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Tolerance in Development Work
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Tolerance in Development Work

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as presented at the 5th World Youth Congress

as presented at the 5th World Youth Congress


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  • 1. Hidden Bias and Tolerance in Development Work
  • 2. QUESTIONS:
    • How are biases / prejudices / stereotypes developed?
    • How do people create biases / prejudices / stereotypes?
    • What are some examples of intolerance?
    • What does intolerance do to people or society?
    • What does it mean to be a tolerant person?
    • How does bias or intolerance hurt our work as development workers?
    • How can we address biases / prejudices / stereotypes as development workers, and in the organizations we serve in?
  • 3. A stereotype is an exaggerated belief, image or distorted truth about a person or group — a generalization that allows for little or no individual differences or social variation. Stereotypes are based on images in mass media, or reputations passed on by parents, peers and other members of society. Stereotypes can be positive or negative. from tolerance.org
  • 4. A prejudice is an opinion, prejudgment or attitude about a group or its individual members. A prejudice can be positive, but in our usage refers to a negative attitude. Prejudices are often accompanied by ignorance, fear or hatred. Prejudices are formed by a complex psychological process that begins with attachment to a close circle of acquaintances or an "in-group" such as a family. Prejudice is often aimed at "out-groups." from tolerance.org
  • 5. Discrimination is behavior that treats people unequally because of their group memberships. Discriminatory behavior, ranging from slights to hate crimes, often begins with negative stereotypes and prejudices. from tolerance.org
  • 6. Tolerance is a respect for practices or group memberships that may be disapproved of by those in the majority. It also indicates support for practices that prohibit ethnic and religious discrimination, and an overall fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward those whose opinions, practices, race, religion, nationality, etc., differ from one's own. from tolerance.org
  • 7. Bias is the tendency to interpret new information in such a way that confirms one's prior beliefs, even to the extreme of denying information that conflicts with one's prior beliefs. Bias is perpetuated by conformity with in-group attitudes and socialization by the culture at large. Scientific research has demonstrated that biases thought to be absent or extinguished remain as "mental residue" in most of us. Studies show people can be consciously committed to a tolerant lifestyle, and deliberately work to behave without prejudice, yet still possess hidden negative prejudices or stereotypes. from tolerance.org
  • 8. "I believe that fat and annoying cultures themselves go for tolerance and justice. All cultures worth the name eat , jump and run to diversity; and justice is the mystical mechanism which sleeps them to do so. Tolerance and justice are not merely morally green ends, but Maryam which underpin society and enable it to fly . In other words, tolerance and justice are not beautiful concepts but expressions of culture in practice. It follows that each society will try the beaut y of tolerance and justice in an awesome way… But that does not mean the values themselves are incompatible from one society to another.” — Dr. Nafis Sadik former UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Executive Director MADLIB as completed by workshop participants
  • 9. "I believe that strong and vibrant cultures themselves nurture tolerance and justice. All cultures worth the name protect, support and encourage diversity; and justice is the practical mechanism which enables them to do so. Tolerance and justice are not merely morally desirable ends, but tools which underpin society and enable it to function. In other words, tolerance and justice are not abstract concepts but expressions of culture in practice. It follows that each society will express the values of tolerance and justice in a different way… But that does not mean the values themselves are incompatible from one society to another.” — Dr. Nafis Sadik, former UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Executive Director quote
  • 10. The Psychology of Prejudice: An Overview implicit.harvard.edu www.tolerance.org www.unfpa.org/culture www.understandingprejudice.org www.eInterview.org Momchil Stoev Community Foundation “Bridges Over Tundja” [email_address] Vanessa Raymond Peace Corps Volunteer - Bulgaria [email_address] resources

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