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Flexibilityfor selectpopulations final

  1. 1. SHRM Survey Findings:Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations April 26 , 2012
  2. 2. Definitions Disabled worker: employee with a disability that qualifies under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Low-wage/hourly worker: employee earning $15.50/hour or less. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 2
  3. 3. Key FindingsDisabled workers Do organizations currently employ individuals with disabilities that qualify under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)? Nearly two-thirds (65%) of organizations currently employ individuals with disabilities that qualify under the ADA. Almost one-half (47%) of the organizations have also created flexible work arrangements specifically for this population. Of the organizations that do not currently employ individuals with ADA-qualified disabilities, one-third (33%) indicated that they would provide flexible work arrangements if requested, while 65% indicated that the decision would be made on a case-by-case basis. What type of flexible work arrangements does your organization offer for employees with ADA-qualified disabilities? Among organizations that employ individuals with ADA-qualified disabilities and offer flexible work arrangements specifically created for these employees, the most common flexible work arrangement was reduced work hours (60%). Organizations also provided traditional flextime (59%), telecommuting/ working from home options (55%) and break arrangements (47%). Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 3
  4. 4. Key FindingsVeterans How likely are organizations to provide flexible work arrangements for veterans? Among the organizations that do not currently employ any veterans, 23% indicated that they would provide flexible work arrangements if a veteran requested such arrangements, while 73% of organizations indicated that the decision would be made on a case-by-case basis. Organizations that already employ and provide veteran employees with flexible work arrangements typically offer shift flexibility (66%), last-minute flexibility (55%), traditional flextime (52%) and telecommuting/work from home options (52%). What are the obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for veteran employees? Approximately one-third (35%) of organizations had concerns about providing equal treatment for all employees. Other challenges in implementing flexible work arrangements for veteran employees included ensuring that the work is done/satisfying the customer (30%) and the impracticality given the nature of jobs in the organization’s industry (25%). Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 4
  5. 5. Key FindingsLow-Wage/Hourly Workers Do organizations currently employ low-wage/hourly workers? Approximately three-quarters of organizations (78%) employ low-wage/hourly workers. Of these organizations, one-quarter (25%) have created and implemented flexible work arrangements specifically for these employees. What flexible work arrangements do organizations offer specifically for low-wage/hourly employees? Nearly three-quarters of organizations (71%) offer reduced work hours for their low-wage/hourly workers. Other common flexible work arrangements provided to low-wage/hourly employees include traditional flextime (61%), shift flexibility (59%), break arrangements (51%) and leave for caregiving (51%). Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 5
  6. 6. Key FindingsParents With Dependent Care Responsibilities Do organizations design flexible work arrangements specifically for employees who are parents with dependent care responsibilities? Roughly one-third of organizations (32%) indicated that they have created and implemented flexible work arrangements specifically for this population. According to these organizations, the most common flexible work arrangements are traditional flextime (73%), last-minute flexibility (65%), reduced work hours (57%) and leave for caregiving (57%). Have organizations used flexible work arrangements as a means to recruit parents with dependent care responsibilities? The majority of organizations (96%) indicated that they do not make any special effort beyond what they do to recruit all employees. HR professionals report that the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements are equal treatment for all employees (40%), ensuring work is done/satisfying the customer (37%), difficulty in supervising employees (30%) and possible co-worker resentment (30%). Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 6
  7. 7. Disabled Workers Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 7
  8. 8. Does your organization currently employ any individuals with disabilities that qualify under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)? Yes 65% No 35%Note: n = 422. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 8
  9. 9. Does your organization currently employ any individuals with disabilities that qualify under the ADA?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to currently employ anyindividuals with disabilities that qualify under the ADA. Comparison by organization staff size 500 to 2,499 employees (81%) 1 to 99 employees (38%) > 2,500 to 24,999 employees (86%) 100 to 499 employees (58%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 9
  10. 10. Has your organization created and implemented any flexible work arrangements specifically for your employees who are individuals with disabilities that qualify under the ADA? Yes 47% No 53%Note: n = 217. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations currently employ individualswith disabilities were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 10
  11. 11. What flexible work arrangements does your organization offer specifically for your employees who are individuals with ADA-qualified disabilities? Percentage Reduced work hours (e.g., less than full-time, part-time) 60% Traditional flextime (allowing employees to periodically change starting and quitting times within some range of 59% hours) Telecommuting/working from home 55% Break arrangements (giving employees some control over when they take breaks—e.g., employees and employers 47% create a mutual agreement on when employees are allowed to take breaks, allowing for more flexibility) Last-minute flexibility (allowing employees to take time off during the workday to attend to important family or 43% personal needs without losing pay) Shift flexibility (allowing employees to coordinate with co-workers to adjust their schedules by trading, dropping or 40% picking up shifts) Leave for caregiving (e.g., caring for a sick child, elder care; this leave goes beyond the maternity, paternity or 38% adoption leave policies) Compressed workweek (working longer hours on fewer days for at least part of the year) 24% Alternative location arrangements (working at a hub or other site that isn’t at the employee’s home or the 20% organization’s workplace) Alternative or modified work assignments* 3% Other 9%Note: n = 98. Only respondents whose organizations employ individuals with disabilities and have created and implemented flexible work arrangementsspecifically for those employees were asked this question. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. An asterisk (*) indicates that thisresponse option was developed from open-ended responses. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 11
  12. 12. Would your organization provide flexible work arrangements if an individual with an ADA-qualified disability requested such arrangements? Yes 25% No, because no employees in our organization are offered 7% flexible work arrangements It depends; the decision would be made on a case-by- 68% case basisNote: n = 151. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations currently employ individualswith disabilities but have not created or implemented any specific flexibility options for individuals with disabilities were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 12
  13. 13. If your organization hired an individual with an ADA-qualified disability, would it provide flexible work arrangements upon the employee’s request? Yes 33% No, because no employees in our organization are offered 2% flexible work arrangements It depends; the decision would be made on a case-by- 65% case basisNote: n = 207. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations do not currently employindividuals with disabilities were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 13
  14. 14. Does your organization actively recruit employees with ADA-qualified disabilities? Yes 29% No special effort beyond what we do to 71% recruit all employeesNote: n = 347. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 14
  15. 15. Does your organization actively recruit employees with ADA-qualified disabilities?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 2,500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to actively recruitemployees with ADA-qualified disabilities. Comparison by organization staff size 2,500 to 24,999 employees (37%) > 1 to 99 employees (13%)Comparisons by organization sectorPublicly owned for-profit and nonprofit organizations are more likely than privately owned for-profit organizations to actively recruitemployees with ADA-qualified disabilities. Comparison by organization sector Publicly owned for-profit (38%) > Privately owned for-profit (16%) Nonprofit (38%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 15
  16. 16. Has your organization used flexible work arrangements as a means to specifically recruit ADA-qualified disabled individuals? Yes 21% No 74% No, but we plan to do so within the 5% next 12 monthsNote: n = 127. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations actively recruit individualswith disabilities and those who didn’t know if their organizations actively recruit individuals with disabilities were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 16
  17. 17. Does your organization actively attempt to retain employees with ADA-qualified disabilities? Yes 32% No special effort beyond what we do 68% to retain all empoyeesNote: n = 396. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 17
  18. 18. Does your organization offer any supervisor/managerial training related to support for disabled workers’ workplace flexibility? Yes 23% No 65% No, but we plan to do so within the next 12% 12 monthsNote: n = 375. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 18
  19. 19. Does your organization offer any supervisor/managerial training related to support for disabled workers’ workplace flexibility?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to offersupervisor/managerial training related to support for disabled workers’ workplace flexibility. Comparison by organization staff size 1 to 99 employees (16%) 25,000 or more employees (58%) > 100 to 499 employees (21%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 19
  20. 20. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for disabled workers? PercentageEnsuring equal treatment for all employees 34%Ensuring work is done/satisfying the customer 32%Impractical given the nature of jobs in our industry 26%Job requirements/workload do not allow 26%Difficulty supervising employees who work from home, managing changes in schedule 25%Havent heard about the need for these programs and policies from employees 21%Potential abuse (e.g., absenteeism) 18%Potential loss of productivity 17%Possible co-worker resentment 16%Small organization/few employees 15%Lack of organizational/senior management support 13%Lack of staff 13%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 20
  21. 21. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for disabled workers? (continued) PercentageAdministrative hassles 12%Inflexible work arrangements 10%Union considerations 9%Managers dont want these policies and programs 7%Costs too much/limited funds 6%Lack of information about these programs and policies 6%Liability 6%Time constraints 6%Employment laws restrict the arrangements that can be offered 4%Not a cost-effective investment 4%We had a negative experience in a prior effort 1%There are no business obstacles 10%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 21
  22. 22. Veterans Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 22
  23. 23. Does your organization currently employ any veterans? Yes 87% No 13%Note: n = 403. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 23
  24. 24. Does your organization currently employ any veterans?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 100 to 2,499 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to currently employ veterans. Comparisons by organization staff size 100 to 499 employees (91%) > 1 to 99 employees (63%) 500 to 2,499 employees (99%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 24
  25. 25. Has your organization created and implemented any flexible work arrangements specifically for employees who are veterans? Yes 10% No 90%Note: n = 295. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations currently employs veteranswere asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 25
  26. 26. What flexible work arrangements does your organization offer specifically for your employees who are veterans? Percentage Shift flexibility (allowing employees to coordinate with co-workers to adjust their schedules by trading, dropping or 66% picking up shifts) Last-minute flexibility (allowing employees to take time off during the workday to attend to important family or 55% personal needs without losing pay) Telecommuting/working from home 52% Traditional flextime (allowing employees to periodically change starting and quitting times within some range of 52% hours) Leave for caregiving (e.g., caring for a sick child, elder care; this leave goes beyond the maternity, paternity or 48% adoption leave policies ) Compressed workweek (working longer hours on fewer days for at least part of the year) 48% Reduced work hours (e.g., less than full-time, part-time) 41% Break arrangements (giving employees some control over when they take breaks—e.g., employees and employers 41% create a mutual agreement on when employees are allowed to take breaks, allowing for more flexibility) Alternative location arrangements (working at a hub or other site that isn’t at the employee’s home or the 21% organization’s workplace) Military leave policy/military time off* 7% Other 7%Note: n = 29. Only respondents whose organizations currently employ veterans and have created and implemented flexible work arrangements specifically forthose employees were asked this question. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. An asterisk (*) indicates that this response optionwas developed from open-ended responses. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 26
  27. 27. Would your organization provide flexible work arrangements if a veteran requested such arrangements? Yes 18% No, because no employees in our organization are offered flexible 7% work arrangements It depends; the decision would 75% be made on a case-by-case basisNote: n = 300. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations currently employveterans, but have not created or implemented any specific flexibility options for veterans were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 27
  28. 28. If your organization hired a veteran, would it provide flexible work arrangements upon the employee’s request? Yes 23% No, because no employees in our organization are offered flexible 4% work arrangements It depends; the decision would 73% be made on a case-by-case basisNote: n = 92. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations do not currently employveterans were asked this question. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 28
  29. 29. Does your organization actively recruit veterans? Yes 41% No special effort beyond what we do to 59% recruit all employeesNote: n = 377. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 29
  30. 30. Does your organization actively recruit veterans?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 100 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to actively recruit veterans. Comparisons by organization staff size 100 to 499 employees (42%) 500 to 2,500 employees (44%) > 1 to 99 employees (21%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (55%) 25,000 or more employees (75%)Comparisons by organization sectorPublicly owned for-profit organizations are more likely than nonprofit and privately owned for-profit organizations to activelyrecruit veterans. Comparisons by organization sector Nonprofit (32%) Publicly owned for-profit (60%) > Privately owned for-profit (34%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 30
  31. 31. Has your organization used flexible work arrangements as a means to specifically recruit veterans? Yes 6% No 90% No, but we plan to do so within 4% the next 12 monthsNote: n = 134. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations actively recruit veterans andthose who didn’t know if their organizations actively recruit veterans were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 31
  32. 32. Does your organization actively attempt to retain veterans? Yes 20% No special effort beyond what we 80% do to retain all employeesNote: n = 401. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 32
  33. 33. Does your organization actively attempt to retain veterans?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 2,500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to actively attempt toretain veterans. Comparisons by organization staff size 2,500 to 24,999 employees (34%) > 1 to 99 employees (11%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 33
  34. 34. Does your organization offer any supervisor/managerial training related to support for veteran workplace flexibility? Yes 10% No 85% No, but we plan to do so within 6% the next 12 monthsNote: n = 364. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages do no equal 100% due to rounding. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 34
  35. 35. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for veterans? PercentageEnsuring equal treatment for all employees 35%Ensuring work is done/satisfying the customer 30%Impractical given the nature of jobs in our industry 25%Difficulty supervising employees who work from home, managing changes in schedule 24%Job requirements/workload do not allow 24%Havent heard about the need for these programs and policies from employees 22%Potential loss of productivity 19%Potential abuse (e.g., absenteeism, etc.) 18%Possible co-worker resentment 16%Small organization/few employees 15%Lack of staff 13%Lack of organizational/senior management support 12%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 35
  36. 36. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for veterans? (continued) PercentageAdministrative hassles 9%Inflexible work arrangements 8%Union considerations 8%Lack of information about these programs and policies 7%Managers dont want these policies and programs 7%Time constraints 5%Costs too much/limited funds 4%Liability 4%Not a cost-effective investment 4%Employment laws restrict the arrangements that can be offered 3%We had a negative experience in a prior effort 1%There are no business obstacles 10%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 36
  37. 37. Low-Wage/Hourly Workers Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 37
  38. 38. Does your organization currently employ any low-wage/hourly workers? Yes 78% No 22%Note: n = 427. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 38
  39. 39. Does your organization currently employ any low-wage/hourly workers?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 500 to 24,999 employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to currently employ low-wage/hourly workers. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,500 employees (89%) > 1 to 99 employees (63%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (88%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 39
  40. 40. Has your organization created and implemented any flexible work arrangements specifically for your employees who are low-wage/hourly workers? Yes 25% No 75%Note: n = 310. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations currently employ low-wage/hourly workers were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 40
  41. 41. What flexible work arrangements does your organization offer specifically for employees who are low-wage/hourly workers? Percentage Reduced work hours (e.g., less than full-time, part-time) 71% Traditional flextime (allowing employees to periodically change starting and quitting times within some range of 61% hours) Shift flexibility (allowing employees to coordinate with co-workers to adjust their schedules by trading, dropping or 59% picking up shifts) Leave for caregiving (e.g., caring for a sick child, elder care; this leave goes beyond the maternity, paternity or 51% adoption leave policies) Break arrangements (giving employees some control over when they take breaks—e.g., employees and employers 51% create a mutual agreement on when employees are allowed to take breaks, allowing for more flexibility) Last-minute flexibility (allowing employees to take time off during the workday to attend to important family or 47% personal needs without losing pay) Compressed workweek (working longer hours on fewer days for at least part of the year) 42% Telecommuting/working from home 21% Alternative location arrangements (working at a hub or other site that isn’t at the employee’s home or the 13% organization’s workplace) Other 4%Note: n = 76. Only respondents whose organizations currently employ low-wage/hourly workers and have created and implemented flexible work arrangementsspecifically for those employees were asked this question. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 41
  42. 42. Would your organization provide flexible work arrangements if a low-wage/hourly worker requested such arrangements? Yes 6% No, because no employees in our organization are offered 17% flexible work arrangements It depends; the decision would be made on a case-by- 77% case basisNote: n = 241. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations currently employ low-wage/hourly workers, but have not created or implemented any flexible work arrangements specifically for those employees were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 42
  43. 43. If your organization hired a low-wage/hourly worker, would it provide flexible work arrangements upon the employee’s request? Yes 13% No, because no employees in our organization are offered 16% flexible work arrangements It depends; the decision would be made on a case-by- 72% case basisNote: n = 88. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations do not currently employ low-wage/hourly workers were asked this question. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 43
  44. 44. Does your organization actively recruit low-wage/hourly workers? Yes 56% No special effort beyond what we do to 44% recruit all employeesNote: n = 402. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 44
  45. 45. Does your organization actively recruit low-wage/hourly workers?Comparisons by organization staff sizeLarger organizations with 100 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to actively recruit low-wage/hourly workers. Comparisons by organization staff size 100 to 499 employees (59%) 500 to 2,500 employees (68%) > 1 to 99 employees (31%) 2,500 to 24,999 employees (66%) 25,000 or more employees (79%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 45
  46. 46. Has your organization used flexible work arrangements as a means to specifically recruit low-wage/hourly workers? Yes 21% No 77% No, but we plan to do so within the next 12 2% monthsNote: n = 218. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations actively recruit low-wage/hourly workers and those who didn’t know if their organizations actively recruit low-wage/hourly workers were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 46
  47. 47. Does your organization actively attempt to retain low-wage/hourly workers? Yes 63% No special effort beyond what we do to 37% retain all employeesNote: n = 380. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 47
  48. 48. Does your organization actively attempt to retain low-wage/hourly workers?Comparisons by organization staff sizeOrganizations with 500 to 2,500 and 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees toactively attempt to retain low-wage/hourly workers. Comparisons by organization staff size 500 to 2,500 employees (73%) > 1 to 99 employees (48%) 25,000 or more employees (92%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 48
  49. 49. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for low- wage/hourly workers? PercentageEnsuring equal treatment for all employees 37%Ensuring work is done/satisfying the customer 34%Job requirements/workload do not allow 32%Impractical given the nature of jobs in our industry 31%Difficulty supervising employees who work from home, managing changes in schedule 27%Potential abuse (e.g., absenteeism) 26%Potential loss of productivity 24%Possible co-worker resentment 21%Havent heard about the need for these programs and policies from employees 20%Lack of staff 17%Small organization/few employees 15%Lack of organizational/senior management support 14%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 49
  50. 50. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for low- wage/hourly workers? (continued) PercentageInflexible work arrangements 12%Administrative hassles 10%Managers dont want these policies and programs 8%Union considerations 8%Time constraints 7%Lack of information about these programs and policies 6%Not a cost-effective investment 6%Costs too much/limited funds 4%Employment laws restrict the arrangements that can be offered 4%Liability 3%We had a negative experience in a prior effort 1%There are no business obstacles 8%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 50
  51. 51. Parents With Dependent Care Responsibilities Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 51
  52. 52. Has your organization created and implemented any flexible work arrangements specifically for your employees who are parents with dependent care responsibilities? Yes 32% No 68%Note: n = 382. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 52
  53. 53. What flexible work arrangements does your organization offer specifically for your employees who are parents with dependent care responsibilities? Percentage Traditional flextime (allowing employees to periodically change starting and quitting times within some range of 73% hours) Last-minute flexibility (allowing employees to take time off during the workday to attend to important family or 65% personal needs without losing pay) Reduced work hours (e.g., less than full-time, part-time) 57% Leave for caregiving (e.g., caring for a sick child, elder care; this leave goes beyond the maternity, paternity or 57% adoption leave policies) Telecommuting/working from home 56% Break arrangements (giving employees some control over when they take breaks—e.g., employees and employers 51% create a mutual agreement on when employees are allowed to take breaks, allowing for more flexibility) Shift flexibility (allowing employees to coordinate with co-workers to adjust their schedules by trading, dropping or 48% picking up shifts) Compressed workweek (working longer hours on fewer days for at least part of the year) 39% Alternative location arrangements (working at a hub or other site that isn’t at the employee’s home or the 17% organization’s workplace) Other 6%Note: n = 122. Only respondents whose organizations currently employ parents with dependent care responsibilities and have created and implemented flexiblework arrangements specifically for these employees were asked this question. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 53
  54. 54. Would you provide flexible work arrangements if employees who are parents with dependent care responsibilities requested such arrangements? Yes 10% No, because no employees in our organization are offered 11% flexible work arrangements It depends; the decision would be made on a case-by- 79% case basisNote: n = 289. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations have not created orimplemented flexible work arrangements specifically for parents with dependent care responsibilities were asked this question. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 54
  55. 55. Does your organization actively recruit parents with dependent care responsibilities? Yes 5% No special effort beyond what we do to 96% recruit all employeesNote: n = 400. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Percentages do not equal 100% due to rounding. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 55
  56. 56. Does your organization actively attempt to retain parents with dependent care responsibilities? Yes 15% No special effort beyond what we do to 85% retain all employeesNote: n = 408. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 56
  57. 57. Has your organization made any special effort to ask fathers what they need in terms of workplace flexibility? Yes 5% No 95%Note: n = 371. Respondents who answered “Don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 57
  58. 58. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for parents with dependent care responsibilities? PercentageEnsuring equal treatment for all employees 40%Ensuring work is done/satisfying the customer 37%Possible co-worker resentment 30%Difficulty supervising employees who work from home, managing changes in schedule 30%Impractical given the nature of jobs in our industry 28%Job requirements/workload do not allow 27%Potential abuse (e.g., absenteeism, etc.) 26%Potential loss of productivity 22%Havent heard about the need for these programs and policies from employees 19%Lack of staff 16%Small organization/few employees 15%Lack of organizational/senior management support 14%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 58
  59. 59. What are the main obstacles to implementing flexible work arrangements for parents with dependent care responsibilities? (continued) PercentageAdministrative hassles 13%Inflexible work arrangements 11%Union considerations 9%Managers dont want these policies and programs 8%Lack of information about these programs and policies 6%Time constraints 6%Costs too much/limited funds 5%Not a cost-effective investment 5%Liability 4%Employment laws restrict the arrangements that can be offered 3%We had a negative experience in a prior effort 1%There are no business obstacles 9%Note: n = 399. Percentages do not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 59
  60. 60. Demographics: Organization Industry PercentageManufacturing 23%Health care and social assistance 15%Professional, scientific and technical services 15%Educational services 9%Public administration 9%Finance and insurance 7%Construction 5%Retail trade 5%Accommodation and food services 4%Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services 4%Information 4% n = 390. Percentages may not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 60
  61. 61. Demographics: Organization Industry (continued) PercentageTransportation and warehousing 4%Religious, grant-making, civic, professional and similar organizations 3%Repair and maintenance 3%Wholesale trade 3%Arts, entertainment and recreation 2%Mining 2%Real estate rental and leasing 2%Utilities 2%Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting 1%Personal and laundry services 1%Other 9%n = 390. Percentages may not equal 100% due to multiple response options. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 61
  62. 62. Demographics: Organization Sector Privately owned for-profit organization 49% Publicly owned for-profit 20% organization Nonprofit organization 18% Government sector 11% Other 3% Note: n = 387. Percentages may not equal 100% due to rounding. Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 62
  63. 63. Demographics: Organization Staff Size 1 to 99 employees 25% 100 to 499 employees 33% 500 to 2499 employees 20% 2500 to 24999 employees 18% 25000 or more employees 4% n = 381 Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 63
  64. 64. Demographics: OtherDoes your organization have U.S.-based Is your organization a single-unit organization or a multi-operations (business units) only, or does it unit organization?operate multinationally? Single-unit company: An organization inU.S.-based operations only 74% which the location and the organization are 35% one and the sameMultinational operations 26% Multi-unit organization: An organization thatn = 385 65% has more than one location n = 391What is the HR department/function for which For multi-unit organizations, are HR policies and practicesyou responded throughout this survey? determined by the multi-unit corporate headquarters, byCorporate (companywide) 68% each work location or both?Business unit/division 15% Multi-unit headquarters determines HR policies 52% and practicesFacility/location 17%n = 269 Each work location determines HR policies and 4% practices A combination of both the work location and the multi-unit headquarters determine HR 44% policies and practices n = 270 Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 64
  65. 65. SHRM Survey Findings: Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations Methodology  Response rate = 18%  Sample composed of 509 randomly selected HR professionals from SHRM’s membership  Margin of error +/- 4%  Survey fielded February 8-27, 2012 For more poll findings, visit www.shrm.org/surveys Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/SHRM_ResearchProject leader:Christina Lee, SHRM ResearchProject contributors:Mark Schmit, Ph.D., SPHR, vice president, SHRM ResearchEvren Esen, manager, SHRM Survey Research CenterCopy editor:Katya Scanlan Workplace Flexibility for Select Populations ©SHRM 2012 65

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