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Background check credit final
 

Background check credit final

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    Background check credit final Background check credit final Presentation Transcript

    • January 22, 2010
      Background Checking: Conducting Credit Background Checks
    • Introduction
      Overview of Credit Background Checks
      Many employers conduct some kind of background check on job applicants and/or employees. Background checks may include verification of educational or professional history, contacting references, obtaining a report on an individual’s criminal history, and/or obtaining a report on an individual’s credit history.
      The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) authorizes employers to obtain a consumer report for “employment purposes” from a consumer reporting agency (CRA) so long as certain disclosure requirements are met. The term “employment purposes,” means a report that is used for the purpose of evaluating a consumer for employment, promotion, reassignment or retention as an employee.
      For some employers, credit payment records serve as a factor in evaluating an individual’s suitability for a job, while others seek information on driving records, criminal histories, or other background information. All of these types of reports are considered consumer reports if they are obtained from a CRA.
      Before procuring a consumer report, FCRA requires employers to clearly disclose, in writing, that a report may be obtained for employment purposes and get written authorization from the individual. FCRA also requires that the employer provide the individual with a copy of the report and a written description of the consumer’s rights before taking any adverse action based in whole or in part on the report.
      The Federal Trade Commission website has additional information on the rights and duties imposed by the Fair Credit Reporting Act at (www.ftc.gov/os/statutes/fcradoc.pdf)
      2
    • Does your organization, or an agency hired by your organization, conduct credit background checksfor any job candidates by reviewing the candidates’ consumer reports?
      3
      Note: n = 343
    • When conducting credit background checks on job candidates, in general, how many years of credit history does your organization check by job level?
      4
      Note: n = 45. The data in this table represent organizations that conduct credit background checks on all job candidates. Respondents were asked to round up to the highest year.
    • On which categories of job candidates does your organization conduct credit background checks?
      5
      Note: n = 158 .The data in this figure represent organizations that conduct credit background checks on select job candidates. Percentages do not total to 100% as respondents were allowed multiple choices.
    • When conducting credit background checks on job candidates, in general, how many years of credit history does your organization check?
      6
      Note: n = 4-138. The data in this table represent organizations that conduct credit background checks on select job candidates. Data sorted by the 6–7 years column.Respondents were asked to round up to the highest year.
    • In general, if a credit background check revealed information that presented the job candidate’s financial situation negatively, what types of information are MOST likely to affect your decision to NOT extend a job offer?
      7
      Note: n = 201. Percentages do not total to 100% as respondents were allowed multiple choices. Respondents were asked to select their top two options.
    • When does your organization, or any agency hired by your organization, initiate credit background checks on job candidates?
      8
      Note: n = 199
    • Does your organization allow job candidates, in certain circumstances, the opportunity to explain the results (e.g., high debt, bankruptcy, etc.) of their consumer report that might have an adverse effect on an employment decision?
      9
      Note: n = 197
    • What is the primary reason that your organization conducts credit background checkson job candidates?
      10
      Note: n = 195
    • Demographics: Organization Industry
      11
      Note: n=312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.
    • Demographics: Organization Industry (continued)
      12
      Note: n=312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.
    • Demographics: Organization Sector
      13
      Note: n = 319. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding
    • Demographics: Organization Staff Size
      14
      Note: n = 312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding
    • Demographics: Organization Region
      15
      Note: n = 312. Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding
    • Demographics: Organization Operations Location
      16
      Note: n = 315 Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding
    • Background Checking: Conducting Credit Background Checks
      Methodology
      Response rate = 19%
      Sample comprised of 433 randomly selected HR professionals from SHRM’s membership
      Margin of error is +/- 5
      Survey fielded November 18 – December 4, 2009
      17