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MALAYSIA - The East Asia

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The presentation is basically constitutes an amalgamation of Business as well as Cultural perspective of Malaysia.

The presentation is basically constitutes an amalgamation of Business as well as Cultural perspective of Malaysia.

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  • 1. Presentation On Cross Cultural Management MALAYSIA Submitted ByShreyash falke
  • 2. MALAYSIA Malaysia is a nation located in the Southeast Asia, bordered by Thailand, Indonesia, and Brunei, and shares water boundaries with Singapore, Vietnam, and the Philippines. Malaysia has coasts along the South China Sea.
  • 3. HISTORY ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS HAVE BEEN FOUND THROUGHOUT PENINSULAR MALAYSIA, “SABAH & SARAWAK”. THE EARLIEST EVIDENCE OF HUMAN HABITATION IN THE AREA DATES BACK 40,000 YEARS. THE MALAY PENINSULA WAS KNOWN TO ANCIENT INDIANS AS ‘SUVARNADVIPA’ OR THE ‘GOLDEN PENINSULA’. HINDUISM & BUDDHISM WERE INTRODUCED TO MALAYANS BY INDIANS WHO CAME HERE AROUND 100 BC. IN THE 15TH CENTURY “MALACCA” WAS THE INITIAL NAME OF MALAYSIA. MALAYSIA GOT ITS NAME IN THE YEAR 1963 AFTER THE FUSION OF SINGAPORE, SARAWAK & SABAH INTO A FEDERAL UNION. MALAYSIA FINALLY GOT ITS INDEPENDENCE FROM BRITISH RULE IN THE YEAR 1957.
  • 4. GEOGRAPHY  CLIMATE : LOCATED NEAR THE EQUATOR, MALAYSIA’S CLIMATE IS CONSIDERED TO BE AS EQUATORIAL, BEING HOT AND HUMID THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. MALAYSIA FACES TWO MONSOON WIN SEASONS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. THE SOUTHWEST MONSOON FROM LATE MAY TO SEPTEMBER & THE NORTHWEST MONSOON FROM NOVEMBER TO MARCH.  BORDERS : MALAYSIA SHARES ITS BORDERS WITH : THAILAND INDONESIA BRUNEI.  LAND : THE TOTAL LAND AREA OF MALAYSIA COVERS AROUND 329,847KM2, THE 66TH LARGEST IN THE WORD IN TERMS OF AREA.
  • 5.  MOUNTAIN RANGES : The highest mountain range in Malaysia is the Crocker range in Sabah. This range houses Mount Kinabalu, the highest mountain in the country. FOREST : Forests approximately covers 58.2% of Malaysian land. DEMOGRAPHICS : The demographics of Malaysia are represented by the multiple ethnic groups that exist in this country. Malaysia's population, as of July 2012, is estimated to be 29,457,000 which makes it the 41st most populated country in the world. Out of these, 5.72 million Malaysians live in east Malaysia and 22.5 million live in peninsular Malaysia. the Malaysian population continues to grow at a rate of 2.4% per annum. the female population is greater, with 15,055,845 women, representing 51.11% of the total, compared to 14,184,082 or 48.15% men.
  • 6. NATIONAL FLAG (Jalur Gemilang) NATIONAL EMBLEM (“Jata Negara” in Malay, or the Coat of Arms of Malaysia)
  • 7. STATES & TERRITORY Malaysia is a federation of thirteen states (in Malay: Negeri) and three Federal Territories (in Malay: Wilayah Persekutuan). Eleven states are situated on the Malay Peninsula (West Malaysia) as well as two Federal Territories ,while two states, Sabah and Sarawak are on the island of Borneo (the Malay part of the island is called East Malaysia or Malaysian Borneo); one Federal Territory, the island group with its main island Labuang is situated north east of Brunei and west of Sabah. So Malaysia has a total of 13 states and 4 federal territories. NATIONAL CAPITAL (Kuala Lumpur) )
  • 8. RELIGION Malaysia’s population is multi-ethnic. Around 29 million people are currently spending their life in Malaysia. The dominant religion in Malaysia is “Islam”, whose followers make up 61 per cent of the population. Islam is recognized as the state religion of Malaysia, although the country has a secular constitution. OTHERS 4% BUDDHIST 20% CHRISTIANS 9% MUSLIMS 61% HINDU 6% MUSLIMS HINDU CHRISTIANS BUDDHIST OTHERS
  • 9. NATIVE LANGUAGE The national, or official, language of Malaysia is Malay (Bahasa Malaysia) which is the mother tongue of the majority of ethnic groups. The main ethnic groups within Malaysia comprise the Malays, Chinese and Indians, with many other ethnic groups represented in smaller numbers, each with its own languages. Malaysia contains speakers of 137 living languages. The government provides schooling at the primary level in each of the three major languages, Malay, Chinese (Mandarin), and Tamil. Malaysian English also sees wide usage in business, along with Manglish, which is a colloquial form of English with heavy Malay, Chinese dialect and Tamil influences. Most Malaysians are conversant in English, although some are only fluent in the Manglish form. Many businesses in Malaysia conduct their transactions in English, and it is sometimes used in official correspondence. Examinations are based on British English. English remains an active second language in many areas of Malaysian society. Many Malays don’t have Surnames
  • 10. General Greetings I Saya You Anda/Awak We Kita/ Kami She/he Dia They Mereka Mr. Encik Miss. Cik ENGLISH MALAY Good Morning Selamat pagi Good Afternoon Selamat tengahari Goodbye Selamat tinggal Bon Voyage Selamat jalan Fine Baik Welcome Selamat datang How do you do ? Apa khabar ?
  • 11. TRADITIONAL ATTIRE • Baju Melayu is the term for clothing in the Malay language. Since Malaysia comprises three major cultures: Malay, Chinese and Indian, each culture has its own traditional and religious articles of clothing all of which are gender specific and may be adapted to local influences and conditions.
  • 12.  Gather at Mamak (Street Side Restaurant) store to gossip, eat and drink until late night & wee hours of the morning.  Malaysian’s are very fond of Shopping.  Sitting at parks, from afternoon until evening.  Eating is another favourite past time. With so many different type of food, Malay, Indian, Chinese and Western.  Going to the cinemas is what they prefer on weekends, especially for the younger generations.  Playing Football (for boys)  Having a picnic by the beach.  Playing online games in Internet Room.
  • 13. Malaysian Cuisine ROTI CANAI ROTI JALA ASAM Laksa SATAY
  • 14. Malaysian Cuisine Hainanese Chicken Rice Char kuey teow Oyster omelet Pasembur
  • 15. POLITICAL REVIEW The politics of Malaysia takes place in the framework of a federal representative democratic constitutional monarchy, in which the Yang di-Pertuan Agong is head of state and the Prime Minister of Malaysia is the head of government. Executive power is exercised by the federal government and the 13 state governments. Yang di-Pertuan Agong PM NAJIB RAZAK (Current)
  • 16. FAMOUS TOURIST ATTRACTIONS
  • 17. MULU CAVES PERHENTIAN ISLANDS Gunung Mulu National Park in Malaysian Borneo Northeastern Malaysia near the Thai border LangkaWI Petronas Twin Towers Kedah, adjacent to the Thai border Kuala Lumpur
  • 18. Pulau Tioman East Coast of peninsular Malaysia Taman Negara (NATIONAL PARK) Titiwangsa Mountains Georgetown Inner City CAMERON HIGHLANDS North-East corner of Penang Island Northwestern tip of Pahang
  • 19. Like in other countries around the world, Malaysians hold football in the highest esteem. During the football season, multitudes will hang out at their folks and restaurants to catch the game. Sport in Malaysia includes badminton, rugby, football, squash and field hockey & Moto GP. Golf is another sport which is growing in popularity after many courses were built. Malaysia has hosted several major sports events including the Commonwealth Games in 1998.  In September 2010, Malaysian sports officials announced an agreement with some of Scotland's top sports organizations to develop partnerships to use Scottish expertise to create a successful sports industry in Malaysia.
  • 20.  Malaysia is an upper-middle income economy, which is relatively open and state-oriented. Malaysia's GDP growth was 5.1 percent in 2012 and projected at 5.0 percent in 2013.  In 2012, the economy of Malaysia was the third largest economy in South East Asia behind more populous Indonesia and Thailand and 29th largest economy in the world by purchasing power parity with gross domestic product stands at US$492.4 billion and per capita US$16,922.  According to IMF(International Monetary Fund) Malaysia’s per capital GDP was estimated to be around US$ 17,526 (Oct2013).  Malaysian currency is known as “Malaysian Ringgit”. Current exchange rate : 1 Indian Rupee = 0.053550 Malaysian Ringgit.
  • 21.  Malaysia is a leading exporter of electrical appliances, electronic parts and components, palm oil, and natural gas.  After the Asian financial crisis of 1997-1998, Malaysia has continued to post solid growth rates, averaging 5.5 percent per year from 2000 – 2008. Growth was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in poverty, from 12.3 percent in 1984 to 2.3 percent in 2009.  However, pockets of poverty exist and income inequality remains high relative to the developed countries Malaysia aspires to emulate.  Malaysia has progressed from being a producer of raw materials, such as tin and rubber. Today Malaysia has one of the best Airports, Highways & Telecommunication systems in India.  In 2010, Malaysia launched the New Economic Model (NEM), which aims for the country to reach high income status by 2020 while ensuring that growth is also sustainable and inclusive. The NEM envisions economic growth that is primarily driven by the private sector and which moves the Malaysian economy into higher value-added activities in both industry and services.
  • 22. BUSINESS REVIEW  Government policies that maintain a business environment with opportunities for growth and profits have made Malaysia an attractive manufacturing and export base in the region. The private sector in Malaysia has become partners with the public sector in achieving the nation's development objectives.  Since June 2003, foreign investors could hold 100% of the equity in all investments in new projects, as well as investments in expansion/diversification projects by existing companies irrespective of the level of exports and without excluding any product or activity.  Malaysia also offers a wide range of tax incentives for manufacturing projects.  Import duties on a wide range of raw materials, components and machinery have been abolished, reduced or exempted.  Malaysia is committed to the ASEAN Common Effective Preferential Tariffs (CEPT) scheme under which all industrial goods traded within ASEAN are imposed import duties of 0% to 5%.  Excise duties are levied on selected products manufactured in Malaysia, namely cigarettes, tobacco products, alcoholic beverages, playing cards, mahjong tiles and motor vehicles.
  • 23. 1. Shell Malaysia Industry: Oil & Gas 2. Intel Malaysia Industry: Semiconductor Manufacturing 3. DHL Malaysia Industry: Logistics & Freight Forwarding 4. Petronas Industry: Oil & Gas 5. Maxis Industry: Telecommunications
  • 24. REASONS TO DO BUSINESS IN MALAYSIA The government's pro-business policies with various business and investment incentives to promote business. High population growth rate (2.3%) increased the population demand on various consumer products. Under the government's Economic Transformation Plan (ETP),wholesale and retail are areas earmarked in the National Key Economic Areas (NKEAs) and the authorities are actively promoting these areas. Malaysians can talk in several languages including English, Mandarin, Malay and others.
  • 25. Malaysia has entered into free trade agreements with ASEAN, China, Japan, South Korea, India, Pakistan, New Zealand, and Chile. Its major trading partners include China, Japan, the USA, Singapore, Thailand, Middle East, etc. Malaysia has also introduced special taxation and financial incentives to encourage foreign investment and in particular investments into research and development and promoted activities such as manufacturing, information and communications, biotechnology, healthcare, education and industrial related technology. Diverse business landscape; high quality products and services; good manufacturing practices; the development of good trade support facilities, infrastructure, and transport system; have made Malaysia a reliable supplier.
  • 26. MAJOR IMPORT AND EXPORT PRODUCTS BETWEEN INDIA AND MALAYSIA • In 2006, India-Malaysia trade reached a record US $ 6.58 billion, registering a growth of approximately 22.84% over the previous year and ten times the amount that existed 14 yeas ago. • According to the data of 2006/2007: Indian exports to Malaysia account for US $3,980.36 Whereas India imports goods worth US $9,557.85 million. (MARCH 2012) EXPORTS FROM INDIA TO MALASIYA EXPORTS FROM MALASIYA TO INDIA SUGAR RICE (BASMATI) CRUDE PETROLEUM & PETROLEUM PRODUCTS WHEAT PALM OIL FRESH VEGETABLES & FRUITS ELECTRONIC & ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS RMG COTTON & ACCESSORIES CHEMICALS & CHEMICAL PRODUCTS PRIMARY & SEMI FINISHED IRON CHEMICALS MADE UPS FABRICS ELECTRONIC GOODS METAL MANAFACTURES MACHINERY & INSTRUMENTS LEATHER TOBACCO TEXTILES & TRANSPORT EQUIPMENTS
  • 27. Do’s and Don'ts in the Country  Although handshakes are generally acceptable for both men and women, some Muslim ladies may acknowledge introductions to gentlemen by merely nodding and smiling. A handshake should only be initiated by ladies.  The traditional greeting or Salam resembles a handshake with both hands but without the grasp. The man offers both hands, lightly touches his friend's outstretched hands, and then brings his hands to his chest to mean, "I greet you from my heart". The visitor should reciprocate the Salam .  It is polite to call before visiting a home.  Shoes must always be removed when entering a Malaysian home.  Drinks are generally offered to guests. It is polite to accept.  The right hand is always used when eating with one's hand or giving and receiving objects.
  • 28.  The right forefinger is not used to point at places, objects or persons. Instead, the thumb of the right hand with four fingers folded under is the preferred usage.  Shoes must be removed when entering places of worship such as mosques and temples. Some mosques provide robes and scarves for female visitors. Taking photographs at places of worship is usually permitted but always ask permission beforehand.  Toasting is not a common practice in Malaysia. The country's large Muslim population does not drink alcohol.  Avoid white wrapping paper while gifting something to Malays as it symbolizes death and mourning.  It you offer food, it must be “Halal” (meaning permissible for Muslims).
  • 29. Malaysian court rules : Non-Muslims cannot use 'Allah' People of all faiths use the word Allah in Malay to refer to their God. A Malaysian court has ruled that non-Muslims cannot use the word Allah to refer to God, even in their own faiths, overturning a 2009 lower court ruling.  Land of thieves In Malaysia the only homes that don't have bars and padlocks, fences and gates, belong to the excruciatingly poor.  A land of drug addicts Near about 4% of Malaysia’s people are drug addicts.  Malaysia has a haze (Haze means a mix of Dust & Smoke. It causes vision and respiratory problems after a lot of exposure)