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Shrm 2013 survey findings resume v5 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters and Interviews April 28, 2014
  • 2. • What is the preferred résumé format? Although two-thirds (66%) of organizations prefer chronological résumés, which list education and experience in reverse chronological order, government agencies (30%) prefer functionally organized résumés more than private-sector organizations do (18%). • Should candidates include a cover letter with a résumé? Government agencies (34%) are more likely than private-sector organizations (20%) to consider a missing cover letter a mistake. Smaller organizations (those with fewer than 500 employees) (33%) are more likely to consider a missing cover letter a mistake than are larger organizations (17%). The most important aspects a cover letter should address are how the job candidate’s work experience meets the job requirements, how the job candidate’s skills meet the job requirements, and why the candidate wants to work at the organization. • What interview formats are most frequently used by organizations? Government agencies are more likely to use panel interviews and structured interviews, whereas private-sector organizations are more likely to use semi-structured interviews and screening interviews. Although online interviews are rarely used, they are more likely to be used by larger employers (100 or more employees), as are structured interviews and panel interviews. SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 2 Key Findings
  • 3. • If a job candidate was fired or laid off from a position, what is the best way for the candidate to present this information? Seventy-seven percent of respondents believe that job candidates should explain in the job interview that they were fired or laid off from a position. Fewer than 3% indicated that this information should only be discussed by the job candidate only if the interviewer directly asks about it. Private-sector employers (80%) were more likely than government employers (62%) to agree that this information should be brought up in the job interview, and although much less common, government employers (15%) were more likely to indicate that the information should be presented in the cover letter compared with the private-sector employers (4%). • What is the best way for candidates to handle gaps in employment on a résumé? Fifty-seven percent of respondents indicated that job candidates should neither emphasize nor hide gaps in employment, while 39% indicated candidates should clearly indicate gaps in employment. Only 2% agreed that gaps were not relevant. SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 3 Key Findings
  • 4. • The majority of respondents said they prefer to receive résumés through their organization’s website. HR professionals should determine whether their organization’s website and application process are compatible with smartphones. Research has shown that an increased number of job seekers are using their mobile devices to look for employment, and organizations risk losing top talent if they cannot accommodate job candidates through this medium. • It takes most HR professionals less than five minutes to determine whether a job candidate will proceed to the next step of the selection process. This is understandable, given time constraints associated with reviewing potentially hundreds of résumés for an open position. Applicant- screening software, which has sped up the hiring process in some regard, may eliminate qualified candidates based on the absence of keywords in a résumé, for example. When possible, HR professionals should devote as much time as possible to reviewing résumés and evaluating candidates’ qualifications, particularly because the competition for top talent is extremely high in the current job market. • HR professionals should always be prepared to review résumés with gaps considering the volume of layoffs that occurred during the recession of 2007-2009 and in the months that followed. Résumé gaps should not be an automatic disqualifier for job candidates, who should be evaluated more heavily on their skill sets and potential fit with the organization. SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 4 What Do These Findings Mean for the HR Profession?
  • 5. How does your organization prefer to receive résumés from job candidates? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 5 Note: n = 405. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding.* “Other” responses included applicant tracking system as a preferred way to receive résumés . 68% 14% 5% 4% 1% 7% Through the organization's website By e-mail Through résumé collection service (e.g., Career Builder, LinkedIn) Through both e-mail and postal mail Through postal mail Other*
  • 6. Résumés by e-mail vs. through organization website SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 6 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. 44% 19% 8% 9% 3% 29% 56% 72% 84% 84% 1-99 employees 100-499 employees 500-2,499 employees 2,500-24,999 employees 25,000 or more employees By e-mail Through organization website Comparisons by organization staff size • Organizations with fewer than 100 employees are more likely than organizations with 100 or more employees to prefer to receive résumés by e-mail. Organizations with 100 or more employees are more likely to prefer to receive résumés through their website.
  • 7. During initial screening, on average how long does it take to review a résumé to determine if the job candidate will proceed to the next step of the selection process? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 7 n = 405 76% 15% 4% 3% 2% Less than 5 minutes 5 to 6 minutes 7 to 8 minutes 9 to 10 minutes 11 or more minutes
  • 8. When reviewing a résumé, which of the following aspects provide a positive edge over other résumés? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 8 Note: n = 411. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. “*Other” responses included résumé tailored to specific job requirements and correct spelling and grammar. 66% 43% 43% 27% 26% 20% 18% 9% 7% 4% 1% 1% 10% Chronologically organized résumé Résumé in bulleted format Résumé tailored to the industry A skills summary List of candidate’s accomplishments Functionally organized résumé A career summary Appropriate use of action verbs and phrases A job objective Appropriate résumé font Résumé in a narrative format Digital résumé Other*
  • 9. Do functionally organized résumés provide a positive edge over other résumés? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 9 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. 30% 18% Government Private sector Yes Comparisons by sector • Organizations in the government sector are more likely than organizations in the private sector to report that functionally organized résumés provide a positive edge over other résumés .
  • 10. What is the best format for job candidates to submit their résumés? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 10 n = 391 63% 32% 4% 1% Chronological (lists education and experience in reverse chronological order) Combination (summarizes skills and experience followed by abbreviated chronological work history) Functional (presents skills and experience by types or functions) Other
  • 11. Generally, how many years of job history should a job candidate include on a résumé? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 11 n = 396 38% 9% 38% 9% 5% 1% All years of relevant job history 11 to 15 years 8 to 10 years 6 to 7 years 4 to 5 years Less than 4 years
  • 12. Do you consider the following aspects as mistakes in résumés submitted by job candidates? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 12 n = 393 99% 84% 82% 62% 54% 47% 43% 22% 11% 1% 16% 18% 38% 46% 53% 57% 78% 89% Grammatical/spelling errors Missing detailed job history Missing specific dates of employment Résumé not presented in reverse chronological order Gaps in employment that are more than a few months at a time Résumé too long (e.g., more than two pages) Résumés in narrative format No cover letter Objective not listed at the top of the résumé Yes No
  • 13. Do you consider it a mistake when a candidate leaves out cover letter? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 13 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. 33% 17% 1-499 employees 500 or more employees Comparisons by organization staff size • Organizations with fewer than 500 employees were more likely than organizations with 500 or more employees to consider it a mistake when a job candidate leaves out a cover letter when submitting a résumé.
  • 14. Do you consider it a mistake when a candidate leaves out a cover letter? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 14 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. 34% 20% Government Private sector Comparisons by organization sector • Organizations in the government sector were more likely than organizations in the private sector to consider it a mistake when a job candidate leaves out a cover letter when submitting a résumé.
  • 15. How often do you find inaccuracies in the candidates’ résumés (e.g., grammatical/spelling errors, missing job history)? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 15 Note: n = 383. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding. Sometimes, 81% Rarely, 11% Always, 9%
  • 16. How often do inaccuracies in résumés negatively affect your decision to extend a job interview? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 16 n = 383 Always, 20% Sometimes, 73% Rarely, 6% Never, 1%
  • 17. How important do you consider each of the following? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 17 n = 383 13% 20% 41% 42% 28% 40% 28% 45% 32% 30% 20% 12% 18% 7% 7% 2% 9% 3% 4% A cover letter A thank you note after the interview Cover letter tailored to the job Résumé tailored to the job Very important Important Neither important nor unimportant Unimportant Very unimportant
  • 18. How important do you consider it to be for a job candidate to send a thank you note after the interview? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 18 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Comparisons by organization sector • Organizations in the private sector were more likely than organizations in the government sector to consider it important for a job candidate to send a thank you note after the interview. • Organizations with 1-99 employees were more likely than organizations with 100 or more employees to consider it important for a job candidate to send a thank you note after the interview. Comparisons by organization size
  • 19. To what extent does your organization use the following interview formats? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 19 n = 383 1% 27% 44% 45% 53% 34% 55% 46% 44% 37% 32% 14% 8% 8% 8% 34% 5% 3% 2% 2% Online interview Panel interview Semi-structured interview Structured interview Screening interview Always Sometimes Rarely Never
  • 20. To what extent does your organization use the following interview formats? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 20 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Comparisons by organization sector • Government organizations were more likely than private-sector organizations to report using structured interview and panel interview formats. • Private-sector organizations were more likely than government organizations to report using semi-structured interview and screening interview formats. Comparisons by organization size • Organizations with more than 100 employees were more likely than organizations with 1-99 employees to report using structured interview, panel interview and online interview formats.
  • 21. What is the best way for a job candidate to send a thank you note? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 21 Note: n = 381. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding. Postal mail, 9% E-mail, 50% Both postal mail and e-mail, 37% Other, 3%
  • 22. What is the best way for a job candidate to send a thank you note? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 22 Note: Percentages may not equal 100% due to rounding. 50% 37% 9% 3% 50% 17% 28% 5% E-mail Both postal mail and e-mail Postal mail Other 2013 (n = 381 ) 2008 (n = 457)
  • 23. How is your perception of a job candidate affected by the job candidate following up after the interview? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 23 Note: n = 382. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding. Much more favorably, 6% More favorably, 42% Neither favorably nor unfavorably, 48% Unimportant, 5%
  • 24. What is the most important aspect of a cover letter? (Select top three options) SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 24 Note: n = 384. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple responses. Percentage Selected How the job candidate’s work experience meets the job requirements 51% How the job candidate’s skills meet the job requirements 48% Why the candidate wants to work at the organization 45% Why the candidate wants to make a career change 32% Assessment of the candidate’s writing skills 31% The position for which the job candidate is applying is included 19% Explanation of gaps in employment 18% How the job candidate’s education meets the job requirements 7% Other 6% Contact information is included 5%
  • 25. Do you agree with the following advice for job interviews? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 25 n = 380 42% 47% 53% 66% 73% 74% 74% 58% 53% 47% 34% 27% 26% 26% Play down any job-hopping Bring samples of work to interview Always wear a formal suit to a job interview Address positions that the candidate was fired from Arrive to interview 15 minutes early Bring your résumé with you to the interview Address gaps in employment Yes No
  • 26. Do you agree that candidates should bring samples of their work to job interviews? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 26 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. 39% 62% 500 or more employees 1-499 employees Yes Comparisons by organization size • Organizations with 1-499 employees were more likely than organizations with 500 or more employees to agree that candidates should bring samples of their work to job interviews.
  • 27. What additional advice would you give to job candidates regarding interviews? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 27 Note: n = 165. Percentages do not equal 100% due to theme coding. Top Advice Options Percentage Addressed Do research of the industry, company and position 33% Bring insightful questions to ask the interviewers 24% Be honest; be yourself; be upfront 19% Dress appropriately; look professional 15% Be prepared to talk about your own experience and skills 13% Body language (e.g., smile, eye contact, firm handshake) 8% Be enthusiastic; show interest in the position 8% Give clear and brief answers 6%
  • 28. If a job candidate was fired or laid off from a position, what is the best way for the candidate to present this information? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 28 Note: n = 380. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding. “Other” responses included the candidate should only address the issue if specifically asked about it during the interview. 77% 10% 6% 5% 3% The information should be explained in the job interview Other* The information should be explained in the cover letter The information should be presented in the résumé The candidate should not present this information
  • 29. If a job candidate was fired or laid off from a position, what is the best way for the candidate to present this information? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 29 Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. 4% 80% 15% 62% Explain in the cover letter Explain in the job interview Government Private sector Comparisons by organization sector • Private-sector organizations were more likely than government organizations to agree that the candidate should explain previous termination or layoff during the job interview. • Government organizations were more likely than private-sector organizations to agree that the candidate should explain previous termination or layoff in the cover letter.
  • 30. What is the best way for candidates to handle gaps in employment on a résumé? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 30 n = 368 57% 39% 2% 2% Candidates should neither emphasize nor hide gaps in employment Candidates should clearly indicate gaps in employment Gaps in employment are not relevant Other
  • 31. SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 31 Demographics
  • 32. Demographics: Organization Industry SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 32 Note: n = 185. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Percentage Professional, scientific and technical services 25% Health care and social assistance 21% Manufacturing 13% Educational services 13% Finance and insurance 13% Government agencies 12% Construction 11% Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services 8% Information 6% Transportation and warehousing 6% Retail trade 5% Utilities 5% Accommodation and food services 5% Repair and maintenance 4% Arts, entertainment and recreation 4% Religious, grant-making, civic, professional and similar organizations 3% Real estate and rental and leasing 2% Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction 2% Wholesale trade 2% Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 1% Other industry 12% Note: n = 374. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options.
  • 33. Demographics: Organization Sector 33 n = 371 40% 24% 20% 13% 2% Privately owned for-profit Publicly owned for-profit Nonprofit Government Other SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014
  • 34. Demographics: Organization Staff Size 34 n = 361 11% 22% 30% 28% 9% 1 to 99 employees 100 to 499 employees 500 to 2,499 employees 2,500 to 24,999 employees 25,000 or more employees SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014
  • 35. n = 379 Demographics: Other 35 U.S.-based operations only 77% Multinational operations 23% Single-unit organization: An organization in which the location and the organization are one and the same. 26% Multi-unit organization: An organization that has more than one location. 74% Multi-unit headquarters determines HR policies and practices 56% Each work location determines HR policies and practices 2% A combination of both the work location and the multi-unit headquarters determines HR policies and practices 42% Is your organization a single-unit organization or a multi-unit organization? For multi-unit organizations, are HR policies and practices determined by the multi-unit headquarters, by each work location or by both? Does your organization have U.S.- based operations (business units) only, or does it operate multinationally? n = 379 n = 283 Corporate (companywide) 69% Business unit/division 19% Facility/location 12% n = 283 What is the HR department/function for which you responded throughout this survey? SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014
  • 36. 36 Survey Methodology • Response rate = 14% • 411 HR professionals with a job function of employment/recruitment from a randomly selected sample of SHRM’s membership • Margin of error +/- 5% • Survey fielded March 6 to 18, 2014 SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014
  • 37. For more survey/poll findings, visit shrm.org/surveys For more information about SHRM’s Customized Research Services, visit shrm.org/customizedresearch Follow us on Twitter @SHRM_Research 37 About SHRM Research Project leader: Andrew Mariotti, senior researcher, SHRM Research Project contributors: Evren Esen, director, Survey Programs, SHRM Research Lynn Chen, research coordinator, SHRM Research Tanya Mulvey, researcher, SHRM Research Copy editor: Katya Scanlan, SHRM Knowledge Center SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014
  • 38. Founded in 1948, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is the world’s largest HR membership organization devoted to human resource management. Representing more than 275,000 members in over 160 countries, the Society is the leading provider of resources to serve the needs of HR professionals and advance the professional practice of human resource management. SHRM has more than 575 affiliated chapters within the United States and subsidiary offices in China, India and United Arab Emirates. Visit us at shrm.org. SHRM Survey Findings: Résumés, Cover Letters, Interviews ©SHRM 2014 38 About SHRM