SHRM Survey Findings: The Ongoing Impact of theRecession—California Financial Health and HiringApril 18, 2013
• This is part one (financial health and hiring) of the California results from a series of SHRMsurvey findings about the ...
The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 3Organizations’ FinancialHealth
• What percentage of staff have organizations lost since the U.S. and global recessionbegan in December 2007? About one-qu...
• HR professionals in organizations that experienced layoffs will need to consider the impacton remaining employees. With ...
2%8%13%18%29%29%5%9%15%17%29%24%*More than 50% of staff21% to 50% of staff11% to 20% of staff6% to 10% of staff1% to 5% of...
Since the U.S. and global recession began in December2007, what percentage of full-time regular jobs at yourorganization h...
In the last 12 months, from August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012, whatpercentage of full-time regular jobs at your organizatio...
In the last 12 months, from August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012, whatpercentage of full-time regular jobs at your organizatio...
Compared to 12 months ago, would you say your organizationsoverall financial health is improving, has not changed or isdec...
Compared to 12 months ago, would you say your organizationsoverall financial health is improving, has not changed or isdec...
The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 12Hiring
• Are organizations currently hiring? About three-quarters (76%) of organizations reportedhiring full-time employees, and ...
• An uptick in hiring could influence recruiting difficulty and eventually new-hirecompensation. With three-quarters (76%)...
Is your organization currently hiring for any of the following typesof staff? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recessio...
Is your organization currently hiring full-time or part-time staff?CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—Californi...
Is your organization currently hiring full-time or part-timecontract/temporary staff? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the ...
At what level(s) is your organization hiring?CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and...
Is your organization currently hiring nonmanagement hourly ormanagement (e.g., directors, managers) employees? CaliforniaT...
The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 20Creating Completely New Positions
• Are organizations creating new positions or replacing jobs lost? Of those organizationshiring, approximately one-half (5...
• For California, as for most parts of the U.S., the focus in the coming decade is likely to be onreplacement job fillings...
Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature offull-time positions for which your organization is current...
Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature offull-time positions for which your organization is current...
Compared with the skills required for jobs lost (e.g., due tolayoffs, attrition) since the recession began in December 200...
Compared with the skills required in existing jobs in yourorganization, do these completely new full-time regular position...
The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 27Demographics
Demographics: Organization IndustryCaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©S...
Demographics: Organization SectorCaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHR...
Demographics: Organization Staff SizeCaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ...
CA U.S.U.S.-based operationsonly74% 76%Multinationaloperations26% 24%n = 476 (CA), 3,311 (U.S.)Other DemographicsCaliforni...
• California response rate = 10%• United States response rate = 15%• 491(California) and 3,481 (United States) HR professi...
• For more survey/poll findings, visit www.shrm.org/surveys• For more information about SHRM’s Customized Research Service...
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The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring

  1. 1. SHRM Survey Findings: The Ongoing Impact of theRecession—California Financial Health and HiringApril 18, 2013
  2. 2. • This is part one (financial health and hiring) of the California results from a series of SHRMsurvey findings about the ongoing impact of the U.S. and global recession, which began in2007. California and U.S. results are compared, and statistically significant differences areindicated with an asterisk (*).• Part one results (financial health and hiring) includes the following sections: Organizations’ financial health. Hiring. Creating completely new positions. Demographics.• Part two results (recruiting and skill gaps) includes the following sections: Recruiting challenges. Skill gaps. Recruiting strategies. The Impact of strategic technological changes. Demographics.• Overall and industry-specific results can be found on our website at www.shrm.org/surveys.The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 2Introduction
  3. 3. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 3Organizations’ FinancialHealth
  4. 4. • What percentage of staff have organizations lost since the U.S. and global recessionbegan in December 2007? About one-quarter (24%) of organizations indicated they hadnot lost any employees since the recession began, and 29% lost up to 5% of staff.• What percentage of staff have organizations lost in the last 12 months? Slightly less thanone-half (46%) of organizations have not lost any staff in the past year, and one-third (34%)reported losing up to 5% of employees.• How does the financial health of organizations compare to 12 months ago? Over one-half(54%) of organizations reported a mild to significant improvement; 17% reported nochange; and 29% were in a mild or significant decline.The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 4Key Findings: Organizations’ Financial HealthCalifornia
  5. 5. • HR professionals in organizations that experienced layoffs will need to consider the impacton remaining employees. With 29% of organizations reporting that they lost up to 5% ofstaff during the recession and one-third (34%) reporting losing up to 5% of employees in thelast 12 months, workload issues and burnout could be a potential problem. Economicconditions that continue to improve could lead to increased turnover.• The improved financial health of organizations in California could mean that competitionfor talented employees is likely to begin heating up—if it has not already. With over one-half (54%) of organizations reporting mild to significant improvement in their financialhealth, employees may begin to feel more confident about new seeking opportunities.With unemployment rates for college graduates relatively low overall, competition for themost educated, skilled or experienced workers could start to become more intense.• Improved financial health could enable more organizations to increase their training andeducation benefits. Many organizations put off investing in training during tough economictimes. As more organizations find their financial footing, an increase in investments intraining and development could follow, especially if finding job candidates to fill some jobsproves so challenging that organizations become more focused on growing talent fromwithin.The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 5Implications for HR: Organizations’ Financial HealthCalifornia
  6. 6. 2%8%13%18%29%29%5%9%15%17%29%24%*More than 50% of staff21% to 50% of staff11% to 20% of staff6% to 10% of staff1% to 5% of staff*0% of staffCalifornia(n = 452)United States(n = 3,236)Since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007, whatpercentage of full-time regular jobs at your organization has beenlost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 6Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to rounding. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant difference betweenorganizations in California compared with those in the United States.
  7. 7. Since the U.S. and global recession began in December2007, what percentage of full-time regular jobs at yourorganization has been lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)?CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 7Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown.Comparisons by organization sector:Percentage of organizations that lost 0% of staffPrivately owned for-profit (31%) > Publicly owned for-profit (5%)Comparisons by organization sector• Privately owned for-profit organizations are more likely than publicly owned for-profit organizations to have NOTencountered staff losses (lost 0% of staff) since the U.S. and global recession began in December 2007.
  8. 8. In the last 12 months, from August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012, whatpercentage of full-time regular jobs at your organization hasbeen lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 8Note: An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant difference between organizations in California compared those in withthe United States.46%34%10%7%2%1%49%33%10%5%2%1%0% of staff1% to 5% of staff6% to 10% of staff*11% to 20% of staff21% to 50% of staffMore than 50% of staffCalifornia(n = 456)United States(n = 3,277)
  9. 9. In the last 12 months, from August 1, 2011, to July 31, 2012, whatpercentage of full-time regular jobs at your organization hasbeen lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition)? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 9Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown.Comparisons by organization staff size:Percentage of organizations that lost 0% of staff1 to 99 employees (59%) >2,500 to 24,999 employees (27%)25,000 or more employees (16%)Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 1 to 99 employees are more likely than organizations with 2,500 or more employees to have NOTencountered staff losses (lost 0% of staff) in the last 12 months.Comparisons by organization sector:Percentage of organizations that lost 0% of staffPrivately owned for-profit (49%)Nonprofit (46%)> Publicly owned for-profit (17%)• Privately owned for-profit and nonprofit organizations are more likely than publicly owned for-profit organizations tohave NOT encountered staff losses (lost 0% of staff) in the last 12 months.Comparisons by organization sector
  10. 10. Compared to 12 months ago, would you say your organizationsoverall financial health is improving, has not changed or isdeclining? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 107%20%22%38%13%8%21%17%41%13%Significant declineMild decline*No changeMild improvementSignificant improvementCalifornia(n = 472)United States(n = 3,362)Note: An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant difference between organizations in California compared with those inthe United States.
  11. 11. Compared to 12 months ago, would you say your organizationsoverall financial health is improving, has not changed or isdeclining? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 11Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown.Comparisons by organization sector:Significant declineGovernment (21%) > Privately owned for-profit (4%)Comparisons by organization sector• Government organizations are more likely than privately owned for-profit organizations to be in a significant declinecompared to 12 months ago.
  12. 12. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 12Hiring
  13. 13. • Are organizations currently hiring? About three-quarters (76%) of organizations reportedhiring full-time employees, and one-third (34%) part-time employees. Fortemporary/contract positions, 39% of organizations are hiring full-time employees, and 30%part-time employees.• For what types of positions are organizations hiring? Most organizations are hiring atnonmanagement levels (70% for hourly and 64% for salaried positions), and approximatelyone-half (51%) reported hiring for management positions such as directors and managers.One-quarter of organizations (25%) are hiring at the executive/upper-management(e.g., CEO, CFO) level.The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 13Key Findings: HiringCalifornia
  14. 14. • An uptick in hiring could influence recruiting difficulty and eventually new-hirecompensation. With three-quarters (76%) of organizations reporting hiring full-timeemployees, and one-third (34%) part-time employees, a more robust labor market isdeveloping. Though this change is a welcome development for California’s economy, witha smaller pool of unemployed job seekers and more opportunities to move for thosecurrently in jobs, staffing for some roles could grow more challenging. Eventually this couldlead to increases in compensation packages offered to some new-hires.• Use of contract and temporary workers will continue to be an option. Some organizationswill put off hiring employees until economic conditions further stabilize. For theseorganizations, hiring temporary or contract workers may be the strategy they focus on inthe next several years.• HR professionals will need to work with hiring managers to set realistic expectations forfilling some jobs. Hiring managers may have become acclimated to a “buyers market”economic environment where filling many jobs was relatively easy. But with improved labormarket conditions this may no longer be the case, especially for jobs requiring in-demandeducation, credentials, skills or experience. In these situations, HR professionals will need towork with hiring managers to set reasonable expectations for how long it will take to fillsome jobs and to develop competitive compensation packages.The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 14Implications for HR: HiringCalifornia
  15. 15. Is your organization currently hiring for any of the following typesof staff? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 15Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options.26%37%38%78%30%39%34%76%Part-time contract/temporaryFull-time contract/temporaryPart-timeFull-timeCalifornia(n = 489)United States(n = 3,480-3,481)
  16. 16. Is your organization currently hiring full-time or part-time staff?CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 16Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown.Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 100 to 2,499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currentlyhiring full-time staff.Comparisons by organization staff size: Full-time staff100 to 499 employees (80%)500 to 2,499 employees (91%)> 1 to 99 employees (60%)• Organizations with 500 to 2,499 or 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employeesto be currently hiring part-time staff.• Organizations with 2,500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currentlyhiring part-time staff.Comparisons by organization staff size: Part-time staff500 to 2,499 employees (56%)25,000 or more employees (71%)>1 to 99 employees (17%)100 to 499 employees (27%)2,500 to 24,999 employees (48%) > 1 to 99 employees (17%)
  17. 17. Is your organization currently hiring full-time or part-timecontract/temporary staff? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 17Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown.Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 500 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currentlyhiring full-time contract/temporary staff.Comparisons by organization staff size: Full-time contract/temporary staff500 to 2,499 employees (59%)2,500 to 24,999 employees (52%)25,000 or more employees (54%)> 1 to 99 employees (22%)Comparisons by organization sector: Full-time contract/temporary staffPublicly owned for-profit (57%) > Privately owned for-profit (32%)Comparisons by organization sector• Publicly owned for-profit organizations are more likely than privately owned for-profit organizations to be currently hiringfull-time contract/temporary staff.Comparisons by organization sector: Part-time contract/temporary staffGovernment (69%) > Privately owned for-profit (21%)• Government organizations are more likely than privately owned for-profit organizations to be currently hiring part-timecontract/temporary staff.
  18. 18. At what level(s) is your organization hiring?CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 18Note: Only respondents whose organizations were currently hiring full-time regular staff were asked this question. An asterisk(*) indicates a statistically significant difference between organizations in California compared with those in the UnitedStates.20%49%70%71%25%51%64%70%*Executive/uppermanagement(e.g., CEO, CFO)Management(e.g., directors, managers)*Nonmanagementsalaried employeesNonmanagementhourly employeesCalifornia(n = 371)United States(n = 2,722)
  19. 19. Is your organization currently hiring nonmanagement hourly ormanagement (e.g., directors, managers) employees? CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 19Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown.Comparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 100 to 499 and 2,500 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees tobe currently hiring nonmanagement hourly employees.Comparisons by organization staff size: Nonmanagement hourly100 to 499 employees (82%)2,500 to 24,999 employees (83%)25,000 or more employees (90%)> 1 to 99 employees (42%)• Organizations with 2,500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to be currentlyhiring management-level employees.Comparisons by organization staff size: Management2,500 to 24,999 employees (71%) > 1 to 99 employees (27%)
  20. 20. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 20Creating Completely New Positions
  21. 21. • Are organizations creating new positions or replacing jobs lost? Of those organizationshiring, approximately one-half (51%) primarily hired direct replacements of jobs lost,whereas 38% hired for completely new positions. About one in 10 (11%) organizationsadded new duties to the jobs lost. California (38%) is more likely than the U.S. (31%) to be hiring for completely newpositions, and the U.S. is more likely to be hiring direct replacements (57% versus 51%).• Do the completely new positions hired require new and different skill sets? Compared with the skills required for the jobs lost since the recession began: Most (70%) organizations required a mixture of new skills and the same types ofskills for new positions. One in five (20%) required completely new and differentskill sets, and 10% required approximately the same types of skills. California (70%) is more likely than the U.S. (58%) to require a mix of new and thesame skills for new positions, whereas the U.S. is more likely to be requiringapproximately the same types of skills (23% versus 10%). Compared with the skills required in existing jobs (for organizations that had not lostany jobs since the recession began): Three in five (60%) organizations required a mixture of new skills and the sametypes of skills. Thirty-one percent required approximately the same types of skills.Few organizations (9%) required completely new and different skills.The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 21Key Findings: Creating Completely New PositionsCalifornia
  22. 22. • For California, as for most parts of the U.S., the focus in the coming decade is likely to be onreplacement job fillings. In the coming years, HR professionals are likely to be staffing forreplacement needs more than filling newly created positions. According to the U.S. Bureau ofLabor Statistics’ (BLS) 2010-2020 Employment Project Report, slower population growth will lead toa decreasing overall labor force from 2010 to 2020. It projects 54.8 million total job openings in thistime period with more than half—61.6%—resulting from “replacement needs,” i.e., the need toreplace workers who retire or otherwise permanently leave an occupation. Replacement needswill exceed new job growth vacancies in four out of five occupations. Of those Californiaorganizations hiring, approximately one-half (51%) primarily hired direct replacements of jobs lost.• Staffing for replacement needs of jobs exited by retiring Baby Boomers may create an evenbigger staffing challenge in the years ahead. The retirement of the Baby Boomer generation willadd to replacement needs hiring. For many jobs requiring high levels of education, this changecould result in recruiting difficulty.• If replacement needs hiring proves increasingly challenging, California HR professionals mayneed to convince their hiring managers that staffing for some jobs will be more difficult thanexpected. This is particularly true of STEM jobs such as engineering, science and tech jobs. HRprofessionals may need to work with their organizational leaders to come up with more effectiverecruitment strategies for hard-to-fill jobs.• Jobs requiring new skills may require more organizational investment in training anddevelopment. Though most new job openings may be due to replacement needs, manyorganizations in California are hiring for completely new positions (38%) or adding new duties tojobs that were in place pre-recession (11%). Getting new-hires up-to-speed with the needed skillsmay require an investment in training and development. A greater reliance on new entrants tothe labor force to replace retiring Baby Boomers could also emphasize the need to invest intraining and development programs.The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 22Implications for HR: Creating Completely New PositionsCalifornia
  23. 23. Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature offull-time positions for which your organization is currently hiring?CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 23Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. Only respondents whose organizations were currently hiring full-timeregular staff were asked this question. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant difference between organizations inCalifornia compared with those in the United States.11%31%57%11%38%51%New duties added to jobs lost(e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) sincethe recession began*Completely new positions*Direct replacements of jobs lost(e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) sincethe recession beganCalifornia(n = 365)United States(n = 2,665)
  24. 24. Which of the following best describes, in general, the nature offull-time positions for which your organization is currently hiring?CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 24Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown.Comparisons by organization sector: Direct replacements of jobs lostGovernment (83%) > Nonprofit (37%)Comparisons by organization sector• Government organizations are more likely than nonprofit organizations to be currently hiring direct replacements of jobslost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since the recession began.Comparisons by organization sector: New duties added to jobs lostNonprofit (22%) > Privately owned for-profit (3%)• Nonprofit organizations are more likely than privately owned for-profit organizations to be currently hiring for new dutiesadded to jobs lost (e.g., due to layoffs, attrition) since the recession began.
  25. 25. Compared with the skills required for jobs lost (e.g., due tolayoffs, attrition) since the recession began in December 2007, dothese completely new full-time positions require: CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 25Note: Only respondents whose organizations had lost jobs since the recession began in December 2007 and were hiring full-time staff for “completely new positions” were asked this question. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant differencebetween organizations in California compared with those in the United States.23%19%58%10%20%70%*Approximately thesame types of skillsCompletely new anddifferent skills*A mixture of new skills andthe same types of skillsCalifornia(n = 83)United States(n = 391)
  26. 26. Compared with the skills required in existing jobs in yourorganization, do these completely new full-time regular positionsrequire: CaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 26Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. Only respondents whose organizations had not lost jobs since therecession began in December 2007 and were hiring full-time staff for “completely new positions” were asked this question.5%42%54%9%31%60%Completely new anddifferent skillsApproximately thesame types of skillsA mixture of new skills andthe same types of skillsCalifornia(n = 55)United States(n = 437)
  27. 27. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 27Demographics
  28. 28. Demographics: Organization IndustryCaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 28Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.22%13%11%9%8%8%5%2%22%13%13%14%20%11%7%10%7%6%Professional servicesHealthManufacturingState or local governmentFinanceHigh-techConstruction, mining, oil and gasFederal governmentOtherCalifornia(n = 489)United States(n = 3,481)
  29. 29. Demographics: Organization SectorCaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 29Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.48%19%17%12%3%43%17%12%25%3%Privately owned for-profitPublicly owned for-profitNonprofitGovernmentOtherCalifornia(n = 473)United States(n = 3,294)
  30. 30. Demographics: Organization Staff SizeCaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 3030%32%16%14%8%26%33%19%16%6%1 to 99 employees100 to 499 employees500 to 2,499 employees2,500 to 24,999 employees25,000 or more employeesCalifornia(n = 460)United States(n = 3,208)
  31. 31. CA U.S.U.S.-based operationsonly74% 76%Multinationaloperations26% 24%n = 476 (CA), 3,311 (U.S.)Other DemographicsCaliforniaThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 31CA U.S.Single-unit organization: An organizationin which the location and theorganization are one and the same.34% 36%Multi-unit organization: An organizationthat has more than one location.66% 64%CA U.S.Multi-unit headquarters determines HRpolicies and practices46% 50%Each work location determines HRpolicies and practices4% 3%A combination of both the work locationand the multi-unit headquartersdetermines HR policies and practices50% 47%Is your organization a single-unit organization or amulti-unit organization?For multi-unit organizations, are HR policies andpractices determined by the multi-unit headquarters,by each work location or by both?Does your organization have U.S.-based operations (business units) only,or does it operate multinationally?n = 478 (CA), 3,325 (U.S.)n = 327 (CA), 2,204 (U.S.)CA U.S.Corporate(companywide)65% 68%Business unit/division 22% 19%Facility/location 13% 13%n = 328 (CA), 2,206 (U.S.)What is the HR department/function forwhich you responded throughout thissurvey?
  32. 32. • California response rate = 10%• United States response rate = 15%• 491(California) and 3,481 (United States) HR professionals from a randomly selectedsample of SHRM’s membership participated in this survey• Margin of error: California +/-4%, United States +/-2%• Survey fielded August 28 through September 14, 2012The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 32SHRM Survey Findings: The Ongoing Impact of theRecession—California Financial Health and HiringSurvey Methodology
  33. 33. • For more survey/poll findings, visit www.shrm.org/surveys• For more information about SHRM’s Customized Research Services, visitwww.shrm.org/customizedresearch• Follow us on Twitter @SHRM_ResearchThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Financial Health and Hiring ©SHRM 2013 33About SHRM ResearchProject leader:Tanya Mulvey, survey research analyst, SHRM ResearchProject contributors:Alexander Alonso, Ph.D., SPHR, vice president, SHRM ResearchEvren Esen, manager, Survey Research Center, SHRM ResearchJennifer Schramm, GPHR, manager, Workplace Trends and Forecasting, SHRM ResearchCopy editor:Katya Scanlan, SHRM Knowledge Center
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