Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY ♥

2,098

Published on

Published in: Sports, Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,098
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
79
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY
  • 2. LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY FOUR STAGES
  • 3. EGGS Female butterflies lay many eggs during their short life to insure that even a small number of these eggs will survive. Caterpillars (butterfly larva) hatch from eggs. The eggs are usually laid in a protected location on or near the plants that the soon-to-be caterpillar will eat. Most eggs are attached to the plant with a fast-drying glue-like chemical that the female butterfly secretes along with the egg.
  • 4. EGGS Some species lay one egg at a time, others lay eggs in small clusters, while others lays hundreds at a time. Eggs are usually laid on the under surface of a leaf or somewhere near the host plant. For example, the Monarch butterfly lays its eggs on the bottom of the milkweed plant which its caterpillar will eat. Other locations are flower heads, and crevices in tree bark. A few (like ghost moths) lay thousands of eggs while they fly; the larva of these species usually eat grass. •
  • 5. EGGS Butterfly eggs come in many shapes and colors. The shapes include spherical, oval, and pod-shaped; the colors include white, green, and yellow. The eggs have a thin, tough shell with raised ribs or pits (reticulations). At the top of each egg is a micropyle, a small pit that marks where the sperm entered the egg. While the egg is developing, air and water enter the egg through the micropyle.
  • 6. EGGS There is a yolk inside each egg that nourished the developing larva. When it is time to hatch, the larva gnaws open the egg shell with its jaws. After hatching, most caterpillars finish eating their egg case as their first meal. After this, the plant upon which the egg was laid will be nourishment.
  • 7. LARVA A caterpillar is the larval stage of butterflies and moths. The caterpillar hatches from a tiny egg and will eventually pupate and turn into an adult butterfly or moth. This larval stage usually lasts from two weeks to about a month. This is the main feeding stage of the butterfly. Caterpillars eat almost constantly and grow very quickly, at an astonishing rate.
  • 8. PUPA The pupa is the stage in a butterfly's (or moth's) life when it is encased in a chrysalis and undergoing metamorphosis. It does not eat during this stage. The pupa stage lasts from a few days to many months (some butterflies overwinter in the pupa stage, and the adult emerges in the spring).
  • 9. PUPA The pupa of a butterfly is called a chrysalis (derived from the Greek word for gold). The chrysalis of many butterflies (like the Nymphalidae and Satyridae families) are suspended from a silk pad and abdominal hooks. Others (like like swallowtails and sulphurs) also have a silk girdle supporting their mid-section. About a day before the adult butterfly emerges, the chrysalis of many species (including the monarch) becomes transparent.
  • 10. ADULT An adult butterfly emerges full-grown from the chrysalis, often losing reddish meconium fluid as it leaves. When the adult emerges, its wings are wrinkled, wet and deflated, but the abdomen is distended with fluid. The butterfly pumps some of this fluid into the wings through veins to inflate them. The butterfly then rests and then lets the wings dry out. The primary purpose of the adult stage is to mate and reproduce.
  • 11. ADULT Adults can only eat liquid food through their straw-like proboscis. Most butterflies only sip flower nectar, liquids from rotting fruit, mushy bird dung, and mineral-rich water from puddles (this activity is called puddling). Some butterflies (like the Zebra Longwing) sip pollen. The Harvester Butterfly sips the body fluids from woolly aphids using its proboscis. A few butterflies sip rotting flesh. A rare few lepidoptera (like the great silkmoth) cannot eat at all; they die in about a week, after mating and reproducing.

×