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Introducing the design studio
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Introducing the design studio

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Workshop presentation for the taster introduction to the curriculum design approach we are developing at Sheffield Hallam University.

Workshop presentation for the taster introduction to the curriculum design approach we are developing at Sheffield Hallam University.

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  • QESS are devising a methodology to support staff with responsibilities to lead on and contribute to Course Planning It comes in response to the Academic Quality Framework and findings from ‘enhance’
  • Have you ever led or contributed to a Curriculum Planning activity before? How did it go? How will you make a start in creating your plan? What one thing more than any other will ensure success for you?
  • All are important but Design provides a starting point to ensure we identify and address priorities and requirements Curriculum design across the University is not widely understood or consistently practised and this has resulted in inconsistent approaches being taken, a lack of enthusiasm and a lack of systematic support. All of these deter innovation, miss the opportunity to systematically create a platform for inspiring teaching and, most importantly, deliver a curriculum that is often not engaging our students effectively. A suitable curriculum design process is needed to support the enhancement-led Academic Quality Framework (AQF) contributing to a designed, managed and inspiring student experience.
  • A highly usable, agile, coherent and sustainable institutional approach to curriculum design that results in pedagogic and curriculum innovation and an engaging teaching and learning experience
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  • Transcript

    • 1. The Design Studio
      • Andrew Middleton
      • Head of Innovation & Professional Development, QESS
      (CC) pimousse3000
    • 2.
      • Course Planning
      • Where do you start?
      • … then what?
      • … and other challenges
    • 3. Introducing a Design Studio approach
      • Curriculum Design, …Plan, …Develop, …Deliver?
      • In contrast
      • The Design Studio methods will,
        • share experience
        • be enjoyable
        • create a consistent, supported process
        • encourage consistency
        • clarity
        • formal collaboration
      • enhance project revealed Academic,
        • inexperience
        • detachment
        • diverse practice
        • inconsistency
        • uncertainty
        • isolation
    • 4. Objective for the Design Studio
      • An approach that is,
      • Highly usable
      • Agile – works for different needs, situations, people
      • Collaborative, creative and critical
      • Resulting in,
      • pedagogic and curriculum innovation
      • and an engaging teaching and learning experience
    • 5.
      • Suitable for the approval of,
      • new courses
      • annually reviewed provision, and
      • 5 Yearly Review
      Applications
    • 6. Contexts for Curriculum Design
      • Design is affected by context
      • some context is fixed - you have no choice
      • some context needs to be pinned down - you must make a choice
    • 7. The Design Team members
      • Design Facilitator: experienced mentor and advocate
      • Academic Lead: responsibility for taking it forward
      • Student Designer: an equal design partner
      • Academic peers: sharing experience
      • Quality Adviser: advising on process
      • Administrative adviser: logistics and processes
      • LTA adviser: supporting innovation
      • E-learning adviser: supporting best use of Blackboard etc
      • Information adviser: readings and resources
      • Learning adviser: embedding learning literacies
      • Professional & Employer representatives: employability
    • 8. Viewpoints
      • University of Ulster’s Viewpoints method
      • http://tinyurl.com/bpx54xj
      • Using ‘Lenses’ – approaching the design by considering principle-based themes e.g. assessment, employability, learner engagement, etc
      • Collaboration workshops
    • 9. Module timeline worksheet
      • Teams work together around the module (or course) design worksheet
    • 10. Choosing a ‘lens’
      • Lens - theme/set of cards, a view of the course
      • Lenses include
        • Assessment and Feedback
        • Information Skills
        • Learner Engagement
        • Creativity
        • Graduate Outcomes/Attributes
      • Thematic lens card sets prompt design discussion based on:
        • Principles
        • HEFCE code of practice
        • Examples
      Assessment and Feedback cards are pictured here (principles based on REAP project).
    • 11. Choosing an objective
      • The team decide on an objective for their session and write it at the top of the module worksheet
      The ‘objective’ guides the design team through the process This is different to learning outcomes which can also be stated
    • 12. Reading the front of the cards
      • The team read the principles on the front of the cards, choosing ones appropriate to their objective*
      * The ‘objective’ of their design focus
    • 13. Mapping the cards to the timeline
      • The team take their selected cards and map them to the appropriate point on the timeline (e.g. at the induction phase, during first few weeks of course)
    • 14. Reading examples on cards
      • The course team turn the cards over and read the examples/ideas on the back.
    • 15. Choosing relevant examples
      • The team tick any examples that align with their course outcomes
    • 16. Adding in own ideas/comments
      • The team write on any of their own ideas or comments, in order to tailor the examples to their own module.
    • 17. Sample finished worksheets
    • 18. Discussion
      • the benefits of a structured, collaborative design approach;
      • the actual methods used and the roles involved;
      • the use of lenses or themes;
      • where next.
    • 19. Where next?
      • Work with pilot teams
      • Refine, develop and release the materials for use at scale over semester 2
      • Partners/designers wanted!

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