forma deimpresiones en bloque de madera producidasen serie, y que se podían adquirir fácilmente.Se añadía una inteligente composición yrefinamiento para mayor efecto. Al principio,solamente aparecieron en el mercado grabadossimples en negro, monocromos, pero prontosurgieron "grabados en rojo", que utilizaban este color como tono principal, al cual se añadían elamarillo y el verde, y se abrió un nuevo campo en la historia de la pintura japonesa. La venta de grabados Ukiyo-e en grandes cantidades fue un fenómeno paralelo a la expansiónde obras literarias en forma de libros impresos llamados Ukiyo-zoshi. Los temas de los Ukiyo-eeran los familiares y populares para las masas: las zonas de diversión, los teatros y la lucha sumo. La Escuela Torii, que incluía los artistas Kiyomoto y Kiyonobu Torii, desempeño un papelimportante en el desarrollo de la rama de Ukiyo-e llamada Yakusha-e (retrato de actores), y de esemodo también contribuyó al desarrollo del Kabuki en el Período Edo. También debe señalarse quela figura dominante en el Ukiyo-e cuando comenzó a adquirir más independencia como tipo dearte pictórico de la pintura costumbrista fue Masanobu Okumura. El "Ukiyo" del Ukiyo-e y del Ukiyo-zoshi, se refieren, como se indicó anteriormente, a la viday costumbres contemporáneas, pero también tenían la connotación de libertinos. A medida que pasaba el tiempo, las técnicas de grabados en plancha de madera se volvieroncada vez más intrincadas, culminando en el grabado de Ukiyo-e a todo color conocido comoNishiki-e.
  • 52. Aparecieron maestros en el retrato de mujeres hermosas tales como Harunobu SuzukiKiyonaga Torii y Utamaro Kitagawa. Pintaban mujeres japonesas extremadamente elegantes yhermosas, pero a sus obras les faltaba individualidad, necesitaban energía y a menudo sugeríanuna sociedad decadente. Entre estas obras, las que representaban actores de Kabuki de TooshuusaiSharaku conseguían en un grado más alto captar el carácter individual, pero al parecer sus obrasno eran bien apreciadas en su época. En el momento en que los temas de retrato y de pinturacostumbrista parecían haber agotado sus posibilidades, cobraron auge los grabados de paisajesUkiyo-e. Las Treinta y Seis Vistas del Monte Fuji, de Hokusai Katsushika, las Cincuenta y TresEstaciones en el Tokaido, de Hiroshige Ando y otras excelentes obras hicieron su aparición. Estosgrabados Ukiyo-e también influenciaron mucho a los artistas impresionistas de Occidente.3.7. HUNDIMIENTO DE LA SOCIEDAD FEUDAL Y LA MODERNIZACION La Restauración Meiji de 1868 marcó la fase de la modernización japonesa, por donde lasdiversas energías nuevas que habían estado acumulando su impulso bajo el antiguo sistemasalieron de repente a la luz. Durante este noble período, el Japón dio fin a su aislamiento y a laexistencia feudal, y surgió para abrirse camino en el mundo internacional como nación moderna.En lo que a historia cultural se refiere, fue una época en que Japón empezó a absorber lasmodernas culturas de Europa y América. A partir de esta época, la cultura occidental ha seguidoentrando en el país. En 1867, el Shogunato Tokugawa sufrió un colapso, como si se lo hubiese tragado unaavalancha, y se estableció un nuevo gobierno con el Emperador como jefe nominal. La caída delShogunato fue provocada por el nacimiento del antiextranjerismo expresado en forma de unnacionalismo ingenuo entre los japoneses, que se habían visto obligados a observar de cerca lamoderna fuerza militar de Europa y América cuando el Comodoro Perry obligó al Japón a abrirsus puertas al mundo exterior en 1853. Este antiextranjerismo, expresado por el slogan "excluir alos extranjeros" estaba vinculado con el concepto de la lealtad imperial expresado como"reverenciar al Emperador" y despertó una conciencia nacionalista absoluta, dirigida hacia launificación del pueblo bajo el Emperador como gobernante. La considerable energía que estoprodujo, llevó a la caída del Shogunato, aunque también existía el hecho de una elevadaconciencia política entre las clases más bajas de la sociedad. El establecimiento de un nuevo gobierno por parte de los leales que habían presionado alshogunato con su antiextranjerismo trajo consigo un brusco cambio de actitud y la asimilaciónactiva de la cultura europea y americana. Estos esfuerzos no se limitaban a los asuntos militares,sino que incluían el estudio de los sistemas económicos, judiciales y políticos. Fue en estacoyuntura que el capitalismo japonés empezó a desarrollarse. El nuevo gobierno no estaba ligadoa su feudalismo inherente; adoptó mediadas completas y deliberadas de "ilustración cultural", queincluían la abolición completa de las rígidas distinciones de clases. El gobierno también tomó lainiciativa de adoptar un sistema constitucional, promulgando la Constitución Imperial de Meiji en1889, e implantando un sistema de monarquía constitucional. La economía japonesa se desarrolló rápidamente tras la entrada en vigor de la Constitución, yen menos de 60 años el Japón surgió como estado capitalista moderno. La rápida modernizacióndel Japón, sin embargo, creó numerosos problemas subsidiarios. Los dirigentes del Japón de esaépoca se sentían débiles en medio de la influencia poderosa de las potencias mundiales, yreflejaban una impaciencia y un sentimiento de frustración que les llevó a tratar los problemasinternacionales transformándose en un país militarmente fuerte. Aquí radican los límites demodernización democrática de los japoneses. Más allá de estos límites se encuentra el camino
  • 53. hacia la militarización, que alcanzó su culminación en la Guerra del Pacífico, una tragedia que noobstante proporcionó al Japón la posibilidad de renacer.3.7.1. Encuentro de las culturas tradicional y occidental Ya hemos hablado del modo según el cual puede considerarse la modernización en el Japóncomo un proceso de asimilación de la cultura occidental. Durante el Período Tokugawa, el Japónhabía seguido una política de aislamiento, restringiendo su contacto con el mundo exterior alcomercio solamente con China y Holanda, en la isla de Dejima, en Nagasaki. Por cuanto estapolítica se derivaba de un deseo de mantener el statu quo y perpetuar indefinidamente el gobiernode Tokugawa, no es extraño que los nuevos inventos y descubrimientos no fueran recibidos. Elresultado, por supuesto, fue que cuando el Japón salió de su aislamiento, estaba, en el área de latecnología, muy por detrás de las potencias occidentales. Sin embargo, en el campo de la literatura y del arte, el Período Tokugawa contempló elentusiasta desarrollo de varios campos, que llevaban al florecimiento de los elementos distintivosde la cultura japonesa. Con todo, el contacto con el Occidente que tuvo lugar al final del PeríodoTokugawa condujo inicialmente a una toma de conciencia de la superioridad científica ytecnológica de Occidente, especialmente en los terrenos militar y médico. Por consiguiente, unode los primeros pasos emprendidos por el gobierno Meiji tras su comienzo fue la adopción de unapolítica de "civilización e ilustración", incluyendo el esfuerzo para introducir tecnologíaextranjera. La introducción de tecnología necesitaba una organización social y una conciencia capaces deabsorberla. Así pues, el propio gobierno Meiji, instrumentó reformas mediante la total abolicióndel sistema vigente, así como de los clanes, y la institución de un sistema prefectural en 1878.Además, aunque Japón ya se preciaba de poseer el mayor índice mundial de asistencia escolar,conseguido a través de su sistema de escuela primaria privada en el Período Tokugawa, elgobierno instituyó en 1872 un sistema de educación primaria general. Este sistema subrayabaexclusivamente la importancia de la adqusición de las capacidades de "leer, escribir y aritmética(el ábaco)", intentando de ese modo proporcionar una educación popular adecuada a la sociedadmoderna. La educación superior también registró un avance gracias a la contratación denumerosos occidentales, con salarios extraordinariamente altos, para que sirvieran de profesores yde consultores. Esta medida fue paralela al incremento del número de japoneses que fueron aestudiar a países occidentales. No eran solamente unas cuantas personas de la élite los quepudieron estudiar la cultura occidental, sino que mediante traducciones el número de personascapaces de beneficiarse se multiplicó varias veces. Este período se califica a veces como una “era de cultura accidentalizada”. Aunque estopudiera ser excesivo, lo cierto es que fue una época en que se adoptaron las costumbres de unmodo un tanto superficial, provocando una reacción que daba excesivo énfasis a la culturatradicional. No se puede negar que la cultura occidental estaba, no obstante, extendiéndose profundamentee influenciando la vida del pueblo. Sin embargo, lo que ocurría más frecuentemente era unencuentro entre las dos culturas, dando por resultado un estímulo mutuo, o, a menudo en las artes,una coalescencia de formas altamente deseable. Las formas poéticas tradicionales waka y haiku,por ejemplo, estaban en decadencia, pero experimentaron una completa transformación amediados del Período Meiji, a través de un movimiento de reforma dirigido por Skiko Yosano yShiki Masaoka de este modo ambas formas llegaron a ocupar puestos importamte en la literatura,junto con el Shintaishi (poesía de nuevo estilo) que los poetas japoneses habían aprendido de laliteratura occidental.
  • 54. En lo que respecta a las artes visuales, la situación era al principio deprimente.Inmediatamente después de la Restauración Meiji, dominaban el cambio social radical y elutilitarismo, llevando a una tendencia a tomar a la ligera el arte tradicional. Fue la llegada a Japóndel inglés Charles Wirgman y de dos italianos, Antonio Fontanesi y Vincenzo Ragusa, lo queintrodujo modernas técnicas europeas de pintura y de escultura, y ésto dio lugar a un nuevo tipode pintura japonesa. Surgieron muchos excelentes pintores modernos de estilo occidental, entreellos, Yuichi Takahashi, Seiki Kuroda, Takeji Fujishima y Shigeru Aoki. El americano Ernest Fenollosa recalcó la importancia del valor inherente del arte clásicojaponés. Se puso en marcha el movimiento de Tenshin Okakura para restablecer el arte japonés ensu lugar merecido. En 1888 fue fundada la Escuela de Arte de Tokio (Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko),estableciendo una nueva base del estilo japonés de pintura. Fueron activos en ese período HoogaiKanoo, Gahoo Hashimoto, Taikan Yokoyama, Shunsoo Hishida y otros, todos ellos dedicados ala pintura de estilo japonés. Pese al intercambio técnico que tuvo lugar entre la pintura japonesa y la de estilo occidental, oa los intentos de combinar los instrumentos japoneses y occidentales en el campo de la música, lasdiferencias esenciales prevalecen y seguirán prevaleciendo, entre estas dos formas de expresión delas respectivas culturas. En el campo de la ciencia y la tecnología, Japón no poseía una tradición para competir con lade Occidente, pero en el terreno del arte, Japón sí tenía una tradición rica y madura que estabadestinada a sobrevivir y a seguir desarrollándose con la asimilación del arte occidental. Incluso enlas áreas del arte como el Kabuki o la música de estilo japonés, que ofrecían de por sí pocasposibilidades de desarrollo, se realizan esfuerzos para conservar la tradición del pasado. El Japón contemporáneo da la impresión de ser una mezcla de diversas variedades de culturaimportada, que parece haber arrollado la cultura japonesa nativa. Pero al reflexionar se descubreque hay aquí un elemento muy japonés. La historia de la cultura japonesa se caracteriza por audazaceptación y asimilación de las influencias extranjeras. En Japón existe un campo abonadodispuesto a aceptar todo tipo de culturas, pero el campo está condicionado por la naturaleza yotras circunstancias japonesas, que indican las dos características básicas que han caracterizadodesde hace tiempo la cultura japonesa: adaptabilidad y multiplicidad. Historia Cultural del Japón Una Perspectiva, By Yutaka Tazawa, et al, Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Japan, 1973
  • 55. CAPITULO CUARTO 4. RELIGIONES4.1. Kami, the Foundation of Japanese Culture Ishida IchiroIn this essay I will explain as concretely as the first is magical in nature, the secondpossible the nature of the Japanese belief in religious. The difference between the twokami, a word sometimes misleadingly indicates that there are also two types oftranslated as “gods.” kami (spirits and kami). According to the myths in the early-eighth-4.1.1. From spirits to kami century Kojiki (Record of Ancient Matters), Let us begin by looking at the prayers, when the kami looked down from the field ofcalled norito, that priests of Shinto (the Way High Heaven, they observed that the treeof the kami) recite. Two types of norito are roots, grasses, and all of nature chattered likefound in the Engi shiki (Procedure of the buzzing mayflies by day and emitted an eerieEngi Era), compiled early in the Heian glow by night. When the heavenly kami tookperiod (794-1185): the Hoshizume no stalks of rice down to earth, the spirits (kami)Matsuri prayer to pacify the kami of fire and of nature stopped their gibbering and grewthe Toshigoi no Matsuri prayer for an quiet. And the Nihon shoki (Chronicle ofabundant harvest in the autumn. Japan), also compiled early in the eighth The prototypical prayer to propitiate the century, records two instances, in the time ofspirit of fire is “O kami of fire, we offer you the early emperors, of swollen rivers beinggreens, mud, water, and gourds, so please be pacified when gourds were thrown into theat peace.” The basic form of the harvest rushing waters. This suggests that the spiritsprayer is “O kami, you said you would make (kami) of mountains, rivers, tree roots,the rice plants bear fruit. We labor in the grasses, and other elements of nature livedmuddy fields, so please protect the rice on even after the kami of the age of wet-riceplants from storm and flood and make them cultivation had emerged.fruitful.” The first type of prayer seeks to The eighth-century Hitachi no kuni fūdoki,work directly upon the object of the petition; a record of the natural features and customsthe second requests the kami’s help. Thus, of the ancient province of Hitachi (part of
  • 56. Ibaraki Prefecture), includes an interesting extended their lineage back to mythical timesstory indicating the way in which the nature and thus further consolidated their authority.kami (spirits) survived. The fudoki begins by At that time, however, kami wererelating that the aboriginal people of Hitachi enshrined but never entombed, whereaslived in caves and holes and subsisted by human beings were entombed but neverhunting and gathering, but then they took to enshrined. Although the kami abhorred theraiding the fields of the wet-rice cultivators pollution of death, people built large tombswho settled there. In the time of the sixth- and conducted elaborate funerary rites, as wecentury emperor Keitai a man named Yahazu know from groups of clay figurinesno uji Matachi was clearing land for paddies connected with such rites excavated fromin a valley when a horde of great horned ancient tumuli.serpents (called yato no kami) descended It was at this stage of history, in the sixthfrom the mountains and ravaged his new century, that Buddhism was brought tolands. Infuriated, Matachi donned his armor, Japan, whereupon a most unusual religiousmounted his horse and rode away the phenomenon appeared, a division of laborserpents brandishing his sword. Some he cut between buddhas and kami: People began todown, and the rest he drove back into the entrust the welfare of spirits of the dead tomountains. He then raised a palisade and dug the buddhas, while praying to the kami fora moat between the mountains and his land the peace and prosperity of the living.and announced, “Everything from here on is Thereafter the history of the concept of kamiyour land. Everything on this side I declare was shaped by changes in the relationship ofto be my fields. I will build a shrine for you, kami and buddhas.so torment me no more.” The accountconcludes by stating that the practice of 4.1.3. Buddha manifest as kamienshrining these ancient serpentine kami of When Buddhism entered Japan, there wasthe mountains continues “even now.” conflict between those loyal to the kami and those endorsing the “foreign gods” or4.1.2. The advent of Buddhism and the “barbarian gods,” as the buddhas anddivision of labor between kami and bodhisattvas of the new religion were called.buddhas In the Nara period (710-94), however, the As wet-rice cultivation progressed, concept of kami as guardians of the Buddhistpowerful clans emerged. They adopted teaching—the idea that the kami aided theagricultural kami as tutelary deities and propagation of Buddhism—developed. In thegoverned by “divine right.” The clan leaders Heian period it was believed that kami, likereasoned that if they were recognized as human beings, suffered from worldlydescendants of the kami revered by the passions and likewise depended on thepeople of their domains, they would gain the buddhas for salvation. People began to reciteauthority to conclude priestly rites and would Buddhist scriptures, erect Buddhist pagodas,thus ensure their lineage. They managed this and build Buddhist temples for the sake ofby creating legends of marriage between kami.kami and human beings. Such unions Around the middle of that period, however,resulted when a kami descended either from when Buddhism had spread to the commonthe heavens or from a mountain peak and people, a new concept developed—that thewedded a beautiful maiden. Their son was buddhas and bodhisattvas of India werethe progenitor of the clan. Meanwhile, the manifest in the form of kami in Japan. Thisclan had buried their chiefs and other leading theory, known as “honji suijaku” (originalfigures in imposing tumuli to display their substance and manifest traces), attained itspower. By devising legend of couplings mature form in the Kamakura periodbetween kami and humans, the clans (1185-1333), when every kami was identified with a particular Buddha or bodhisattva. In
  • 57. the thirteenth century “honji suijaku” took a Zongaku (1290-1373), the son of Shinran’snew twist. Now it was believed that buddhas great-grand-son Kakunyo (1270-1351),and bodhisattvas could also manifest wrote in the Shoshin honkai shū (The Truethemselves in human form and that after Will of Kami): “The kami of Japan are ofdeath such people became kami, as in the two kinds, gonshin [buddhas andcase of the court scholar and poet Sugawara bodhisattvas in the form of kami] and jisshinno Michizane (845-903). This theory was [human beings who have become kami afterpropounded in the Gukanshō, a history by death]. Gonshin are the manifest traces ofJien (1155-1225), an eminent priest of the buddhas and bodhisattvas, and because allTendai sect of Buddhism, and in the the buddhas and bodhisattvas accept Amidathirteenth-century Kitano tenjin engi emaki, a as their fundamental teacher and as thepictorial scroll depicting the life of original Buddha, the true will of all kami isMichizane and the building of Kitano Tenjin, to convert the Japanese people to faith ina shrine in Kyoto dedicated to him. Amida. Therefore it is acceptable to pray toMichizane had died in exile, his downfall gonshin, though if you pray to Amida therebrought about by court slander, and his spirit is no deed to pray to kami. As for jisshin,had been enshrined to appease it lest it vent they are deceased fathers and grandfathersits spleen at an unjust fate by visiting who have been enshrined as kami and whosemisfortune on the living. The original tombs have been made into shrines.building (hokora) dedicated to his spirit Therefore essentially they are ordinaryeventually became a full-blown shrine human beings, and you must not pray to(jinja). them lest they curse you. This variant of “honji suijaku” prevailed in With the deification of human beings,the Kamakura period and on into the Shinto began to assert its independence fromMuromachi period (1392-1573). Early on, in Buddhism. In the thirteenth century thethe 1350s, tales of this variant of “honji Watarai family of priests of the Outer Shrinesuijaku” were compiled in the Shintōshū by of Ise Grand Shrine compiled the ShintoAgui. A fifteenth-century scroll relates in gobu sho (Five Books of Shinto) expoundingpictorial form that the bodhisattva so-called Ise Shinto, which focused onAvalokiteshvara (known as Kannon in worship of kami of Ise Grand Shrine. And inJapan) had been a queen of the ancient the Muromachi period, in reaction to theIndian kingdom of Magadha. She had been popular philosophy of the fundamental unityassassinated but had come to life again and of the “three teachings”—Confucianism,flown to Japan, where she had become the Taoism, and Buddhism—Yoshida Kanetomokami of Kumano, in present-day Wakayama (1435-1511) propounded the “anti-honjiPrefecture. suijaku thesis that the buddhas and bodhisattvas were actually manifestations of4.1.4. The deification of human beings kami. His teaching, known as Yoshida Following the Mongol invasion of 1274 Shinto, called the original kami Daigenand 1281, a major change in the concept of Sonshin (the Great Original Kami).kami occurred. Shinran (1173-1262), the Gradually, however, Neo-Confucianism,founder of the Jōdo Shin (True Pure Land) based on the teachings of Zhuxi (Chu Hsi),sect of Buddhism, had taught that believers exerted an ever-stronger influence on Shinto,should put their faith exclusively in the leading to syntheses of Confucian and ShintoBuddha Amitabha (Amida in Japanese), teachings. In the transition from thepraying to no other buddhas and no kami. As Momoyama (1582-1603) to the Tokugawahis descendants spread his teachings through (1603-1868) period, the warlord Toyotomithe countryside, Amitabha and the Hideyoshi (1536-1598), who unified Japanindigenous kami achieved a rapprochement. after a prolonged period of strife among the rulers (daimyo) of regional domains, was
  • 58. enshrined in Hōkoku shrine after his death, When the intellectual climate (x) changesand Tokugawa Ieyasu (1542-1616), who from x1 to x 2, the kami respond by altering indefeated the Toyotomi forces in battle and nature and form (y) from y1 to y2.founded the Tokugawa shogunate, was What, then, is the essence of kami (f)?posthumously enshrined in Tōshōgu shrine. First, through their worship the kami servedAs Neo-Confucianism spread during the to consolidate communities small and largeTokugawa period, so called Confucian linked by ties of consanguinity or geography.Shinto developed and everyone became a Second, the kami safeguarded the securitykami upon death and thus was to be and prosperity of the living. People pray toenshrined as a kami. the kami for help during life but did not ask During the transition from the Tokugawa them to succor the spirits of the dead; thatperiod to the Meiji era (1868-1912) of the was for the buddhas. Thus, the essence of themodern period, the domains, which had been kami is an amalgam of these two roles; insubmissive to the shogunate, became more other words, the kami represent theassertive. Many deified their titular founders. principles of the life-centeredness of theAnd with the establishment of the “familial community and the life-centered community.state” of the Meiji era—the concept of the It follows that they are the deification of thestate as one great family under the life will of the community as it manifestspaternalistic rule of the emperor—many past itself from one age to another. Specifically,emperors and loyal retainers were enshrined before the Mongol invasions of the thirteenthas kami. Yasukuni Jinja, a state shrine century shrines were dedicated only to kamidedicated to the spirits of all who had died in as defined above; after that, deified humanwar at home or abroad, was established in beings were also enshrined. Thus, whether orthe new capital of Tokyo. The government not human beings were enshrined as kamiproclaimed that Shinto was not a religion but has nothing to do with the essence of kamia system of “national morality,” a way of but represents only a variation, a change inrepaying the debt of gratitude to ancestors, terms of the functions x and y in the equationand required all subjects to pay homage to above.the kami. The great number of kami and rites surviving since ancient times has led some4.1.5. The nature of kami ethnologists to explain Shinto in terms of When it comes to actually defining kami, animism or shamanism: others havethis historical overview may seem more concluded that kami are really ancestralconfusing than enlightening. But the very spirits and that the tomb is the prototype ofchanges over the centuries provide a major the shrine. In the light of the historicalclue to the nature of kami. The kami of Japan changes undergone by kami, I believe thathave swiftly altered in nature and form with these theories are erroneous and have misledevery shift in the intellectual climate over the people both in Japan and overseas.ages. This process can be expressed by theequation f (x) = y. The essence of kami is f.4.2. EL BUDISMO Y SHINTOISMO Buda significa la persona que ha visto la innumerables budas del pasado y apareceránverdad. Buda no es solamente Gautama innumerables budas en el futuro. Gautama esSiddhartha sino que debería haber algunos solamente uno de las budas.que vieron la verdad antes de Gautama y También, el budismo no es simplemente ladespués de él existe la posibilidad de que enseñanza de Gautama, porque en elmás budas aparezcan. Es decir, existen budismo nosotros mismos aprendemos la
  • 59. enseñanza y a nosotros mismos nos espera Hay básicamente dos caminos para serconvertirnos en buda. Entonces, ¿qué es los buda en el budísmo japonés: 1) el camino deque tenemos que hacer para ser buda? Hay jiriki (a través de su propio entrenamiento) ydos respuestas para esta pregunta: una es 2) el camino de tariki (dependiendo delcontestar con lo que Gautama enseñaba y la poder de otros. La primera manera de serotra es escribir sobre la enseñanza del buda es también el camino del zen. Pero estobudismo en Japón. La enseñanza original de implica una severa disciplina que la genteGautama es ver la vida como dolor. En común y corriente no puede seguir. Por esonuestra vida hay penas inevitables como el años después, se presentó entrenamiento másenvejecimiento, enfermedades, y la muerte. fácil de hacer. Este es el camino de tariki.El budismo empieza con el entendimiento de Como nuestro poder tiene sus límites,este hecho. Entonces ¿qué tenemos que hacer pedimos la ayuda de los budas. Es decir, unapara vencer estas adversidades? Vencerlas no buda llamado Amida tiene Joodo (una tierraes buscar panaceas para ella porque son pura o tierra de budas) que es un mundo decosas imposibles de obtener. Por eso lo que paz y tranquilidad. Si los que quieren pedir lael budismo busca no es el elixir sino aceptar ayuda de Amida cantan Namu Amidabutsu,las realidades como el envejecimiento, Amida promete que les hará renacer en elenfermedades, y la muerte. Cuando mundo de Joodo. La gente que canta estaaceptamos estas tres tal cual, la pena se plegaria teniendo absoluta creencia enresuelve. Gautama pensó así. Pero ¿cómo Amida, puede renacer en Joodo, que es ellograrlo? La razón por la cual nosotros no mundo de Amida, donde pueden ser budas apodemos aceptar el envejecimiento, las través del entrenamiento. Este es el caminoenfermedades, y la muerte es porque nos de tariki.apegamos a la juventud, la salud y a la vida. De todos modos hay el camino de jiriki y elPero este tipo de apego es demasiado fuerte de tariki y cualquiera de los dos quepara poder renunciar a él. tomemos, en el budismo se espera que Gautama nos enseñó Shukke, que significa nosotros nos volvamos budas. En otrasalejarse de su esposa, casa y propiedad. A palabras, el budismo no es solamente latravés de esta acción podemos eliminar el enseñanza del buda sino la enseñanza queapego y podemos ser budas. Esta es la nosotros seamos budas. Esta es laenseñanza original del budismo que se característica básica del budismo.originó en la India. La mayoría de los templos shintoistas automáticamente consideran creyentes a la gente que vive en sus alrededores. ¿Cuándo se formó el shintoismo? En realidad, fue cuando el budismo llegó a Japón que el shintoismo se estableció. Por supuesto, antes de la llegada del budismo, había una religión japonesa parecida al shintoismo, pero era algo inconsciente semejante a costumbres y convenciones. Sin embargo, la llegada del budismo hizo a los japoneses reconocer estas costumbres y convenciones como una religión japonesa. Fue en aquella época que el shintoismo se estableció. El shintoismo normalmente es inconsciente y convencional y cuando está consciente de otras religiones, se activa. Cuando el budismo vino a mediados del siglo seis, el shintoismo se hizo
  • 60. activo. El budismo es una religión extranjera Período Edo el budismo tenía, por decirloy la gente del shintoismo con frecuencia así, la posición de la religión nacional. Elcriticaba el budismo diciendo que los dioses gobierno Meiji, tenía la teocracia como lajaponeses se iban a poner furiosos. Pero idea básica de la política, subyugó alcuando el budismo se naturalizó, el budismo colocándolo por de bajo delshintoismo se volvió nuevamente inactivo. shintoismo, deseando crear una nuevaEn el momento que el budismo se reconoce religión. Por eso, se impulsó el movimientocomo una religión extrajera por una razón u de supresión del budismo. Pero esta campañaotra, el shintoismo se activa de nuevo y se no duró mucho tiempo porque el budismohace un principio para excluir al budismo. había echado raíces bastante profundas en laEsto fue hasta el fin del período Edo cuando mente de los japoneses y también porqueel gobierno de Meiji hizo la exclusión del había peligro de que si se reprimía elbudismo basado en el principio de budismo, el cristianismo avanzaría. Elexclusividad del shintoismo que se reactivó. gobierno, que tenía miedo de la expansiónPor algunos años después de la llegada del del cristianismo, cambió su camino tomandobudismo al Japón, hubo un movimiento de la política de la moralización del puebloposición a dicha religión, pero no pasó japonés con la ayuda del budismo ymucho tiempo para que el budismo echara shintoismo. Es decir, subordinar el budismoraíces en la tierra japonesa. Por mucho al shintoismo y obligarles a ayudar altiempo el shintoismo y budismo siguieron el gobierno. El budismo se concilió y de esacamino de la coexistencia; las dos llegaron manera se evitaron problemas religiosos enaún a fusionarse. No fue sino hasta la el futuro.Restauración Meiji que ambas seantagonizaron de nuevo intensamente. En el 4.3 El mundo de kami Takamag a hara Tokoy Nakatsu Kuni Tokoy o ono no kuni Kuni Oomino kuni
  • 61. El budismo El mundo de Lin-ne (transmigración) = El mundo de dolor Gedatsu enseñado por Sere Gautama Siddhartha s I cele VI II Nirvana Gedatsu V III IV O ojoo El budismo japonés A través de budasI. seres celestialesII. infiernoIII. espíritus hambrientesIV. animalesV. demonios enfrecidos JoodoVI. seres humanos (paraíso)
  • 62. 4.4. Las Raíces confucianas de la religiosidad japonesa Kaji Nobuyuki«La mayoría de personas que critican las ‘nuevas religiones’ suponen que sus fieles sonignorantes e iletrados. Están equivocados. Muchos de estos creyentes han recibido una elevadaeducación; algunos han estudiado carreras de ciencias: medicina, ingeniería, etcétera. Lejos de serignorantes, tienen la convicción de quienes, insatisfechos con las religiones establecidas, hanbuscado activamente su propio camino espiritual». Este texto pertenece al libro Chinmoku noShūkyō (El confucianismo, una religión silenciosa) Tokio, Chikuma Shobō, 1994, pág. 11, quepubliqué el año pasado. En esta obra examino las raíces de los problemas de los japoneses con lareligión, incluyendo la actual confusión religiosa. No quisiera dar la impresión de practicar elautobombo, pero creo que este libro presenta una explicación sólida de los problemas religiososque sufre el Japón actual y proporciona a los lectores los conocimientos necesarios para tomarseuna opinión inteligente sobre esta materia. No puedo permanecer callado al observar la confusión religiosa que ha invadido nuestros días ylas graves consecuencias que ello implica para Japón y sus habitantes. En este artículo intentarédesenredar el enmarañado ovillo. Primero, me referiré a las principales características y a losaspectos más problemáticos de la religiosidad japonesa; luego, expondré las soluciones.4.4.1. La esfera cultural confucianaChina, la península de Corea y Japón constituyen lo que denominaré el nordeste asiático, del quede momento excluyo el norte de Vietnam. Distingo esta zona de la del sureste asiático basándomeen que ambas regiones han desplegado culturas diferentes. Los países del nordeste asiático estánvinculados, en general y en forma amplia, por el confucianismo. Es decir, forman parte de laesfera cultural confuciana. Los habitantes del sureste asiático, en cambio, están atrapados en unared cuyas cuerdas abarcan no sólo el confucianismo, sino también el islamismo, el hinduismo, elbudismo Theravada, el cristianismo y otras religiones. Debido a esto es difícil definir el suresteasiático como una cultura uniforme. Así pues, no tiene sentido agrupar el nordeste y suresteasiáticos en el concepto «Asia Oriental», ya que las dos regiones tienen pocos elementosculturales en común; «Asia Oriental» no es más que una práctica etiqueta geográfica. Los problemas religiosos del Japón actual se han desarrollado en el contexto de su historia comoparte de la esfera cultural confuciana. No podemos, pues, esclarecer las razones de la confusiónactual teniendo sólo en cuenta la religión moderna. Me atrevería incluso a decir que no podemosocuparnos de las cuestiones religiosas del nordeste de Asia, incluyendo Japón, sin comprender elsentimiento religioso confuciano.
  • 63. 4.4.2. Los antecedentes históricosEn primer lugar, deberíamos comprender las idiosincrasias históricas del nordeste de Asia. Elestado centralizado y unificado surgió en China a fines del siglo III a.C., un modelo que tendríafiel réplica en la península de Corea y en Japón. En los tres países, prácticamente ha dominadohasta el presente la misma clase social. La firme continuidad étnica es una característica delnordeste de Asia. De hecho, es un rasgo confuciano en sí mismo ya que, tal como expondré másadelante, el primer valor del confucianismo es la perpetuación de la vida, fundamentalmente através de ritos ancestrales y de la prosperidad de los descendientes y de la familia. En resumen, elconfucianismo se caracteriza por un sentido de la historia profundamente desarrollado. El primer Estado centralizado de China fue el de las dinastías Qin (aproximadamente entre losaños 221-206 a.C.) y Han (206 a.C. al 220 d. C.), encabezadas por el huangdi o emperador. Como«hijo del cielo», el emperador gobernaba de acuerdo con el «mandato del cielo». Shangai, el diossupremo, simbolizaba este cielo. Todo el mundo estaba sometido al emperador, salvo sus padres yShangai. A decir verdad, incluso Shangai estaba al servicio del emperador, ya que sólo el hijo delcielo podía venerar al cielo; así, Shangai era, por decirlo crudamente, propiedad del emperador.Huelga decir que la gente en general no participaba del concepto del cielo y de la filosofíaestablecida sobre su base. En efecto, el emperador lo gobernaba todo, incluidos, naturalmente, la religión y el clero. Losreyes coreanos y los emperadores japoneses (y sus vicarios del shogunato) mostraban la mismaactitud. En este sentido, el nordeste asiático difiere sustancialmente de las otras regiones. En laIndia hinduista, la casta sacerdotal brahmán estaba por encima de la casta de reyes y guerrerosKshatriya. En la esfera cultural cristiana, el aparato de la iglesia y del clero se alineaba con eldominio seglar de monarcas y aristócratas. Los gobernantes tenían que tratar a la iglesia conguante blanco. De hecho, en la cumbre de la jerarquía eclesiástica, el papa disponía de unaautoridad y de un poder muy por encima del de los monarcas mundanos (aunque estos fueronganando pujanza con el paso del tiempo). En cambio, durante más de dos mil años, en todas las dinastías chinas, la religión y el clero hanestado sometidos al gobierno y al emperador. Cualquier religión que intentara liberarse del controlgubernamental—en otras palabras, si alguien intentaba establecer un objeto de culto por encimadel emperador—tenía garantizada una violenta persecución, ya que esto equivalía a repudiar a lamáxima autoridad. Los budistas chinos tienen un refrán cuya traducción aproximada dice así:«Las ordalías bajo los tres Wu y un Zong». Con él se refieren a los cuatro emperadores que sedistinguieron por la implacable persecución contra el budismo: Daowu, de Wei del Norte; Wu, delZhou del Norte; Wuzong, de Tang; Shizong, del último Zhou. Para el emperador, reconocer una entidad superior a su persona y permitir su culto al pueblohubiera sido poner en peligro su razón de ser. Por consiguiente, procuraba tenerlo todo y a todosbajo su control. Hubo, por supuesto, emperadores que abrazaron el budismo. Esto no significaba,sin embargo, que reconocieran a Buda como un ser supremo único y absoluto; sólo lo admitían enel panteón de las deidades. El nordeste de Asia era politeísta; las múltiples divinidades eranconsideradas—y siguen siéndolo en la actualidad—entes encargados de conceder diferentesfavores terrenales. Buda, llamado por los chinos Hushen o «Dios extranjero», era uno de ellos.Cuando, más tarde, los misioneros cristianos fueron autorizados a propagar su religión, no sedebió a que el emperador reconociera al Dios cristiano como un ser supremo y único, sino a que elcristianismo era una religión dedicada al culto de un miembro nuevo del panteón (un error quefinalmente causó grandes problemas). Por otra parte, al darse cuenta de que las persecuciones eran el origen de potenciales rebeldes,las autoridades chinas intentaron integrar a budistas y taoistas en el orden establecido, en lugar deexpulsarlos. Sin embargo no se podían construir templos budistas (o taoistas) sin tener laautorización oficial: los monjes de ambas religiones debían disponer de un permiso
  • 64. gubernamental llamado dudie que los convertía en guanseng o «monjes burócratas». De estamanera, pasaban a formar parte del orden establecido, lo que les obligaba a trabajar para elbienestar del Estado. Naturalmente esto condujo al desarrollo de una jerarquía sacerdotal condiversidad de categorías y títulos. Había, por supuesto, individuos que se hacían monjes más porconvicción que por el deseo de convertirse en guanseng, pero como no estaban legalmentereconocidos, no recibían el dudie y carecían de categoría oficial. Este control gubernamental sobre la religión se implantó en China con el desarrollo de lascreencias. Cuando Japón, a finales del siglo VII, importó de China sus códigos legales yadministrativos—el llamado sistema ritsuryō—las autoridades dictaron una ordenanzaconcerniente a los monjes y monjas, una especie de dudie (en japonés dochō). El sistemajerárquico de los monjes budistas todavía persiste hoy, aunque en forma algo diferente, a pesar deque las organizaciones religiosas se han convertido en entidades corporativas pertenecientes alsector privado.4.4.3. El respeto a la autoridad Este proceso histórico ha modelado un sentimiento y una actitud respecto a la religióncaracterística del nordeste de Asia: una gran intolerancia hacia las religiones antisociales que hantrastornado el equilibrio político. Aparte del confucianismo, las religiones tienen inherentementeciertos aspectos antisociales. Primero, su objeto supremo de culto está en el más allá; segundo,disponen de sus propias organizaciones; y tercero, establecen sus propios lugares y centros dereunión. Estos tres aspectos se oponen potencialmente a otros tres: el Estado, la familia y el hogar.En realidad, desde tiempos inmemoriales, la mayoría de religiones que han sido erradicadas operseguidas lo fueron por las creencias cuyas formas chocan con los valores profanos: el sertrascendental con el Estado, la organización religiosa con la familia y la iglesia o templo con elhogar. Por supuesto, este tipo de conflictos se dan en todo el mundo. No sorprendente, pues, quesurja la oposición a la s religiones antisociales. En el nordeste de Asia, sin embargo, a lo largo dela historia, la gente ha dado por sentado que la religión debe estar sometida al orden político ybajo su control. Esta región es más sensible a los conflictos mencionados que otras zonas delmundo y da prioridad absoluta a la política frente a la religión, actitud que concuerda con elsentimiento nacional. El respeto a la autoridad está tan fuertemente arraigado e impregnado en la sociedad delnordeste de Asia que es prácticamente imposible cambiarlo. Por ejemplo, los funcionarios de laKeidanren (Federación de Organizaciones Económicas de Japón) y otros dirigentes empresarialesjaponeses apremian al Gobierno a suprimir las regulaciones burocráticas, pero tan pronto el yencomienza a revalorizarse con relación al dólar cambian de opinión y presiona para que se tomenmediadas. El japonés, en general, probablemente está a favor del control burocrático frente a ladesregulación. Esto puede aplicarse también a la religión. Cuando el ciudadano percibe un gruporeligioso determinado como algo antisocial, comienza a cuestionar la legalidad de sus actividades,sin prestar demasiada atención a sus enseñanzas. Más concretamente, la gente piensa en lasviolaciones del Código Penal. La ciudadanía mira a los grupos religiosos con ojos críticos casi dela misma forma que las autoridades: «Castíguenlos con todo el peso de la ley, cuando antesmejor». Es el sentir general. Esta actitud hacia la ley es peculiar del nordeste de Asia, donde surgieron muy pronto losestados centralistas unificados y la ley fue considerada como un instrumento del gobierno. Elordenamiento jurídico se justifica todavía en este sentido. La gente no opone resistencia a la ideade utilizar la ley como un instrumento de control. En esta zona hay poca conciencia de losderechos humanos. En cambio, en los países occidentales, el valor de los acuerdos contractuales yel respeto a la ley es algo que existe para garantizar el cumplimiento de los contratos. Desde la
  • 65. base del individualismo, en Occidente también se cree que la ley existe para proteger al individuo,es decir, los derechos humanos. Los habitantes del nordeste de Asia tenemos una actitudcompletamente diferente hacia la ley. ¿Y quién puede ponernos objeciones? Los occidentalesconsideran su actitud moderna y superior. Mas esto se reduce a una diferencia cultural (estilo devida); las actitudes no son más avanzadas o retrógradas, mejores o peores.4.4.4. El culto a la familiaLos ciudadanos del nordeste asiático tienen también actitudes profundamente arraigadas,modeladas por la cultura, con relación a los otros dos focos de conflicto mencionadosanteriormente: la confrontación entre las organizaciones religiosas y la familia y entre los templosy las iglesias y el hogar. Desde aquí llegamos al concepto distintivo de la familia en el nordeste deAsia. Los seres vivos, las personas humanas, no podemos violar los imperativos biológicos; y el másbásico es el deseo de perpetuación de la especie. Para satisfacer esta voluntad desplegamos laactitud reproductiva. Pero, esto no basta para garantizar la continuidad de la vida. Son necesariostambién otros apoyos complementarios: la defensa frente a los ataques de enemigos externos, eltratamiento contra las enfermedades y las disposiciones y los acuerdos que rigen los encuentroscon el sexo opuesto. Estos sostenes elevan la eficacia de la actividad reproductora. Los cachorros de todas las especies animales crecen y abandonan el hogar. En cambio, loshumanos mantienen relaciones familiares incluso después del crecimiento de los hijos. Si laconducta de los animales es natural, la de la humanidad es sumamente antinatural., es decir,artificial. Así, el término «familia» tiene dos significados. Existe la familia natural que dura desde lareproducción hasta que la descendencia deja el hogar y la familia artificial en donde las relacionesse prolongan psicológicamente incluso después de que el joven se convierte en adulto. Sobre loscimientos de la unidad básica de la familia artificial, los humanos ponen, una tras otra, diversascapas de organización social hasta llegar a la creación del Estado. En la actualidad, funcionaincluso una organización supranacional conocida como Naciones Unidas. Todas estasorganizaciones e instituciones artificiales han sido concebidas para perpetuar la vida. Precisamente porque la familia es un producto artificial, las personas han establecido normas yreglas: moral, leyes, instituciones, etcétera. Los chinos llaman este conjunto li, «ritos». En lamedida en que la familia artificial (en adelante la llamaremos simplemente «familia» es elhabitual modo de vida, el «culto a la familia» es la usual forma de esta vida (cultura). Creo queesto es válido para casi todo el mundo, a excepción de la esfera cultural cristiana de signoindividualista. Pero, debido a que las normas y las reglas son productos intelectuales, sonvulnerables a la violencia y a los nuevos sistemas lógicos (incluyendo la sofística); carecen delimpacto dramático necesario para generar la clase de valores por cuya defensa la gente daría lavida. Los derechos—emociones—son necesarios para reforzar los preceptos y disposicionesintelectuales. A menos que las normas y regulaciones que rigen la vida formen parte del conjuntode sentimientos, no tendrán fuerza para mover a la gente. Por buenas que sean estas disposiciones,carecerán de valor si no están realmente unidas a las verdades y anhelos íntimos de los que lasaplican. La religión es uno de los mejores vehículos para atraer estos sentimientos. Mas, sólo sobrevivenlas religiones compatibles con diferentes pueblos y religiones del mundo. No admito el conceptode «religión universal».De hecho, ¿dónde existe realmente una religión de este tipo? El budismose ha extinguido en la India, su lugar de origen. Los cristianos han dejado de ser perseguidos enJapón desde la Restauración Meiji de 1868, pero después de un siglo, en nuestro país cuentanaproximadamente con solo un millón de creyentes. En Japón apenas hay musulmanes. Sin
  • 66. embargo, en las escuelas se sigue enseñando, erróneamente, que el budismo, el cristianismo y elislam son la «tres grandes religiones universales». Por supuesto, en definitiva el error es atribuiblea los expertos en religión. En el fondo de sus almas, todos los humanos son religiosos. Poseen también un sentido de loétnico. La religión que se mezcla con elementos étnicos consigue fuerza y se convierte en unareligión étnica o regional. Esta religión es la que pone los cimientos sobre los que se constituyenlas normas familiares—relaciones de familia, moralidad, etcétera--, y sobre su base se erige lasuperestructura de las normas y regulaciones sociales, incluyendo las del Estado. Por supuesto,nada de todo esto existe desde el comienzo en forma sistemática, pero cristaliza en institucionescon el paso del tiempo. El confucianismo de China nos proporciona un ejemplo de cuantodecimos. Con el tiempo, esta religión se extendió por el resto del nordeste de Asia y, a la vez quesufría sutiles cambios, se convertía en la base de la actitud religiosa común y del concepto defamilia que han transformado esta religión en la esfera cultural confuciana.4.4.5. Para acabar con el aguijón de la muerte Tal como la defino, la religión sirve para explicar la muerte y lo que ocurre después de ella. Loseruditos en religión suelen explicar la muerte en términos de total sumisión a un ser trascendental,pero esta descripción se aplica sólo en la teología cristiana. En el politeísmo del nordeste asiático,tiene poco fundamento. Sin embargo, los eruditos en religión japoneses no están de acuerdo coneste concepto, pero lo apoyan por pereza. Esto se debe a que son incapaces de interpretar o hacerfrente a las realidades religiosas que han surgido en el Japón actual. El confucianismo reconoce que la vida del alma sigue después de la muerte. La familia puedecomunicarse con el espíritu del muerto a través de ritos y, de esta manera, hacerlo volver almundo de los vivos. Esta práctica shamánica es la base de ritos ancestrales que fueronincorporados al budismo chino y japonés en forma de servicios en favor de los antepasados. Esimportante observar, sin embargo, que aunque el alma, tal como la entiende el confucianismo,marcha de nuevo después de haber vuelto al reino de los vivos, siempre permanece en este mundosi tenemos en cuenta que el budismo cree en la transmigración de las almas. Las personas quealcanzan la iluminación se convierten en budas y de esta manera se liberan de la rueda delnacimiento y de la muerte, pero los que no logran la emancipación a través de la iluminaciónrenacen en uno de los llamados seis reinos de la existencia: infierno, espíritus hambrientos,animales, demonios enfurecidos, seres humanos y seres celestiales. Los budistas, pues, reconocenla existencia del infierno. Los confucianos no creen en él; no les preocupan las amenazas delinfierno para hacer o dejar de hacer tal o cual cosa. ¿Qué le ocurre al cuerpo después de la muerte? Según los budistas sólo transmigra el alma (laconciencia); el cuerpo es un mero vehículo temporal que debe ser incinerado y abandonado tras lapartida del alma. Por tanto, las tumbas y similares no tienen sentido. Los confucianos, en cambio,creen que los hijos son copias de los cuerpos de sus progenitores.. Significa esto que aunque sedeje de existir como individuo una vez se muere, el cuerpo sigue viviendo mientras lo hagan losdescendientes. Como hemos indicado anteriormente, según los confucianos el espíritu permaneceen el mundo tras la muerte y si uno de los descendientes realiza los ritos adecuados, aquél puederegresar al mundo de los vivos. El cuerpo perdura también a través de los descendientespersonales. Al explicar la muerte qué ocurre tras el fallecimiento en el sentido de que el cuerpo y el almasiguen viviendo, el confucianismo liberó al nordeste de Asia de los miedos y ansiedad que rodeana la muerte. Esta es una de las principales razones por las que el confucianismo recibió el apoyode los asiáticos de esa zona. Fue el infranqueable muro de la cultura confuciana lo que obligó achinos y japoneses a incorporar los servicios religiosos y otros ritos confucianos relacionados con
  • 67. los espíritus de los ancestros, aunque esto significó distorsionar los principios originales delbudismo indio. Dado este tipo de religiosidad, es comprensible que el más elevado valor del confucianismofuera la perpetuación de la vida, basada en los ritos ancestrales y en la prosperidad de losdescendientes de la línea familiar. El mejor marco para expresar este valor era el hogar; y lafamilia, que cuidaba el hogar, era considerada un bien sagrado. Además, ya que la familiaencarnaba la perpetuación de la vida, la persona no era un individuo abstracto sino ante todo unmiembro de la familia. La familia frenaba el ego individual. Así se formó el concepto confucianode la familia. Todas las religiones del mundo salvo la cristiana se caracterizan por un fuerte sentido de lafamilia, pero la confuciana difiere al basarse en otros elementos culturales dotados especialmentede sentido histórico. Su motor es la esperanza en la perpetuación de la vida en una líneaininterrumpida que se extiende desde los antepasados hasta el presente y sus descendientes.4.4.6. Afirmación de la vida terrenalEl sentimiento básico que moldea al budismo es la percepción de este mundo en términos desufrimiento. «Sufrir» significa que todo lo de este mundo cambia constantemente. Tal como rezala fórmula budista, «todas las cosa son transitorias». Este concepto se ajusta perfectamente a larealidad de la India, con su intenso calor y su pobreza material. Que los seres humanos nazcan,mueran y renazcan representa una interminable repetición de la rueda de la vida y de la muerte enun mundo de sufrimientos. Existe una vida futura, pero de sufrimiento. La gente lucha porliberarse del sufrimiento a través de diversas disciplinas espirituales. Una de ellas consiste enabandonar toda atadura, la principal causa del sufrimiento. La resolución a abandonar las atadurasse expresa en la renuncia a la vida terrenal, la máxima encarnación de los principios budistas. La renuncia es el principal punto de discusión entre el budismo y el confucianismo. Y es lógicoque así sea. El confucianismo respeta a la familia y al hogar como algo sagrado. Sin importar loafligido que uno pueda estar o lo duro que pueda ser, el primer deber de toda persona es protegerel hogar. Este imperativo, basado en su concepto de la vida y la muerte, forma los cimientos de lacultura del nordeste de Asia. La renuncia a la vida terrenal implica abandonar el hogar. Quiere decir separarse de lasposesiones, de las relaciones sociales y de la familia. La renuncia es el ideal más elevado de loque `podríamos llamar fundamentalismo budista. El enfrentamiento cultural entre elfundamentalismo budista transmitido a China durante los dos primeros siglos después de Cristo yel confucianismo defensor de la familia era inevitable. Tal como he indicado anteriormente, unode los puntos más controvertidos se relaciona con el ideal budista de la renuncia. El abandono dela familia implica dejar el panteón familiar dedicado a los espíritus de los antepasados y la tumbaque contiene sus restos mortales. Además de representar la repudia absoluta del conceptoconfuciano de la vida y la muerte, la renuncia planteó la cuestión pragmática de a dónde iría aparar la familia. Los budistas que renunciaba a los bienes materiales se rapaban la cabeza. Esta era también unacuestión problemática. Los confucianos creen que los hijos son copias de los cuerpos de lospadres. El Xiao jing (clásico de la piedad filial), atribuido a Confucio, enseña que «las personasrecibimos el cuerpo, el pelo y la piel de nuestro padres. La piedad filial comienza por abstenersede injuriarlos». Raparse voluntariamente la cabeza era un insulto a los padres y el colmo de laimpiedad filial. Es decir, la renuncia era considerada una negación física y mental de los idealesconfucianos. Todavía se libró una nueva batalla entre el confucianismo y el budismo. Desde el punto de visitacultural, el debate sobre la vida seglar frente a la religiosa fue una acerada confrontación entre la
  • 68. cultura confuciana defensora de la familia y la budista, que entendía el mundo como lugar desufrimiento y apremiaba a abandonar el hogar y la familia para buscar la iluminación personal. Eltaoismo también se vio envuelto en el debate. En el transcurso de cinco o seis siglos, sinembargo, las tres religiones lograron cierta aproximación. El budismo, por ejemplo, incorporóritos ancestrales en forma de servicios para rogar por los espíritus que habían ido al infierno. A consecuencias de este acercamiento, el budismo japonés se edificó sobre el budismo indio yel confucianismo chino. En realidad, podría decirse que el 70 o el 80% es de origen confuciano;servicios a favor de los antepasados, tumbas, ritos funerarios, etcétera. Esta tendencia se haacentuado en los últimos tiempos. Desde el siglo pasado, los budistas japoneses se han inclinadopor lo que podríamos denominar «vida seglar religiosa» o «vida religiosa seglar», una posiciónsituada a medio camino entre el fundamentalismo budista y el culto confuciano a la familia.Según sea el caso, los miembros de las sectas budistas japonesas establecidas optan por una de lasdos vías. Algunos, descontentos con el budismo oficial, regresan al fundamentalismo budista yabrazan con agrado la vida religiosa. Sin embargo, son una minoría. El modo de pensar de laspersonas que defienden y practican los «funerales naturales», esparciendo las cenizas del difuntoen las montañas en lugar de enterrarlo, se acerca también a la actitud de los budistasfundamentalistas frente a la muerte. También éstos son una minoría. La inmensa mayoría dejaponeses que se consideran budistas, en realidad son confucianos por actitud y les repugna laidea de renunciar al mundo. En el fondo, se aferran a la vida seglar y niegan la monástica. Esto essólo una suposición. Los confucianos aceptan totalmente el mundo; su idea de una buena vida esdisfrutar de las comidas sabrosas en un hogar cálido, vestir ropas limpias, recibir una educacióndecente, etc. Es un punto de visita seglar. La renuncia al mundo, por el contrario, implica llevarharapos, comer las sobras y vivir contento en un cobertizo. La escolarización es irrelevante. Comopuede verse, las actitudes seglar y religiosa acarrean estilos de vida, o de cultura, diferentes. No setrata de valores superiores o inferiores, sino distintos.4.4.7. El encanto de la magiaLos elementos mágicos de la religión japonesa—poderes sobrenaturales, exorcismo, hechizos,sortilegios y otros rituales--reflejan la influencia del taoismo. La mayoría de personas, sinembargo, no se dan cuenta de ello ya que en Japón apenas existen grupos taoistas o actividadesreligiosas semejantes: todos estos elementos han sido absorbidos por el shintoismo y el budismo.La atracción que los japoneses sienten por lo mágico se relaciona, a mi entender, con unacomprensión distorsionada de los conceptos confucianos de la vida y de la muerte. El confucianismo cree en la existencia del espíritu de los muertos. Estos espíritus, sin embargo,no causan daño. Un confuciano objetaría con enfado la afirmación que hacen los budistas de queun antepasado puede ser un espíritu malo porque hizo daño en su vida anterior. De hecho, comodescendiente suyo, tomaría tal afirmación como una calumnia personal. Según los confucianos,las almas no se mueven de este mundo y pueden retornar a casa mediante la realización de ritosancestrales. El budismo, sin embargo, predica la transmigración a través de varios reinos,incluyendo el infierno; esta enseñanza ha impulsado a la gente a conjeturar que algunos de susantepasados estarían en el infierno (esto implica, naturalmente, que no se confia en la buenaconducta de los antepasados). Es con relación a esta creencia que mucha gente está confundida,especialmente los confucianos japoneses cuya fe tiene tintes de budismo. A pesar de la extrema dificultad por alcanzar la liberación budista, algunos monjes religiososengañan a la gente presentando dicha liberación como algo que puede alcanzarse en el momento.Estos predicadores aluden a las almas que no han alcanzado la emancipación y todavía estánligadas a la rueda de nacimiento y de la muerte y que fallecen como espíritus sin iluminación; estoespíritus trastornados y agitados contrastan con las almas que se pueden hacer regresar con
  • 69. medios confucianos (ritos ancestrales, servicios funerarios budistas). Hablan acerca de los malosespíritus, de los que vagan por el limbo, de los que rondan alrededor de los vivos y hasta de losespíritus guardianes. Al recurrir a elementos taoistas, afirman que pueden desterrar los espíritus malos o trastornadosrealizando ritos de purificación o de exorcismo. Para ello, cobran sumas desorbitadas. Pero, enrealidad, desterrar estos espíritus no cuesta ni un yen; sólo hace falta comprender correctamente ladoctrina de Confucio. No habría confusión si la gente comprendiera bien los diferentessignificados de «alma» en el confucianismo, budismo, taoismo, cristianismo y otras religiones.Mas la mayoría de los japoneses lo ha mezclado todo. No son pocos los monjes budistas que enrealidad no comprenden las enseñanzas de su religión sobre esta materia.4.4.8. La necesidad de impartir educación religiosaAl comentar la actual confusión religiosa que se vive en Japón, los eruditos en esta materia,psiquiatras psicólogos, sociólogos, antropólogos culturales y pedagogos coinciden en atribuir elinterés de los jóvenes por lo oculto y su predisposición a las nuevas religiones al «miedo de laépoca» o a la «psicología milenarista». ¡Qué visión más superficial! En primer lugar, elconfucianismo no tiene un concepto equivalente al del Apocalipsis o milenio cristiano o alconcepto budista del corrupto Ultimo Día de la Ley. La gente del nordeste de Asia no piensageneralmente en estos términos. En segundo lugar, en tanto que la muerte llega a todos y en cualquier parte del mundo, cadaépoca experimenta miedo. No hay razón alguna para singularizar el presente. Además, «el miedode la época» no sirve para explicar todas las realidades religiosas de hoy. No necesitamos fútilesexplicaciones de esta clase; lo que de verdad importa es identificar claramente las doctrinas y lasvisiones de la vida y de la muerte del confucianismo y de otras religiones establecidas en elnordeste asiático y aseguramos de que la gente—especialmente los jóvenes—las comprenden. Enotras palabras, lo que necesitamos es educación religiosa. Desde la era Meiji (1868-1912) hasta el fin de la II Guerra mundial en las escuelas japonesas seenseñaba el shintoismo oficial. Los fieles de otras religiones populares eran perseguidos bajo laacusación de lesa majestad o de violación de la ley de Preservación de la paz. Debido a ello, elartículo 20 de la Constitución japonesa de posguerra dispone que «ninguna organización religiosarecibirá privilegio alguno del Estado» (párrafo 1) y que «el Estado y sus órganos se abstendrán deimpartir educación religiosa o de realizar actividades religiosas» (párrafo 3). Estoy de acuerdo en que la educación no debe distinguir a una religión en concreto, pero engeneral se debería buscar e impartir una formación religiosa. Nada ha tenido un impacto tangrande en el modo de vivir y en las instituciones que la religión. Ni las escuelas primarias ni enlas secundarias se enseña ningún tipo de formación religiosa como tal. Se dan clases de moral,pero como no se enseña nada sobre religión, que es su base, impartir tales doctrinas es un ejerciciocarente de sentido por mucha energía que se gaste en ello; es como sacar agua con un cedazo.¿Cuán efectivas son las clases de moral a la hora de reducir las peleas entre los niños en lasescuelas? ¿Acaso lo son más que la religiosidad confuciana con su acento en la perpetuación dela vida? Dada esta práctica, es natural que cuando los graduados de escuelas superiores, completamenteignorantes—quizás sería mejor decir inocentes—en materia religiosa, van a trabajar o ingresan eninstituciones de educación superior (universidades, escuelas de formación especializada, etcétera)no opongan resistencia a la religión, sea cual sea, y se sientan atraídos con gran facilidad porcualquier organización religiosa que se cruce en su camino. Al fin y al cabo, son introducidos enun mundo fascinante del que no saben nada.
  • 70. Durante más de cincuenta años no hemos hecho nada para encauzar las necesidades religiosasde nuestra juventud. Me parece que ahora nos estamos llevando nuestro merecido, en forma deconfusión religiosa, por haber desterrado de la escuela toda alusión a la religión como reacción alhecho de haber tenido que comulgar con el shintoismo estatal del pasado. Sería bueno revisar laley de Personería Jurídico Religiosa. El control sobre estas organizaciones es muy estricto, perotales medidas atacan solamente los síntomas; no sirven para arrancar de raíz las causas que hanfacilitado que un culto determinado haya hecho estragos. Se necesita tiempo para que eltratamiento de un problema de resultados, pero creo que la mejor prescripción es estudiarformación religiosa. Debemos administrar esta medicina hoy mismo. De hecho, debíamos haberlohecho mucho antes. El Ministerio de Educación tendría que constituir un consejo asesor para estudiar los pros y loscontras de la formación religiosa. Bastaría una orden ministerial. El Ministerio de Educación hade aplicar políticas relevantes de este tipo para aliviar la ansiedad ciudadana. En la actualidad, elMinisterio está muy ocupado en cambiar el sistema universitario, pero es una políticainsignificante. Tal futilidad no cambiará nada. Es como montar un automóvil y olvidarse deinstalar el motor. Que el ministro de Educación logre pasar a la acción dependerá de su valíapolítica. Limitarse a disolver una determinada organización religiosa no solucionará el problema. Si se instituye la educación religiosa—y repito, me refiero a la enseñanza de la religión engeneral, no a una religión en concreto—será necesario, lógicamente, estudiar con cuidado loscriterios de selección del profesorado. El certificado no debe restringirse a los docentes que hayanrealizado estudios religiosos. La enseñanza sobre religión exige conocimientos en una gama muyamplia de materias—filosofía, literatura, historia y arte, entre otras--, así como una profundacomprensión de la conducción humana. La mayoría de profesores debería provenir de launiversidad, aunque también se podría contratar a personal no académico (incluyendo a losjubilados) que posea una rica experiencia de la vida y la sociedad. Será también importante que la educación religiosa no se limite a inundar de hechos a losestudiantes. La educación japonesa, con su acento sobre la forma, corre siempre el peligro dequedar inmovilizada en modelos inflexibles. Me gustaría que la educación religiosa se enfocaradesde una amplia perspectiva, como parte de una educación destinada a la formación del carácter. Durante las vacaciones de la Semana Dorada de primeros de mayo, cuando escribía esteartículo, las cadenas de televisión presentaban uno tras otro diversos programas sobre el gruporeligioso ahora blanco de las críticas. Pero todo este alboroto acabará perdiendo fuerza.Probablemente se olvidará al cabo de medio año. Si no se hace nada—si la conexión entre lareligión japonesa moderna y el confucianismo tradicional sigue sin ser entendida y no se tomanmedidas para introducir la educación religiosa general—hechos como los vividos recientementeocurrirán de nuevo algún día. He comenzado el artículo citando un pasaje de mi libro sobre el confucianismo. Quisieraterminarlo con otra cita de la misma obra (pág. 11) como una manera de expresar mi sincerapreocupación en el sentido de que si no hacemos nada la tragedia se agravará: Las nuevasreligiones están cargadas de entusiasmo generado por la ofensiva que han desencadenado. Sonenergía en sí mismas. Tanto los dirigentes como los adeptos están llenos de ardor. Más, a medidaque los grupos adquieren una mayor estructuración, pasan de la ofensiva a la defensiva. Estoocurre cuando su energía comienza a menguar. La gente que busca ardor, se desencanta. Al llegara ese punto, crecen invariablemente los nuevos grupos y los fieles de las viejas organizacionescambian su lealtad. Así se reproduce de nuevo el ciclo: otras religiones llenas de energía seencargarán de captar prosélitos. (Con la amable autorización de Bungei Shunjū ».Traducido de Shūnkyō kyōiku ga kairiki, ‘ranshin o fusegu’, publicado en Shogun, julio de 1995,págs. 54-67; versión ligeramente resumida.
  • 71. Cuadernos de JAPON, Vol. IX, No. 1, invierno, 19964.5. What Is Zen?Before I proceed to write about the influence of Zen on Japanese culture, I must explain what Zenis, for it is possible that my present readers may not know anything about it. As I have alreadywritten some books on Zen, however, I will not go into a detailed presentation here. Briefly, Zen is one of the products of the Chinese mind after its contact with Indian thought,which was introduced into China in the first century A.D. through the medium of Buddhismteachings. There were some aspects of Buddhism in the form in which it came to China that thepeople of the middle Kingdom did not quite kindly cherish: for instance, its advocacy of ahomeless life, its transcendentalism or world-fleeing and life-denying tendency, and so on. At thesame time, its profound philosophy, its subtle dialectics and penetrating analyses andspeculations, stirred Chinese thinkers, especially the Taoists. Compared with Indians, the Chinese people are not so philosophically-minded. They are ratherpractical and devoted to worldly affairs; they are attached to the earth, they are not stargazers.While the Chinese mind was profoundly stimulated by the Indian way of thinking, it never lost itstouch with the plurality of things, it never neglected the practical side of our daily life. Thisnational or racial psychological idiosyncrasy brought about the transformation of IndianBuddhism into Zen Buddhism. One of the first things Zen accomplished in China as soon as it had gathered its forces and wasstrong enough to stand by itself, was to establish a special form of monasticism quite distinct fromthe older kind of monkish living. The Zen monastery became a self-governing body divided intoso many departments, each of which had its own office to serve the community. A noteworthyfeature of this institution was the principle of complete democracy. While the elders werenaturally respected, all members were equally to engage in manual labor, such as gathering fuel,cultivating the land, and picking tea leaves. In this even the master himself joined, and whileworking with his brotherhood he guided them to the proper understanding of Zen. This way of living significantly distinguished the Zen monastery from the sangha brotherhoodof the earlier Buddhists of India. The Zen monks were not only democratic; they were willing toemploy themselves in all the practical ways of life. They were thus economically-minded as wellas politically minded. In metaphysics Zen absorbed much of Taoist teachings modified by Buddhist speculations. Butin its practical conduct of life, it completely ignored both the Taoist transcendentalism and theIndian aloofness from productive life. When a Zen master was asked what his future life wouldbe, he unhesitatingly answered, “Let me be a donkey or a horse and work for the villagers.” Another departure from the older pattern of monkish brotherhood, whether Christian orBuddhist or anything else, was that the Zen monks were not always engaged in offering prayers,practicing penance, or performing other so-called deeds of piety, nor in reading or reciting thecanonical books, discussing their contents, or studying them under the master, individually orcollectively. What the Zen monks did besides attending to various practical affairs, both manualand menial, was to listen to the master’s occasional sermons, which were short and cryptic, and toask questions and get answers. The answers, however, were bizarre and full of incomprehensibles,and they were quite frequently accompanied by direct actions.
  • 72. I will cite one of such examples—perhaps an extreme one. Though it did not take place betweenmaster and monk but between monks themselves, it will illustrate the spirit of Zen whichprevailed in its earlier days, towards the end of the T’ang dynasty. A monk, coming out of themonastery that was under the leadership of Rinzai (Lin-chi, d. 867), met a party of three travelingmonks belonging to another Buddhist school, and one of the three ventured to question the Zenmonk: “How deep is the river of Zen?” The reference to the river arose from their encountertaking place on a bridge. The Zen monk, fresh from his own interview with Rinzai, who wasnoted for his direct actions, lost no time in replying. “Find out for yourself,” he said, and offeredto throw the questioner from the bridge. But fortunately his two friends interceded and pleaded formercy, which saved the situation. Zen is not necessarily against words, but it is well aware of the fact that they are always liable todetach themselves from realities and turn into conceptions. And this conceptualization is whatZen is against. The Zen monk just cited may be an extreme case, but the spirit is there. Zen insistson handling the thing itself and not an empty abstraction, It is for this reason that Zen neglectsreading or reciting the sutras or engaging in discourse on abstract subjects. And this is a cause ofZen’s appeal to men of action in the broadest sense of the term. Through their practical-mindedness, the Chinese people and also to a certain extent the Japanese have taken greatly toZen.2 Zen is discipline in enlightenment. Enlightenment means emancipation. And emancipation is noless than freedom. We talk very much these days about all kinds of freedom, political, economic,and otherwise, but these freedoms are not at all real. As long as they are on the plane of relativity,the freedoms or liberties we glibly talk about are far from being such. The real freedom is theoutcome of enlightenment. When a man realizes this, in whatever situation he may find himself heis always free in his inner life, for that pursues its own line of action. Zen is the religion of jiyū(tzū-yu), “self-reliance,” and jizai (tzū-tsai), “self-being.” Enlightenment occupies the central point of teaching in all schools of Buddhism, Hīnayāna andMahāyāna, “self-power” and “other-power,” the Holy Path and the Pure Land, because theBuddha’s teachings all start from his enlightenment experience, about 2,500 years ago in thenorthern part of India. Every Buddhist is, therefore, expected to receive enlightenment either inthis world or in one of his future lives. Without enlightenment, either already realized or to berealized somehow and sometime and somewhere, there will be no Buddhism. Zen is no exception.In fact, Zen that makes most of enlightenment, or satori (wu in Chinese). To realize satori, Zen opens for us two ways in general: verbal and actional. First, Zen verbalism is quite characteristic of Zen, though it is so completely differentiated fromthe philosophy of linguistics or dialectics that it may not be correct to apply the term “verbalism”to Zen at all. But, as we all know, we human beings cannot live without language, for we are somade that we can sustain our existence only in group life. Love is the essence of humanity, loveneeds something to bestow itself upon; human beings must live together in order to lead a life ofmutual love. Love to be articulate requires a means of communication, which is language.Inasmuch as Zen is one of the most significant human experiences, one must resort to language toexpress it to others as well as to oneself. But Zen verbalism has its own features, which violate allthe rules of the science of linguistics. In Zen, experience and expression are one. Zen verbalismexpresses the most concrete experience. To give examples: A Zen master produces his staff before his congregation and declares: “Youdo not call it a staff. What would you call?” Someone comes out of the audience, takes themaster’s staff away from him, breaks it into two, and throws it down. All this is the outcome ofthe master’s illogical announcement.
  • 73. Another master, holding up his staff, says: “If you have one, I give you mine; if you have none,I will take it away from you.” There is no rationalism in this. Still another master once gave his sermon: “When you know what this staff is, you know all,you have finished the study of Zen.” Without further remark he left the hall. This is what I call Zen verbalism. The philosophy of Zen comes out of it. The philosophy,however, is not concerned to elucidate all these verbal “riddles” but to reach the mind itself,which, as it were, exudes or secretes them as naturally, as inevitably, as the clouds rise from themountain peaks. What concerns us here is not the substance thus exuded or secreted, that is,words or language, but a “something” hovering around there, though we cannot exactly locate itand say “Here!” To call it the mind is far from the fact of experience; it is an unnamable “X.” It isno abstraction; it is concrete enough, and direct, as the eye sees that the sun is, but it is not to besubsumed in the categories of linguistics. As soon as we try to do this, it disappears. TheBuddhists, therefore, call it “unattainable,” the “ungraspable.” It is for this reason that a staff is a staff and at the same time not a staff, or that a staff is a staffjust because it is not a staff. The word is not to be detached from the thing or the fact or theexperience. The Zen masters have the saying, “Examine the living words and not the dead ones.” The deadones are those that no longer pass directly and concretely and intimately on to the experience.They are conceptualized, they are cut off from the living roots. They have ceased, then, to stir upmy being from within, from itself. They are no more what the masters would call “the one word”which when understood leads immediately to the understanding of hundreds of thousands of otherwords or statements given by the Zen masters. Zen verbalism deals with these “living word.”3The second disciplinary approach to the experience of enlightenment is actional. In a sense,verbalism is also actional as long as it is concrete and personal. But in the actional what we call“the body,” according to our sense testimony, is involved. When Rinzai was asked what theessence of Buddhist teaching was, he came right down from his seat and, taking hold of thequestioner by the front of his robe, slapped his face, and let him go. The questioner stood there,stupefied. The bystanders remarked; “Why don’t you bow?” This woke him from his reverie; andwhen he was about to make a bow to the master, he had his satori. When Baso (Ma-tsu, d.788) took a walk with Hyakujo (Pai-chang), one of his attendant monks,he noticed the wild geese flying. He asked, “Where are they flying?” Hyakujo answered, “Theyare already flown away?” Baso turned around and, taking hold of Hyakujo’s nose, gave it a twist.Hyakujo cried, “It hurts, O Master!” “Who says they are flown away?” was the master’s retort.This made Hyakujo realize that the master was not talking at all about the conceptualized geesedisappearing far away in the clouds. The master’s purpose was to call Hyakujo’s attention to theliving goose that moves along with Hyakujo himself, not outside but within his person. Thisperson is Rinzai’s “true man in all nakedness going in and out through your senses.” I wonder ifthis is symbolized in that “third man” who is often referred to by some modern writers as walking“beside you” or “on the other side of you” or “behind you.” We may say this is a practical lesson, teaching by action, learning by doing. There issomething like it in the actional approach to enlightenment. But a direct action in Zen has anothermeaning. There is a deeper purpose which consists in awakening in the disciple’s mind a certainconsciousness that is attuned to the pulsation of Reality. The following story is in a somewhatdifferent vein; it simply illustrates how important it is to grasp a trick by going through a practicalsituation oneself without any outside aid. It exemplifies the pedagogic methodology of Zen’sspirit of “self-reliance.” This is in perfect accord with the teaching of the Buddha and othermasters: “Do not rely on others, nor on the reading of the sūtras and sāstras. Be your own lamp.”
  • 74. Goso Hōyen (Wu-tsu Fa-yen, d. 1104), of the Sung dynasty, tells us the following to illustratethe Zen spirit that goes beyond intellect, logic, and verbalism: “If people ask me what Zen is like, I will say that it is like learning the art of burglary. The sonof a burglar saw his father growing older and thought, ‘If he is unable to carry on his profession,who will be the breadwinner of the family, except myself? I must learn the trade.’ He intimatedthe idea to his father, who approved of it. One night the father took the son to a big house, broke through the fence, entered the house,and, opening one of the large chests, told the son to go in and pick out the clothing. As soon as theson got into it, the father dropped the lid and securely applied the lock. The father now came outof the courtyard and loudly knocked at the door, waking up the whole family; then he quietlyslipped away by the hole in the fence. The residents got excited and lighted candles, but theyfound that the burglar had already gone. “The son, who had remained all the time securely confined in the chest, thought of his cruelfather. He was greatly mortified, then a fine idea flashed upon him. He made a noise like thegnawing of a rat. The family told the maid to take a candle and examine the chest. When the lidwas unlocked, out came the prisoner, who blew out the light, pushed away the maid, and fled. Thepeople ran after him. Noting a well by the road, he picked up a large stone and threw it into thewater. The pursuers all gathered around the well trying to find the burglar drowning himself in thedark hole. “In the meantime he went safely back to his father’s house. He blamed his father deeply for hisnarrow escape. Said the father, ‘Be not offended, my son. Just tell me how you got out of it.’When the son told him all about his adventures, the father remarked, ‘There you are, you havelearned the art.’” The idea of the story is to demonstrate the futility of verbal instruction and conceptualpresentation as far as the experience of enlightenment is concerned. Satori must be the outgrowthof one’s inner life and not a verbal implantation brought from the outside.4There is a famous saying given by one of the earlier masters of the T’ang dynasty, which declaresthat the Tao is no more than one’s everyday-life experience. When the master was asked what hemeant by this, he replied, “When you are hungry you eat, when you are thirsty you drink, whenyou meet a friend you greet him.” This, some may think, is no more than animal instinct or social usage, and there is nothing thatmay be called moral, much less spiritual, in it. If we call it the Tao, some may think, what a cheapthing the Tao is after all! Those who have not penetrated into the depths of our consciousness, including both theconscious and the unconscious, are liable to hold such a mistaken notion as the one just cited. Butwe must remember that, if the Tao is something highly abstract transcending our dailyexperiences, it will have nothing to do with the actualities of life. Life as we live it is notconcerned with generalization. If it were, the intellect would be everything, and the philosopherwould be the wisest man. But, as Kierkegaard points out, the philosopher builds a fine palace, buthe is doomed not to live in it—he has a shed for himself next door to what he constructed forothers, including himself, to look at. Mencius says, “The Tao is near and people seek it far away.” This means that the Tao is oureveryday life itself. And, indeed, it is due to this fact that the Tao is so hard to grasp, so elusive topoint out. How elusive! How ungraspable! “The Tao that can at all be predicated is not the Tao ofalways-so-ness (Ch’ang tao).” The Tao is really very much more than mere animal instinct and social usage, though thoseelements are also included in it. It is something deeply imbedded in every one of us, indeed in allbeings sentient and nonsentient, and it requires something altogether different from the so-called
  • 75. scientific analysis. It defies our intellectual pursuit because of being too concrete, too familiar,hence beyond definability. It is there confronting us, no doubt, but not obtrusively andthreateningly, like Mount Everest to the mountain-climbers. “What is Zen?” (This is tantamount to asking, “What is Tao?”) “I do not understand,” was one master’s answer. “What is Zen?” “The silk fan gives me enough of a cooling breeze,” was another master’s answer. “What is Zen?” “Zen,” was still another’s response. Perhaps Lao-tzu’s description may be more approachable for most of us than those of the Zenmasters: The Tao is something vague and undefinable; How undefinable! How vague! Yet in it there is a form. How vague! How undefinable! Yet in it there is a thing. How obscure! How deep! Yet in it there is a substance. The substance is genuine And in it sincerity. From of old until now Its name never departs, Whereby it inspects all things. How do I know all things in their suchness? It is because of this. The object of Zen training consists in making us realize that Zen is our daily experience and tatit is not something put in from the outside. Tenno Dōgo (T’ien-huang Tao-wu, 748-807)illustrates the point most eloquently in his treatment of a novice monk, while an unknownJapanese swordmaster demonstrates it in the more threatening manner characteristic of hisprofession. Tenno Dōgo’s story runs as follows: Dōgo had a disciple called Sōshin (Ch’ung-shin). When Sōshin was taken in as a novice, it wasperhaps natural of him to expect lessons in Zen from his teacher the way a schoolboy is taught asschool. But Dōgo gave him no special lessons on the subject, and this bewildered anddisappointed Sōshin. One day he said to the master, “It is some time since I came here, but no aword has been given me regarding the essence of the Zen teaching.” Dōgo replied, “Since yourarrival I have ever been giving you lessons on the matter of Zen discipline.” “What kind of lesson could it have been?” “When you bring me a cup of tea in the morning, I take it; when you serve me a meal, I acceptit; when you bow to me, I return it with a nod. How else do you expect to be taught in the mentaldiscipline of Zen?” Sōshin hung his head for a while, pondering the puzzling words of the master. The master said,“If you want to see, see right at once. When you begin to think, you miss the point.”The swordsman’s story is this; When a disciple came to a master to be disciplined in the art of swordplay, the master, who wasin retirement in his mountain hut, agreed to undertake the task. The pupil was made to help himgather kindling, draw water from the nearby spring, split wood, made fires, cook rice, sweep therooms and the garden, and generally look after his household. There was no regular or technical
  • 76. teaching in the art. After some time the young man became dissatisfied, for he had not come towork as servant to the old gentleman, but to learn the art of swordsmanship. So one day heapproached the master and asked him to teach him. The master agreed. The result was that the young man could not do any piece of work with any feeling of safety.For when he began to cook rice early in the morning, the master would appear and strike himfrom behind wit a stick. When he was in the midst of his sweeping, he would be feeling the samesort of blow from somewhere, some unknown direction. He had no peace of mind, he had to bealways on the qui vive. Some years passed before he could successfully dodge the blow fromwherever it might come. But the master was not quite satisfied with him yet. One day the master was found cooking his own vegetables over an open fire. The pupil took itinto his head to avail himself of this opportunity. Taking up his big stick, he let it fall over thehead of the master, who was then stooping over the cooking pan to stir its contents. But thepupil’s stick was caught by the master with the cover of the pan. This opened the pupil’s mind tothe secrets of the art, which had hitherto been kept from him and to which he had so far been astranger. He the, for the first time, appreciated the unparalleled kindness of the master. The secret of perfect swordsmanship consist in creating a certain frame or structure of mentalitywhich is made always ready to respond instantly, that is, immediately, to what comes from theoutside. While technical training is of great importance, it is after all something artificially,consciously, calculatingly added and acquired. Unless the mind that avails itself of the technicalskill somehow attunes itself to a state of the utmost fluidity or mobility, anything acquired orsuperimposed lacks spontaneity of natural growth. This state prevails when the mind is awakenedto a satori. What the swordsman aimed at was to make the disciple attain to this realization. Itcannot be taught by any system specifically designed for the purpose, it must simply grow fromwithin. The master’s system was really no system in the proper sense. But there was a naturalmethod in his apparent craziness, and he succeeded in awakening in his young disciple’s mindsomething that touched off the mechanism needed for the mastery of swordsmanship. Dōgo the Zen master did not have to be attacking his disciple all the time with a stick. Theswordsman’s object was more definite and limited to the area of the sword, whereas Dōgo wantedto teach by getting to the source of being from which everything making up our daily experienceensues. Therefore, when Sōshin began to reflect on the remark Dōgo made to him, Dōgo told him:“No reflecting whatever. When you want to see, see im-mediately. As soon as you tarry [that is,as soon as an intellectual interpretation or mediation takes place], the whole thing goes awry.”This means that, in the study of Zen, conceptualization must go, for as long as we tarry at thislevel we can never reach the area where Zen has its life. The door of enlightenment-experienceopens by itself as one finally faces the deadlock of intellectualization. The slipperiness or elusiveness of the truth or reality or, shall I say, God, when one tries to gethold of it or him by means of concepts or intellection, is like trying to catch a catfish with a gourd.This is aptly illustrated by Josetsu, a Japanese painter of the fifteenth century. The picture of hiswhich is reproduced among our illustrations is a well-known one; as we notice, the upper part of itis filled with poems composed by renowned Zen masters of the day.5We now can state a few things about Zen in a more or less summary way: (1) Zen discipline consists in attaining enlightenment (or satori, in Japanese). (2) Satori finds a meaning hitherto hidden in our daily concrete particular experiences, such as eating, drinking, or business of all kinds. (3) The meaning thus revealed is not something added from the outside. It is in being itself, in becoming itself, in living itself. This is called, in Japanese, a life of kono-
  • 77. mama or sono-mama. Kono- or sono-mama means the “isness” of a thing, Reality in its isness. (4) Some may say, “There cannot be any meaning in mere isness.” But this is not the view held by Zen, for according to it, isness is the meaning. When I see into it I see it as clearly as I see myself reflected in a mirror. (5) This is what made Hō Koji (P’ang Chü-shin),a lay disciple of the eighth century, declare: How wondrous this, how mysterious! I carry fuel, I draw water. The fuel-carrying or the water-drawing itself, apart from its utilitarianism, is full of meaning; hence its “wonder,” its “mystery.” (6) Zen does not, therefore, indulge in abstraction or in conceptualization. In its verbalism it may sometimes appear that Zen does this a great deal. But this is an error most commonly entertained by those who do not at all know Zen. (7) Satori is emancipation, moral, spiritual, as well as intellectual. When I am in my isness, thoroughly purged of all intellectual sediments, I have my freedom in its primary sense. (8) When the mind, now abiding in its isness—which, to use Zen verbalism, is not isness —and thus free from intellectual complexities and moralistic attachments of every description, surveys the world of the senses in all its multiplicities, it discovers in it all sorts of values hitherto hidden from sight. Here opens to the artist a world full of wonders and miracles. (9) The artist’s world is one of free creation, and this can come only from intuitions directly and im-mediately rising from the isness of things, unhampered by senses and intellect. He creates forms and sounds out of formlessness and soundlessness. To this extent, the artist’s world coincides with that of Zen. (10)What differentiates Zen from the arts is this: While the artists have to resort to the canvas and brush or mechanical instruments or some other mediums to express themselves, Zen has no need of thing external, except “the body” in which the Zen- man is so to speak embodied. From the absolute point of view this is not quite correct; I say it only in concession to the worldly way of saying things. What Zen does is to delineate itself on the infinite canvas of time and space the way the flying wild geese cast their shadow on the water below without any idea of doing so, while the water reflects the geese just as naturally and unintentionally. (11)The Zen-man is an artist to the extent that, as the sculptor chisels out a great figure deeply buried in a mass of inert matter, the Zen-man transforms his own life into a work of creation, which exists, as Christians might say, in the mind of God. Zen and Japanese Culture, By Daisetsu Suzuki, Taiyosha, 19794.6. El Kegon Sutra En el Kegon Sutra, que es un Sutra importante del budismo, el mundo real cotidiano se llamaJihookai, que significa un mundo del orden de cosas. Este es el mundo que nosotrosexperimentamos diariamente. Por ejemplo, si hay distintas cosas como A, B, C, etc. comonosotros normalmente experimentamos, A tiene su naturaleza, B sus propias características y A yB se separan claramente, no permitiendo ninguna confusión. Este estado es Jihookai. Sinembargo, existe otra manera de ver el mundo que es característica del pensamiento asiático y elbudismo. Eso es ver el mundo quitando estos bordes que distinguen cosas. En esta manera de
  • 78. captar el mundo, los aspectos discriminados que existían divididos sin limites, se convierten derepente en un espacio del estado no discriminatorio. El Kegon Sutra llama este tipo de mundoRihookai, es decir, el mundo de la lógica. Aquí, las diferencias entre las cosas desaparecen y laindividualidad se niega también. Este tipo de estado se expresa como mu, que normalmentesignifica nada. Tales palabras como mu y kuu, que significan aire o vacío no expresan el estadode la nada sino algo que tiene la posibilidad de yuu, es decir, la posibilidad sin limites de haceraparecer cosas. Existen diferencias entre cada individuo. Sin embargo, ri es todo sindiscriminación. ¿Cómo el Kegon explica esta discrepancia? ¿Es posible que cuando existendistintas cosas como A, B, C, todas sean sin características? El Kegon tiene dos maneras deexplicar esto. Primero, introduzco la idea de las relaciones existenciales de la Filosofía Kegon. Los individuosde A, B, C, D,.. se están relacionados, aunque no tienen características, por lo tanto para laexistencia de A, todos los individuos de B, C, D,… están relacionados con él. Es decir, en estemundo, todas las cosas se relacionan y nada puede existir ignorando la interconexión del todo. Sitiene esta manera de pensar, A es A basado en las relaciones con otros individuos, aunque no tienecaracterística. Se puede decir que en la estructura interna de A, se incluyen todos los otros de unamanera escondida. Dentro de esta relación, A es A y no es ni B ni C. Nunca ocurre que cierta cosaexista sola individualmente. Todas las cosas siempre existen al mismo tiempo como totalidad. La otra manera de pensar es la teoría de existencia de principal y subordinación. Dejen meexplicar esto brevemente. Supongamos que aquí hay cosas distintas como A, B, y C. Según elKegon, estas son cosas diferentes y al mismo tiempo están relacionadas. Por ello A, B, C, estáncompuestas de los mismos innumerables elementos constituyentes existenciales tales como a, b,c, d,… Si se usa la idea del simbolismo, aunque el signifié es igual que a, b, c, d., el signifiant esA o B o C…Para explicar esta idea enigmática, el Kegon introduce el concepto de yuuryoku ymuryoku. Yuuryoku, traducido literalmente, significa la existencia de la fuerza, es algo activo,explícito, auto expresivo y dominante. Muryoku , que significa la ausencia de fuerza, es alcontrario de yuuryoku: pasivo, retirado, auto negante y no dominante. De los innumerableselementos, a, b, c, .. aparece uno como dominante, dejando el resto sin fuerza. Esta es la razón porla cual se reconoce la diferencia entre A, B, C,… en la vida cotidiana. En cada uno de A, B, C, sereconoce algo distinto, y eso es el resultado de las relaciones de los elementos de yuuryoku ymuryoku. Si presta atención a los elementos constituyentes, se puede decir que todas las cosasexisten libremente. Como en la vida cotidiana solamente los elementos de yuuryoku se ponen enel primer plano, la gente le presta atención a la diferencia entre cosas individuales. Pero eso nosignifica que no existen elementos de muryoku. Ellos, en realidad, existen como la estructuraprofunda. ¿Qué es la personalidad de la gente? Cada individuo piensa que él es una existencia única diferente de otra gente. Fue cuando empezóla Edad Moderna Europea que los seres humanos comenzaron a encontrar grandes valores en lapersonalidad del individuo. Desde aquel entonces se empezó a pensar que era importante que sedesarrollara la individualidad de la gente. Esa idea llegó al Japón y los japoneses modernos estánde acuerdo con ella. Pero aquí, me gustaría analizar de nuevo el significado de uniqueness. Lapalabra individual viene de la forma negativa del verbo dividir. Esto se basa en la idea de quenosotros los seres humanos somos las últimas unidades indivisibles que llegamos después de larepetida acción de dividir. Es decir, en la raíz de este pensamiento existe la idea de dividir. Mientras que en la Edad Moderna Europea, se estimaba y se refinó el funcionamiento de laconciencia de dividir, el budismo, al contrario, hacía muchos esfuerzos hacia el refinamiento de laconciencia de eliminar este pensamiento de dividir las cosas. Por lo tanto, al pensar en launiqueness de la gente, debe existir en el budismo pensamiento distinto de la individualidadoccidental. Sin embargo, esto no se puede expresar en la palabra individualidad. En el mundo
  • 79. occidental, desde temprana edad, a uno le dicen que establezca su ego propio. Pero según elbudismo, la gente siempre existe por sus relaciones con otra gente. Si uno es sacado del grupo,pierde su identidad. Se explicó anteriormente porque uno puede tener su eachness, aunque le faltasu individualidad. Si uno trata de guardar su eachness observando esta idea, antes de pensar en suindependencia, está más consciente de su relación con otra gente. Desde el punto de vista de laidea del individualismo, probablemente este tipo de actitud se critica por ser demasiadodependiente de otros. Sin embargo, el budismo enseña que es en estas relaciones que se encuentrael yo. Las dos ideas son totalmente distintas la una de la otra. La individualidad que viene de laidea del individualismo pareciera muy apropiada, ya que el individuo puede desarrollar suindividualidad según su deseo. Sin embargo, como expliqué anteriormente en conexión con laidea de muryoku, pareciera que está limitada la posibilidad de que el individuo se puedadesarrollar en una dirección imprevista. Es cierto que es activo y dinámico pero él mismo limitasus, por los demás, amplias posibilidades con su propio juicio.
  • 80. CAPITULO QUINTO 5. CULTURA     5.1. The Dual Structure of Japanese superimposed on other Asian countries’Culture indigenous cultures. But because Japan provides a model case of the formation and Ichiro Ishida development of a dual cultural structure, explaining this can, I believe, help people The dual structure so characteristic of elsewhere in understanding Japanese cultureJapanese culture is bound up with Japan’s and considering the cultural course of othercultural position in Asia and in the world as a Asian countries.whole. It can be argued that the countries ofAsia have begun to form the regional entity 5.1.1. Chinese Culture and dual Structure“Asia” only since, under the influence of of Japanese CultureEuropean and American culture, have come Until Japan began to feel the impact ofto possess a shared sense of values. Western culture, it was influenced chiefly byUnderlying this school of thought is the Chinese and Indian culture. As early as theperception that whereas the European region Heian period (794-1185), the Japanesewas able to establish the present European conceived of Tenjiku (India), ShintanUnion because of the long accumulation of (China), and Japan, which they called theshared experience of military and political “Three Lands,” as constituting a singledomination by Rome, religious domination cultural sphere. In more recent times the artby Christianity, and so on, Asian countries critic and philosopher Okakura Tenshinhave no such heritage of shared experience. (1862-1913), inheriting this view,In fact, the various regions of Asia have their proclaimed, “Asia is one.” But Japan wasown highly developed indigenous cultures, never subjected to Chinese politicalwhich do not blend easily. domination, and there was no direct Cultural stratification is not unique to exchange of people and goods with India.Japan; influences from Chinese, Indian, and The Indian religion of Buddhism wasin some cases Islamic culture, as well as transmitted to Japan in Sinicized form. NorWestern culture (divided into liberal and did the Three Lands possess the kind ofsocialist culture), have also been religious authority that the pope enjoyed in regard to European Christianity.
  • 81. Before the introduction of European clans into smaller ones, he had each clanculture, China exerted the major cultural name a patriarch (uji nokami) and bestowedinfluence on Japan. But because Chinese upon each patriarch a peerage (kabana) inculture itself had two forms and was received accordance with his ancestors’ contributionsby Japan in two ways, the cultural history of to the imperial clan (officially recognizedpremodern Japan, an agrarian society shaped when the clan genealogies were authorized)by wet-rice cultivation can be divided and his own contributions to theroughly into three phases. In the first phase, establishment of Temmu’s new regime. Thecomprising the Yayoi and Kofun, or emperor then appointed the clan patriarchs toTumulus periods (from about 300 B.C. posts in the bureaucratic apparatus of thethrough the sixth century A.D.), the impact ritsuryō system modified from Chinese legalof Chinese culture was weak and indigenous and administrative codes, determining eachculture developed. In the second phase, one’s position in the hierarchy in accordanceincluding the Nara, Heian, and early with the rank of his peerage, the power of hisKamakura periods (from the seventh through clan, and his ability.the thirteenth century), Japan took in many Superficially, Japan had rapidly put ininstitutions of ancient northern Chinese place Chinese-style legal and bureaucraticculture and gradually indigenized them. In systems, but in truth the old institutions ofthe third phase—the late Kamakura, clan society, somewhat modified, had beenMuromachi, Azuchi-Momoyama, and purposefully reimplanted in the foundationTokugawa periods (from the fourteenth of the new regime. Utilizing their energy, thecentury to 1868)—Japan utilized the culture emperor swiftly consolidated the new systemand institutions of southern China as the raw of what might be called the “clan-systemmaterial from which to mold and develop a ritsuryo state.” Since this system wasdistinctively Japanese culture and perpetuated by inherited court ranks (on’i),institutions. its two layers—the clan system as the substructure and the ritsuryo system as the5.1.2. Ancient Northern Chinese Culture superstructure—infiltrated each other. In thisand the Dual Structure way Chinese culture and institutions were In the transition to the second phase, from Japanized, indigenized.the time of the empress Suiko (r. 592-628) to The process of indigenization became stillthat of the emperors Kōtoku (r. 645-54) and more vigorous at the beginning of the HeianTenji (r. 661-71), the culture of Sui period. In the politics the action of cultural(589-618) and Tang (618-907) China was volition, continually regenerated by theimported and superimposed on Japan’s clan agrarian lifestyle arising from Japan’ssociety (ancient feudal society) like a geography and climate (the substructure), ledfloating island. Though the extent and depth to the repeated enactment of statutesof Chinese cultural influence was much contravening the ritsutyo system. It wasgreater in the reign of Kōtoku than it had around this time that the cultural principle ofbeen in that of Suiko, the floating island of respecting the ideal but opportunelyChinese culture was not yet jointed to the modifying it developed. Several emperors,underlying clan society. beginning with Kammu (r. 781-806), This changed after the emperor Temmu (r. consolidated imperial power, according both672-86) ascended the throne upon usurping statutes reinforcing the ritsuryo system andthe crown from his nephew in the Jinshin those contradicting it the status ofDisturbance of 672. Temmu officially supplementary rulings (kyaku)recognized and put into writing the complementing the ritsuryo codes andrelationship between the genealogical attempting thus to tighten up the system oftraditions of the clans (kyūji) and those of the the ritsuryo state.imperial clan (teiki). After dividing the large
  • 82. In religion, meanwhile, the Buddhist priest 5.1.3. The utilization of southern ChineseSaichō (767-822) indigenized the teachings culture and the formation of Japaneseof China’s Tiantai Buddhism (called Tendai culturein Japan), expounding the interpenetration The balance of political power betweenand interdependence of ideal and actuality, warriors and nobles continued to shift. Aftergood and evil. He advocated Buddhism as a the Jōkyū Disturbance of 1221, the retiredmeans of “pacifying and protecting” the state emperor Gotoba’s unsuccessful attempt toin a way different from the Buddhist schools overthrow the Kamkura shogunate, membersintroduced to Japan in the preceding Nara of the powerful Hōjō family took over asperiod. shogunal regents, or shikken. Under Hōjō In the mid-Heian period, while ritsuryo rule the warriors’ political power was freedgovernment was retained, a new system was from the restrictions imposed by the nobilityadded whereby a maternal relative of the and achieved parity. And after the attemptedemperor was appointed to the post of sessho Mongol invasions of 1274 and 1281 the(regent for an underage emperor) or warriors achieved political ascendancy.kampaku (regent for an adult emperor)— After engineering the overthrow of theposts not included in the modified ritsuryo Hōjō regime in 1333, the emperor Godaigosystem—taking over some or all of the (r.1318-39) attempted to restore directemperor’s official duties and advising him. imperial rule by retired emperors in the so-The institution of imperial regents (sekkan called Kemmu Restoration (1333-36), butseiji) further indigenized government. The was thwarted by the warrior AshikagaJapanization of Chinese culture at this time is Takauji, who set up a rival “northern court”also indicated by the modification of Chinese by whose authority he established thepalace architecture into the shinden-zukiri Muromachi shogunate in 1338. Takauji didstyle of architecture and the modification of the reverse of the Kamakura shoguns,bugaku, a form of dance with instrumental incorporating the court nobles’ politicalaccompaniment imported from China, into power into the apparatus of warrioryamato mai, literally “Japanese dance.” government. The third Muromachi shogun, Toward the end of the Heian period, the Ashikaga Yoshimitsu (1369-94), madeintroduction of de facto rule by “retired government by nobles an empty formalityemperors” (insei), emperors heading the and then dissolved it.imperial family who had abdicated in favor Southern Chinese culture emerged at justof sons or grandsons, made both the about this time. The Japanese, taking in thismodified ritsuryo system and the imperial- culture and its institutions, utilized them toregent system mere formalities. Meanwhile, fashion their own distinctive culture andpowerful warrior clans from rice-growing institutions. In place of the ancient bugakuregions began to infiltrate the government and yamato mai, the dance-drama forms ofapparatus of the court nobles. With the Noh and Kyōgen were developed; instead ofadvent of the Kamakura period Minamoto no the earlier waka poetry, renga (linked verse)Yoritomo, the head of the dominant warrior flourished; Chinese-style palace architectureclan and the first shogun (1192-99) of that and shinden-zukuri gave way to shoin-zukuriperiod’s military government (bakufu), and tearoom architecture. It was during thiscreated a system of joint rule with emperor period that the Japanese arts of the teaGoshirakawa (r. 1155-58), incorporating ceremony and flower arrangement began tounofficial feudal rule into the official take form.political apparatus of the court nobility. This Toward the end of the Muromachi period,Japanization of government spurred the once again powerful warriors came forthindigenization of other cultural phenomena. from rice-growing regions. Feudal lords called daimyo built up huge domains. After the transitional Azuchi-Momoyama period, a
  • 83. system of centralized feudal rule (called the responsibilities), and provisions enshriningbakuhan system because it combined rule by aspects of the feudalistic ie system based ona centralized bakufu and regional domains the law of Tokugawa feudalism, such asknown as han) took form in the Tokugawa those pertaining to collateral relationshipsperiod, during which the Japanese created and inheritance. Though the provisions ontheir most representative culture and property and those on collateral relationshipsinstitutions. and inheritance were contradictory, nevertheless they complemented each other.5.1.4. Western Culture and the Dual According to the Meiji Constitution of 1890,Structure of Japanese Culture which had been granted by the emperor, the Around the end of the Tokugawa period, “family rights” (actually, feudalistic powers)the wave of European powers’ Asian set forth in the Civil Code’s chapter onaggression (colonization) began to lap domestic relations were allocated by theJapan’s shore. Following the Meiji emperor, and the individual rights in theRestoration of 1868, which put an end to chapters on property were guaranteed by theTokugawa rule, the nation attempted to emperor (imperially endowed civil rights).ensure its independence by swiftly The process by which “national morality,”modernizing, preserving the traditional the ethic of “loyal patriotism” (chūkunfamily (ie) and village (mura) that had been aikoku) was formed corresponded exactly tothe basic units of feudal society while that by which the Civil Code wassuperimposing the Western institutions of established. The ethic of “closed” devotiondemocratic politics and capitalist economics. to one’s feudal lord, now in the concentratedDuring the first decade of the Meiji era form of loyalty to the emperor, and modern(1868-1912), the phase of westernization Western nations’ ethic of “open” patriotismknown as “civilization and enlightenment” as the function of autonomous individuals(bummei kaika), both the substructure and accumulated one atop the other during thethe superstructure of Japanese culture 1880s, setting the Imperial Householdaccumulated mass; in the second decade they Ministry and the Ministry of Education atwere stitched together; and in the third and loggerheads; were stitched together in 1890fourth decades they became welded. The by the proclamation of the Imperial Rescriptcompilation of Japan’s Civil Code and the on Education; reinterpreted to mean thatestablishment of “national morality” loyalty to the emperor was synonymous with(kokumin dōtoku) vividly illustrate this patriotism and that these were the supremeprocess. virtues of imperial subjects. Thus were When compilation of the Civil Code began perfected early modern Japan’s state systemin the mid-1870s, an individualistic, liberal and its ideology.(capitalist) legal code modeled on French In the Taishio era (1912-26), with thecivil law was envisaged, but civil-law relaxation of outside pressure on Japan, theprecedents from the Tokugawa period were superstructure developed further. This led tolater incorporated; the product, known as the the florescence of so-called TaishoOld Civil Code, thus mingled old and new. Democracy, which took an open approach toBut because of scathing criticism by the legal “the world and the masses.” But as outsidescholar Hozumi Yatsuka, and others (the so- pressure intensified again in the early yearscalled Civil Code controversy), the code was of the Showa era (1926-89), the substructurereworked in the 1990s. The resulting Meiji filtered deeper and deeper into theCivil Code comprised two layers: superstructure, and a closed trend extendedindividualistic, liberal (capitalist) provisions to every aspect of politics, law, the economy,based on modern European law, such as religion, thought, and the arts. After Japan’sthose regarding certain aspects of property defeat in World War II, Americalaw (rights in rem and obligatory rights and superimposed open politics, law, economy,
  • 84. thought, and artistic activities on this postwar period as the late phase of thatwartime system, which nevertheless transition. Wet-rice production by ie andremained intact. During the almost fifty mura communities modeled by Japan’syears of the postwar period, the substructure geography and climate, which formed theand superstructure were stitched together and basis of Japanese culture until the war,then welded into a seamless whole; weakened rapidly after the war, especially inregulation, sectionalism, and backroom recent years, and lost the energy to infiltratedealings came to permeate every aspect of the superstructure (Chinese culture) and theJapanese life and finally brought the nation post-Meiji superstructure (European culture)to an impasse. and in the nature and intensity of outside pressure changed the direction in which the5.1.5. The Culmination of the Dual dual structure of Japanese culture developed.Structure of Culture The history of Japanese culture represents a As we see from the above discussion, in grand laboratory of human, especially Asian,Japan’s agrarian period there evolved a dual culture and thus provided us with much foodstructure: an indigenous substructure of for thought when considering the present andclosed culture and institutions rooted in the future of other Asian countries.lifestyle of wet-rice cultivation andsuperstructure of imported open culture andinstitutions. Japan’s cultural history can be 5.2. WABI, SABIseen as having developed through a repeated Shirasu Masako, Essayistprocess whereby the substructure infiltratedthe superstructure and the two layers There is an antique dealer in Ogaki, Gifuaccumulated, then were stitched together, Prefecture, known as Nagazen. His real nameand finally became welded. was Zenzō. A gentle, refined man, he was Before the Meiji era, the development of well-known to other antique dealers in Japan.this dual structure resulted ultimately in the He died this winter at age 99.closed system of Tokugawa feudalism. In the Some time ago, he invited me to eat wildmodern period, however, domestically the thrush at a country house in the Kisodual structure reinforced the feudalistic mountains. The last part of the mountainnature of every area of Japanese life both road was not passable by car and we had tobefore and after World War II, while walk. The cobbled road was quite steep andexternally it gave rise to the Greater East I was afraid it would be too much of a strainAsia Co-Prosperity Sphere and overseas for a man almost in his nineties. But heaggression before the war and to such proved to be more fit than me and led thephenomena as the export and offshore way, his tall frame erect and dignified.manufacture of industrial products after the The color of chrysanthemums and spireswar. The culmination of the development of leaves enlivened the bleak scenery along thethe dual structure appears to have reversed. road. Winter was on its way to the Kiso Taking a comprehensive view, I believe mountains and the first snow was imminent.that Japanese history can be divided broadly I do not know how the thrush wereinto three phases based on two industrial obtained—“mist netting” of wild birds wasrevolutions (the introduction of the prohibited—but they were delicious. Seatedtechniques of wet-rice cultivation and of round a large fire pit, we passed the timeindustrial technology and that the agrarian pleasantly, eating and drinking from noon toage ended with the Tokugawa period). I nightfall. After resting a bit after the meal,regard the period from the Meiji Restoration Nagazen said, “Well then, shall I make tea?”until World War II as the early phase of a From a cloth wrapped bundle, he took out atransition to an age of industrial production hanging scroll and placed it on the wallsupported by science and technology and the behind the fire pit. It was just the right size,
  • 85. and the calligraphy by Jiun went perfectlywith the sooty wall. With this touch thehearth-side atmosphere was instantlytransformed. I felt as if we were enjoying arelaxed drink with Jiun. Nagazen brought out some winterchrysanthemums and spires which he hadpicked on our way up without my noticing.He nestled them in a jar from the old kilns ofEchizen, adding a subtle accent of color tothe dark, earthen-floored room. Then he tookhis tea utensils out of a box and beganpreparing tea with gentle movements. Hisdemeanor was natural and humble. Therewas no hint of formality or ostentation. My eyes were fixed on each of Nagazen’sgestures. He was born near Nagoya, so it wasnot surprising that he had practiced at teaceremonies. But what impressed me abouthis way of making tea had little to do withexperience. I could not help but think thatthis was how Takeno Jōō and Sen no Rikyūmust have served tea. He seemed to becompletely indifferent to the conventionalforms of the tea ceremony. He had actuallymade his own forms. “I forgot whether this is done first orwhether it comes later. Oh well, it doesn’treally matter so long as you enjoy it”. Perhaps he was just helping me relax sinceI was not an expert on the tea ceremony. Ifso, it would have made his performance evenmore remarkable. The moon had alreadyappeared even though it was early evening. Iwas a little drunk and late autumn breezeseemed to waft through my body, lifting meup to the ceiling. Much has been said about wabi and sabi,the rustic simplicity, quietness, and solitudewhich are the core esthetic principles of thetea ceremony. As long as people indulge intheorizing, however, they show a lack of trueunderstanding. The ultimate meaning of thetea ceremony is achieving the playful state ofmind, empty and without purpose,demonstrated by this old man. This state ofmind is close to Zen enlightenment.Nanpouroku, Nihon Shisoutaikei, KinseiGeidouron, Iwanamishoten, 1972
  • 86. 5.3. SADO: Tea CeremonyShirasu Masako, Essayist Today’s tea ceremony is often thought of opportunity for a happy and peaceful homeas something young girls learn to prepare for life.marriage or an opportunity for polite The phrase ichigoichie (the only encountersocializing. In the past it was a pastime of in a life-time) is hackneyed today, but it hasfierce warriors. Leaving the carnage of the poignant meaning for the warriors of formerbattlefield, they lay down their arms and times. Even today, no one knows whetherbowed to pass through the low doorway of they will be alive tomorrow or not. In ourthe tea room. Perceiving the light fragrance peaceful times, we are fairly sure thatinside it, they had a physical sensation of the tomorrow will come and we feel no need tojoy of being alive. fight for our future. One can fight in a It is difficult now to imagine their feelings, meaningful ways: however, cutting awaybut we still have the tea utensils they used one’s own pride, vanity, and self-satisfactionand loved. The most important of these was a and other useless emotions. By placingchawan (a tea bowl). A person who importance on the now which never returns itunderstands tea bowls naturally understands is possible to have ideal relationships withthe way of tea. other people. This is what I see as the true The great tea master Rikyū once said that purpose of the tea ceremony.it is enough to simply enjoy drinking tea, but In general, the practice known as thethe tea bowl is a necessary condition for this classical arts, including poetry, noh, andenjoyment. It beauty appeals to the eye, and Japanese dance, have hardened into rigidits weight and texture in the hand and the styles after the initial creative period. Thistouch of its edge on the lips enhance the form or kata takes on great value. This isflavor of the tea and calm the heart. probably necessary to some extent, but it Wakeiseijaku (harmony, respect, quiet, and should not be forgotten that the forms of thesolitude) is a phrase which acutely conveys tea ceremony exist within a wider frameworkthe spirit of the tea ceremony. The bowl and of meaning and that they are just forms. Thethe other utensils make that spirit visible. tea ceremony had its source in the way of lifeLike the parts of an orchestra they perform a of individual human beings. If the spirit ofmomentary melody of life, sometimes the founder is not infused in the form andseparating and sometimes coming together. incorporated in the body of the practitioner, The utensils are used by people, and one the style and the form will be empty andcan tell the personality of the owner of a tea barren.bowl to a surprising degree by observing andhandling it. This is probably why military Yamagami Sojiki, Nihon no Chasho,leaders of earlier times competed so Heibonsha-Toyo-bunko, 1971seriously for tea utensils. There was even astory of a loyal retainer being rewarded witha tea bowl in lieu of an entire province. Some 5.4. WAKA: Japanese Poetrywarriors were more perceptive than others in Baba Akiko, Tanka Poetdiscerning the true worth of the tea bowlsthan others, but they all felt it an honor to Waka—“Japanese poetry” or “Japaneseown them. song”: poetry in the classical form consisting The tea ceremony is a condensed, of five lines with 31 syllables in the patternestheticized version of ordinary life. It 5-7-5-7-7. In the “Manyoshu” (Theflourished in a period of frequent internal Anthology of Ten Thousand Leaves, ca.warfare, emerging when warriors who spent 759), these are referred to as tanka (shortall their time fighting had lost the poems) as distinct from the chōka (long
  • 87. poems) which contain an indefinite number antecedents in shorter prose narratives, suchof parts of 5- and 7- syllable lines, with an as the 10th-century “Tales of Ise” that framedextra 7-syllable line at the end. A chōka may the waka they contained in a context anbe followed by a hanka (a short envoy), account of the circumstances in which theywhich is identical in form to a tanka. were composed. Poetry was to become such In the Heian period (794-1185), the desire an intimate and integral part of the daily lifeto distinguish the native tradition from of the Heian nobility that it would beChinese verse gave rise to the term yamato- virtually impossible to isolate the waka fromuta or waka, “Japanese poetry”. The “The Tale of Genji”.Kokinwakashū (The Collection of Ancient This was the background against whichand Modern Poetry), the first imperial poetry poetry contests arose with the courtiers vyinganthology, was compiled with a self- to compose the most skillful verses often onconsciously Japanese aesthetic. In his famous a single assigned topic. Accomplished poetspreface in the vernacular script, Ki-no- emerged and the contests between them gaveTsurayuki wrote: “Japanese poetry has its rise to widely circulated anecdotes; in thisseed in the human heart and countless words milieu devices of literary language wereas leaves.” He describes the power of the increasingly refined. As one genre among theform thus: “It is poetry that moves heaven many collections of prose narratives the talesand earth without strain, touches the that alternate poetry and prose clearly reflectemotions of unseen spirits and gods, creates how the poets from the Heian period to post-harmony between men and women, and classical times took enormous pains overcalms the hearts of fierce warriors.” their diction. It was, of course, in the Since the end of the Manyō age, waka had medieval period that there appeared expertbeen overshadowed by the vogue for treatises on poetics, rival schools ofcomposing Chinese verse, but with the scholarship and intense critical debates.completion of the “Kokinwakashū” in 905 At all events, we cannot overlook thethe native poetic style came into its own. The presence of waka as a continuous andesteem for the human heart that lies at its coherent element at the center of Japanesecore is an essential feature of waka. Since the literature. In modern times the 31-syllableearly days of the “Manyōshū”, the elegant verses have once again taken on the nameenjoyment of poetry had always been valued tanka. Although they have been declaredas an important part of ceremonial occasions, dead repeatedly, they have survived to attainand the Heian period brought still further an extraordinary popularity today. Asrecognition of waka, which came to figure indicated by the depth and breadth of thenot only in official banquets but also at contemporary love of the form, it continuesprivate gatherings of intellectuals and to uphold a uniquely Japanese culturalcourtiers, where it became common to hold tradition and is the most Japanese of literarypoetry contests and exchanges of verse. This arts. Thus, the term “Japanese poetry” is allage saw waka recognized as the preeminent the more apt today.element of literature. For the women who served at court, poetry Wakashi, by Senichi Hisamatsu, Tokyodowas a heightened, celebratory language in Shuppan, 1960-1970the midst of daily life. As the court ladiesand gentlemen engaged in the give and takeof verses, the literary artistry of their 5.5. BONSAIlanguage was polished and elaborate poetic Kurita Isamu, Writer, Criticdevices were developed. It should beremembered that waka were fundamental to Bonsai is considered even in Japan as aother literary works of the period such as pastime for the elderly. At times it is“The Tale of Genji”. Of course, these had criticized by foreigners as an unnatural,
  • 88. artificial, and distasteful hobby involving the are confronted with the great decision as todistortion of the natural shape of trees. In whether or not to cut a certain branch.fact, as a younger boy, I, too, avoided it as a Local garden plants, no to mention myJapanese taste for old fashioned things and garden in the country, change their shapethe worst example of depauperation and rapidly over the year. The growth of theartificiality. However, after a certain period, plants and the seasonal laws of nature prevailI realized I was wrong and my appreciation subtly yet strictly. It does not require a year.changed entirely. Nowadays, although I In spring day by day the trees and plantscannot collect bonsai due to the difficulty in undergo remarkable changes. If thegrowing them, whenever I see one, I stop to transformation is contrary to your mentalenjoy it and mediate for a while. image, you realize the dominance of the laws What was the key to this complete turn- of nature. This was because you had notabout and my sudden appreciation and taken seasonal changes into considerationsympathy for bonsai? quite apart from the manipulation of space. Everything said or written about bonsai so The time axis covers not only the fourfar has a common fault. It has only been seasons, but time-spans ranging from a year,discussed from the point of view of an a few years to several decades. These mustonlooker who has not dabbled with bonsai also be taken into account when forecastinghimself. The same applies to the performing the harmony between nature and plants.arts and fine art in Japan, too. They are very Moreover, a single tree also has to harmonizedifferent from European culture in that there with the natural environment surrounding it.is no clear distinction between the creator Consequently, pruning may appear to imposeand the viewer. Be it renga, haikai, yōkyoku, man’s own ideas but in reality it istea ceremony, or ikebana, the audience also, continuous forecast and expectation ofas a rule, takes part in the creation. Even in natural laws and an endless process ofkabuki, the hanamichi (flower way) and the approaching and adjustment towards truesense of solidarity with the audience invites creation.them to join the actors. In village plays and In appreciating any Japanese garden thefestive kagura, too, the villagers may be pruning with participation from the creator’samateur, but they can also perform. side is actually a very significant element. My participation in bosai was in the form Let us extend this theory to bonsai.of pruning. Every spring, at my country Needless to say, the scale of bonsai is muchhouse at the foot of Mt. Fuji an unusual type smaller than actual nature. However, the timeof cherry shrub called fuji-zakura or required to grow them can be severalkogome-zakura would come into bloom in decades or even a century or two.vast numbers. I would get lost in creating a Miniaturization is not the purpose ofmagnificent view by sorting out the bonsai. On the contrary, the purpose is thesurrounding plants and cutting some expression of a total aesthetic harmonybranches. Through that work, I learn a lot between natural and artificial laws. Beyondabout nature. the form of the bonsai presented in front of First of all, you cannot start pruning garden our eyes, lies the idea of figuration formedplants without utilizing your own figurative over the years through pruning by humanimage or an unconsciously formed prototype hands. Particularly in ancient bonsai, there isas to what a natural landscape should look more than the knowledge of an individuallike. That is to say, pruning is the modelling person reflected in it. The true and total formof the cultural tradition, personal experiences of creation which lies in the Japanese souland knowledge that you have experienced so lives on in the bonsai. It can be regarded as afar. Furthermore, by pruning man has to moment of our confession of faith in God thecommunicate with and challenge nature. You Creator.
  • 89. 5.6. Kome: Rice The cycle of the Japanese festivals isTanigawa Ken-ichi ethnologist heavily related to rice, and rice is central to most cultural practices, but this same rice It is said that in poor Japanese farming very rarely became the possession of itsvillages a sick and dying person could be producers. The great majority wasrevived by shaking a bamboo cylinder confiscated by people in authority. In thecontaining raw grains of rice near his or her Nara and the early Heian periods, this meantpillow. This custom derives from the fact the court. In the feudal period, it was thethat the hard working farmers who worked regional lords. From the Meiji period to theso hard producing rice seldom got to eat any end of World War II it was the landholdingof it themselves. Most of it went to pay taxes class. Thus, the Japanese have remainedand the remainder was used as currency to obsessed with rice through the centuries asbuy daily necessities. the object of unfulfilled desire. Under the Taiho code of ancient times, a The Japanese attitude toward rice began totax, called tachikara (rice paddy strength), change in the late 1960s during the period ofwas assessed on all rice-producing land. The high economic growth. Diet changed andword shows that rice was considered the people began eating less rice. Farmers wereultimate source of mental and physical forced to curtail production and could noenergy and that it was also the basis of the longer pursue their previous goal ofnation’s economic strength. continually increasing rice production. Now Rice was a festival food generally eaten by foreign countries are asking Japan to open itsthe peasantry only during the New Year rice market. The Japanese have beenholidays and on other ceremonial occasions. working hard at producing rice since theIt was also a public substance that could not beginning of history with a religious faith,easily be set aside for personal use. Thus, but this faith is now wavering. We are at aobsession with rice cultivation shown by the critical juncture in which our sense ofJapanese since the Yayoi period was based tradition based on rice may be lost.on complete circumstances. The idea of a spirit residing in ears of rice Daijoosai no Seiritsu, by Kenichi Tanigawa,is also found among the minority peoples of Shogakukan, 1990Southeast Asia and southern China. It is notlimited to Japan. But only in Japan is the ricespirit worshiped as a major god 5.7. KI: WoodUkanomitama. U is honorific and ka Kawai Masao, Anthropologist(sometimes pronounced ke) is the powerresiding in food, particularly rice. The inner A wood culture flourishes in Japan. Theshrine of Ise is dedicated to Amaterasu Japanese venerate old or large trees as godsOmikami, (the sun goddess and ancestor of or the dwelling places of gods, marking themthe imperial family) but the outer shrine is for reverence with shimenawa (straw ropes).dedicated to Toyouke Omikami, This practice is often cited with an examplepersonification of the rice spirit. Clearly, rice of animism in Japan, but it reflects feelingswas seen as something more than the not unique to Japan. Studies by Masamipersonal property of farmers. Kitamura and others reveal that Europeans The niinamesai (the farmers’ rice harvest also sense a mysterious, divine presence infestival) was taken over by the court at a large trees and this seems to be a universalvery early date. The tasting of new rice by tendency of human nature.the emperor became an important ritual for Our wood culture includes woodenruling the country, as shown by the phrase household objects and highly refined forms“eating country” in reference to the country of wooden architecture. All Japanese have aruled by the emperor. dream of living in a wooden house with a
  • 90. garden. Most would like to have a bath tub of grained plastic wall paper in order to satisfyhinoki (Japanese cypress) and to be the sentimental desire for a bit of nature.surrounded daily by the smell of wood. Today’s Japanese live in houses which onlyDecorating a house with flowers to enjoy pretend to be made of wood. Wooden bowlstheir fragrance is common, but there are and trays have disappeared from everydayprobably few peoples as fond of the smell of life, and only chopsticks remain as evidencewood as the Japanese. of a wood culture. These too are gradually Life in a wooden house has a strong being replaced by plastic as a result of thereligious implication in Japan. Until recently, foolish movement to ban throw-awaymost homes contained Buddhist altars chopsticks as a way of protecting forests.commemorating their deceased family The dead are being driven away from ourmembers. Thus, most families lived in the homes. The intermingling, shadowy presencepresence of their dead. The wooden house of elderly people and wooden structures arewas a receptacle for life supported by the being eliminated, replaced by those nucleardead. families, cheery and artificial. Recently, walking in a tropical rain forest Entering a virgin laurel forest, one feels ain West Africa, I felt the uncanny presence deep sadness. Life close to the laurel forestof the trees. A dark, primeval forest, with must have moved the ancient Japanese totrees forty meters high, it is an ecosystem appreciate calm, simplicity and solitude, thewhere vast amounts of energy are circulated. aesthetic feelings described by the termsI felt overwhelmed by the life force stored wabi, sabi, and yusui. There are very few ofand radiating from the trees. these original forests left. They have been Human lives end in a few decades but the replaced by more economically useful trees.trees standing around me has been alive for The present century lacks the darkness of oldcenturies. Trees do not die of old age. forests, and as it comes to an end, we standAnimals have a limited life span even if they in a lonely, glaring light, sniffling anddo not fall ill. Trees live virtually forever if clearing our throats uncomfortably in annot struck by sickness or disaster. The secret allergic reaction to the pollen that resultsof their long life is the fact that they embrace from overplanting of cedar trees for lumber.their own death, and that life and death Why aren’t Japanese houses built of stonecoexist in them. like those of Europeans? Some say it is Only the outside layers of a tree are alive. because wood is plentiful here, but it is alsoIts heart, the large part of trunk, is an because good building stone is not available.accumulation of dead cells. With its own According to Fujita Kazuo’s unique theory,dead body as its core, a tree sprouts fresh the pressing of the Japanese Islands betweenleaves, generates delicate flowers, and grows the Pacific plate and the Philippine plate hasluxuriant fruit. A wooden house is made of cracked the rock so much that it is difficult tocorpses of trees, all these living parts cut find single stones of two cubic meters oraway. For several decades or centuries, the more. This is also the reason that Japaneseshining, life-supporting skin of the tree has mountains are covered with vegetation. Theexuded tranquility, comforting and calming abundant greenery typical of Japan is aus. The Japanese have been fortunate to live fragile form of beauty growing on mountainsunder the protection of the spirits of their of sand and gravel which are always on theancestors and trees. verge of disintegration. Could this geological Japan has been blessed with a wood phenomenon be a reason for the Japaneseculture, but now wooden houses with sense of aware (the impermanence ofthatched roofs are rare. Steel frames, things)?concrete walls, and aluminum windows arethe norm. Concrete pillars are given a thinveneer of wood or walls covered with wood- 5.8. GIRI
  • 91. Kōsaka Jiro, Writer Following are some examples of the heroes’ attitudes to giri expressed in novels: Among the numerous variety of human The strain in this weary world is giri, therelationships, the duty or justice to be invisible disposition of a samuraipursued as a human being is called giri. (“Chinsetsu Yumiharizuki”) There is no other word quite so typically Even if you are a bumpkin, you cannotJapanese. Besides, there is no exact abandon the appropriate giri and lawequivalent to the word in English. (“Osome Hisamatsu”) No doubt, from a foreigner’s point of view, Having married a woman of the chōninthere is nothing so complicated to [trade class], I have forgotten all about giriunderstand. Moreover, without grasping this and law (“Kanadehon Chushingura”)unique word, it is impossible to interpret the Indeed, looking back, I am unaware of aacts, thoughts, and diverse human great giri. (“Futatsu Chōchō Kuruwa Nikki”)relationships of the Japanese. Oh my God! My wife talks of nothing but Ruth Fulton Benedict, in her book “The giri. (“Kasane Izutsu”)Chrysanthemum and the Sword” analyses the Pondering over the meeting and partingJapanese giri. with my sweetheart, giri requires the The Japanese often claim that “there is preparation of appropriate clothes.nothing so perplexing as giri. In referring to (“Shunshoku Tatsumi no Sono”)the cause of their acts, their fame, or the Do not forget your giri and your loincloth.dilemma they confront in their country, the (“Sendōbeya”)Japanese always mention giri. Strictly I was obliged to speak up from a sense ofspeaking, the rule in giri is the rule of giri. (“Kōshoku Ichidai Otoko”)returning something that has to be doneunder any circumstance. Benedict explains The world of kabuki, Saikaku andthe reason that the Japanese are obliged to Chikamatsu Monzaemon, in which thefulfill their giri is that “if they do not, they dilemma being trapped between justice andwould be regarded as ignorant of giri and be charity is depicted, was passed down input to shame in front of others.” “Onna Keizu” by Izumi Kyoka and “Jinsei As Benedict points out, there are countless Gekijo” by Ozaki Shiro from the Meijigiri public obligations and ninjō (personal period onwards and survives continuously tocharity) which exist around us in the this day in the Heisei period as a moralrelationships with our profession, class, attitude in the life of Japanese people.relatives, parents and friends. Under restraint of the traditional moral Swords and Chrysanthemum (Kiku toconcepts of justice and charity, drama, Katana), by Ruth Benedict, 1973literature and popular songs have been sungand performed, emphasizing the melancholyin life.5.9. HaikuBy: James Thompson Seventeen . . . seventeen . . . seventeen: the words echo in the halls striking fear in the hearts ofhaiku students and sensei alike. Poets are assailed by well meaning fans and critics chanting thehaiku mantra: “five-seven-five”. With every poem, haiku poets are presented with the opportunity(or cursed with the responsibility) to explain their art form. Of the many conceptions andmisconceptions about haiku, the one most often discussed is the syllable count. Webster’s New
  • 92. Collegiate Dictionary (1980), defines haiku as: “an unrhymed Japanese verse form of 3 linescontaining 5,7, and 5 syllables respectively.” Wow, that is like trying to use a tiny bonsai as anexample of a giant redwood tree. It took R.H. Blyth four volumes to describe haiku and two moreto discuss its history. I will touch briefly on two elements outlined in the Webster definition: thesyllable count and the amount of lines in haiku.Jack Kerouac, who helped popularize haiku in America with his book The Dharma Bums (1958),provided a much different definition outlining the vast differences in Western Language andJapanese. In Scattered Poems (1970), a posthumous collection of Kerouac’s poems, he stated: “A‘Western Haiku’ need not concern itself with seventeen syllables since Western Languages cannotadapt themselves to the fluid syllabic Japanese. I propose that the ‘Western Haiku’ simply say alot in three short lines in any Western Language.” While this approach to haiku may not addressall the elements of haiku, Kerouac’s haiku are widely anthologized in haiku collections.In Haiku in English (1967) Harold G. Henderson states: “As a general rule a classical Japanesehaiku: 1. consists of 17 Japanese syllables (5-7-5) 2. contains at least some reference to nature(other than human nature) 3. refers to a particular event (i.e., not a generalization)  4. presentsthat event as happening now- not in the past.” He continues: “Japanese haiku ‘syllables’ used forthe 5-7-5 count are not English syllables. They are rather units of duration.” The vast differencebetween the Japanese and English languages creates the confusion regarding the haiku ‘syllables’.While English words are broken into syllables, the Japanese words are broken into onji (sound-symbols). Japanese onji are much shorter than English syllables (i.e. the single syllable Englishword “ran” breaks down into 2 Japanese onji, and the word “rain” breaks into 3 onji). Cor van denHeuvel, in the preface to The haiku Anthology, Expanded Edition (1999), details how thisdifference affects English Language haiku:”It is now known that about 12 - not 17 - syllables inEnglish are equivalent in length to the 17 onji (sound- symbols) of the Japanese haiku.”The comparison of English syllables to Japanese onji is not exact, in fact, Cor van den Heuveldescribes haiku as: “... a short poem recording the essence of a moment keenly perceived in whichnature is linked to human nature. A haiku can be anywhere from a few to 17 syllables, rarelymore.” And what dictates how many syllables you use? Simply the nature and language of yourpoem. In a poem about his brother, who was killed in The Vietnam War, Nicholas Virgilio wrote: Lily: out of the water . . . out of itself. (Nicholas Virgilio) He used eleven syllables in this beautiful haiku, which won a first place in the American Haikuand Japan Air Lines haiku contest in 1963 (out of over 41,000 English Language haikusubmitted). Another haiku: “In a Station of the Metro” by Ezra Pound, considered by some to bethe best English Language haiku ever written, diverts from 17 syllables: The apparition of these faces in the crowd; Petals on a wet, black bough. (Ezra Pound) Nineteen syllables! But, also notice that there are only two lines in this haiku. Many Japanesehaiku were written as one-line poems (written vertically). These poems when typeset horizontallyare sometimes presented in the one-line form, other times they are presented in a three-line form.Generally, while the three-line form is the most widely selected, one-line, two-line and even four-
  • 93. line forms are acceptable, provided the language and content of the poem support the linebreaks. Another example of a successful departure from a three line haiku is TakayangiShigenobu’s haiku, which is basically a concrete haiku: in a mountain range’s creases hear ing clear ly the bur ied ear s (Takayangi Shigenobu)Considering the language differences between Japanese and English, Webster’s definition ofhaiku is incomplete at best. English Language haiku often diverges greatly from the syllable andline form described in the dictionary. In 1987, Cor vanden Heuvel wrote in The New York TimesBook Review: “A haiku is not just a pretty picture in three lines of 5-7-5 syllables each. In fact,most haiku in English are not written in 5-7-5 syllables at all--many are not even written in threelines. What distinguishes a haiku is concision, perception and awareness--not a set number ofsyllables.” Seventeen . . . seventeen . . . seventeen: the words fade into the distance. As outlined above,haiku is more than syllable and line counts, much more. Seasonal content (kigo), cutting words(kireji), and “nowness” are other very important elements of haiku. They will be discussed infuture articles, in the meantime I close with perhaps the most famous, and most widely translatedhaiku: the old pond a frog jumps in the sound of water Matsuo Basho (1686)5.9.1 El Haiku y la NaturalezaDe aquí para alláLos sonidos de la cascada¡serán las hojas nuevas!Por Yosa Buson
  • 94. Wochi-kochi niTaki no oto kikuWakaba kana El ambiente general de la naturaleza cambia con frecuencia en Japón, una tierra bendecida conun agradable clima y una amplia capa forestal. Estas características han tenido una gran influenciaen la sensibilidad y las emociones de los japoneses, algunos de los cuales mantienen la antiguacreencia de que los seres humanos mantienen una relación especial con las plantas y que admirarlas escenas que forman las flores y los árboles nos permite absorber parte de su fuerza vital. Esta afinidad con la naturaleza es la que genera los breves poemas haiku. En los haiku siemprese utiliza el kigo (palabras de la temporada), que actúa como códigos simbolizando una de lasestaciones de la naturaleza. Casi mitad de todos los kigo en los haiku se refieren a las plantas. En el haiku presentado aquí, la palabra wakaba (hojas tiernas) recrean la sensación delcomienzo del verano, cuando los capullos han florecido y las brillantes hojas tiernas diseñan ladefinición del paisaje. Esta parte del año evoca el sentimiento de una nueva y vital fuerza que escapaz de difundir aires de renovación también entre los sere humanos. Otras palabras códigocomo aoba (hojas verdes) o shinryoku (nuevo verdor) también podrían haber sido usadas peroninguna de las dos evocaría el sentimiento de juventud que evoca wakaba. Wochi-kochi es una expresión antigua. En este caso describe cómo el amante de naturalezaescucha el sonido de una cascada aquí y allá cerca y lejana. No escucha el sonido de muchascascadas, sólo una cuyo sonido reverbera en todas las direcciones sobre la montaña cubierta dehojas tempranas. Por ello, el poema apela a los sentimientos tanto visuales como auditivos yexpresa la alegría de ser uno con la totalidad de la fuerza vital de la naturaleza. Texto: Nakamura Yutaka (poeta de haiku)Yosa Buson (1716-1783) fue un famoso poeta de haiku del período Edo (1603-1867). Su estilo expresivo está dotadode elegancia y aire romántico. También fue un gran pintor dentro del estilo literario (bunijin gaka). NIPPONIA Descubriendo Japón No. 1, 19775.10. RakugoTime NoodlesThere were two men walking on a cold night. One says, “Hey, let’s go get some hot noodles,udon.” The other guy says, “But we dont have enough money. A bowl of noodles costs sixteen,but we only have fifteen together.” The first guy tells the second fellow not to worry and takeshim to a noodle shop. They order one bowl of noodles and share it. As the first guy pays, he saysto the cashier, “Mister, please count with me, I am not confident about counting money: One,two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, what time is it?” “Nine." "Oh, ten, eleven, twelve,thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen ... Thanks, good night!”The other guy was impressed and decided to try the same thing himself. The next night he goesalone to a different noodle shop and orders a bowl of noodles. Then when he finally pays, hesays, “Mister, please count with me. I am not confident about counting money: One, two, three,four, five, six, seven, eight, what time is it” “Five.” “Oh, six, seven, eight, nine, ten .....?”
  • 95. CAPITULO SEXTO 6. EMPEROR (Ten-no)6.1. EMPEROR According to mythology, Japan’s first Emperor Jimmu, a descendant of the Sun GoddessAmaterasu, was enthroned in the year 660 BC. While the myths are not considered historicallyaccurate, it is a commonly accepted fact that emperors have reigned over Japan for more than1500 years, and that they have all descended from the same imperial family. Despite the fact the effective power of the emperors was limited or purely symbolicthroughout most of Japan’s history, all actual rulers, from the Fujiwara and Hojo regents to theMinamoto, Ashikaga and Tokugawa shoguns respected the emperor and were keen in having theimperial legitimization for their position as rulers of Japan. With the Meiji Restoration of 1868,the Tokugawa shogunate was overthrown, and Emperor Meiji became the head of state. Under thenew Meiji constitution, the Emperor held sovereign power, and his political and military powerwas theoretically close to absolute. In practice, however, the real power first laid with theoligarchic genro and later with the generals and admirals. The postwar constitution of 1946 states that the emperor has only a symbolic function. Henow mainly participates at ceremonies and diplomatic meetings, but has no effective politicalpower. In 1989, Emperor Akihito became Japan’s 125th emperor. He is married to EmpressMichiko, the first empress who did not come from the nobility. Their eldest son is Crown PrinceNaruhito. The imperial family resides in the Imperial Palace in Tokyo.6.2. CULTURE OF TRANSLATIONYANABU, AkiraDepartment of Intercultural Studies. St. Andrew’s University, Osaka, Japan The Tenno system has been generally looked upon as being the center of Japanese culture. However, from myviewpoint of the translation theory of translated cultures it consists almost entirely of imported foreign cultures.Clearly the terms and rituals of the Tenno system are almost all translated cultures. The following serves asexamples: the word “Tenno” itself, who the treasures of the Tenno family, their clothes, rituals and so on. Thispaper at first introduces these facts and then deals with the reason. Some symbolic anthropologists in Japanhave argued about the Tenno system from the viewpoint of the boundary of culture. They often call the
  • 96. argument “the kinship theory,” some of which are similar to my argument on the translation theory. However,the kinship theory argues it from inside a culture while the translation theory generally presupposes two culturesand it treats the Tenno system from the boundary between these two cultures. The translated culture is different from both its original one and the one to which it is transferred. This“difference” usually accompanies the difference of value; a higher or lower value goes with the translatedcultures. From that kind of higher value the Tenno system has derived its authority.Keyword: TENNŌ, CULTURE, RITUAL, TRANSLATION, TRANSLATED WORD, BOUNDARY,KINSHIP, WA, KAN, ON-READING, KIN-READING, OUTSIDE6.2.1.“Tennō” as the Translated Word What is the symbol of Japanese culture? Many people then may answer that it is the “Tenno” the Japanese Emperor. The Constitution of Japan prescribes that the Tenno “shall be the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people.” Even scholars who criticize the Tenn o system assume it to be the center of Japanese culture. Now, does the Tenno system express Japanese culture? Strange to say, most of the Tenno system has not consisted of Japanese culture but of imported cultural things, which are correctly speaking in my terms, of the culture of translation. Then, at first, I will point out this fact as shown below, and then deal with its reason. In the first place, the word “Tenno” was imported from ancient Chinese literature. In those days, the name of the person who would later become the Tenno was Sumeramikoto or Okimi in the native language. When Chinese characters came into the islands about in the fifth century, his name became written as Tenno (天皇) in Chinese characters. Chinese characters in Japan often translate into English as “Sino-Japanese.” Apparently while they are similar to Chinese words there are major differences, because they are different in their sounds, grammar and even meanings. The word “Tenno” in ancient Japan was also made from such Chinese characters. The earlier names in the native language soon faded away and Tenno derived from foreign language remained as the formal name. What is important here is that such a use of the word Tenno was not the proper way to use it in China. A philologist, Tsuda S okichi writes that Tenno had meant the pole star in Heaven as a term of Taoism, which was an important religion in ancient China. That is to say, not knowing the correct meaning, people in ancient Japan introduced and used this Chinese word, which was from the language of the highest civilization in those days (Tsuda, 1963). In Japanese history the Tenno system has undergone several great changes. One of these changes was at the beginning of the modern era when the Tenno was ranked as the Dai-nihon- teikoku Tennō ( 大 日 本 帝 国 天 皇 , the Tenno of the Empire of Great Japan ) in the Meiji Constitution. Particularly during World War II Japanese authorities often used this title. I think that “the Empire of Great Japan” in this formal title consisted of translated words. In 1881, eight years before the promulgation of the Meiji Constitution a famous educator Nishi Amane wrote A Draft of the Constitution under the orders of Yamagata Aritomo, who was responsible for the enactment of the constitution. He writes in his paper as follows: Teikoku-dai-nihon ( 帝 国 大 日 本 , the Empire, Great Japan (signifies four islands: NihonChikushi Shikoku and Ezo,…. I mean this name results from the same sort of title as Great Britainthat means a country unifying England and Scotland (1962:202). “Great Japan” is thus modeled after “Great Britain” in its geographical meaning. In addition, teikoku ( 帝 国 ) in his writing here became used in those days as a translated word from “the British Empire”, and Nishi was the originator who used this translated word. We can understand therefore that Teikoku-dai-nihon used here by Nishi imitated “the British Empire” and “Great Britain.” Later, based upon that this model which was called in Japanese translation Dai-ei-
  • 97. teikoku (大英帝国, the Empire of Great Britain), people of the day must have coined Dai-nihon-teikoku (大日本帝国, the Empire of Great Japan) as the formal title for Japan. It was natural thatthe Japanese took Britain, the most civilized country in those days, as their model. In spite ofNishi’s hopes people had soon forgotten this original meaning. This title would before longbecome understood as the seemingly imposing name of this country and so could become theformal title. After the new Constitution in 1947, people often called Tenno by the name of shōchō Tenno(象徴天皇); this is because the new Constitution prescribed Tenno as shocho (symbol). In 1946,when the Diet considered the draft of the Constitution, some member questioned the meaning ofthis word, shocho to the Minister Kanamori, who was responsible for the enactment of theConstitution. Because the Minister could not answer adroitly, he replied that shocho meantakogare (longing), which caused the members of the Diet to laugh. People of those days madefun of this Kanamori’s answer saying “an akogare commentary on the Constitution.” To tell thetruth, the Commander in chief of the allied forces, MacArthur, had already written the originaldraft before the discussion in the Diet the Japanese Minister of the day therefore could not answereffectively. This matter showed that Japanese accepted the title of the translated word shochowithout knowing its correct meaning. Now I would like to explain my term “translation” or “translated word”. In short I will say thatthe meaning of a translated word is not always equivalent to that of its original word. I willoutline the whole circumstances as an abstract model. Let us suppose that there is culturalphenomenon a in culture “A.” In a narrow sense a can be a word in language “A.” If a isexporting into another culture “B” that is different from “A”, a does not move into “B” as thesame thing as the original a. It becomes a’ through the translation, then a’ ≠ a. Here a’ appears asa thing which has lost its cultural structure in A, or a word divorced from proper context. Itsmeaning in B is therefore uncertain, obscure or seemingly having a double meaning. On the other hand, human consciousness reflects the cultural structure, and the structure oflanguage and of culture controls that part of the human brains corresponding to it. Human beingsthink therefore that such a thing which has lost its structure or a word lost its context ought not toexist. In other words, human consciousness cannot usually seize the reason a’ has appeared. Thenpeople think a’ to be a itself, or to be B in another culture “B.” For instance, the populace usuallythinks words translated into Japanese such as kenri ( 権利), shimin ( 市民) to be real Japanesewords. On the other hand, intellectuals who are knowledgeable of Western culture think thatkenri = right, shimin = citizen and so on. They do not generally notice that neither of thesejudgments is correct (Yanabu. 1982). The model mentioned above is, so to speak, the argument from the viewpoint of culturalrelativism; thinking from this viewpoint, the explanation above must be almost applicable to theissues of intercultural communication. On the other hand, from the viewpoint of culturaluniversalism, the model should express as a’ = a because both the cultures A and B are universal.Speaking of many real translated phenomena, some of them are a’ ≠ a and the others are a’ = a.For instance, a Japanese kuruma (car) and an American car are almost a’ = a from their materialviewpoint, while they are a’ ≠ a when viewed from their social meaning or from their function indaily life.6.2.2. The Rituals of the Tenno System as the Culture of Translation What I have said above about the words of the Tenno system is also applicable to its rituals in asimilar way. The most precious things in the Tenno family must be the Three Sacred Treasureswhich are the mirror, the sword and the comma shaped beads. As the historian Murakami
  • 98. Hideyoshi (1986) has explained they have all been imported or copied from China or Korea.Other famous precious things of the Tenno family are those in the ancient warehouse, Shosoin, inwhich there are many original and copied works of arts and precious things which have beentransmitted from abroad. In addition people around the Tenno family have eagerly imported,collected and stored these things. Furthermore it is quite unusual in the world, as experts of finearts have pointed out, that so many ancient and precious things were collected in one place in sucha good state of preservation. The music of the rituals peculiar to the Tenno family is gagaku (the imperial court music) whichhad also been introduced from China. It has remained better preserved in Japan than in China, itscountry of origin, and Korea through which it was transmitted to Japan. Speaking of the myth ofthe Tenno family the most famous one is Tenson Korin (the descent to earth of the descendant ofthe Sun-Goddess) that Kojiki (Record of the Ancient Matters) and Nihon-shoki (Chronicles ofJapan) have handed down. In regard to this myth a famous historian, Egami Namio, has explainedon this myth that the same sort of stories as the ancestor of the governor who had at one timedescended from Heaven have been inherited from various parts of the eastern Eurasian continent;the ancient Japanese must have inherited the Tenson Korin myth from them. Similarly Daijosai(the ritual of succession to throne) must have followed on from the rituals observed by nomadicpeople on the continent (1988). As for the title of Tenno and the era names of successive Tenno,they have been coined from two Chinese characters selected from Chinese literature. The costumeof the Tenno family has inherited to that of the Tang dynasty in ancient China. The things mentioned above are the translated cultures chiefly from the advanced civilizedcountry of the day, China. In the modern era, however, it was chiefly from Western countries thatJapanese imported and translated foreign things. The formal costume of the Tenno was modeledafter the French military uniform style. Goshin’ei (the portrait of Tenno) which people onceworshiped everywhere in Japan was dressed in this French style of clothes, a cap and even asaber. Today although the military uniform is of course not used, the formal costume of the Tennofamily is the Western style together with the traditional one imported earlier from China.Speaking of vehicles, the car of the former Tenno, made by Benz in Germany was very famous,while the vehicle for the wedding ceremony was a British style coach. In the wedding of thepresent Crown-Prince, for security reasons this British style coach was not used, and was replacedby a car made by Rolls-Royce in Britain. The formal cooking of the Imperial court is Frenchcuisine. As for the finishing education of the Crown-Prince, while his father studied under anAmerican tutor, he furthered his education at Oxford University in Britain. I will emphasize here that these sorts of imported things are of the culture of translation,namely, a’ ≠ a, and these circumstances are, to our surprise, quite different from Japanese peopleto comprehend. Regarding the words and rituals of the Tenno system in the modern era, we havebeen, so to speak, present on the spot; strange to say, it is difficult for Japanese people to noticethat such words and things have been imported from foreign countries. For instance, how manyJapanese noticed that Goshin’ei which nearly all Japanese worshiped as the picture of living godwas wearing a thoroughly French style of dress? Many Japanese think the era name Showa (昭和)is surely Japanese, since they have forgotten how this word had once appeared. How did thefollowing era name Heisai (平成) appear? Scholars of Chinese classics assembled and selectedChinese characters from ancient Chinese literature one by one. In short, the French costume hadchanged into another meaning while its appearance remained the same. Again, while itsappearance remained the same, the word Showa changed into another meaning when it wasaccepted as a Japanese era name. Speaking of a recent case, the present Empress was, just before her marriage, going to meet theTenno for the first time and was requested to put on the formal costume of the Imperial Court.Her family then intended to prepare the formal Western clothing as the formal Imperial costumefor her; however, they could not get a pair of long white gloves, so she went to the Court with a
  • 99. pair of short white gloves. People spoke afterwards that the Court blamed her for the shame of herapparel. Why was she in the wrong? It was not because she did not put on the foreign clothes, butbecause she did not put on the formal Imperial clothes. A more recent case is that of the presentCrown Princess who once put on wa fuku (Japanese clothes) in public, and some people in theImperial Household Agency blamed her for the inappropriateness of his clothing. What did theyrequire her to put on instead of Japanese clothes, then? Was it Western clothes? Surely theoriginal meaning of Western clothes had changed, however, into the formal costume of the Tennofamily.6.2.3. The Tenno System from the Viewpoint of “Boundary Theory” As to the cultural or symbolic structure of the Tenno system, recently and in particular from theviewpoint of so called symbolic anthology, some Japanese researches are discussing it in asimilar way to my view. They accept and argue the theories on boundary, liminality or margin,which Mary Douglas (1979), Victor Turner (1974) and so forth have dealt with. I will call them“boundary theory” below. Based on this boundary theory, they are particularly discussing thesubject of the Tenno system, which they often call the “kinship theory”, so I will briefly outlinethese theories. Yamaguchi Masao argues that while scholars discussed the Tenno system as the center ofpower from the viewpoint of politics, they should in fact study it as the structure of both centerand the boundary of Japanese culture. The kinship cannot be an entirety without the boundaryopposed to it. In the Japanese ancient myth, a famous hero, Susano-no-mikoto embodied such aboundary. He was a weeping child who performed profanity at the High Celestial Plain, he wasthen expelled and while in a phase of wandering subjugated a huge eight headed serpent beforefounding the Izumo Kingship. He was the importer of disorderly chaos, the embodiment ofviolence and the originator of order; thus, he was the god of the double meaning. Through hisexistence, the ancient Tenno system included wild powers that could otherwise be out of order,and as such, it became created as a cosmographical world (1975: 1989). Yamaguchi also dealswith another mythical hero Yamatotakeru-no-mikoto as follows: He offered the original image of a Japanese tragic hero through a pattern of the “wandering stories of high personages.” The hero wandered, and undertook sufferings to himself, he expiated thus the sins of community and died tragically (1989:191) In this way, he says, the kingship recovered the entirety through the medium of such a deepstructure. Ueno Chizuko explains this pole of the boundary using a word yosomono (stranger) as follows: In short, Tenno has been a stranger. It is a gross mistake that Tenno has been the ancestor of the jyomin (people). Tenno has been a stranger, which the ideologists of the Tenno system have been saying repeatedly. There is no reason to misread it (1988: 7-8). She also explains this matter using a term “outside” as in the following: We should think of the dialectic of the inside and the outside at the beginning of the power theory. In other words, it is necessary to recognize the “outside” or the existence of the “out” to have self-consciousness for a community or a nation (ibid: 8)
  • 100. So far her view is similar to mine. This theory might explain the facts I mentioned above thatthe Tenno system has consisted of foreign cultures. However, a little later, she says this about the“outside” or the “boundary”: This “outside,” however, is not necessary at all to be the substantial outside but to be the symbolic outside is sufficient. If a community has the idea of the outer world, people can also have certain self-consciousness as contrasting with the outer world. The outside is, therefore, not necessary to be even the geographical outside. The argument on the Tenno system viewed from my translation theory and that of the boundarytheory are, seemingly, quite similar but different in a crucial point, which she has stated in thequotation above. I have also said that the Tenno system has consisted of outside cultures, in which the “outside”is practically the outside, namely really the geographical outside. The translation theorynecessarily presupposes two different cultures or languages. The boundary theory is, when theydeal with the boundary as of a foreign culture, also similar to the translation theory; it treats,however, the boundary from inside a culture. On the other side, the translation theory deals withthe boundary essentially as the boundary between two cultures. Words or cultural phenomena of translation may be suspicious and mysterious from someviewpoints. This is because as I explained above, between cultures A and B when a in culture Amoves into culture B it changes into a’ so that a ≠ a. The interpretation of the translation theoryand that of the boundary theory may resemble each other, when we look at the externalphenomena. For instance, people have thought oni (demon) to be the one who was expelled froma culture, but from another point of view, it may be the one who had come from some outside theworld. Although there could be cases of both, the boundary theory does not consider which casethe oni in question derives from; in either case the oni’s existence was suspicious, strange andmysterious. To take another instance of language, in the modern era in Japan, people have so frequentlyused and abused such difficult translated words as kenri (right), sonzai (being), jyokyo (situation),sogai (alienation) and so on, though they have not understood the meanings well; we may saybecause people have not understood these words, they have willingly abused them. Havingwritten about these circumstances in various books and papers, I will not explain them in detailhere (1976.1987). However, another similar instance does occur these days in which so calledforeign loan-words are written in the Japanese syllabary, katakana. We can see in a commercialon TV for some cold remedy phrase such as “Kondorichin (コンドロイチン ) is efficacious!”Nearly all TV viewers cannot understand what the word kondorichin means. Naturally theproducer of this commercial fully understands these circumstances and that because the viewerscannot understand its meaning, it can be efficacious for them. I have called this sort ofphenomenon the “cassette effect”, which is peculiar to translated words. I think that this “effect”transforms translated words into something mysterious and fascinating like the efficaciousmedicine. In case of the contrary it makes them into something suspicious and disagreeable likeoni, namely, the “cassette” causes either a positive or a negative effect.6.2.4. Translation Theory in the Japanese Language The attempt to consider over the entire human world in the name of “culture” has beguncomparatively recently, and at most from the late-nineteenth century. This attempt which themodern ages may have requested is, however, very difficult to research because an idea such asculture is quite vague and hard to define. It is desirable that one should establish some material
  • 101. ground in order to research a phenomenon objectively and scientifically. As for my method thematerial ground for researching culture is language. The ground that I deal with in the Tennosystem to be a culture of translation is the structure of translation in the Japanese language, so Iwill outline its point below. The basic structure of translation in the Japanese language was formed in ancient times whenthe natives of these islands first encountered Chinese characters. In my view the core of thisstructure is “on-reading” ( 音 読 み ) and “kun-reading” ( 訓 読 み ) of Chinese characters and“vertical reading” ( 読み下し) the lines of Chinese writing. On-reading and kun-reading contrast with each other, and two readings of the same Chinesecharacters. While on-reading is the Japanese sound modeled after the original Chinesepronunciation following the Japanese phonology, kun-reading represents the sound of the nativeJapanese word corresponding to the Chinese character, so both readings are Japanese ones; it is inparticular important that on-reading is seemingly similar to Chinese but different. In the sameway, the Japanese translated words and cultural things are seemingly similar to the originalforeign ones but different. Vertical reading is, on the other hand, the Japanese method for thereading of Chinese writing. It changes the order of original words according to Japanese grammar,then adds Japanese particles and other grammatical words understanding Chinese writing. Thus,Chinese writing read vertically are also apparently similar to the original writing but different;they are, so to speak, neither Chinese nor Japanese but translated writing. While on-reading andkun-reading are interchangeable readings between a Chinese origin word of kan (Chinese) and acorresponding Japanese word of wa (Japanese), vertical reading uses both wa and kan, andtogether forms one Japanese writing. We can call the former a paradigmatic relation of wa andkan, and the latter a syntagmatic relation of wa and kan; this structure of these two relations issimilar to what structuralism defines but is different, which I will explain later. This structurecombining the two originally different languages of wa and kan into just one by differentiatingthem each other has founded the method of translation in Japan. By means of this method,Japanese scholars and students have studied not only Chinese classics, but also Dutch, Englishand other Western languages throughout Japanese history. This way of learning must have alsobecome the basic structure for accepting foreign languages and even foreign cultural things. Referring to some stone monuments, we can understand that these two readings and verticalreading methods might both have begun about the same time when Chinese characters first cameinto Japan. The originators might have been visitors from Korea, and natives might havecooperated with the work. People in Korea might have already used these methods, and similarmethods seem to have been used to some extent in other areas surrounding ancient China. It was,however, the achievement of Japanese culture to have succeeded and completed these methods.Owing to these methods of translation, people soon invented a way of Japanese writing that waswritten in Kojiki (Record of Ancient Matters) and Manyo-shu (the earliest extent collection ofJapanese poetry). From this way of writing wa-kan-konkobun (writing in literary Japanese ornatewith Chinese words) resulted; later contemporary Japanese succeeded it. In other words, peoplehave formed Japanese writing through the method of translation. Afterwards, when Japanese encountered with Dutch, English and other Western languages, theyread these languages essentially in the same way. They read every original word with a Japaneseword (on-reading or kun-reading), then changed the order of the original words, added someJapanese (vertical reading) and read them. Thus Japanese students and scholars have inherited thismethod for studying foreign languages up until today. The paradigmatic relation of on-reading is the relation of replacing words; in this method it isquite important for the cultural structure of translation that this relation usually causes adistinction of value between the higher-grade and lower-grade. Usually kan (Chinese) ranks as thehigher, while ordinary wa (Japanese) ranks as the lower; however, kan sometimes ranks as thelower. In either case the distinction of wa and kan accompanies higher or lower value. The
  • 102. paradigmatic relation of translation is, strictly speaking, different from what structuralismexplains, because the higher and the lower are not exactly interchangeable each other. In otherwords, the “distinction” corresponds with the positive or negative effect of “cassette effect”mentioned above. This distinction results from the situation where two different structuresencounter each other; this is peculiar to the translation theory. The encountering of different cultures generally produces a value, or people in a specific culturediscover a new sort of value when they encounter another culture. The structure of value betweenwa and kan is peculiar to Japanese culture, but it must be a universal phenomenon whereimportant values begin to appear in the circumstances of intercultural contacts. Making anadditional remark I think that prior to the modern era the Japanese sciences have derived theirauthority from translation; namely they have become the mediator of the replacement of thehigher and the lower.In the same way then, the authority of the Tenno system results from the culture of translation.This, I believe, is not so strange in the history of cultures; to give an example the important partsof modern Western culture have resulted from the contacts with ancient Hebrew, Greek andOriental cultures, in other words, the ancient Western people must have discovered new sorts ofvalues there. The on-kun-reading relation is applicable to so called loan-words written in katakana (Japanesesyllabary) which are widely used today. These loan-words are essentially similar to kan words.For instance, “illiberal” and (リベラル) are not equivalent; because their scripts and sounds are ofcourse different, moreover, from the viewpoint of grammar, while liberal is an adjective riberaruis a root of an adjective verb and is a sort of noun. Their meanings are different too. The relationof these two words is the same as the relation between Chinese words and Chinese characters inJapanese (Sino-Japanese), therefore, riberaru is a sort of kan. Thus the loan-words written inkatakana also have distinction from ordinary native Japanese wa words that are usually written inhiragana (Japanese cursive characters). The Japanese translating method through this ancientstructure has maintained the same principles even though its external appearance has changedwith time. To make an additional remark, this structure of translation through wa-kan must have largelycontributed to the swift and large scale importation and acceptance of the advanced foreigncultures. It has built the advantageous feature of Japanese culture, which I would not deal with indetail in this paper though. Besides, this “distinction” is, on the other hand, different from “discrimination” formed in thepolitical or social structure. The present Tenno system forms a structure of distinction, while theTennō system formed by Meiji Constitution was that of discrimination, which I will explain later.6.2.5. The Structure of the Tenno System and Some Historical Prospect The Tenno system has, on the one hand, conserved the unique core of Japanese culture; on theother hand, because it is of “translation,” it has necessarily changed when it has had theopportunity for intercourse with foreign cultures in history. The argument about the Tennosystem in the translation theory should deal with these two phases, namely the conservation ofuniqueness and the changes through translation in history. The Meiji Constitution created the rituals of the Tenno system as the apparatus of ultimatediscrimination of Japanese people, and after 1945 in the age of the new Constitution the roles ofthe rituals have largely changed and weakened. In short, they were not the rituals of the livinggod anymore. Meanwhile, through the development of TV and other popular media, the ritualshave become established next to people’s daily lives. The Imperial Law has prescribed some ofthem such as the Succession to the Throne and the Mourning for the Tenno; it has excluded, on
  • 103. the other hand, other traditional customary rituals like the Imperial Wedding and so on as formalrituals, though the Imperial Wedding soon reestablished itself in effect as a formal ritual. Maybemore important matters are that practically the same sorts of rituals have appeared continuously,taking, in particular, European Royal Families as models; these are greeted like national sportsevents, inquiries after people in calamities, participation in charitable works, visits to foreigncountries and Royal Families and so on. People usually watch them on TV and they always get ahigh audience rating. Critics sometimes say the Tenno family has thus become somewhat publicentertainers, it is important however that these performances are presented as the hare (gala)corresponding with the ke (ordinary) of the daily lives of the populace; they form the culturalstructure of “syntagmatic relation” mentioned above, where hare is next to ke. This relation is notof the political “discrimination” but of cultural “distinction” as I stated above. In principle,political or social powers build discrimination consciously and people in its structure are usuallyconscious of it. On the other hand, people are generally not conscious of cultural distinction,which is formed in the cultural structure. In view of this, distinction is rather similar to“difference” in terms of structuralism. While the former Constitution formed the Tenno system based upon the Prussian Constitution,in the present Constitution the Tenno system is signified as shocho which is translated from“symbol.” The core of this newly translated system is the “acts in matters of state” performed byTenno, many of which are formal performance such as “appointment” contrasting with the earlier“designation,” by which the Constitution prescribes that the Tenno “shall appoint the PrimeMinister designated by the Diet.” Besides, the promulgation of treaties, the awarding of honorsand so on are formal practices as opposed to the substantial practices undertaken by therepresentatives of people. These formal performances are almost worthless from the viewpoint ofpolitics; from the cultural point of view, however, these performances as shocho are theindispensable half of the role of paradigmatic relation between the formal practices and thesubstantial ones. The cultural structure mentioned above is essentially due to the contrast between wa and kan.The former is native language or culture and the latter is what was originally introduced fromforeign languages or cultures and has changed its meaning with the lapse of time. Through thishistorical change, it is important in the cultural viewpoint that the confronting relation betweenhigher-graded kan and lower-graded wa has remained; I have already argued about thesecircumstances in regard to the technical terms of the Japanese sciences in various books andpapers. The same is generally true of the Tenno system. The essential dual structure of wa and kan has remained firmly entrenched in the history of theJapanese language and culture as I have explained above. The former Constitution has oncedefined the Tenno system as the structure of “discrimination,” which may have been, however,an exceptional phase in Japan’s long history. The fundamental core of the Tenno system inJapanese history must have been the structure of cultural “distinction.”6.3. TEN-NO: Emperor Miyata Noboru, Ethnologist The title of ten-no was established in 1881. Prior to that a number of different appellations wereused, mikado (honorable gate), dairi (interior), and tenshi (son of heaven) to distinguish theemperor from the Tokugawa shogun who was called taikun (great lord), and these words werethought to correspond to the foreign concept of emperor. The deliberate use of the word tenno(heavenly king) rather than kootei (the Chinese word for emperor) shows an intention to indicatehis religious authority. The Chinese word tenno refers to the highest ranking divinity in heaven. Inthe past, the most common word for the Japanese monarch was written with the Chinese
  • 104. characters for great king and read ookimi or sumera-mikoto. Sumera-mikoto was based on theword suberu, meaning to rule by divine power. The ancient authority of the emperor was cloaked in mystery, and from pre-modern tocontemporary times it has been maintained as a residue of the past. The use of the emperor’s reignname and reign period to mark time, court ranks assigned to confer prestige, and court rituals areholdovers from the old imperial system which still have an effect in the real world. In our current information society, the emperors actions are regularly reported by the media,but in pre-modern times the emperors existence was not generally known. Gyookoo (the imperialexcursion) organized by the Meiji government made ordinary people much more aware of theemperors presence. Places where the emperor lodged became sacred, and the trees he plantedwere seen as divine. When national holidays were established, it became customary to celebratekigensetsu (anniversary of the mythical first emperor’s accession) and tenchosetsu (the reigningemperors birthday). These celebrations were instituted by force, and eventually the people cameto recognize the position of the emperor. Theoretically, the emperor is given his religious authority when the tenno spirit takespossession of his body. The rituals for this purpose are the niinamesai and the daijoosai, part ofthe accession rites. The central event is bringing the spirit which has left the old emperor into thebody of the new emperor through magical techniques. A type of night gown, the madokoobusuma, plays a notable part of the ceremony, a magical ritual symbolizing the shedding of skinand rebirth. As an imperial household ritual, it has the function of giving new life to the rice spirit,which is a central feature of agricultural rites. This is the reason for seeing the emperor as a priestwith a special role and as a deity. In ancient times, it was desired that the leader had theshamanistic power of communication with gods and spirits, and there were examples of femaleshamans becoming emperor. The modern emperor is defined in the post war constitution as a symbol of the nation. Thefunctions of the emperor are specifically regulated by the Imperial House Act and the imperialsuccession is determined by the deliberations of the Imperial Household Councils. The emperorsformal participation in national events is subject to cabinet advice and approval. The emperorsimage has bee constructed by the mass media to create a human feeling between the emperor andthe people. Still, the Japanese emperor retains a mysterious religious authority not seen in themonarchs of other nations.Daijousai no Seiritsu, by Kenichi Tanigawa, Shogakukan, 19906.4. EDICTO IMPERIAL DE EDUCACION, 1890 Conoced vosotros, nuestros súbditos: Nuestros antepasados imperiales han fundado este Imperio sobre una base amplia y duradera, yhan implantado firmemente la virtud. Nuestros súbditos, por siempre unidos en la lealtad y lapiedad filial, han ejemplificado de generación en generación la belleza misma. Esta es la gloriafundamental del carácter de nuestro Imperio, en este hecho descansa también la fuente de nuestraeducación. Vosotros, Nuestros súbditos, debéis ser filiales con nuestros padres, afectuosos convuestros hermanos y hermanas; armoniosos como esposos y esposas, como amigos verdaderos.Debéis respetar la Constitución y observar las leyes; surgiese una emergencia ofrézcanse concoraje al Estado, y así guardad y mantened la prosperidad de Nuestro Trono Imperial, coetáneocon el cielo y la tierra. Seáis vosotros no sólo Nuestros buenos y fieles súbditos, pero rendid lasmejores tradiciones de vuestros antepasados
  • 105. CAPITULO SEPTIMO 7. CONSTITUCION7.1. LA CONSTITUCION DE JAPON Promulgada el 3 de noviembre de 1946, el 3 de mayo de 1947 entra en vigor la nuevaConstitución que sustituye a la Constitucion Meiji de 1889. En sus puntos esenciales reconoce lasoberanía popular expresada mediante sufragio universal, articula la división de poderes delEstado y establece la figura del Emperador como símbolo del Estado y de la Unidad Nacional, sincapacidad de gobierno pero que sanciona las decisiones del Gabinete y la Dieta. Los poderes del Estado quedan divididos en: - Poder Ejecutivo, en manos de un Primer Ministro, elegido por la Dieta, y su gabinete de ministros. - Poder Legislativo a cargo de la Dieta, bicameral. La antigua Cámara de los Pares es reemplazada por la Cámara de los Consejeros (cámara alta), también elegida por sufragio universal, como la Cámara de Representantes (cámara baja). - Poder Judicial, a través de los Tribunales. El Emperador no tiene poderes ejecutivos, ejecuta los actos establecidos en la Constitución.Nombra al Primer Ministro y al Presidente del Tribunal Supremo. Pero éstos son designados porla Dieta y por el Gabinete, respectivamente. Aunque se renuncia a la guerra como derecho soberano de la nación en reformas posteriores se crean las Fuerzas de Autodefensa (1954). Se renuncia a la amenaza y al uso de la fuerza como medio para resolver conflictos con otras naciones.Preámbulo y Primeros Capítulos:
  • 106. Nosotros, el pueblo japonés, actuando por medio de nuestros representantes de la Dieta Nacionaldebidamente elegidos, determinamos que aseguraremos para nosotros y para nuestra posteridadlos frutos de la pacífica cooperación con todas las naciones y las bendiciones de la libertad en estepaís, resolviendo que merced a la acción gubernamental jamás volveremos a sufrir los horrores dela guerra, y proclamando que el poder soberano reside en el pueblo que establece firmemente estaConstitución. El gobierno es el representante del pueblo, su autoridad deriva del pueblo, el poderestá ejercido por los representantes del pueblo, y los beneficios de él son disfrutados por elpueblo. Este es un principio universal, humano, en el cual se funda esta Constitución.Rechazamos y revocamos todas las constituciones, leyes, ordenanzas y edictos en contradiccióncon la presente.Nosotros, el pueblo japonés, deseamos la paz para siempre y somos plenamente conscientes de losaltos ideales que rigen las relaciones humanas; hemos decidido preservar nuestra seguridad yexistencia, confiando en la justicia y en la fe de los pueblos amantes de la paz. Deseamos ocuparun lugar de honor en la sociedad internacional, luchando por la conservación de la paz y lasupresión de la tiranía, la esclavitud, la opresión y la intolerancia. Reconocemos que todos lospueblos del mundo tienen el derecho a vivir en paz, libres del miedo y de la miseria. Creemos que no hay nación que sea sólo responsable de sí misma, sino que las leyes de lamoralidad política son universales, y que la obediencia a dichas leyes es deber de todas lasnaciones que mantengan su soberanía y justifiquen su relación soberana con otras naciones. Nosotros, el pueblo japonés, comprometemos nuestro honor nacional en el cumplimiento, portodos nuestros medios, de estos altos ideales y propósitos.Capítulo I. El EmperadorArtículo 1. El Emperador será el símbolo del Estado y de la unidad del pueblo, y su posiciónderiva de la voluntad del pueblo, en quien reside el poder soberano.Artículo 2. El trono imperial será dinástico y sucesorio, de acuerdo con la ley de la Casa Imperial,aprobada por la Dieta.Artículo 3. El consejo y la aprobación del gabinete serán requeridos para todos los actos delEmperador en asuntos de estado, y el gabinete será responsable de ellos.Artículo 4. El Emperador realizará sólo los actos referentes a asuntos de estado, previsto en estáConstitución, y no tendrá poderes relativos al gobierno. El Emperador puede delegar larealización de sus actos en asuntos de estado, de acuerdo con la ley.Artículo 5. Cuando, de acuerdo con la ley de la Casa Imperial, se establezca una regencia, elregente realizará sus actos, en los asuntos de estado, en nombre del Emperador. En este caso seaplicará el primer párrafo del artículo precedente.Artículo 6. El Emperador nombrará al Primer Ministro, según la designación de la Dieta.El Emperador nombrará al presidente del tribunal supremo, según la designación del gabinete.Articulo 7. El Emperador, con el consejo y la aprobación del gabinete, realizará los siguientesactos relativos a asuntos de estado en bien del pueblo:Promulgación de la Constitución, leyes, órdenes del gabinete y tratados.Convocatoria de la Dieta.
  • 107. Disolución de la Cámara de Representantes.Proclamación de la elección general de miembros de la Dieta.Confirmación del nombramiento y cese de los ministros del Estado y otros funcionarios, deacuerdo con la ley, y de los plenos poderes y credenciales de los embajadores y ministros.Confirmación de la amnistía general y especial, conmutación de penas, suspensión de condenas yrestablecimiento de derechos.Concesión de honores.Confirmación de instrumentos de ratificación y otros documentos diplomáticos de acuerdo con laley.Recepción de los ministros y embajadores extranjeros.Realización de las funciones ceremoniales.Articulo 8. La Casa Imperial no puede recibir ningún bien, ni hace regalos, sin autorización de laDieta. Capítulo II. Renuncia a la GuerraArtículo 9. Aspirando sinceramente a una paz internacional basada en la justicia y el orden, elpueblo japonés renuncia para siempre a la guerra como derecho soberano de la nación, y a laamenaza o el empleo de la fuerza como medio de solucionar las disputas internacionales.Con el fin de realizar el propósito expresado en el párrafo anterior, no se mantendrán las fuerzasde tierra, mar y aire, al igual que cualquier otro potencial bélico. El derecho de beligerancia delestado no será reconocido. Capítulo III Derechos y Deberes del PuebloArticulo 10. Las condiciones necesarias para ser ciudadano japonés quedarán determinadas por laley.Articulo 11. El pueblo disfrutará de todos los derechos humanos fundamentales. Estos derechoshumanos fundamentales, garantizados al pueblo por la Constitución, serán conferidos al pueblo deestas generaciones y de las futuras, como derechos eternos e inviolables.Articulo 14. Todo el pueblo es igual ante la ley y no habrá discriminación en las relacionespolíticas, económicas o sociales, por causa de la raza, el credo, el sexo, la oposición social o elorigen familiar.No se reconocerá a los nobles ni a la nobleza.Ningún privilegio acompañará a las concesiones honoríficas, las condecoraciones, o lasdistinciones de cualquier clase, ni habrá ninguna concesión cuyo valor se prolongue más allá de lavida del individuo que la ha recibido.Articulo 15. El pueblo tiene el derecho inalienable de elegir a sus funcionarios públicos y dedestituirlos,Todos los funcionarios públicos son servidores de la comunidad y no de un grupo determinado.El sufragio universal de los adultos está garantizado con respecto a la elección de los funcionarios
  • 108. públicos.En todas las elecciones no se violará el voto secreto. Los votantes no serán responsables, públicani privadamente, por la elección que han hecho.Articulo 19. La libertad de pensamiento y de conciencia no será violada.Artículo 20. La libertad religiosa queda concedida a todos. Ninguna organización religiosarecibirá privilegio alguno del Estado, ni ejercerá autoridad política alguna.THE CONSTITUTION OF JAPANPREFACECHAPTER I: THE EMPERORCHAPTER II: RENUNCIATION OF WARCHAPTER III: RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF THE PEOPLECHAPTER IV: THE DIETCHAPTER V: THE CABINETCHAPTER VI: JUDICIARYCHAPTER VII: FINANCECHAPTER VIII: LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENTCHAPTER IX: AMENDMENTSCHAPTER X: SUPREME LAWCHAPTER XI: SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS7.1.1. Constitutional BackgroundAfter the war (1945), two committees set up by the Japanese government proposed only smallchanges to the 1889 Constitution. General Douglas MacArthur, on 4 Feb 1946, set up a"constitutional assembly" of 24 westerners headed by Charles Louis Kades. This committeecompleted a draft in only five days. Governing Shigeru Yoshida called the radically differentdocument "outrageous", but could no longer object when Emperor Hirohito endorsed it. Withminor changes, the document became the new Constitution on 3 Nov 1946.One of the most striking features of the Constitution is its pacifist doctrine in Art. 9, which ismore binding and explicit than that found even in the charter of the United Nations (cf. Art. 51UN Charter). However, the introduction of Self-Defence Forces in 1956, the mutual security pactwith the US in 1960, and a new law allowing Japanese troops to participate in UN peace-keepingoperations led to pragmatic alterations of the original concept. Art. 9 does not rule out defendingthe Japanese homeland from attack. On 18 Dec 1998, Japans navy sank a North Koreansubmarine only 50 km off the Japanese coastline. But Japan still does not have bombers, long-range missiles, aircraft carriers, or other means of projecting power beyond its own territory.Another provision looking outdated compared to current practices is Art. 89 prohibiting subsidiesto private universities. Constitutional research committees without special powers and with noforeseeable results have been set up in the lower and upper houses.The next elections will be based on the new electoral-reform bill of Ozawa who managed toreplace Japans old multi-member electoral constituencies with a mixture of single-member, first-past-the-post seats and others filled by proportional representation. The new electoral system issimilar to the one of Germany.
  • 109. 7.1.2.PartiesThe conservative Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) of Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto and theNew Frontier Party (NFP) of former LDP member Ichiro Ozawa are most likely to win the nextelections. The Socialist Party (SP) of Wataru Kubo never won a majority in parliament. Mr.Ozawas book Blueprint for a New Japan calls for a demolition of the countrys bureaucratic ruleof mandarins who are used to giving advice to business and act on their own discretion usingbroadly defined regulations; the book also wants to strengthen the Prime Minister againstunelected bureaucrats.7.1.3. History and News • April 1998: LDP introduces bill to extend SDF role to supporting U.S. forces. • July 1997: Last date for parliamentary elections; the new electoral law with 300 single- member constituencies plus 200 seats for proportional representation will apply for the first time. • 1997: Japan broadens the role of SDF to surrounding areas, i.e. Korea, Taiwan, Philippines. • 5 Jan 1996: Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama (SP) resigns for reasons of incompetence. Ryutaro Hashimoto (LDP) becomes new Prime Minister. • 8 Dec 1995: New Religion Law requires publicity of property after terrorist acts of the religious Aum-Group. • Dec 1994: All opposition parties except the communists come together to establish the New Frontier Party. • 1994: Ozawas "Hosokawa Coalition Government" with Tsutomu Hata falls apart as the SP switches over to the LDP. • 1993: Ozawa defects from LDP and forms his own party. This ends 38 years of conservative de-facto monopoly of power of the LDP. • 1978: Operational guidelines for SDF adopted. • 1960: Joint security treaty with the United States. • 1959: Supreme Court rules SDF constitutional. • 1956: Introduction of Self-Defence Forces (SDF). • 3 Nov 1946: New Constitution adopted. • 1945: General Douglas MacArthur brings about sweeping reforms during a six-year occupation by American forces. • 1920: Takashi Hara is the first commoner to become Prime Minister and introduces universal male suffrage; he was later assassinated. • 1890: Meiji Constitution. • 1868: The Perry incident leads to collapse of the Shogunate, the abolition of feudalism, and a reform-oriented government under Emperor Meiji. • 1853: Commodore Matthew Perry and his "black ships" force open the ports of Edo (Tokyo) Bay.7.1.4. Literature • Hitoshi Abe et al. (eds.), The Government and Politics of Japan (Japanese original 1990), 1994. Percy R. Luney/Kazuyuki Takahashi (eds.), Japanese Constitutional Law, 1993.
  • 110. National Clearinghouse for U.S.-Japan Studies Indiana University Lessons on the Japanese Constitution Lynn Parisi November 2002Japan’s current constitution was written in 1946 and adopted in 1947, while Japan was underAllied occupation following World War II. On the occasion of its adoption, one Japanesepolitician called the document an “ill-fitting suit of clothes,” totally inappropriate as agovernmental blueprint for Japan. Observers predicted that the constitution would be replaced assoon as the Occupation ended. Debate over the workability of Japan’s constitution has been apolitical constant; yet, the document has not been amended since its inception. Much of theongoing controversy stems from the context in which the document was brought into being.Following a brief exploration of the history of Japan’s 1947 Constitution, this digest introducesrecent scholarship and offers examples of how that scholarship deepens the story of Japan’spostwar constitutional process. In its final section, the digest provides ways in which study of thepostwar constitution can enrich social studies instruction.7.1.5. Historical Overview.When the constitution was presented to the Japanese people in 1946, official commentaryexplained that the Japanese government, with significant input from the emperor and feedbackfrom Occupation authorities, had written the document. Quickly, however, the explanation ofJapanese authorship was replaced with a version acknowledging the strong hand of SupremeCommander of the Allied Powers (SCAP) General Douglas MacArthur and Occupation personnelin the constitution-making process. Early in the Occupation, Americans charged with overseeingthe democratization of Japan identified the Meiji Constitution of 1887 as a flawed document thathad enabled militarists to take control and lead Japan into war. The Potsdam Declaration, whichhad set the terms for Japan’s surrender and reconstruction at the end of WWII, provided therationale for modifying the Meiji Constitution by requiring that Japan remove all obstacles todemocracy and ensure basic freedoms and rights. SCAP called upon Japan’s leaders to revise theconstitution in accordance with the Potsdam Declaration. When Japanese government leadersmade only cosmetic changes, MacArthur concluded that it was within SCAP’s authority to draft acompletely new government charter for Japan. During one week in February 1946, a committee of24 Americans, both military and civilian, drafted a democratic constitution for Japan. MacArthurapproved it and SCAP presented it to Japan’s foreign minister as a fait accompli.This account of the making of Japan’s postwar constitution has been the accepted history untilrecent years. The account credits the making of Japan’s postwar constitution as an essentiallyAmerican story. In it, U.S. government and Occupation forces are the key actors and authors.Japan, represented by its government, is a minor and, in fact, reluctant player. Although thisaccount casts the United States in the role of bearer of democracy, it has led to the more negativebut common sentiment that the United States imposed a constitution on Japan. This raises thecrucial question of how an alien political document survived in a reluctant nation. If Japan wasresistant to the document and to the democracy it put in place, how did this foreign constitutionstay in place? Why did this exercise in democracy building succeed when many others havefailed?
  • 111. 7.1.6. Japan’s 1947 Constitution: A New Narrative.Recent scholarship has led to more complex understandings of Japan’s postwar constitutionalstory. Over the past two decades, American and Japanese historians and political scientist have re-examined the birth of Japan’s 1947 Constitution. Looking beyond the initial drafting conventionof February 1946 and taking advantage of documents that were classified until the 1970s,researchers have uncovered a story of democracy building in Japan that involved intricate debateand collaboration within and across national lines. Their research has brought into focus diverseJapanese as well as American roles in the constitution-making process, integrating Japanesechapters into what had been an American-centered story.7.1.7. Japanese Involvement.Current research reinforces the narrative that Japan’s postwar leaders resisted changes to the MeijiConstitution. However, such scholars as John Dower argue that focusing on the role of Japan’spolitical leaders obscures the supportive role played by common Japanese people. While Japanesegovernment response to SCAP’s call for constitutional revision did stall, Japanese peopleresponded to the opportunity. Between late 1945 and spring 1946, SCAP received 12 proposalsfor constitutional revisions from outside the Japanese government. Proposals came from liberaland conservative sources, including the Communist, Liberal, Progressive, and Socialist parties,the grassroots Constitutional Research Association, and individuals. Suggestions included theabolition of the emperor; retention of the emperor with limits on authority or exclusively symbolicduties; economic rights; gender equity; and the right to education. A number of these popularlygenerated suggestions correlated with SCAP interests and with provisions SCAP ultimatelyincluded in its own draft.7.1.8. Not Simply an American Replica.American writers from SCAP’s government section, charged by MacArthur with writing a draftconstitution, took note of suggestions for the document contributed by Japanese people andgroups. They also chose not to limit themselves to creating an American replica for Japan. Theylooked within but also beyond the U.S. Constitution. Many on the American writing committeeembraced the expansive human rights of the New Deal. These ideals were not reflected in the U.S.Constitution, nor necessarily embraced by conservatives within American occupation personnel.Beate Sirota Gordon, a young and idealistic member of the committee, has recorded her searchthrough Japanese libraries for sample constitutions from other nations that might provide modelsfor a progressive Japanese document. In its original form, Gordon’s human rights section for theJapanese constitution articulated rights far more progressive than anything in the U.S.Constitution. In the constitution’s final version, articles on women’s rights significantly surpassedU.S. guarantees. Other features in the American draft clearly reflected compromise with Japanesetradition. Notable, of course, was the maintenance of the emperor. While the 1947 Constitutiondemotes the emperor from his earlier position as sacred and inviolable, it maintains a hereditarythrone as a symbol of the state, making the Japanese governmental system comparable to theBritish.7.1.9. The Adoption Process.Japanese input in the constitutional process became more pronounced after SCAP presented theAmerican draft to the Japanese government in February 1946. Adoption was an arduous processthat entailed months of intergovernmental, parliamentary, and popular discussion. As the
  • 112. document moved through multiple drafts, it was translated from the original English intoJapanese, then back into English for SCAP review. Some scholars argue that, in this process, theoriginal American draft underwent “Japanization,” becoming more representative of Japanesethought. The following example illustrates the process by which Japanese writers influencedconceptual issues through translation.American political philosophy rests on the concept of popular sovereignty: ultimate power residesin the people. This principle was fundamental to Occupation efforts to rebuild the Japanesegovernment. The preamble in SCAP’s draft constitution established popular sovereignty withinJapan; sections on human rights underscored it.But for their part, Japan’s postwar governmental elite had not swayed from the position in theMeiji Constitution that the Emperor commanded ultimate and inviolable power. When Japaneseleaders received the American draft, their first task was to translate it into Japanese. Translatorsdropped the American-authored preamble altogether, thus circumventing the troubling issue ofpopular vs. imperial sovereignty. Required by SCAP to reinsert the concept of popularsovereignty, Japanese translators used the archaic word shiko, meaning “supreme height.” A termout of use in 1940s Japan, shiko was meaningless in conveying the concept to Japanese readers.Through this word choice, the Japanese government obscured the meaning of a political conceptthey did not endorse (Dower: 379-382). SCAP, in turn, re-translated the Japanese version intoEnglish and succeeded in catching most of the conceptual changes that the Japanese hadintroduced. Translation continued to be an issue through six revised drafts in the Japanese Diet.7.1.10. Opportunity for Revision.MacArthur invited Japanese review and revision of the constitution between 1948 and 1949 toinsure that it reflected the free will of the Japanese people. Constitutional scholar Shoichi Kosekihas noted that there was little response, despite vocalized concern over foreign authorship. TheJapanese government established a review committee, but received only a few proposals forminor revisions. Although it could have done so, the government did not invite public response tothe constitution through a national referendum. According to Koseki, the fact that the Japanesegovernment and people disregarded the opportunity to change the constitution when invited to doso, indicates an early level of support that renders the claim of foreign imposition moot (249-254).7.1.11. Article Nine.Early in the occupation, MacArthur identified the abolition of war as a critical principle to beincluded in any revision of Japan’s constitution. MacArthur drew on the idea of a world withoutwar expressed in the 1928 Kellogg-Briand Pact. However, the no-war provision as it appears inthe final constitution is very much a negotiated principle, going beyond American mandate orauthorship. MacArthur stipulated that Japan would abolish war as a sovereign right of the nation.War would be renounced as a means to settle disputes and as a means to preserve security. Japanwould not have the right to build or maintain a Japanese Army, Navy, or Air Force, and wouldrelinquish the right of belligerency (Gordon: 104). This wording would have denied Japan theright to use military force for any reason, including defense. In the February 1946 draftconstitution, Charles Kades, chair of SCAP’s constitutional committee, deleted the reference tonational defense, but broadened the prohibition against military forces and supplies.Once in their court, Japanese Diet members debated the clause, particularly its implications fornational defense. Many within the Diet argued that this meant Japan could not defend itself from
  • 113. attack. Others countered that the right of national defense was irrevocable and so Article Ninecould not prohibit it. Still others cautioned that the Pacific War had been waged in the name ofnational defense. Some argued that Article Nine would keep Japan out of the United Nations byprecluding Japan from contributing to international peacekeeping and thus, be ultimately self-defeating. While politicians argued, the Japanese people embraced the no-war provision. JohnDower suggests that they did so because Article Nine offered this devastated, defeated people apositive national result from the war. While they might be proud of little in their recent nationalpast, Japanese could be proud to lead the world in outlawing war (398).Following months of debate, the final version of the “no-war” clause came from Japan’s House ofRepresentatives:Aspiring sincerely to an international peace based on justice and order, the Japanese peopleforever renounce war as a sovereign right of the nation and the threat or use of force as a meansof settling international disputes.In order to accomplish the aim of the preceding paragraph, land, sea, and air forces, as well asother war potential, will never be maintained. The right of belligerency of the state will not berecognized.Most analysts agree that the failure to clearly define national defense left the meaning of ArticleNine open to debate for all time. Article Nine’s ambiguity came into play almost immediatelywith the communist victory in the Chinese Civil War, and then again with the Korean War. In theCold War context of a regional communist threat, U.S. and Japanese governments interpretedArticle Nine to support rearmament for national defense.7.1.12. The Japanese Constitution in American Classrooms.What are the lessons worth teaching in Japan’s constitutional story? Why is changinghistoriography on this topic relevant in the classroom? Where can Japan’s constitution be taughtin the social studies curriculum and to what purpose?On one level, multiple narratives of Japan’s postwar constitution over half a century offer studentsa living case study in how history is constructed, modified, and enriched by ongoing research andnew access to previously unavailable historical sources. Japan’s constitution also provides a casefor examining national perspectives in the intersection of two nations’ histories. The conventionalnarrative that Americans authored Japan’s postwar constitution claims the story as an Americanstory. Newer research makes it a binational and negotiated story.In civics classes, students can examine what has been seen as an example of successfullytransplanting American democracy. In considering the complex story that has emerged, studentscan better appreciate the multiplicity of factors in that success. Study of Japan’s constitutionshould take students beyond the story of the American “constitutional convention” and engagethem in an analysis of the players and conditions in Japan that enabled constitutional democracyto take root. In looking at Japan’s governmental blueprint, students should be encouraged to lookfor American influences as well as examine provisions of the document that tie it to other nationalmodels and recognize elements that make Japan’s 1947 Constitution unique.For students in government, history, or international relations classes, Article Nine offers a casestudy of an enduring constitutional issue affecting Japan in the world. The meaning of Article
  • 114. Nine, and the larger question of whether to amend the constitution regarding this provision, hasbeen brought to the fore repeatedly: during the Korean War, in a 1954 constitutional assembly,during the 1960 U.S.-Japan security treaty protests, and during military build-up in conjunctionwith the Vietnam War. In the 1990s, the U.S. criticized Japan for limiting its Mideastpeacekeeping contributions to financial and humanitarian aid under Article Nine.Most recently, Article Nine underlies the controversy over Japanese response to the 2001 terroristattacks on the United States. Factions within the ruling Liberal Democratic Party argue that newglobal realities call for Japan to sever the reins of Article Nine and revise the constitution. Criticsacross the political spectrum argue that Article Nine has been bent to the breaking point in 2002as Japan has redefined its “defensive” role to include sending Self-Defense Forces to aid U.S.forces in the Pacific, carrying munitions, and refueling war equipment. In April 2002, theKoizumi government proposed a set of “emergency-contingency” bills designed to give thenational government power in case of foreign military attacks. Critics noted that the bills, initiatedin the name of self-defense, would legalize national preparation for war, an arguably offensivemeasure. While the “emergency-contingency” bills were defeated, controversy over constitutionalreform related to Article Nine grows. Students can track this ongoing constitutional issue thoughonline access to English-language Japanese newspapers such as The Japan Times, The MainichiDaily News, and The Asahi Shimbun.7.1.13.ReferencesBeer, Lawrence W. and John M. Maki. From Imperial Myth to Democracy: Japan’s TwoConstitutions, 1889-2002. Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2002.Dower, John. Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II. New York: Norton, 1998.Gordon, Beate Sirota. The Only Woman in the Room: A Memoir. New York: KodanshaInternational, 1997.Inoue, Kyoko. MacArthur’s Japanese Constitution: A Linguistic and Cultural Study of itsMaking. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991.Koseki, Shoichi. The Birth of Japan’s Postwar Constitution. Trans. Ray Moore. Boulder, CO:Westview Press, 1998.Miller, Barbara, Lynn Parisi and Others. The Bill of Rights around the World. Boulder, CO:Social Science Education Consortium, 1992.
  • 115. 7.2. Pact of Perpetual Friendship1927.6.20 「Pact of Perpetual Friendship」 French draft (20 June 1927)Article 1 The high contracting powers solemnly declare in the name of the French people and thepeople of the United States of America that they condemn recourse to war and renounce it,respectively, as an instrument of their national policy towards each other.Article 2 The settlement or the solution of all disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or ofwhatever origin they may be which may arise between France and the United States of Americashall never be sought by either side except by pacific means. 日本の批准書の付属宣告: “The Imperial Government declare that the phraseology, ‘in the names of their respectivepeoples,’ appearing in Article I of the Treaty for the Renunciation of War, signed at Paris onAugust 27, 1928, viewed in the light of the provisions of the Imperial Constitution, is understoodto be inapplicable in so far as Japan is concerned.”7.3. Misterios de la Constitución del Japón Los tres principios de la constitución del Japón son: la soberanía nacional, el respeto a losderechos fundamentales del hombre y el pacifismo. En la Constitución Imperial del Japón que sepromulgó en 1889 siendo efectiva hasta el fin de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, la soberanía delEstado residía en el emperador, no en el pueblo. En principio, el emperador que era soberano,hizo la Constitución Imperial del Japón para el pueblo. La actual constitución se creó modificando la anterior. Está claramente escrito en supreámbulo. Entonces, ¿desde cuándo el pueblo se hizo soberano? Esta claro que desde elmomento en que la nueva constitución entró en vigor, el pueblo se hizo soberano, porque estáescrito en la nueva constitución. Entonces, ¿quién hizo esta nueva constitución? Naturalmente, fueel emperador de aquel entonces, es decir, Hirohito. Por ello, es natural pensar que en el momentoen que la nueva constitución se promulgo (3 de mayo de 1947) el pueblo se hizo soberano. Segúnlo anterior, parece que la constitución presente es una constitución que el Emperador estableció.Sin embargo, eruditos en estudios sociales dicen que la constitución del Japón fue establecida porel pueblo. Quizás, porque ofrece soberanía nacional. De todas maneras existen muchasinterpretaciones al respecto. Una opinión es que después de la derrota en la Segunda GuerraMundial los vencedores empezaron a ocupar Japón, y el emperador cesó de ser el soberano delestado. El emperador obedecía a los órdenes que venían de EEUU y cedió su poder al pueblo.
  • 116. Según esta teoría, la constitución es la impuesta por EEUU y por lo tanto tenemos que hacernuestra propia constitución. Otra teoría dice que quien estableció la constitución fue el pueblojaponés, soberano del país. Según ella, el pueblo se hizo soberano el día que aceptó el gobierno laDeclaración de Potsdam, el 13 de agosto de 1945. Esto se conoce como la teoría de la Revoluciónde Agosto. ¿Por qué es una revolución? Porque aunque está escrito el proceso de la revisión en laConstitución Imperial del Japón, desde el principio, no se suponía que existiera una situacióndrástica tal como la eliminación del emperador. Desafortunadamente, es un hecho innegable queen el proceso de elaboración de la nueva constitución, las intenciones de los ocupantes sereflejaron fuertemente. Se podría decir incluso que se tradujo al japonés lo que estaba escrito eninglés. ¿Qué significa todo esto? La constitución es la base del estado. Nosotros, los japoneses no hicimos algo de talimportancia. Le dejamos a EEUU tomar la iniciativa. ¿Por qué sucedió eso? Porque EEUU no confiaba en Japón. Creían que los japoneses no podrían crear una buenaconstitución. Los demócratas japoneses también pensaron que era mejor que EEUU se encargarade hacer la constitución. Ellos querían reprimir las fuerzas de oposición doméstica que existían todavía y les conveníaque EEUU construyera el sistema de post-guerra. Había dos cosas que EEUU pensaba hacer al ocupar a Japón. Una fue construir un paísdemocrático a la americana renovando los sistemas japoneses como la constitución y la otra fueutilizar al máximo al Emperador para obtener el primer objetivo. Estos dos objetivos parecencontradictorios pero EEUU no pensó así y el resultados fue una sociedad que es una amalgama dedemocracia (constitución) y emperador. ¿Por qué EEUU no abolió el sistema imperial y convirtió a Japón en una república? Antes dela Guerra el gobierno del Japón solía difundir la noción de que el emperador era un dios y cuandola Guerra empezó, este hecho le dio a EEUU la impresión de que el emperador, en realidad, teníaun significado religioso para los japoneses. La invasión de Okinawa le costó a EEUU más de lo que había anticipado y llegó a pensar quedebían evitar el desembarco en la Isla Honshu, utilizando al emperador. La lógica de EEUU fue lasiguiente: si capturamos y ejecutamos al emperador, el príncipe o alguno de sus familiares le sucederá einiciará una guerrilla. Aunque la subyuguemos, después de la ocupación, se iniciará unmovimiento de nacionalismo derivado del sentimiento contra EEUU, que no dará al país paz pormucho tiempo. El emperador es parte de las costumbres y creencias antiguas del Japón. Es mejor respetar estepunto. Es importante enseñar que la democracia a la norteamericana y el sistema imperial puedenexistir sin contradicción. El medio más rápido de conseguir esteobjetivo es que el emperador se convierta en un demócrata. Más concretamente, el emperadorrenovará la Constitución Imperial, admirando la democracia pero ubicándose en esta nuevaconstitución en un lugar que no perturbe la noción de democracia. No importa que su figuracarezca de importancia, lo importante es que él ocupe un lugar. Gran parte de la nueva constitución sigue los lineamentos de las constituciones establecidas,pero la parte dedicada al emperador es particularmente japonesa. Según la constitución, él notiene ninguna función política, es solo un símbolo del país. La palabra símbolo en este caso no esfácil de entender. Dicen que los norteamericanos pensaban algo parecido de la bandera de su país.Pero, el emperador y la bandera del país no son iguales en el sentido de que el emperadorrepresenta una tradición de más de mil años: Hirohito era soberano bajo la constitución anterior yse quedó como emperador aunque se convirtió en el símbolo. El hecho de que los 8 primeros
  • 117. artículos sean dedicados a la figura del emperador y sólo a partir del 10mo sean dedicados a lademocracia crea una atmósfera de contradicción entre algunos japoneses. ¿Cómo se justifica que la figura del emperador aparezca en la Constitución Imperial? ¿Desdecuándo el emperador se hizo el gobernante del país? Fue en 1867 cuando el Tokugawa shogunatodevolvió la soberanía al emperador y este la reivindicó. Antes de ese año, el sistema del PeríodoEdo era Ritsuryo sei, un sistema legal y administrativo, proveniente de China. Dicho sistemaempezó a principio del siglo VIII y se abolió solo a finales del período. Para aquel entonces elemperador tenía el derecho de nombrar al shogun. La regencia en el Período Heian, el shogunato de Kamakura, Muromachi y Edo sondesviaciones del sistema de ritsuryo pero no su negación total. Durante esos períodos, losemperadores fueron olvidados pero existía sin duda el sistema ritsuryo hasta 1867. Al añosiguiente este sistema fue reestructurado según los modelos internacionales cuando los samurai declase baja derribaron al gobierno Edo, elevando al Emperador Meiji como jefe del estado. El sistema imperial de Meiji es muy diferente de la monarquía absoluta europea. Esta últimase basa en lo absoluto de las leyes: los reyes consiguieron el poder total a través delestablecimiento de la autoridad de hacer leyes libremente. El Emperador Meiji también hizo unaley para impulsar la modernización y en este sentido son parecidos. La diferencia era que lasociedad japonesa no estaba hecha de manera que las leyes penetraran en todas las capas de lasociedad. En el Período Edo, los emperadores no tenían ningún poder político. Cada parte de lasociedad se movía a su voluntad. Esta tradición estaba demasiado arraigada para ser eliminada:pueblos, familias, lugares de trabajo, escuelas, etc. tenían sus propias leyes no-escritas yfuncionaban como mini-comunidades. Las leyes son algo que el gobierno decide sin tomar encuenta a los pueblos y las impone. No es aconsejable hacer cosas obviamente contra las leyes,pero de ser posible, se deben ignorarlas. Las personas que crearon la Constitución de Meiji eran realistas, sospechando que las leyes noiban a funcionar como en Europa. Oficialmente hicieron una constitución siguiendo las pautas dela monarquía Europa y usando el poder religioso del emperador, controlaban lo que no podían conlas leyes: trataban de dominar el país con sistemas duales. Como los lideres de Meiji estaban conscientes de que Japón era un país pequeño y débil, no seatrevían a hacer guerras temerariamente. A principios de la época de Showa (1920), se empezó aanidar en el centro del gobierno el espiritualismo irresponsable tal como el Espíritu Yamato, conel cual los gobiernos de esa época trataban de hacer creer al pueblo japonés que podría ganar laSegunda Guerra Mundial.7.4. Americans who wrote Japan’s constitution debate it againBy Yuri KageyamaThe Associated Press TOKYO – In 1946, Americans Richard Poole and Beate Sirota Gordon worked day and nightafter World War II to help write Japan’s pacifist constitution and make sure the nation neverembraced militarist aggression again. More than a half-century later, they spoke yesterday before a parliamentary committeegrappling with possible revisions to the document, which has been criticized at home and abroadfor preventing Japan from doing its share of international peace keeping. But the Americans’ message couldn’t have bee more divided – Poole wanted the constitutionchanged; Gordon opposed it.
  • 118. Their divergent opinions echoed Japan’s own split on the issue of changing the constitution,which is celebrated today in a national holiday called Constitution Memorial Day. Written by the United States after Japan’s defeat, the constitution is remarkably democratic forthose times in guaranteeing human rights, sexual equality and religious freedom. It never has beenupdated, and requires a national referendum for revision. The sticking point in the debate is Article No. 9, which promises Japan will “forever renouncewar” and never maintain armed forces. Asian nations remain extremely wary of any attempt by Japan to strengthen its military. Anyproposal to modify Article No. 9 is likely to meet protests from victims of Japanese aggression. Gordon, who wrote the section on women ’s rights when she was only 22, countered a criticismcommon among Japanese that the constitution was foisted on Japan by the United States. “Usually one doesn’t force something on someone that’s better than what one has. The Japaneseconstitution is superior to the U.S. Constitution,” Gordon, who now lives in New York City, toldthe committee in fluent Japanese. “If it’s a good constitution, then it’s fine.” Poole, of McLean, Va., told the committee that Article No. 9 contradicts modern reality becauseJapan already has one of the world’s largest militaries, though it is called the Self-Defense Forces. “It just has a different name,” said Poole, 81. “In the light of today’s reality and the need forJapan to assume responsibilities in international affairs on much the same basis as other leadingdemocracies, it strikes me that the current ambiguity should be removed.” Japan often has been criticized for shirking its international responsibilities. Tokyo came underfire for contributing cash but no soldiers during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, when other U.S. alliessent troops to drive Saddam Hussein’s Iraqi forces out of Kuwait. “For 50 years, Japan has been widening the interpretation of the constitution. But that hasreached its limits,” said Kimitaka Kuze, a ruling–party legislator and committee member. Still, Yasuhisa Jinkoji, a law student at the committee session, said he couldn’t make up hismind after hearing from Pole and Gordon. “The constitution was like a star of hope for the people, and maybe it should be protected,” hesaid. THE SEATLE TIMES WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 20007.5. Japan, too, benefited from American assistance. But its legacy continues tobe a curious one. The American Shogun By Ian Buruma One of the first measures taken by occupation in 1945 was to organize hundredsJapanese officials in anticipation of a U.S. of special brothels. They thought Allied
  • 119. troops would do to them what Japanese occupiers themselves, which led to peculiartroops had done to the Chinese and Southeast inconsistencies and policy reversals.Asians: loot, kill and rape on a massive scale. First of all, there was the SCAP himself.Setting up brothels was one way, they hoped, He was a conservative Republican whoof slacking the foreigners’ thirsts for nevertheless supported New Dealrevenge. Democratic and even socialist reforms in Instead of vengeful hordes, however, Japan Japan. But when he was confronted by thegot the Supreme Commander for the Allied logical results of his own reforms, he wasPowers (SCAP) Gen. Douglas MacArthur, liable to take harsh action. Havingsurrounded by a staff of New Dealers, who encouraged political activism, he crackedpromised to turn Japan into a peace-loving down in 1946 on peaceful demonstrationsliberal democracy. Japanese women would against the Japanese government.get the vote, political prisoners would be MacArthur, with one beady eye on a futurereleased, land reformed, unions organized, presidency of the U.S., liked to pose as apolitical parties set up, education liberalized, man of iron principle. Yet his policy onindustrial monopolies busted, the press freed Japanese war crimes was marked byand farmers liberated from their feudal expediency. He allowed Japanese generals tobonds. be hanged, but kept the emperor, who had To make Japan fit for demokurashi, the been their supreme commander, safely on his“feudal” mentality of the Japanese had to be throne. The emperor was thought to bestamped out first. Kabuki theater was indispensable, the generals were not. In theforbidden. Passages in schoolbooks extolling eyes of many Japanese, right and left, thisthe samurai spirit were blacked out, and discredited the war-crimes trials.teachers who had done their best to instill Economic policy was often equallythat spirit during the war were told to teach inconsistent. The New Dealers weredemokurashi instead. In almost every convinced that the big industrial and bankingrespect, however, the American occupation combines, the zaibatsu, had been theof Japan must count as one of the most warmongers and should be dismantled. Thisbenign in history. Unlike Germany, Japan meant in practice that old founder families ofcontinued to be governed by local politicians the zaibatsu lost some of their wealth, whileand civil servants. American officials the companies themselves--Mitsui andadvised on how to be democrats with a Mitsubishi among them-- survived as leaner,mixture of naiveté and idealism. And above fitter enterprises. And the ministries thatit all there was MacArthur, who was part controlled the wartime Japanese economyU.S. proconsul, part Japanese shogun, to were also left intact, with their oldmake sure all was good. bureaucrats in place. The remarkable thing about the U.S. But the main inconsistency, the one thatoccupation is how many reforms actually caused more bad blood than any other, wasstuck. Land reform did wonders for the rural the so-called Reverse Course. MacArthureconomy. Japan got a pacifist Constitution, and his New Dealers might have been mostlyremoving Japan’s right to wage war, which concerned with pacifism, egalitarianism andoutraged nationalist right wing but still democracy, but military hard-liners in theenjoys the support of most Japanese. And the SCAP’s staff, as well as conservatives backdemocratic system of government works in Washington, had other priorities. Theyafter a fashion. Yet by no means all Japanese were afraid of Japan’s going socialist just atwere grateful for everything the Americans the time that the communist bloc wasdid. The occupation left a legacy of anti- shaping up as America’s main enemy. This isAmericanism among right-wing nationalists, where George Marshall comes in. In 1947as well as left-wing pacifists. The reason for George Kennan, head of the Policy Planningthis was a history of conflict among the Staff in Washington, had convinced Marshall
  • 120. that the policy on Japan should be reversed: them to build up what they had alwaysno more nonsense about redistributing wanted: Japan as an economic superpower,wealth and fostering union radicalism; Japan monopolized by an elite of conservativeshould become a capitalist powerhouse politicians, bureaucrats and industrialists.against communism. The “Marshall Plan” for Japan, in other Marshall decided Japan should be allowed words, set up Japan Inc.to export its way out of trouble, and given On the margins of the Japanese elite are thethe tools to do so. Vast amounts of U.S. right-wing nationalists, who are as resentfultaxpayers’ money were transferred to rebuild of the occupation as the leftists. TheirJapanese industry. Japanese welfare grievance is that too much of the pre-Reversespending was reduced, workers’ wages cut Course occupation remains in place: theand raw materials allocated to promote Constitution, liberal education and so forth.export production over domestic So the legacy of American assistance toconsumption. “Reds” were purged in the Japan is a decidedly mixed one: anger on theunion, and war criminals released from left, resentment on the right and a set ofprison—one of them, Nobusuke Kishi, soon economic and political arrangements in theto become prime minister. And the task of middle, which some Western commentatorsrebuilding Japanese industry fell to those have described as a threat to the world. If thiswho knew best how to do it, the same seems complicated, it has nothing to do withbureaucrats and politicians who ran the the inscrutability of the Japanese, andJapanese war economy. everything with the extraordinary history of Japanese liberals and leftists felt betrayed. American occupation.They would feel even more betrayed whenthe cold war started in earnest, and U.S. Newsweek May 26, 1997politicians, like Richard Nixon, told theJapanese that the pacifist Constitution hadbeen a mistake, and it was time for Japan torebuild its army. But conservatives weredelighted. For the reverse course enabled7.6. Japan: militarism under the Koizumi Administrative Kan TakayukiUnder the Koizumi Administration [Liberal Democratic Party leader Junichiro Koizumi has beenJapan’s Prime Minister since 2001], Japan is advancing headlong on a course towardmilitarisation. In this context, militarisation first means the preparation by the government of thesocial machinery allowing it to obtain the power to apply and activate military powers withoutrestraint. Second, it means the preparation of the legal, political, social background for ensuringthe smooth implementation of the above policy. Third, it means to enhance social systems topunish, expel, and retaliate against opposition, resistance, and obstructive groups within andwithout Japan, who are struggling against the above policies. Fourth, it means to propagate theideology that it is ‘just’ to eradicate the ‘enemies’ of war, national security and the nation state.This is, of course, nothing other than an energetic call for xenophobia.These policies are not recent, but were planned in a longer time span since the end of USOccupation. In a perspective of 20 years, they represent the ‘sum total of the Post World War TwoPolitics’ as exemplified by the Nakasone Administration in the 1980s, which came to power amidthe dramatic ebb of the anti-government forces which had embodied the post WWII situation.
  • 121. 7.6.1. Japan’s historical revisionism in early 90sIn a short span, in the second half of the 1990s, the precedents for the establishment of theKoizumi Administration were set up through a series of legislation. These laws included therevision of the Defense Guideline for the Japan-U.S Security Treaty, the Law for MilitaryEmergencies in Areas Surrounding Japan, passed in August 1999; the Anti-Organized CrimeLaw, The Basic Resident Register Law; and the National Flag and Anthem Law.However, the Koizumi administration has pushed the pedal to the floor in terms of theseretrogressive policies of the nineties. The authorization of a junior high school history textbookwritten by revisionists who denied Japan’s responsibility for the war of aggression, together withKoizumi’s official visit to the Yasukuni Shrine (where war criminals are enshrined) on August 13,2001 two days before the anniversary of the end of the war, marked the beginning of itsmilitarisation policies. Koizumis display to the world of his close friendship with PresidentGeorge W Bush, on the other hand, was a sales pitch for his administration.7.6.2. After September 11Then, the events of September 11 happened. The suicide attacks on the World Trade Center inNew York and the Pentagon were, regardless of who were the perpetrators, and whether they wereright or wrong, expressions of political will, or symbols of the hatred and grudge against UScontrol over the world, through globalisation.It is terrible that these attacks brought many casualties, including innocent civilians who had noresponsibility for US supremacy. However, it may be inevitable there were many people whosecretly cried ‘hurray!’ at the success of the attacks on the heart of the US military and financialestablishments. This is because five-sixths of the world population have failed to share in theprofits of US dominance over the world. Noam Chomsky very appropriately pointed out that itwas precisely the US that is a ‘rogue nation,’ as he criticized Bush’s policy and US domination.7.6.3. The success of the US threatAmerica, the modern ‘Empire,’ declared a war of retaliation against the terrorists and theiraccomplice nations, and launched military actions to annihilate Osama Bin Laden and al-Qaeda.The US went on to threaten the whole world: it demanded that all countries be either on the sideof good or of evil, or in other words either on the US side or on the other. The industrializedcountries went along with this logic, and even China and Russia followed suit. Pakistan, the onlynation that had recognized the Taliban Administration in Afghanistan, and even Libya, which wasintimidated by the threat of being labelled a terrorist supporting country, joined in.Bush labelled the remaining countries, which opposed the US, as an ‘axis of evil.’ As a result,Iraq and the People’s Democratic Republic Korea will be declared the next targets of US militaryattacks after the restoration of order is completed in Afghanistan. This intimidation continues.Why has this reckless blackmail been able to go on? There are two reasons: 1. US military technology has reached a level so advanced that it can now bomb targets in any areas of the world as long as it can set up a front-line base in a neighbouring country. All countries of the world know this quite well. 2. Countries complying with America can expect some economic gain.
  • 122. The former condition might apply to Libya, and the latter to Russia and Pakistan.7.6.4. In the interstices of the mass mediaNeedless to say, not all articles in the media supported the argument for war. Although thenumber was very limited, some articles critical of the retaliatory war appeared in the mass media.Among them, a report from the Asahi Shinbun Jerusalem office on September 16th highlightedthe plight of Palestine which bin Laden believed to be similar to the Afghan situation. Thereporter stated that “if the fight against terrorism is analysed as a clash between West and non-West, it would just support Saddam Hussein and bin Laden. In the Islamic world, extremists likebin Laden are quite exceptional. As the connections between terrorism and Islamic extremists aremade clear, it is easy to trumpet the Islamic threat. However, if anti-terrorist acts are enforcedwithout resolving the difficulties of the Third World, such as oppression and poverty, more peoplewould be driven to bin Laden’s ‘empire’.”As for arguments against war, a letter to the editor in the Asahi Shinbun by Sakamoto Ryuichi, aninternationally known musician, had a limited but significant impact. In his letter, he stated that“Prime Minister Koizumi, as the representative of a nation with a pacific constitution, should notsupport any form of war. Furthermore, he should not be able to contribute to a war in whichinnocent citizens are being targeted: Sakamoto’s argument certainly brought fresh air to anatmosphere in which it was difficult to raise voices of disagreement or criticism. His position as amusical celebrity made it possible for Sakamoto’s opinion to appear in the newspaper. However,it was followed by sporadic criticisms against war in other regions in Japan, such as Nara,Nagasaki, Tottori, and Kyoto. Unfortunately, most of these articles appeared only in regionalpapers without being connected to one another; they were contained in the interstices of the massmedia.7.6.5. No FutureThe Japanese government has always ‘cooperated’ actively with US ‘wars.’ This means that itneglected the indignation against America of five-sixths of the world’s population. Actually, theUS did not even appreciate this Japanese ‘cooperation’ because the Japanese Army, or ‘SelfDefence Forces’ as they are called, did not engage in combat directly. The US also felt thatJapanese economic ‘servicing’ for US wars was insufficient.Therefore, in order to obtain appreciation from the Bush administration, and to win economicgains, the Japanese government has been carrying out an endless series of ‘services’. Since theEuropean Union’s cooperation with America began to diminish, Japanese support has beenincreasing. With regard to the reduction and reorganization of US bases in Okinawa, thegovernment turned down people’s demands for a review of the US-Japan Status of ForcesAgreement (SOFA), and it is clear that Tokyo gives more weight to Washington than to theOkinawan people. I cannot totally disagree with the voices of the spirited right-wing nationalistwho call the government ‘traitorous.’Since joining the US war in Afghanistan, Japan seems to be losing the trust it once enjoyedamong the people of Afghanistan and the Middle East countries, a level of trust which US andEuropean countries never received. Consequently, it lost the chance to make non-militarypeople’s grassroots assistance for basic needs such as medical services, health, education,clothing, food, and housing. Moreover, because of its unwillingness to welcome refugees from
  • 123. Afghanistan, and to provide support for war damage and victims (apart from ‘services’ to the US),Japan invited ridicule and scorn from abroad. In the long run, this has been a huge andunrectifiable mistake. In this sense, the Koizumi administrations choices without future are‘traitorous.’7.6.6. Muted criticismHowever, criticism has been muted in spite of all these consequences. The media has also failedto make any fundamental criticisms to the government. This is not simply because the anti-government movement in Japan has stagnated for a long time, split into specific issues, andgenerally inclined to withdrawal. It is also because Japan is, as everybody knows, in a serious andchronic economic slump. People are concerned with social problems such as corporatebankruptcies, joblessness and suicides caused by economic distress.Koizumi’s reform program has failed to undo the collusion between politicians, bureaucrats andbusiness, but rather has preserved the privilege of the powerful, who can get away with criminaloffences and wrongdoing without facing prosecution. People have become aware that if thereform is pushed through, it will hit the economically weak directly. This has increased criticismagainst Koizumi, and his popularity has fallen from a high of 80% to 40%. However as a result ofthe events of September 11, voices against Koizumis militarisation have been toned down. Theadministration, taking advantage of this situation, has pushed forward with militarisation.7.6.7. Escalating militarisationJapan has been under strong influence from US military and political strategy since its defeat in1945. During the Cold War period, this might have been excused as inevitable due to theinternational political structure. However, under the new international structure since the 1990s, itcould have been possible for Japan to contribute to international politics following a spirit of‘demilitarisation and democratisation,’ the ostensible slogans of the US occupation of Japan.On the contrary, however, the Japanese government has become increasingly enslaved toAmerica, and enhanced its war efforts. The following examples are instructive: the huge monetarycontributions it made to the Gulf War in 1990; dispatching the Self Defense Forces to join UNPeace Keeping Operation in Cambodia in 1992; the revision of the Japan-U.S DefenseCooperation Guidelines and the preparation of related domestic laws in the late 1990s; activecooperation in US military exercises; and, in the name of cutting back on the bases, thecoordination of Japan-US military forces in actually strengthening the bases in Okinawa.Up until the Mori Administration (with the exception of the Nakasone government in the 1980s),however, the Japanese government has maintained restraints on militarisation. This has been truesince the policy of Yoshida Shigeru, who was prime minister in the late 1940s to early 1950s, tomaintain a small military.Koizumi Junichiro gained public support with his pledge to carry out structural reform and tochange post-war politics as a ‘mission.’ The fact that he was sitting in the premier’s chair in 2001was very distressing to many Japanese and other people throughout the world who had beenvictimized by US supremacy. In terms of his reforms, because of opposition from powerfulleaders of his own party, who had gained profits from post-war conservative polities, he could notcarry out any social and economic reforms that were beneficial to marginalized people. So he
  • 124. turned to education, where he promoted a scheme to hollow out the democratic principles of theBasic Law on Education in order to bring competition into education.He also tried to abolish the ‘control’ that Article 9 (the peace clause) of the Constitution exertedover the government and military, who wanted a free hand in issues involving security. There isonly weak lobbying in terms of education, whereas there is strong lobbying in terms of Article 9.Both involved ‘Americanisation’ in areas where there was no fear of the opposition.7.6.8. The Military Emergency LawsTaking advantage of the September 11 attacks, the Koizumi Administration began to plot torapidly change Japan into a nation capable of engaging in warfare in close cooperation with theUS. The newspapers of April 8 printed some of the proposed text of the three MilitaryEmergency-related Laws, which included sanctions to be meted out to people or organizationsthat opposed the use of civilian properties for cooperation with the US military under theEmergency laws. Later, clear language will be written on ‘large scale terrorism’ andcountermeasures against ‘suspicious vessels’ or in other words, to use Bush’s phrase, attacks fromthe ‘evil axis.’Therefore, the Military Emergency Laws, which will be discussed again in the extraordinary Dietsession this fall, signify an assurance by government authorities that they will serve the interestsof US and the ‘Japanese Military’ in war situations. Moreover, on the ‘home front,’ they willestablish a ‘National Mobilization System,’ like the one that existed during World War II, inpresent-day Japan.The special relationship between Japan and America since 9/11 has meant a change for Japanalong the road to becoming a nation that can wage war, by throwing away Article 9 of theConstitution.7.6.9. Critical voicesIn opposition to the ‘cooperation’ between US and Japanese government carried out in the nameof retaliation for 9/11, there have been critical voices and activities from citizen groups andpolitical parties (though as I said before, they have not been large in numbers). They have equallycondemned the war and terrorism.There is another view, however, which says that nearly all the terrorists of 9/11 as well as othersuicide bombers thereafter, as well as people who had relationships with the terrorists, had nomeans to express their political opinions legally in the face of the military, political and economicviolence directed against them. We should work before all to ensure that they have the means offree expression, so that they do not have to resort to terrorism, and to achieve solutions to theproblems they face. If we do not do so, it will be a glaring injustice.7.6.10. Sustainable development or massacreIn other words, people from the North should be aware that we have no right to blame terroristswhen there is a terrible gap between the North and the South, a vicious cycle of poverty, and aDebt Crisis which widens the economic gap. People in the North should at least be aware thatthere are people who had no options than to resort to suicide bombing as an expression ofdesperate resistance against US supremacy, or against the tyranny of dictators in their own
  • 125. countries. It is trivial to ask whether Bin Laden and his group are the real perpetrators, or evenwho Bin Laden is at all.The international community should work to eliminate the poverty suffered by five-sixths of theworld’s population. We should try to realize an economics that enables sustainable developmentfor the whole world. Through this process we should build a social environment wheredemocratic politics can be realized. Once these conditions are guaranteed, we can launch debatesand articulate the problems that exist between peoples: in economics and politics, religions andcultures. The question of whether the political structures of the countries in the so-called ‘evilaxis’ are desirable or not seems irrelevant in this connection.What is called ‘war’ by the US (its selfish activities in the Middle East), and what Israel calls‘war’ (evil robbery supported by the US) are frontal attacks against the road to peace and justice.To comply with the US is a crime. Dr. Nakamura Tetsu, who has worked providing medicalservices in Peshawar, Pakistan, told us of the inevitability of becoming a terrorist for people bornand bred in Afghanistan, who are only given the choice between dying in disgrace and becominga suicide bomber, refusing to die in disgrace. There is some ground for choosing to be a bomber.If we deny both options, then we leave literally nothing but genocide. The US and Israel are goingalong that path.7.6.11. A glimmer of hopeHowever loudly they may condemn terrorism, US policymakers may encourage further terrorismand suicide bombings, and the militarisation of the Koizumi Administration is complying with theUS.The Japanese Government and its people are at a junction where we must choose whether we willgo forward along the road to Hell, killing five sixths of the world in league with Bush and Sharon,or to turn around in order to seek an alternative road of co-existence with others.If we do nothing, the structure today ensures that we will proceed in the former direction. It willtake much time and energy to choose the latter. This is because it is difficult to find a quick andworkable solution. To change the world, we must begin by changing ourselves. With the currenthistorical background, it is very difficult for us to do so. All the same, I believe that the future,and the only glimmer of hope, lies in the latter.* Kan Takayuki is a Pacific Asia Resource Center (PARC) board member and has written manybooks on Japanese politics and society. This article was translated by Ishio Miyoko. It firstappeared on PARCs new English language website at: http://www.parc-jp.org/parc_e/index.html7.7. HISTORIA QUE EL LIBRO DE TEXTO NO ENSEÑA7.7.1. Destino manifiesto Después de que Japón perdiera la Segunda Guerra Mundial contra Estados Unidos, se llevó acabo la ceremonia de la firma de la rendición en el barco Missouri el 2 de septiembre de 1945. Enaquel entonces se izó la bandera de EEUU que se había usado cuando el Comodoro Perry llegó alJapón. Para EEUU esto significaba que la expedición de Perry al Japón y la ceremonia derendición que tuvo lugar 92 años después tenían una estrecha relación.
  • 126. Los Estados Unidos, que se estaban moviendo hacia al oeste, se anexó Texas de México en1845. Justificaba la expansión del territorio, diciendo que era una política natural debido alincremento de la población y un destino manifiesto que dio Dios. Esta manera de pensar lepareció justa a los Estados Unidos, que estaba tratando de ir más allá del Pacífico y fue esto quemotivó la expedición de Perry al Japón. Un industrial llamado Aaron Palmer, a quien galardonó el Congreso como persona deservicios distinguidos para hacer posible la apertura del Japón al resto del mundo por Perry. Elapuntó más allá del Pacífico, China y Japón del Lejano Oriente, como un área a donde se deberíaavanzar. En aquel entonces, sin embargo, aunque se deseara cruzar el Pacífico en barco, no habíaningún puerto que pudiera facilitarle comida, combustible, etc. Por eso pensó Palmer que no habíaotra manera, después de anexarse Hawaii, sino pedirle al Japón que se abriera al comercio. Haber planificado la estrategia de abrir al Japón, Palmer explicó ardientemente al Presidente yal Ministro de Relaciones Exteriores que sería posible hacer que Japón abriera sus puertos al restodel mundo. Por ejemplo, la propuesta que les presentó en 1849 era la siguiente: mandar la armadadirectamente a Edo y exigir una entrevista con el shogun o el jefe de la sección que manejaasuntos de esta índole. No es aconsejable ponerse en contacto con los samurai de bajo rango. Estalínea de conducta coincide exactamente con lo que Comodoro Perry hizo cuando llegó al Japón. Palmer también dijo que si Japón rechazaba la propuesta, debería bloquear la Bahía de Edo,tomando Shinagawa. En realidad cuando estaba negociando Perry con el Japón, declaró que siJapón no le daba una respuesta, lo considería un insulto, sugiriendo que Japón debería aceptar lasconsecuencias. Antes de la expedición al Japón, Perry se reunió con frecuencia con Palmer parahacer un plan preliminar sobre esto. Por eso no es nada extraño que haya hecho Perry lo quePalmer le aconsejó. El 14 de agosto de 1945, cuando Japón se rindió, el periódico, New York Times, escribió losiguiente: por primera vez hemos logrado el sueño perseguido desde la expedición de Perry alJapón. Ya no hay intruso en el Pacífico. El mercado chino es ahora todo para nosotros. Esteartículo claramente indica cuál era la meta de Estados Unidos. La llegada del Comodoro Perry eranada menos que un acontecimiento histórico resultado de la estrategia mundial de Estados Unidosque se llamaba “Destino Manifiesto”. Kyoukasho ga Oshienai Rekishi, By Fujioka Nobukatsu, Sankei Shinbunsha, 19967.7.2. Potsdam El 12 de abril de 1945 en medio de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, el presidente de los EstadosUnidos, Roosevelt murió de repente. Si en aquel entonces no hubiera muerto y hubiera continuadodirigiendo la guerra, habría durado mucho más tiempo y Japón hubiera sido ocupado por losejércitos de Estados Unidos y de Rusia. Es cierto que Japón hubiera sido un país dividido comoCorea. Esa era la política de Roosevelt. Porque el 8 de febrero de 1945 en Yalta, él había firmadoun acuerdo secreto con Stalin, lider de la Unión Soviética, que los ejércitos soviéticos iban ainvadir al Japón dos o tres meses después de la rendición de Alemania. El día siguiente el Ministro de la Defensa, Stimson visitó al Ministro de RelacionesExteriores, Josef. C. Gru y reveló el secreto sobre el desarrollo de una bomba atómica y de unplan de participación de la Unión Soviética en la guerra con Japón. Gru era el embajador en Japón cuando la guerra empezó y era una persona que hizo muchosesfuerzos por terminar la guerra lo antes posible. Cuando Roosevelt murió, era el Ministro deRelaciones Exteriores. La sorpresa que le dio el conocimiento del plan de la participación de laUnión Soviética en la guerra y el desarrollo de la bomba atómica fue grande. Buscó la posibilidadde salvar al Japón de la destrucción total. Lo que culminó los enormes esfuerzos que hizo Gru fuela Declaración de Potsdam que se hizo pública el 26 de julio.
  • 127. Su contenido era severo, ya que estaba basado en la política de Roosevelt y la declaración diceque si Japón no la aceptaba, habría una rápida y total destrucción del país. Pero si uno ve elproceso de esta declaración, es claro que se publicó con la intención de salvar al Japón que estabadirigiéndose hacia una división del territorio. Desafortunadamente, cuando la declaración de Potsdam se publicó, Japón no la aceptóinmediatamente, lo cual resultó en el lanzamiento de bombas atómicas y la participación de laUnión Soviética en la guerra. Sin embargo, Japón se rindió el 15 de agosto de 1945 antes de quela Unión Soviética invadiera al Japón, evitando así el destino de ser un país dividido. Kyoukasho ga Oshienai Rekishi, By Fujioka Nobukatsu, Sankei Shinbunsha, 1996
  • 128. CAPITULO OCTAVO 8. CONFLICTOS8.1. THE ERA OF IMPERIALISM 1830--1914IMPERIALISM: TWO VIEWS For those countries that participated in the race for colonies, imperialism was a tremendous source of profit, power, and prestige. These countries took pride in the belief that their presence benefited the less developed parts of the world that they colonized. But to the people who lived in these conquered areas, imperialism meant an entirely different thing.THE IMPERIALISNT’S VIEWIn the 1890’s the United States joined the Europeans in the race for colonies abroad. Afterthe Spanish-American War, the United States annexed the Philippines, which had belongedto Spain. In the following statement, President McKinley explains why his country hadtaken the islands. This statement is representative of the late nineteenth-century imperialistview.I have been criticized a good deal about the Philippines, but I don’t deserve it. The truth is, Ididn’t want the Philippines, and when they came to us, like a gift from the gods, I did not knowwhat to do wit them…. I walked the floor of the White House night after night until midnight; andI am not ashamed to tell you, gentlemen, that I went down on my knees and prayed for light andguidance. And one night late it came to me this way—I don’t know how it was, but it came: (1)That we could not give the Philippines back to Spain—that would be cowardly and dishonorable;(2) that we could not turn them over to France or Germany—that would be bad business anddiscreditable; (3) that we could not leave them to govern themselves—they were unfit for self-government…and (4) that there was nothing left for us to do but to take them all, and to educatethe Philippines, and uplift and civilize and Christianize them, and by God’s grace, do the verybest we could by them as our fellow men….I then I went to bed, and went to sleep, and slept
  • 129. soundly, and the next morning I sent for the chief engineer of the War Department (ourmapmaker), and told him to put the Philippines on the map of the United States.--Adapted from: G.A. Malcolm and M.M. Kalaw. Philippine Government. Manila: Associate Publishers, 1923THE CONQUERED PEOPLE’S VIEWThough China remained independent during the nineteenth century, its rulers came to holdlittle power over much of its territory. By the end of the century China was divided intovarious European spheres of influence. European influence in China began as early as the1830’s with British trade agreements. Soon after, other powers negotiated treaties with theChinese. By the late 1840’s the United States, France, Belgium, and Sweden were grantedtreaties as well. The following selection is what was circulated throughout the province ofKwantung in 1841. It expresses the Chinese people’s view of the British imperialist presencein China.We loyal and patriotic people of Kwantung Province note that you English barbarians havedeveloped the nature of wolves, plundering and seizing things by force. In trade relations, youcome to our country seeking only profit, which resembles an animal’s greed for food. You areignorant of our laws and institutions. You have no gratitude for the favors given you by our royalcourt. You bring opium into our country to injure our people, cheating hem of silver and cash.Except for your solid ships, your fierce gunfire, and your other powerful weapons, whatknowledge or other abilities have you?You have killed and injured our common people in many villages. You have disturbed the peace.You have failed to pay proper respect to our religious beliefs and practices. This is a time whenHeaven is angered and mankind is resentful. Even the ghosts and spirits will not tolerate youbeasts.We really ought to use refined expressions, but since you beasts do not understand our refinedlanguage, we use rough, vulgar words to instruct you in simple terms.--Adapted from: Ssu-yu Teng and J.K Fairbank. China’s Response to the West: A Documentary Survey.Cambridge. Mass., Harvard University Press. 19548.2. La Guerra del Opio (1840-1842) Como consecuencia de la Revolución Industrial que ocurrió a mediados del siglo 18, laproducción de productos textiles se aumentó rápidamente, forzando a Inglaterra a buscarmercados nuevos para esos productos. En aquel entonces al comercio entre Inglaterra, India yChina era, por decirlo así, un comercio triangular: productos ingleses a India, productos hindúes aChina y productos chinos a Inglaterra. Después de mediados del siglo 18, el té se hizo unanecesidad, la exportación de dicho producto de China a Inglaterra se aumentó significativamente.Pero como el monto de la exportación de productos ingleses e hindúes a China no se incrementó,la afluencia de plata a China, como resultado del desequilibrio de la balanza del comercio, se hizomayor.1 Por eso Inglaterra buscó en India el mercado de algodón e India empezó a exportar a China opio
  • 130. para conseguir plata para pagar a Inglaterra.2. A Inglaterra le interesaba China como mercado para capital industrial que se estabadesarrollando rápidamente.3. En 1800 la Dinastía Ching prohibió la importación del opio, pero siguió viniendo comoartículo de contrabando.4. En el siglo 19, a diferencia de la época previa, los productos algodoneros ingleses fueron aChina en grandes cantidades y la plata llegó a Inglaterra. China se volvió un país con déficit en labalanza comercial.5. Como consecuencia de la salida de plata, su valor se incrementó en China, causando una granconfusión económica. La costumbre de fumar opio se extendió, volviéndose un problema social.6. La Dinastía Ching trató de impedir a Inglaterra que entrara en el mercado chino, insistiéndoleque hiciera “Chookoo Booeki”, es decir, hiciera comercio como un país tributario.8.3. Crafty plan spelled daimyo demiseThe Meiji Restoration saw many miracles. One that strikes people today as difficult to understandis why the daimyo lords of more than 260 domains across the country simply gave up power tothe new government.It all happened on July 14, 1871.All representatives of the domains who were in Tokyo at the time were called to the ImperialPalace. Sanjo Sanetomi, the Meiji governments executive council chief, read aloud a statement onthe new order issued under the emperors name.It was called "haihan chiken," which means abolition of domains and adoption of the newprefectural system.About 10,000 soldiers from Satsuma, Choshu and Tosa were mobilized in Tokyo for possibleviolent outbreaks sparked by the announcement.The majority of the representatives were stunned or perplexed to hear the announcement, but therewas no resistance. The coup detat to create a centralized government was well-planned by youngleaders like Okubo Toshimichi of Satsuma, Kido Takayoshi of Choshu, Itagaki Taisuke of Tosaand Okuma Shigenobu of Hizen.The new order deprived all daimyo and samurai of their privileges and vested interests, turningthem into commoners -- equal to farmers, merchants or anyone else under the emperors rule.As the late historical novelist Ryotaro Shiba put it, this was the moment when the ideas of"citizens" and "the nation" entered Japanese history.In 1869, two years before the coup, Okubo, Kido, Itagake and Okuma had talked their owndaimyo into handing over control of their domains to the Imperial Court, as the Tokugawashogunate did in 1867, effectively putting an end to the shogunate.These young revolutionaries, disguised as loyalists to their domains, convinced their daimyo to do
  • 131. so by suggesting that such a gesture of faith in the Imperial Court would prompt the emperor togive these domains something more substantial, such as partial rule in the Meiji oligarchy underthe joint alliance of Satsuma, Choshu and other major powers.Okubo and the others knew this was not what they wanted. But these daimyo were confidentenough to join the new regime.As the powerful domains did, others followed suit, wishing not to be discriminated against by thenew government. All took part in what is known as "hanseki hokan," or the return of domainregisters, and the daimyo were reappointed as governors, as expected.But the Meiji revolution did not stop at scrapping the domains. The dramatic announcementshattered the last hopes of powerful daimyo who would have maintained the feudal system, andthey all complied meekly.Many other daimyo were relieved by the abolition of the domain system, as the new centralgovernment would take over huge accumulated deficits in their domain budgets. Roughly two-thirds of the domains across the country were on the verge of financial collapse at the time.(Masaru Fujimoto)8.4. China, Japan bolster navies for warThe Sino-Japanese War broke out at almost the same time that Japan signed a revised treaty withBritain in July 1894 to put the two countries on an equal footing in bilateral negotiations.Relations between Japan and China under the Ching Dynasty had been tense since the Meijigovernment opened Korea with the 1876 "unequal pact." Japan forced Korea to sign the treaty,using the same tactics employed by Western powers in their dealings with the Tokugawashogunate.Under the Yi Dynasty, Korea had been resigned to Beijings suzerainty, which Japan refused torecognize.In summer 1882, a party of nationalists opposed to foreigners and discontented farmers attackedthe Japanese legation in Seoul. Beijing and Tokyo responded by sending troops to help theopposing camp.Violence again broke out on the peninsula two years later as Korean liberals attempted a coup thatsaw clashes between Chinese soldiers and Japanese legation guards -- an event known in Japan asthe Koshin Incident.Following the coup attempt, Japanese representatives Ito Hirobumi and Saigo Tsugumichi metwith Chinese statesman Li Hungchang in Tientsin in 1885 to ease tension.The two delegations agreed that both countries would withdraw their troops from the peninsulaand give prior notice before redispatching them.
  • 132. For the decade leading up to the Sino-Japanese War, hostility between the two countriesintensified, prompting both to build up their defense capabilities in preparation for war.Beijing formed the Northern Sea Fleet in 1885 with the purchase of two battleships fromGermany and five cruisers from Britain. It built naval bases at Lushun (Port Arthur) on the tip ofthe Liaotung Peninsula and Weihai on the Shantung Peninsula to defend Bo Hai, an arm of theYellow Sea.China meanwhile boasted of two key battleships -- the Dingyuan (Teien) and the Zhenyuan(Chinen), each weighing 7,335 tons, armored with 30 cm of steel and equipped with two 15-cmand four 7.5-cm guns in addition to four 30.5-cm main guns.The Imperial Japanese Navy mapped out a plan in 1883 to build a modern fleet with three coastaldefense ships and several 3,000-ton and 4,000-ton cruisers, including the 4,160-ton Yoshino,which was lightly equipped with four 15-cm guns and eight 12-cm high-speed guns.The Yoshino was among the cruisers Japan ordered from Britain. It was the worlds fastest ship atthe time, capable of cruising at 22.5 knots, compared with the 7 knots averaged by the Chinesefleet in the Sino-Japanese War. (Masaru Fujimoto)8.5. Edo castle becomes Imperial PalaceBy March 1868, conflict in the city of Edo was approaching a climax.The combined Imperial forces of the Satsuma, Choshu and other anti-Tokugawa domains leftKyoto under the command of Prince Taruhito of Arisugawa and were swiftly moving east,meeting little resistance.The prince and his delegation had already reached Sunpu Castle in Shizuoka Prefecture on March5, 1868, while his advance battalion had taken the Tokaido Highway (todays National Route 1)and were approaching the Rokugo River in Kawasaki.The delegation had already set March 15 as the date for a full-scale assault on the Tokugawashogunates stronghold -- Edo Castle. The plan was to scorch the city of 1.5 million inhabitantsand turn it into a wasteland.The campaign stemmed from a decision, made in October the previous year by the Edogovernments last shogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu, to accept the demand of anti-Tokugawa forcesto return ruling power to the Imperial Court. The decision was made with the intention that,despite the relinquishing of his clans 260-year rule, Tokugawa would remain one of Japans mostdominant lords.The shoguns decision to step down deprived the pro-Imperial revolutionary regime of an excuseto sweep out entirely the structure of the Tokugawa government.In addition, nothing had really changed despite Yoshinobus announcement; the shogunatecontinued to levy rice harvests and taxes from areas under its direct rule.
  • 133. The revolutionary forces were not happy about the stalemate.Despite Yoshinobus efforts to avoid a violent confrontation between the pro-Imperial and pro-Tokugawa forces, leaders -- in preparation for the formation of a new government in Kyoto --adopted a resolution to restore the Imperial monarchy under 15-year-old Emperor Meiji and tourge the Tokugawa clan to return all of its subjects and properties to the Imperial court.Outraged by the demand and encouraged by the burning of Satsuma houses in Edo by Tokugawasoldiers, such proshogunate domains as Aizu, part of Fukushima Prefecture, and Kuwana in MiePrefecture enticed Yoshinobu to effectively declare war against Satsuma on New Years Day1868. Their declared enemy, the domain of Satsuma, was key in driving the shogunate to theverge of collapse.The reaction from Tokugawas side was exactly what Saigo Takamori -- a low-ranking samuraifrom Satsuma who had become a a spiritual and charismatic figure throughout the process of theMeiji Restoration -- had wanted.The Tokugawa government mobilized 15,000 troops in Osaka, where Yoshinobu was stationed atthe time, and faced the Imperial forces in Kyotos Fushimi and Toba on Jan. 3, 1868.The clash saw an anticlimactic end on Jan. 6 when defeated shogunate forces retreated to OsakaCastle, with the domains of Yodo in Kyoto Prefecture and Tsu in Mie Prefecture defecting to theImperial forces. Yoshinobu fled the stronghold for Edo by ship, taking only a few lieutenants andleaving his forces behind.Even after the Toba-Fushimi Battle, the new government battalions kept heading for Edo, hoistingbanners featuring the Imperial symbol, the chrysanthemum. The banners proved effective --anyone challenging troops bearing the Imperial symbol would be proclaimed a nation of theenemy.While the majority of Tokugawa retainers were determined to fight to the last in Edo, Yoshinobudecided to let Katsu Kaishu make a last attempt to bring about a peaceful shift in power.Katsu had been under house arrest since 1865, when the shogunates naval training center inKobe, Katsus brain-child, was accused of breeding anti-Tokugawa activists.On March 13, 1868, two days before the Imperial forces planned assault, Saigo arrived in Edo.Knowing that Saigo was effectively commanding the Imperial forces, Katsu immediately decidedto visit him. The two had met nearly four years earlier in Osaka, and Saigo willingly accepted theinvitation to meet.Since their first meeting, Saigo had been impressed by Katsus outspokenness and realistic visionof an end to the shogunate system. Katsu, on the other hand, had seen in Saigo qualities thatwould make him an effective national leader.Saigo and Katsu met at a house in Satsuma, near todays JR Tamachi Station. The agreement thetwo men reached was simple: The Tokugawa clan would evacuate Edo Castle and TokugawaYoshinobu would be placed under house arrest in Mito, his native domain.
  • 134. "There may be difficult problems. But I will take complete responsibility and take care of them,"Saigo said, promising that his troops would not attack the castle. Wrapping up their business aftera brief discussion, they then went on to discuss personal matters.Their last-minute meeting resulted in the prevention of bloodshed and the castle was handed overto the new government on April 11 the same year. Since then, the castle has served as the ImperialPalace. (Masaru Fujimoto)8.6. Discontented samurai influence Satsuma generals moveWhile new technologies from the West like locomotives and gas lights were swiftly promptingJapans modernization in the late 19th century, a lingering issue was about to split the leadershipof the Meiji government.The issue in point was a scheme to conquer Korea, better known as "seikanron," which wasincorporated into the political agenda of the antiforeign, pro-Emperor movement toward the endof the Edo Period.Because the Netherlands and China were the only partners of commerce during the Tokugawashogunate era of self-imposed seclusion, Korea was the shogunates sole diplomatic partner.When the Meiji government was founded in 1868 and notified the peninsula nation about thechange in government, Korea -- then under the Yi Dynasty with close relations to the QingDynasty in China -- halted diplomatic relations with Japan.A plan to invade Korea was on one level used as a vent for discontent among people in the formersamurai class over their treatment under the new government.This sentiment was conveyed to Saigo Takamori (1827-1877), a lower-class samurai from theSatsuma domain and a key figure in the Meiji Restoration.A wide-eyed, charismatic figure who stood 179-cm tall and weighed over 100 kg, Saigosympathized with these former samurai, especially those in the lower class, and was persuaded tocampaign for leadership of the "seikanron" scheme.In addition to his magnetism, which fascinated those around him, Saigos behavior earned himdeep respect from the public. After young leaders from the Satsuma, Choshu and other powerfuldomains took top posts in the new government, their lifestyles became flamboyant and theirattitudes arrogant -- at least thats what Saigo felt. He continued to live a simple life until hisdeath.In 1873, Gen. Saigo, as state councilor in charge of defense, urged Premier Sanjo Sanetomi toassign him to Korea as a delegation chief. He claimed he could persuade Korea to resumerelations with Japan.His idea was that he might be killed in Korea, which would give Japan an excuse to wage waragainst the country.
  • 135. Although the Cabinet approved Saigos request to head the Korea mission, main leaders likeOkubo Toshimichi, Kido Takayoshi, Ito Hirobumi and Iwakura Tomomi -- all against thecampaign -- were at the time on a European mission. Upon their return, the Cabinet reversed theearlier decision to enter Korea.Upset over the change in plans, Saigo resigned his post as councilor and returned to his hometownof Kagoshima (formerly Satsuma) to await a civil war against the new government. (MasaruFujimoto)8.7. Saigos last stand in KagoshimaWhen Saigo Takamori (1827-77) learned about his students attack on an army munitions depotand a naval shipyard in Kagoshima on the night of Jan. 29, 1877, he realized there was no way outand decided to wage war against the Meiji government, taking it as a fait accompli.Saigo was away when young rebels from his private-yet-prefecture-financed military academy inKagoshima caused the uprising in a bid to retrieve weapons and ammunition from governmenttroops, who had been ordered to remove them from facilities in the prefecture.He told his aides, "I could have stopped them if I had been there. But its too late now."At the time, Kagoshima Prefecture, which contributed more than a handful of its leading figuresto the founding of the Meiji government, had isolated itself from the rest of the nation, ignoringthe young governments newly established law and order. The government feared a possiblerebellion by Kagoshima.Following the attack, Saigo sent a letter to the Meiji government saying that he and a contingentof soldiers plan to head for Tokyo "to make some inquiries to the government."The letter requested that the government notify the public about Saigos move so as not to upsetresidents, since the army would be marching to the capital, and that it "protect" his men. Strangelyenough, the letter was meant as a declaration of rebellion against the government, whichunderstood the message.On Feb. 15, Saigo led a contingent of seven battalions consisting of 14,000 hastily arrangedtroops as it left Kagoshima under unusually heavy snow for southern Kyushu.With Saigos influence, his camp was sure that it would be able to easily take over all of Kyushuand advance to Osaka by early March.It proved not to be the case.Army Minister Yamagata Aritomo (1838-1922) immediately ordered Tani Tateki (1837-1911),chief commander of Kumamoto Prefectures conscript army, to block the Saigo camp and defendthe prefecture just north of Kagoshima to the last.The conscript army was holed up in Kumamoto Castle and withstood a fierce offensive by Saigostroops for more than 50 days.
  • 136. One of the most brutal battles took place at Tabaruzaka, a hill with winding paths that had beenconsidered a natural fort. The Meiji government army crushed Kagoshima troops at Tabaruzakaon March 20, using some 400,000 rounds of ammunition and 1,000 shells a day during the 17-daybattle. The campaign saw 3,000 casualties.Saigo pulled back to Kagoshima for a last charge and told his men to make their own decision.More than 10,000 surrendered.About 300 rebels were holed up at Kagoshimas Shiroyama Hill in September, surrounded by2,400 army snipers. After repeated assaults, a wounded Saigo asked one of his lieutenants, BeppuShinsuke, to assist in his ritual suicide in traditional samurai manner.Beppu severed Saigo head, and about 160 remaining soldiers died in a suicidal campaign againstgovernment troops, ending Japans last civil war. (Masaru Fujimoto)8.8. Meiji government discord sparked Taiwan invasionWhen "seikanron," a scheme to conquer the Korean Peninsula, split the leadership of the Meijigovernment, Interior Minister Okubo Toshimichi (1830-78) proposed instead to send troops toTaiwan in a bid to unite the nation.Okubos proposal, made in 1874, came after 54 Okinawans were slain by Taiwans indigenousFormosa tribe in November 1871, when a fishing boat from Naha, with 66 aboard, drifted in theEast China Sea and washed ashore on a Taiwan beach.Okinawa, or the kingdom of the Ryukyus, as it was then called, belonged both to Japans Satsumadomain and China at the time. After the November massacre was reported to Satsuma, hardlinersthere reacted immediately and called for retaliation against China.The Meiji governments defense chief Saigo Takamori and Foreign Minister Soejima Taneomitried to control such a hasty move and decided to take diplomatic measures to seek internationalrecognition of Okinawa as Japanese territory.In Beijing, China, then under the Ching dynasty, told Japanese officials that although itacknowledged the slaying of its "subjects," the victims were not Japanese.China also claimed that the massacre was committed by "barbarians in an area outside the realmof Chinese law," although Taiwan was in fact a part of China. This argument gave an excuse forthe Meiji government to send troops to Taiwan in the name of crushing the "barbarian" Formosatribe.Okubo scrapped the seikanron scheme, and along with other leaders decided to take advantage ofthe massacre to boost reunification efforts.For Okubo, the de facto leader of the Meiji government, the plan was a way of diverting publicdiscontent over the governments treatment of those in the former samurai class.With the establishment of the new government, many of the former samurai were deprived of
  • 137. their privileges and had no way to support themselves.The government appeared split, however, as the defense chief Saigo supported the seikanron planand was also sympathetic to the samurai, especially those in the former Satsuma domain.The government appointed Saigos younger brother, Tsugumichi, to lead the military campaignagainst Taiwan, and in May 1874 dispatched 3,600 troops aboard four battle ships from Nagasaki.The Formosans surrendered within a day, and China agreed to pay condolence money to thefamilies of the slain victims. In addition, China agreed to recognize Okinawa as Japaneseterritory.Shortly before Japanese forces left Nagasaki for the mission, Okubo learned that the U.S. hadcanceled a plan to lend Japan vessels to aid the mission. He rushed to the Kyushu port to postponethe campaign, but the troops had already departed for Taiwan when he arrived.Because of the surprise cancellation, the government assigned Mitsubishi Co. responsibility overmilitary transport operations and designated all government steam vessels to the company.After the Taiwan incident, the government signed a contract with Mitsubishi stating that it wouldcontinue to provide the firm with vessels for business purposes at no charge, on condition thatthey be loaned to the government when needed.The contract originated as a government measure -- but went on to foster a major domestictransport firm. (Masaru Fujimoto)8.9. Loyalty to the West marked China warThe Japanese government, in an effort to seek justice under modern Western rules, declared waragainst China on Aug. 1, 1894.Even Fukuzawa Yukichi, a leading Meiji educator, called the war the challenge of "Asias leaderof Western civilization," referring to Japan, against a "barbaric nation" that represented traditionalEastern civilization, China.In the struggle to revise Japans treaties with the United States and European countries, the Meijigovernment had to prove the country had achieved "maturity" as defined by the West.The Sino-Japanese War served as a perfect opportunity for Japan to demonstrate its pledge to betrue to the spirit of wartime international law, while educating Japanese citizens on the role of themilitary.Because the domestic media were not developed enough to dispatch Japans war propagandaoverseas, the government had to manipulate sympathetic foreign correspondents in Tokyo andelsewhere to do the job.When Japanese forces massacred Chinese soldiers and civilians in Lushun (Port Arthur) on theLiaotung Peninsula -- an apparent violation of international law -- the government used the
  • 138. foreign press to deflect criticism.Although the structure of the Japanese armed forces and their weapons had been modernized tolevels close to those of the West and outperformed those of China, the army had serious hygieneand logistical deficiencies.About 88 percent of the nearly 14,000 soldiers and other military people who died during the war,which lasted until the following spring, were victims of epidemics.The war effectively ended when Chinas Northern Sea Fleet perished in the Yellow Sea navalbattle.Chinese statesman Li Hungchang arrived in Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi Prefecture, on March 20,1895, for the postwar settlement and began negotiations with Prime Minister Ito Hirobumi andForeign Minister Mutsu Munemitsu, his Japanese counterparts.On April 17, 1895, the peace treaty was signed on condition that China recognize Koreasindependence and that China cede the Liaotung Peninsula, Taiwan and the nearby PescadoresIslands.The treaty also forced China to pay an indemnity of 200 million taels (about 300 million yen atthe time) and to open more ports.Soon after the signing of the treaty, the cession of the Liaotung Peninsula brought diplomaticintervention from Russia, Germany and France.Legation members in Tokyo from these countries visited the Foreign Ministry on April 23 and"advised" the Japanese government to give up the peninsula out of fear that Japans militarypresence in China would threaten their vested interests.The intervention eventually led to the outbreak of the Russo-Japanese War within a decade.(Masaru Fujimoto)8.10. Japan and Russia go to battleJapan broke off relations with Russia on Feb. 6, 1904, after repeated talks in a tug of war over thecontrol of the Korean Peninsula and Manchuria in northeastern China.With the Anglo-Japanese Alliance signed in 1902, Japan was able to take a hardline stance againstRussia without fear of intervention from European powers.The alliance resulted from Russias rejection of the "Manchuria-Korea exchange," a Japaneseproposal that would allow Russia a free hand in Manchuria and Japan sway over the KoreanPeninsula.The alliance also forced Russia to accept a promise to withdraw its troops from Manchuria,although it did not comply. Despite being rebuffed by China, as well as by Japan, the UnitedStates and other Western powers, the Russian military remained in the region.
  • 139. The czarist countrys advance into China had gained momentum shortly after the 1894-95 Sino-Japanese War. Meanwhile, Russias Tripartite Intervention with Germany and France forcedJapan to return the Liaodong Peninsula to China.In 1896, Russia obtained the right from Beijing to build the Chinese Eastern Railway acrossManchuria to Vladivostok, short-cutting its Trans-Siberian Railway.Two years later, Russia moved into the Liaodong Peninsula after winning a lease contract fromChina. It began linking the Chinese Eastern Railway with the South Manchurian Railway toinclude such ports on the peninsula as Port Arthur (Lushun) and Dalian.Japanese public opinion was moving toward war with Russia, and Feb. 6, 1904, became adecisive step in that direction. Two days later, the Japanese navy attacked and trapped the Russianfleet at Port Arthur and declared war on Feb. 10, 1904.The first Japanese army descended on the Korea Peninsula during that month and March andreached Manchuria by May, during which time the second army landed on Liaodong Peninsulaand occupied Nanshan and Dalian.The most brutal battle took place at Port Arthur. The third army, which arrived at the site inAugust 1904, launched an intensive assault under Gen. Nogi Maresuke.Port Arthur was Japans key target as the Imperial Japanese Army was desperate to crush the portwith Russias most powerful Baltic fleet due to arrive.It took three campaigns for the army to subdue the port, which fell at last in January 1905, aftermobilizing a total of 130,000 troops and seeing 59,000 casualties.The Baltic fleet received the report on the fall of Port Arthur in Madagascar where it had waitedthe arrival of additional battleships from the Baltic. (Masaru Fujimoto)8.11. Naval might proven in Battle of TsushimaAfter repeated onslaughts on and the eventual fall at the end of 1904 of Russias stronghold inPort Arthur (Lushun), on the tip of Chinas Liaodong Peninsula, Tokyos next desperate tasktoward victory in the Russo-Japanese War was to annihilate the Baltic squadron.Under Vice Adm. Zinovy Rozhestvensky, 45 warships of the Baltic squadron left the Gulf ofFinland in October 1904 for Vladivostok; their aim was to restore Russian naval power in the FarEast and to relieve Port Arthur.Although Tokyo was well aware that the squadron was heading for the naval port, it had notdetermined the route the enemy fleet would take. If Rozhestvenskys fleet made it into port, it wasbelieved almost impossible to annihilate.Seventy-three patrol boats were mobilized to trace the whereabouts of the Russian squadron. At2:45 a.m. on May 27, 1905, the Shinano spotted the lights of what appeared to be the Baltic fleetoff the Goto islets, Nagasaki Prefecture.
  • 140. In an attempt to confirm the sighting, the patrol boat strayed further into the Tsushima Straitbetween Japan and Korea without realizing its reconnaissance had led it directly amid the Balticsquadron. Startled but achieving confirmation, the Shinano reported the sighting at 4:45 a.m. thatday.The message reached Adm. Togo Heihachiro aboard the Mikasa, the flagship of Japans combinedfleet of fast British-built battleships, cruisers and scores of torpedo boats, at shortly after 5 a.m.Togos campaign staff officer Akiyama Saneyuki issued an order to all warships: "Havingreceived the report that the enemys warships have been sighted, the Combined Fleet willimmediately set out to attack and annihilate them. Weather is fine and clear, but the sea is high."The well-prepared Combined Fleet intercepted the unwieldy Baltic squadron in the strait. Thenaval battle was lopsided and overwhelmingly, if not completely, in favor of Togos warships.By the next day, the Russians had lost 34 warships, including all of the squadrons battleships.Only three Russian vessels reached Vladivostok intact, others being scuttled at sea or interned atneutral ports.Japans losses were miraculously slight with only three torpedo boats sunk.The victory was attributed to the fleets advantage of speed over its enemy and thorough drills --undertaken while awaiting the Baltic squadrons arrival -- that enhanced the accuracy of itsshelling.The British, who were allies of Japan, compared the victory to Britains win in the Battle ofTrafalgar. The battle confirmed Japans naval supremacy in waters off of northeast Asia.Following the naval battle, Togo became an instant hero both at home and abroad, especially inthose nations that had conflicts of interest with Russia.Turkey, which was under the military threat of a czarist empire, praised Togo and named streetsafter the Japanese commander in chief. Some even named their children after him.In Finland, a Togo beer is still sold nearly a century after the battle, which was a decisive factor inJapans victory in the war. (Masaru Fujimoto)8.12. Portsmouth mitigated 05 victors spoilsAfter Japan triumphed in the 1905 Battle of Tsushima, its Combined Fleet effectively annihilatingRussias Baltic flotilla, the government was desperate to end the war.The Russo-Japanese War had already put the country in massive debt and government leaderswere well aware that it no longer had the financial strength to continue its struggle against Russia.At the same time, the government knew that unilaterally proposing a truce would only give theadvantage to Russia, which was clearly losing in both its land and sea campaigns.Only three days after the naval offensive in May 1905, the government had Ambassador to
  • 141. Washington Takahira Kogoro ask U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt for mediation.Because no Japanese troops had advanced onto Russias mainland, the Russians had only onereason to call for a truce. The czarist nation was just about to confront a violent change.The Revolution of 1905 had begun on "Bloody Sunday" Jan. 22, when troops fired on a workersdemonstration in St. Petersburg.Widespread disorder followed, including a mutiny on the battleship Potemkin and a nationalgeneral strike organized by the St. Petersburg soviet workers council.Roosevelt approached Russia, and peace talks were arranged in Portsmouth, N.H., where ForeignMinister Komura Jutaro and his delegation met their Russian counterparts in August that year.Befitted as an apparent victor, Japans demands were stiff. They included recognition of Japanssupremacy in Korea, the cession of Sakhalin and the transfer of Russias interests, including theLiaodong Peninsula and its railway, as well as payment of a war indemnity.Negotiations were on the verge of collapse because Russia flatly rejected the Japanese demandsfor all of Sakhalin and the indemnity.Without the capability to fight further, Japan had no choice but to accept Russias offer for thesouthern half of the island, which came under U.S. intervention. It gave up on the indemnity.The Treaty of Portsmouth was signed on Sept. 5 that year.The Japanese public, which pushed the government for further assaults on Russia withoutknowing the countrys state of financial exhaustion and had expected far greater returns, wasoutraged by the results.On the day of the signing of the treaty, their anger manifested in a riot in Tokyo.Mass demonstrators rallied through Hibiya Park before breaking off into smaller groups withsome attacking the offices of newspapers that supported the treaty, others setting fire to policeboxes, streetcars and the Prime Ministers Official Residence.The unrest prompted martial law in the capital, but antigovernment sentiment spread across thecountry. (Masaru Fujimoto)8.13. LA SEGUNDA GUERRA MUNDIALEl 1 de septiembre de 1923 a las 11: 58El Gran Terremoto de Kanto:Magnitud: 7,9Muertes: 100.000Casas quemadas: 450.000Suma de daños: 37% de P.N.B
  • 142. Naturalmente la economía cayó en un gran desorden; las letras que los bancos tenían no sepudieron liquidar y el Banco del Japón decidió garantizarlas. En todo Japón había 1.500 bancos aprincipios de la Época Showa. Banco de Watanabe era uno de ellos. No era del grupo de bancosprincipales. Con la quiebra de este banco, pronto 32 bancos y algunas compañías quebraron. Estafue la Crisis Financiera de Showa. En medio de esta crisis, grandes bancos absorbieron los pequeños que habían quebrado. Elnúmero de bancos bajó de 1.500 a una tercera parte en unos cinco años. El 40% del monto total delos depósitos se concentró en cinco bancos gigantes; Mitsubishi, Mitsui, Sumitomo, Yasuda yDaiichi. Este porcentaje no parece mucho, pero si uno considera el hecho de que el resto o sea el60% fue dividido entre 500 bancos, es fácil de entender cuán poderosos estos bancos eran. Asíempezó el control del Japón por zaibatsu, y lo que consolidó el poder de los zaibatsu fue ellevantamiento de la prohibición de la exportación de oro en 1930 y al año siguiente nuevamentese volvió a implantar la prohibición. ¿Por qué tuvo Japón que hacer una cosa tan irracional?Porque quiso cumplir una promesa que hizo en la conferencia de Génova en 1922. En esaconferencia los países principales llegaron a un acuerdo para levantar la prohibición de laexportación de oro. En aquel entonces Japón se había vuelto de un país de tercera clase a uno desegunda y quería ser considerado una potencia. Pensaba que ésta era una excelente oprtunidad. El día 24 de octubre de 1929 un acontecimiento cuya enorme influencia nadie pudo preverocurrió en Nueva York. La gran baja repentina de las acciones. Japón levantó la prohibición de laexportación de oro en medio de la gran depresión causada por este hecho. El resultado era obvio;los inversionistas extranjeros compraron el oro de Japón, pensando que era mucho mejor cambiardinero por oro en una situación como esa. Así, mucho oro salió del país. Pero, durante esaconfusión económica existía gente que ganaba mucho dinero. Eran los zaibatsu. El yen se aprecióartificialmente por la política del gabinete japonesa de levantar la prohibición de la exportación deoro. Era obvio que el valor del yen iba a bajar tan pronto como el gobierno prohibiera laexportación de oro. Los zaibatsu compraron dólares mientras el valor del yen era alto. Porsupuesto, pronto el gobierno prohibió la exportación de oro y el valor del yen bajó. Obviamentelos zaibatsu ganaron mucho dinero comprando yenes con los dólares que se volvieron caros denuevo. Mientras tanto la crisis llegó a la zona agrícola. Los precios de los productos agrícolascayeron drásticamente. El número de desempleados llegó 3 millones. El promedio diario desuicidios en Tokio era de 5.5 personas. En esta situación es fácil entender la razón por la cual partidos que se denominaban comunistasy socialista aparecieron uno tras otro como bambúes después de lluvia. El gobierno trató desuprimirlos. En lugar de una solución adecuada, el gobierno dictó una ley llamada “Ley Para ElMantenimiento del Orden Público”. Era como si estuviera esperando el día cuando todo esto fueraa explotar como una bomba. “Así, Japón va a caerse. Los políticos y zaibatsu son imbeciles.Somos nosotros, la gente militar que piensa en el país seriamente”, los militares decíanfuriosamente, tratando de “salvar” esta situación crítica. Leyendo la Constitución de Meiji, un oficial hizo un descubrimiento. Hablando estrictamente,no está claro si era un descubrimiento o una invención. Esto era un descubrimiento que parecieraigualar a Arquímedes, Galileo, Newton, etc. Se llama “Tosuiken Kanpan”, (encroachment on thesupreme command), La usurpación del mandato supremo. Esto se remonta a la Constitución Meijique se promulgó en 1889. Sorprendentemente la palabra, “el primer ministro” no aparece ni unavez y ni existe la palabra, “gabinete”. Lo que hay es solamente los ministros. En otras palabras, elprimer ministro no tiene ningún poder legal. Por otra parte, según esta constitución, los ejércitospertenecen directamente al emperador.Un día alguien dentro de las fuerzas militares “descubrió”este hecho. Ellos empezaron a decidir “Somos nosotros, la gente militar que pertenecedirectamente al emperador que está encargada del mandato supremo, es decir, asuntos bélicos.Primer Ministro, usted quién es para meterse en asuntos militares. Es presuntuosa imaginar quegabinete tiene derecho de intervenir en nuestras cosas. Es la usurpación del mandato supremo.”
  • 143. Esa era su interpretación de la constitución. Si el primer ministro o gabinete decía que no tenía laintención de obedecerlos, el ministro del ejército o lo de la marina amenazaba que renunciaría a laposición. Por supuesto, él no entregaría la carta de dimisión al primer ministro, cuya posiciónconstitucional no existía. Por eso, la entregaría al jefe directo, el emperador. Esto significaría ladimisión del gabinete. El 26 de febrero de 1936 oficiales del ejército y de la marina formaron una unidad de 1400soldados atacaron a la gente importante del gobierno y ocuparon algunos lugares del gobierno.Después de este acontecimiento la arbitrariedad de los militares se aceleró. Una de las cosas a lascuales dio lugar este acontecimiento fue la resurrección de un sistema en que los ministros delejército y de la marina debían ser generales y almirantes activos. Esto significa que si, porejemplo, al ejército no le gustaba la política del gobierno de la reducción de armas, podían decir algobierno que no tenían la intención de obedecer a ningún ministro. Esto causaba la imposibilidadde formar un gabinete. El gobierno tuvo que hacer grandes concesiones al estamento militar, locual dio amplia discreción al Ejército Kantoogun en China. Chou Nihonshi, by Seido Fujii, Fusousha-bunko, 19968.14. The Yalta Conference www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/wwii/yalta.htm February, 1945Washington, March 24 - The text of the agreements reached at the Crimea (Yalta) Conferencebetween President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin, as released bythe State Department today, follows:PROTOCOL OF PROCEEDINGS OF CRIMEA CONFERENCEThe Crimea Conference of the heads of the Governments of the United States of America, theUnited Kingdom, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, which took place from Feb. 4 to11, came to the following conclusions:I. WORLD ORGANIZATIONIt was decided:1. That a United Nations conference on the proposed world organization should be summoned forWednesday, 25 April, 1945, and should be held in the United States of America.2. The nations to be invited to this conference should be: (a) the United Nations as they existed on 8 Feb., 1945; and (b) Such of the Associated Nations as have declared war on the common enemy by 1 March, 1945. (For this purpose, by the term "Associated Nations" was meant the eight Associated Nations and Turkey.) When the conference on world organization is held, the delegates of the United Kingdom and United State of America will support a proposal to admit to original membership two Soviet Socialist Republics, i.e., the Ukraine and White Russia.
  • 144. 3. That the United States Government, on behalf of the three powers, should consult theGovernment of China and the French Provisional Government in regard to decisions taken at thepresent conference concerning the proposed world organization.4. That the text of the invitation to be issued to all the nations which would take part in the UnitedNations conference should be as follows:"The Government of the United States of America, on behalf of itself and of the Governments ofthe United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialistic Republics and the Republic of China andof the Provisional Government of the French Republic invite the Government of -------- to sendrepresentatives to a conference to be   held on 25 April, 1945, or soon thereafter , at SanFrancisco, in the United States of America, to prepare a charter for a general internationalorganization for the maintenance of international peace and security."The above-named Governments suggest that the conference consider as affording a basis forsuch a Charter the proposals for the establishment of a general international organization whichwere made public last October as a result of the Dumbarton Oaks conference and which have nowbeen supplemented by the following provisions for Section C of Chapter VI:C. Voting"1. Each member of the Security Council should have one vote."2. Decisions of the Security Council on procedural matters should be made by an affirmativevote of seven members."3. Decisions of the Security Council on all matters should be made by an affirmative vote ofseven members, including the concurring votes of the permanent   members; provided that, indecisions under Chapter VIII, Section A and under the second sentence of Paragraph 1 of ChapterVIII, Section C, a party to a dispute should abstain from voting."Further information as to arrangements will be transmitted subsequently.“In the event that the Government of -------- desires in advance of the conference to present viewsor comments concerning the proposals, the Government of the United States of America will bepleased to transmit such views and comments to the other participating Governments.”Territorial trusteeship:It was agreed that the five nations which will have permanent seats on the Security Councilshould consult each other prior to the United Nations conference on the question of territorialtrusteeship.The acceptance of this recommendation is subject to its being made clear that territorialtrusteeship will only apply to (a) existing mandates of the League of Nations; (b) territories detached from the enemy as a result of the present war; (c) any other territory which might voluntarily be placed under trusteeship; and
  • 145. (d) no discussion of actual territories is contemplated at the forthcoming United Nations conference or in the preliminary consultations, and it will be a matter for subsequent agreement which territories within the above categories will be place under trusteeship. [Begin first section published Feb., 13, 1945.]8.15. AGREEMENT REGARDING JAPANThe leaders of the three great powers - the Soviet Union, the United States of America and GreatBritain - have agreed that in two or three months after Germany has surrendered and the war inEurope is terminated, the Soviet Union shall enter into war against Japan on the side of the Allieson condition that: 1. The status quo in Outer Mongolia (the Mongolian Peoples Republic) shall be preserved. 2. The former rights of Russia violated by the treacherous attack of Japan in 1904 shall be restored, viz.: (a) The southern part of Sakhalin as well as the islands adjacent to it shall be returned to the Soviet Union; (b) The commercial port of Dairen shall be internationalized, the pre-eminent interests of the Soviet Union in this port being safeguarded, and the lease of Port Arthur as a naval base of the U.S.S.R. restored; (c) The Chinese-Eastern Railroad and the South Manchurian Railroad, which provide an outlet to Dairen, shall be jointly operated   by the establishment of a joint Soviet- Chinese company, it being understood that the pre-eminent interests of the Soviet Union shall be safeguarded and that China shall retain sovereignty in Manchuria; 3. The Kurile Islands shall be handed over to the Soviet Union.It is understood that the agreement concerning Outer Mongolia and the ports and railroadsreferred to above will require concurrence of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek. The President willtake measures in order to maintain this concurrence on advice from Marshal Stalin.The heads of the three great powers have agreed that these claims of the Soviet Union shall beunquestionably fulfilled after Japan has been defeated.For its part, the Soviet Union expresses it readiness to conclude with the National Government ofChina a pact of friendship and alliance between the U.S.S.R. and China in order to renderassistance to China with its armed forces for the purpose of liberating China from the Japaneseyoke. Joseph Stalin Franklin D. Roosevelt Winston S. Churchill February 11, 1945.
  • 146. CAPITULO NOVENO 9. ECONOMIA9.1. Desarrollo Económico Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial En el Período Edo como no se les permitía a los ciudadanos pensar sobre política, trabajabanpensando sólo en la economía. Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, los japoneses empezarona comportarse como los ciudadanos del Período Edo. Los samuráis desaparecieron y ahora paísesextranjeros les substituyeron. Países como los Estados Unidos y Rusia mantienen el orden delmundo gastando mucho dinero en armamento. Mienta tanto Japón sigue produciendo mercancíapensando que se puede vender sin limites. Algunas condiciones afortunadas contribuyeron a queJapón se convirtiera en uno de los países avanzados.1. Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, paz continúa sin ninguna guerra de importancia. En lahistoria del mundo, eso es raro. Si la paz continúa, el comercio se desarrolla. Japón, que no tienerecursos naturales, no podría sobrevivir sin el comercio internacional.2. Se alió con Estados Unidos: se puso bajo el paraguas de los Estados Unidos, no ha necesitadogastar mucho dinero en defensa.3. Justo después de la Guerra, Estados Unidos le ayudaron ofreciendo comida, capitales,tecnología, recursos, etc.4. Los Estados Unidos llevó a cabo reformas importantes tales como la reforma agraria, ladisolución de Zaibatsu (los grandes consorcios financieros).5. La reforma educativa6. La nueva constitución.7. El empleo de por vida8. Régimen del Partido Liberal Democrático y la Burocracia eficiente.9. La Guerra de Corea: los Estados Unidos compró muchas cosas necesarias para la Guerra comojeeps.10.Después de la Guerra, no había ningunos recursos excepto recursos humanos abundantes. Pero,esto dio buenos resultados. Después de la Revolución de la Energía (cambio en el uso de petróleo)en particular, se construyeron complejos petroquímicos, fábricas siderúrgicas en las tierrasganadas al mar. Eran más eficientes que las fábricas en Europa y los Estados Unidos que teníanequipos viejos.
  • 147. 11.Se aprovecharon las características de la sociedad japonesa. Los grupos formados porjaponeses son comunidades de sensibilidad, donde cada individuo trata de armonizarse con el otroy la idiosincrasia del individuo no se nota claramente formando una comunidad uniforme con elsentimiento de pertenecer al mismo grupo. La sociedad japonesa está compuesta de grupos conesta característica. Este tipo de grupo no admite elementos extranjeros en su interior. Consideradichos elementos como extraños y los excluye. Los japoneses que tanto se preocupan del grupo,al cual pertenecen, tienen la tendencia de no tomar en cuenta grupos de afuera. Entre losjaponeses se forman innumerables “uchi” que literalmente significa “dentro o hogar” y “soto” quesignifica “afuera” en una manera compleja, y “uchi” de la unidad más grande es la comunidadjaponesa. El sistema imperial que estaba compuesto de esas dos ideas era una masa decontradicciones. El tiempo pasó y el sistema imperial de antes de la guerra se desarticuló y elEmperador se convirtió nada más que en el símbolo del país. Ahora, el sistema de la monarquía seconvirtió en la democracia de la posguerra que es el modelo de comportamiento de los japoneses.9.2. Bubble Economy This is the sixth in a yearlong series of articles by 100 pre-eminent Japanese and foreign opinion leaders on issues facing Japan to mark the 100th year of The Japan Times.By TAKAMITSU SAWAJapans worst postwar recession, which began in May 1991 and ended inOctober 1993, accordingto official announcements, has set the stage for the development of a postindustrial society.The nations industrial society has reached maturity following a rapidindustrialization process overthe past 45 years. The economy can be likened to a man who has reached a landing on a longstaircase after climbing a series of flights at breakneck speed.Beyond that platform lies another series of flights -- a more advanced process of industrialdevelopment, or the postindustrial society. Japan is thus going through a major transition periodthat is expected to last from the late 20th century to the early 21st century.By definition, a staircase landing is a flat place where you can take a pause. But the transition I amtalking about is not meant as a "pause." It is a crucial period in which the systems and practicesdesigned for the industrial society are being transformed for the coming postindustrial society.The theory that the industrial society will be followed by a postindustrial society was firstadvanced by Daniel Bell, an American sociologist. At the time, the postindustrial society meant anew kind of economic society that would emerge in industrialized nations following the oil crisisof 1973.What is a postindustrial society? There are various possible answers to the question. The mostgeneral one is that it is a society where industries that deal with things like information, softwareand services play a more important role than those that produce goods using massive quantities ofmaterials and energy.But the postindustrial society is not, as it is often made out to be, an entirely new kind of societyfrom which manufacturing industries will have vanished or in which they will play only a
  • 148. marginal role.Industries that make high-tech products like automobiles, home electronics, information andcommunications equipment, automated office machines and computers will not disappear becausedemand for these products will not go away. The same is true of supporting industries thatproduce parts and materials.It is often said that manufacturing will be relocated to East Asia and Latin America where wagesare low, and that service and information industries will be concentrated in the industrializedcountries. This view is not entirely correct.Industries that rely chiefly on low-cost labor will lack incentives to make technologicalbreakthroughs. As a result, they likely will be left behind in the product development race.Manufacturers in the industrially advanced nations will be able to survive at home if they maketechnological innovations, that is, if they develop new products and boost productivity with thehigh cost of labor as leverage.Industries that can move quickly to low-cost overseas locations are limited to those that mass-produce standardized products -- those that can be made by unskilled workers almost anywhere inthe world as long as easy-to-understand production manuals are available.By contrast, the manufacture of high-tech products, especially parts that require cutting-edgetechnologies, cannot be easily standardized in the form of such manuals. So, at least for the timebeing, makers of such products and parts are likely to stay in the industrialized countries.It will take at least 10 years, even by conservative estimates, before high-tech production can bestandardized and shifted to developing countries. By that time a new generation of high-techproducts will have been developed in industrialized countries.For that to happen, however, it is essential to keep trying, on both the public and private level, toopen up high-tech frontiers. That is the only way to prevent the erosion of the domestic industrialbase.This is where so-called re-engineering comes in. It involves reordering production andmanagement processes using information technologies. Consequently, it is expected to bringabout large cost reductions that will more than offset the disadvantage of high labor costs.In fact, re-engineering is said to have played a vital role in reviving the declining manufacturingindustry in the United States in the first half of the 1990s.Technological innovations hold the key. Costs will drop substantially if innovations in electroniccommunications and related sectors make steady progress and lead to the development of moreadvanced information networks.As a result, white-collar employment in manufacturing industries will be drastically reduced.However, the number of white-collar jobs in service industries will not necessarily increasesufficiently to absorb job losses in the manufacturing sector.Put another way, advances in information technology likely will bring more unemployment, hold
  • 149. down the growth of unskilled workers wages and widen income and regional disparities.In this sense, the postindustrial society does not promise a better life for all. In order to prevent thewidening of disparities, government will have to undertake effective job-creating measures andpursue a well-focused industrial policy.It is also likely that corporate disparities will widen. This is because companies will becomeleaner and market competition fiercer, creating a wider gap between winners and losers.The postindustrial society will put Japanese-style management systems and practices, such aslifetime employment, seniority-based pay and "keiretsu" business groupings, to the acid test.These systems and practices have worked well in the industrial society. Now they are destined tocollapse or be overhauled as Japan moves inexorably toward the postindustrial society.Also doomed is the Japanese-style education system, which emphasizes uniformity. It was welldesigned for Japans industrial society, but it is not suited to the postindustrial society wheregreater stress will be laid on diversity and individuality.The new economic society also will face an urgent need to recruit more talented people. For thetime being, many of them will be hired from abroad because it will take perhaps 10 years or morebefore educational reform shows any effect. The hiring of foreigners will give further impetus toJapans internationalization.Finally, from the standpoint of international division of work, the postindustrial society willconfront Japan with a crucial choice: Whether to base the Japanese economy on information andsoftware industries or to build it on manufacturing industries using advanced informationtechnologies.In my opinion, the latter seems to be the wiser choice, judging from the nations traditional skill atproducing goods. Takamitsu Sawa, a professor of economics at Kyoto University, is director of the universitys Economic Research Institute.
  • 150. 9.3. Ahorros de las fam ilias asalariadas, 1999 16 promedio 13.52 millones 14 12 10 % 8 6 4 2 0 millon 2 y más 2--4 4--6 6--8 8--10 10--12 12--14 14--16 16--18 18--20 20--22 22--24 24 y más (yenes) Monto de ahorros (1$ = ¥110)9.4. Why has Japan’s Household Savings Rate remained high even during the 1990s?--Empirical Analysis on Risk Bias Viewed by the Characteristics of the Household Sector--* The full text can be obtained from "Files for Downloading" (PDF) July 1999 Bank of Japan Research and Statistics Department Shinobu Nakagawa The opinions presented herein are the personal views of the author, and do not represent the official opinion of the Bank of Japan or of the Research and Statistics Department. Economic Research Division, Research and Statistics Department, Bank of Japan. E-mail: shinobu.nakagawa@boj.or.jp1. Japan’s household savings rate decreased during the 1980s due to the progress in upgrading thenation’s social security system and the aging of Japanese society, but has turned to a gradualincrease in the 1990s. Households may be increasing precautionary savings amid growinguncertainty (risk) regarding the future in the Japanese economy as a whole.
  • 151. 2. While the “household” is usually referred to as a single entity, it is actually comprised ofdiverse segments with different characteristics, and these segments may be categorized by annualincome, age and occupation of the head of household, and other factors. Thus, while thehousehold savings rate has increased as a whole, the individual savings patterns and motivationsfor savings may differ. This paper employs various survey data regarding households, includingthe Family Income and Expenditure Survey and the Family Savings Survey (Management andCoordination Agency), as well as the Public Opinion Survey on Household Savings andConsumption (Central Council for Savings Information), to analyze what types of risks areprimarily recognized by what types of households, and what types of households are increasingtheir motivation to save.3. First, looking at the average household savings rates by annual income and age of the head ofhousehold, from 1990 through to the present, the segments that have been increasing their savingsrates on a relative basis are low-income households and elderly households. Additionally, toexamine the factors that affect savings rates by annual income, the functions are estimated usingthe average savings rate by annual income as the dependent variable and (1) projected income forthe next half-year by annual income (expected nominal income growth), (2) income risk byannual income (dispersion of the expected real income growth rate) calculated using the Carlson-Perkin Method, and (3) the real interest rate as the independent variables. The results show that inrecent years, income risk is functioning as a factor to increase savings rates, especially for thelow- and middle-income households. On the other hand, no significant relationship is foundbetween the real interest rate and savings rates overall.4. To analyze in detail the reasons why low-income households are perceiving risk, thesehouseholds are categorized by the age of the head of household. The figures show that recentlythe savings rates of the middle-aged and elderly households are increasing the most. Consideringthat the unemployment rates for middle-aged and elderly workers have been increasingcomparatively quickly since 1990, anxiety regarding current employment conditions may be theprimary reason why middle-aged and elderly low-income households presently perceive risk.5. Meanwhile, looking at various types of surveys about life after retirement, the percentage ofresponses indicating “anxiety about post-retirement livelihood” has been increasing rapidly,especially among the young households. Moreover, the perceptions of problems with pensionsystems by age indicate that individuals in their 20s and 30s view the situation most seriously.The reasons cited include “future reductions in pension benefits” and “raising the age from whichpension benefits will be paid.” This indicates that the motivation to save among the younghouseholds may be increasing due to lowered expectations about their income in the distantfuture, including pension benefits.6. Next, the reasons why savings rates are increasing in the elderly households are considered.Generally, the life-cycle hypothesis dictates that the savings rates of elderly households should belower than the average for all households, because after retirement the representative individualconsumes the assets he has accumulated during his working life. Nevertheless, the averagesavings rate among elderly Japanese is actually higher than the average for all households, incontrast to the conditions in the United States where savings rates peak during middle age andthen decline in proportion to age. Incidentally, also unlike the situation in the United States, inJapan the assets per household by age remain virtually unchanged between ages 60-64 and ages65 and above, so there are no signs that the elderly are consuming their savings.
  • 152. 7. In speculating why the elderly refrain from blithely consuming their assets, one possibilitymight be the motivation to leave behind an estate. Nevertheless, various surveys show that onlysix percent of both individuals in their 60s and those 70 or older have a positive intention to leavebehind their own assets as a bequest for their descendants. On the other hand, only around 10percent of those who will be inheriting the estates (individuals in their 20s, 30s, and 40s) expect toinherit assets from their parents. Thus, the inheritance issue does not have that great an influenceon savings rates among all age segments, at least not before the assets are actually inherited.8. Another possible reason why the elderly refrain from consuming their assets is that they mayfeel some sort of anxiety regarding their future. In fact, even though the pension system has nowbeen substantially enhanced, approximately half of the elderly believe that they “cannot livecomfortably on pension benefits alone.” The reason cited for this is the belief that “the self-payment burden for medical care and nursing care for the elderly will increase.” Additionally, themajority of the elderly cite “preparations for illness or emergencies” among their savings goals.Thus, along with the increase in average life expectancy, the elderly have a growing anxiety aboutthe various burdens that increase with age, including the possibility that they may require nursingcare, and this apparently leads them to increase their savings, or at least to refrain from blithelyconsuming their savings.9. To summarize, Japan’s household savings rate has been increasing from 1990 because themotivation to save among individual segments has been rising due to different perceptions of risk:(1) the middle-aged and elderly low-income households feel anxiety regarding employmentconditions, (2) the young households feel anxiety regarding pension systems, and (3) the elderlyhouseholds feel anxiety regarding nursing care. Considering that the aging of Japanese societywill continue to progress, how to create an environment in which the elderly can consume theirsavings without concern is an important issue for the entire Japanese economy. In a survey ofindividuals in their 50s and 60s, who will eventually become the core of the elderly, when askedabout their post-retirement (future) lifestyle, the highest percentage of respondents states that they“would like to continue working for as long as possible.” Thus, to begin with, preparing anemployment environment in which the elderly can easily work should lead to an easing of thehousehold propensity to save. Additionally, considering that the majority of assets held by theelderly are real assets (housing, residential land, etc.), it is necessary to arrange a system togenerate liquidity from real assets so the elderly can easily secure cash flow. As one specificmeasure, the use of reverse mortgages could be considered.
  • 153. 9.5. Gastos anuales del Estado, 1997: total ¥77.39 billones Medidas para Reserva 0.5% Comidad principal energía 0.9 Presupuesto especial 1.7% 0.3% Medidas para empresas Otros M pequeñas y medianas 0.2 gastos Subsidio estatal 6.7% para municipios Cooperación 15.481 económica 1.4% Servicios 20% públicos 11.1% Defensa 6.4% Bonos del gobierno Pención 2.1 % 16.8023 Educación y desarrollo científico 21.7% 6.343 8.2% Seguridad social 14.550 18.8%
  • 154. 9.6. GDP per Capita of Major Countries (Nominal, 1999) (Unit: U.S.$) 40,000 Suiz a 35,000 J a p ón 30,000 EEUU 25,000 Sue c ia 20,000 Ale m a nia 15,000 Pa ís e s B. 10,000 Gra n B. Bélgic a 5,000 Fra nc ia 0 Sui. USA Ale . G. B Fra . H.K. Ho ng Ko ng9.7. Coexisting with the global economy is the challenge aheadBy TAKASHI INOGUCHIWe should draw on the lessons of the past 500 years in contemplating what might be instore for us in the coming century. And in looking back on the history of Japan over thisfive-century period, three events stand out. The arrival of the Portuguese and the guns theybrought to Tanegashima, off southern Kyushu, Commodore Perry and his Black Ships,and the Plaza Accord -- the three Ps.Soon after the Portuguese arrived in Tanegashima in 1543 with their guns, the modern
  • 155. weapons were being produced in Japan, and in less than 30 years Japanese-made gunswere being exported to other Asian countries in vast quantities.However, as apprehension spread that Christian missionary activities might lead toeventual colonization, the nation abruptly shut its doors in the late 16th century and keptthem bolted through the end of the 17th century. During that period, the Japanese revoltedagainst the outside world and turned the nation into a largely self-contained universe.That historical order was known as "Tokugawa Peace" and internal threats became theprincipal source of national concern. It was this Tokugawa framework that gave shape tothe present-day social order in Japan, and the progenitor of Japanese politics is none otherthan the bureaucratic system formed by the disarmed samurai.The Tokugawa period also marked the emergence of bureaucratic control of the politicalsystem and it was during this period that the Japanese instinct of procuring as much aspossible from domestic sources evolved.In 1853, Commodore Matthew C. Perry arrived in Shimoda, Shizuoka Prefecture, with hisnaval squadron and forced the Tokugawa shogunate to open its ports to trade. This second"P" marked a historical phase in which the Western powers stepped up their presence andmission in Asia in search of new opportunities. In more specific terms, the process startedwith the conclusion of a treaty of amity, the use of port facilities and the beginning oftrade in parallel with the onset of overall reform of domestic structures. Japan, which hadbeen closed for centuries, was now opened to the world.The 100 years after the Meiji Restoration was a century in which the overriding concern ofthe nation was how put up with the external enemy and external pressure as well aslearning how to live with them.Coping with such external forces provided the motive force for the nations drive towardmodernization and enlightenment. The tasks were many: the creation of a legal system anda new political order, the choice of an education system that would foster patriotism andenhance the nations technical skills, the nurturing of industry, and the build-up of thenations armed forces.But in no time, this national policy of building a strong nation and a powerful army wasderailed, and Japan plunged into a war that ended with a defeat unparalleled in the nationshistory. That was, in short, the century of Meiji. That was also the 100 years in which thepower of the bureaucracy was consolidated as nation-building went apace under the din ofexternal tension. It was also during this period that, instead of developing free trade, thenation was stripped of its customs sovereignty for as long as 50 years. The growingstrength of protectionism and trade blocs during the period also drove Japan toward theestablishment of a self-reliant industrialization program.Beginning in 1945, the Japanese had to start all over again, this time under the peaceumbrella provided by the United States. There have been vast changes in the nation but asfar as the basic political and economic framework is concerned, there were few drasticdepartures from what was put in place during the Meiji era.In politics, the bureaucrats continue to hold sway. In the economic field, industriesmaintain the same "produce everything" mentality. These two domains are bonded by the
  • 156. government regulatory system, and the entire enterprise has proved a great success.The last of the three "Ps" with phenomenal impact on Japans development is the PlazaAccord reached by the Group of Seven in 1985. The accord greatly accelerated the marchtoward a high yen, further market liberalization and expanded domestic consumption.This three-pronged development has rattled the very basis of the Japanese system and itstwin pillars of bureaucratic control and industrial self-reliance. The emergence of a globalmarketplace comes hand-in-hand with increased market liberalization. The challengefacing Japan since the Plaza Accord is how to fashion coexistence with the globalcapitalism that has shaken the Japanese bureaucratic and economic system at its roots.This, I believe, is the task we will have to confront in the coming century.The existing Japanese system is not without its merits and strengths. In adapting to globalcapitalism, we must build a system with minimal loss of these strengths and merits. In thisregard, we can cite our comparatively high income levels, relatively low income disparityand relatively stable political and social order.Perhaps some deterioration in income parity cannot be avoided under a global free-tradesystem. Perhaps our inward-looking politicians will take greater interest in the outsideworld. There will surely be more rumblings in the political order, but I believe it willremain basically stable. Though it is unlikely that the current self-contained, homogeneoussociety can remain intact, it is a source of strength we should try our very best to maintain.There is a simple answer to the question, "What should Japan aspire to do in an economicworld shaped by the Plaza Accord?" It lies not in rejecting the outside world throughfurther internal consolidation; nor in harboring a fight-back mentality out of exaggeratedfear of foreign countries. Rather, we should create a framework that can work in harmonywith the rest of world as we tackle our domestic concerns. All this might sound too simple,almost self-evident. But the challenge facing Japan is grave indeed and, as the saying goes,the ball is now in our court. Takashi Inoguchi is the senior vice rector of United Nations University on leave from the University of Tokyo, where he is a professor of political science.
  • 157. Websites1. http://www.ve.emb-japan.go.jp/ Japanese Embassy in Venezuela.2. http://www.colorado.edu/ealld/ For information on East Asian Studies at the University of Colorado, please visit the East Asian Language and Civilization departmental Homepage.3. http://www.colorado.edu/OIE/StudyAbroad/goals.html A list of Study Abroad programs through the University of Colorado including Kansai Gaidai in Hirakata, Tsukuba in Tsukuba and Sophia in Tokyo.4. http://www.kanzaki.com/jinfo/japanese.html A site by Kanzaki which explains options for configuring computers to utilize Japanese fonts.5. http://www.japanorama.com/links.html An immense on-line educational initiative started by computer programmer Jim Breen. Breen-sans site includes dictionaries, translation programs, links, tips on configuring your computer for Japanese, and much more. Includes Access-J, which allows non-Japanese configured computers to access Japanese websites (by converting all Japanese text to image files).6. http://www.mangajin.com/ Although Mangajin is no longer being published, back issues are still available at the company website. A great resource for learning Japanese.7. http://www.rikai.com/perl/HomePage.pl?Language=Ja An absolutely amazing site. This site is great for language practice: mousing over words in English articles will provide Japanese translations and mousing over words in Japanese articles will provide English translations. Capable of administering Kanji and vocabulary drills. This site must be seen to be believed!8. http://www.origami.as/home.html Information about the art of origami, including photos of examples.9. http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/japanese/index.html The folks at this site are attempting to put great works of Japanese literature online in Japanese, Japanese romanization, and in English translation.10.http://www.sasugabooks.com/ An on-line bookstore which specializes in ordering books in Japanese from Japan and also in stocking books in English about Japan.11.http://www.bento.com/tokyofood.html Information about Japanese food, restaurants, and recipes12.http://www.gaijinpot.com/ An odd name, but a nice resource. An extensive listing of job opportunities in Japan for foreign workers.13.http://www.meijigakuin.ac.jp/~pmjs/pmjs.html The web site of the PMJS Journal, with articles and links to topics in art, culture, history, politics, philosophy and religion.14.http://www.bukkyosho.gr.jp/ A web page with resources on Yogacara, Buddhist, Taoist and Confucian philosophy.
  • 158. Links to Links1. http://www.jandodd.com/japan/links.htm A large list of links on a variety of topics, including language, sports, tourism, politics, etc.2. http://yo.netster.com/Index.asp?Site=a29ucmFkaC5uZXQ%3D Provides lists of links under such topics as business, computing, culture, language, and news.3. http://www.sabotenweb.com/bookmarks/index.html Schneider-sensei has collected a large list of links on an array of topics. You can also access and subscribe to her listserv Sensei Online from here.4. http://www.lightspan.com/ A list of links dedicated to the study of the Japanese language.5. www.japanecho.co.jp interesting topics about Japan6. www.writing.berkeley.edu/tes/-ej/7. www.ipl.org Internet public library8. http://ariadne.ne.jp9. www.ndl.go.jp/ndlelp/index-e.html Japanese Congress Library10.http://wings.buffalo.edu/world/ Map of the world11.http://www.ntt.jp/japan/map Map of Japan12.www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/society/webpages.html list of www servers13.www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/society/subject soc.html14.www.mid.net/KOVACS list of www servers15.www.acejapan.or.jp/jsg/jsnet Japanese Studies Network Forum  [Public Offices]1. www.kantei.go.jp/ Prime Minister´s Office2. http://infomofa.nttls.co.jp/infomofa Ministry of Foreign Affairs3. http://jica.ific.or.jp JICAUniversities and research organizations1. www.nacsis.ac.jp academic information center2. www.tulips.tsukuba.ac.jp/ Library of Tsukuba University3. www.jpf.go.jp_ Japan FoundationMass media1. www.asahi.com newspaper2. www.yomiuri.co.jp/ newspaper3. www.mainichi.co.jp newspaper4. www.japantimes.co.jp/ newspaper5. http://nhk.or.jp NHK (Japanese Broadcasting Corporation)Others1. www.cgp.org/cgplink/index.html Japan Foundation, New York2. www.acejapan.or.jp/jsg/jsnet Japan Studies Network Forum (JS-NET FORUM)3. www.fix.co.jp Kabuki for everyone4. http://soumgw.soum.co.jp/mito/ Museum of Mito5. www.toyo-eng.co.jp/NewHome/Useful-Info/index-.html Chiba Bay Area Info6. www.is.kochi-u.ac.jp/weather/index.html weather info7. www.plaza.hitachi-sk.co.jp/~jpnedu/ The Japanase language8. www.knt.co.jp Kinki Tourist
  • 159. Bibliografía 1. BENEDICT, RUTH (1966). The Chrysanthemum and the Sword. Charles Tuttle, Tokyo 2. CHRISTOPHER, ROBERT (1993). The Japanese Mind. Charles Tuttle, Tokio 3. CUADERNO DE JAPON (1996). Vol. IX, número 1. 4. DOI, TAKEO (1989). The Anatomy of Dependence. Kodansha Internacional, Tokio 5. FUJIOKA, NOBUKASU (1996). Kyookasho ga Oshienai Rekishi. Sankei Shinbun,Tokyo 6. FUKUYAMA, FRANCIS (1992). The End of History and the Last Man. Avon Books, New York 7. HASHIZUME, DAISABURO (1991). Booken to shiteno Shakai Kagaku, Mainichi Shinbunsha, Tokyo 8. HERRIGEL, EUGEN (1989). Zen in the Art of Archery. Vintage Books 9. IIDA, TSUMEO (1992). On the Egalitarian Aspects of the Japanese Economy and Society. Japan Review. International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto 10. IKEGAMI, EIKO (1995). The Taming of the Samurai. Harvard University Press. Massachusetts 11. THE JAPN FOUNDATION (1994-1995). Nihongo Kyouiku Tsuushin. No. 19, 20, 21, 22 12. KAWAKATSU, HEITA (1993). Japanese Civilization and the Modern Europe. NHK Books, Tokyo 13. KAZUO, SATO (1988). Haiku kara Haiku e. Nan-un-Do, Tokio 14. KONOSHI, TAKAMITSU (1999). Kojiki to Nihonshoki (Ancient Matters of Japan & Japanese Cronicle), Kodansha Gendaishinsho, Tokyo 15. LEE, O-YOUNG (1982). The Compact Cultura. Kodansha International, Tokyo 16. LOGAN, BILL (1984). All Japan: The Catalogue of Everything Japanese. Quil, New York 17. MARUYAMA, MASAO (1992). Chuusei to Hangyaku (Royalty and Betrayal). Chikuma shoboo, Tokyo 18. OKAKURA, TENSHIN (1994). The Boook of Tea. Kodansha-gakujutsu, Tokyo 19. SANIT-HILAIRE, BARTHELEMY (1996). The Buddha and his religion, Bracken Books, London
  • 160. 20. TAKAHASHI, HIROSHI (2001). Kooi Keishoo (sucesión imperial), Bungei-shinjuu, Tokyo 21. TAKEBE, YOSHIAKI (1993). Kanji isn´t that hard. Aruku, Tokyo 22. TAZAWA,YUTAKA (1973). Historia Cultural del Japón. Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Tokio 23. YAMAZAKI, MASAKAZU (1994). Individualism and Japan. Japan Echo. Inc., Tokio 24. YAMAZAKI, MASAKATSU (1995). Kindai no Yoogo. PHP, Kenkyuujo, Tokyo 25. YANABU,AKIRA Cultura of Translation. Department of Internacional Studies St. Andres’s University Osaka, JapanUna lista de los libros donados por el gobierno del Japón, los cuales se encuentran en laBiblioteca de la USB. REFERENCIA COTA TITULOSN 3735/R62 Robert’s Guide to Japanese Museums.N7358/R6 A Dictionary of Japanese Artists: Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Prints, Lacquer.DS821/A56 All-Japan; The catalogue of everything Japanese.DS833/P3 Historical and geographical dictionary of Japan.DS889/P53 Pictorial encyclopedia of modern Japan.DS821/P5 Pictorial encyclopedia of Japanese culture: the soul and heritage of Japan.G2355/T45 Teikoku’s complete atlas of Japan.DS821/C62 Cultural atlas of Japan.G2355/K57 The national atlas of Japan.SB484/J3597 National parks of Japan.Z3309/J3 Japan English publication in print.Z674,3/D5 Directory of special libraries in Japan.G2357/T6S5 Tokyo metropolitan atlas.Pl726,1/M595 The Princeton companion to classical Japanese literature.DS821/P5/c,3 Pictorial encyclopedia of Japanese culture.DS805,15/J3 Japan statistical yearbook.DS890,3/J36 Japan opposing view points.DS834/W628 Who’s who in Japan, 1991--92. 3rd ed.DS821/C62/c2 Bilingual atlas of Japan. RESERVA
  • 161. No se puede sacar de la Biblioteca los libros que están en la Reserva. Sin embargo, es posiblehacerlo si tiene una carta de autorización con mi firma.PN2924,5 K3B7 Studies in Kabuki : It´s acting, music, and historical context.PN2924,5 K3C48 Chushingura: studies in Kabuki and the puppet theater.PN2924,5 K3E76 The Kabuki theater.SB458 S44 A Japanese touch for your garden.PN2924,5 K3G785 The Kabuki guide.DS806 R43 Introducing Japan.DS822,5 H347 Handbook of Japanese popular culture.DS896,35 P66 Tokyo: the city at the end of the world.DS896,35 R53 Introducing Tokyo.DS897 K84I57 Introducing Kioto.GF666 K67 Japan: geographical background to urban-industrial development.GT2910 I59 Tea ceremony.N7350 N63913 The arts of Japan: late medieval to modern v.1 and v.2.N7350 P3 The art and architecture of Japan.NA1553 N57 What is Japanese architecture?NA7205?3 A Japanese touch for your home.NA7451 E5 The Japanese houses and tradition for contemporary architecture.NX584 Z9U733 Tall mountains and flowing waters. the arts of Uragami Gyokudo.PL811A9Z85 Kabuki in modern Japan.PN1978 J3A28 Backstage at Bunraku: a behind-the scene look at Japan’s traditional poppet theater.PN2924,5 N6M3313 Noh.C8253 N3 Ways of thinking of eastern peoples: India-China-Tibet -Japan.DS835/036 The Cambridge history of Japan, V.1,3,4,5,6.HD70/U5N513 Strategic vs. evolutionary management: A U.S-Japan comparison of strategy and organization.PL715/R56 Pilgrimages: aspects of Japanese literature.PL726,55/K39 Dawn to the west: Japanese literature of the modern era.PL794,4/350320 Matsuo Basho.HD2907/F78 The Japanese today: change and continuity.HN723/M66 Images of Japanese society: a study in the structure of social reality.T174,3/I558 International technology transfer: Europe, Japan and the USA, 1700--1914.PL717/R5 A reader’s guide to Japanese literature.B5241/H45 A dream within a dream: studies in Japanese thought.HC462,6/T648 Tokugawa Japan: the social and economic antecedents of modern Japan.LB45/T64 Transcending stereotypes: discovering Japanese culture and education.BQ9262,9/J3S9 Suzuki, Daisetz: Zen and Japanese culture.DS806/R35 Reischauer, Edwin??????LB1140,25/J3P43 Learning to go to school in Japan: the transition from home
  • 162. to preschool life. PERTENENCIAS PERSONALES 1. Benedict, Ruth. The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, Boston: Houghton Mifflin 2. Doi, Takeo. The Anatomy of Dependence. Tokyo: Kodansha International, 1971. 3. Nakane, Chie. Japanese Society 4. Christopher, Robert. The Japanese Mind, Tokyo: Tuttle Company,1987 5. Nitobe, Inazo. Bushido, Tokyo: Kenkyusha, 1935 6. Okakura, Tenshin. The Book of Tea, Kodansha-Gakujyutsu-Bunko,1994 7. Look Japan (magazine in Spanish) 8. Cuadernos de Japón (magazine in Spanish ) 9. Natsume Soseki, Botchan, Kodansha, 199110. Ogai Mori, The Wild Geese, Charles E. Tuttle Company11. Paul McLean, Behind the Mask, Asahi Press, 198912. Richard Storry, A History of Modern Japan, Taiyosha,199213. Pearl S. Buck, The People of Japan, Seibido, 196914. Nippon Steel Human Resources Development Co, Ltd, Talking about Japan, Alc Press Inc, 198715. Donald Keene, Living in Two Countries, Asahi Press,198716. Daisetz Suzuki, Zen and Japanese Culture, Asahi Press,199017. Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery, Vintage Books,198918. O-Young Lee, The Compact Culture, Kodansha International,199119. Jostein Gaarder, Sophie´s World, Phoenix, 1994

×