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A literate environment analysis
 

A literate environment analysis

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    A literate environment analysis A literate environment analysis Presentation Transcript

    • A Literate Environment Analysis Stephanie Houze EDUC 6706 Walden University June 2011
    • I.Getting to Know Literacy Learners, P–3
      • Analysis
      • I was able to effectively plan for instructions by using assessment to better understand my students. I knew that it was important for me to gather data on my students’ cognitive and noncognitive abilities. So, I used running records and the Motivation to Read Profile (MRP). Positive reading experiences begin from better understanding your students.
    • I.Getting to Know Literacy Learners, P–3
      • • Research
      • Utilizing cognitive assessments like reading running records can aid in acknowledging the students reading abilities (Tompkins, 2010).Noncognitive assessments like MRP includes two instruments: the reading survey and the conversational interview helps to understand students interest ( Gambrell, Palmer, Codling, & Mazzoni, 1996).
    • II. Selecting Texts
      • • Analysis
      • I was able to take into consideration student’s diverse backgrounds, reading abilities, and interests when selecting texts. The literacy matrix helped me to create a more proficient literate environment. It helped me to provide a broad collection of books that were engaging to all ability levels.
    • II. Selecting Texts
      • Research
      • The matrix helps to differentiate text. It is divided into four quadrants on the horizontal line and moves from a narrative text, and the vertical line moves from linguistic (word oriented) to semiotic (communication message through pictures) (Laureate Education, Inc, 2010a).
    • III. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective
      • • Analysis
      • I wanted my students to learn how to be in control of their learning by being strategic and metacognitive processors. I focused on teaching students strategies to help them with decoding words and comprehension. Students received feedback from me on different activities, but were encouraged to monitor their learning independently.
    • III. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective
      • • Research
      • The ultimate goal of the interactive perspective is to teach children how to be literate learners who can navigate the textual world independently (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b).
    • V. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives
      • • Analysis
      • I have learned the importance of teaching students how to think critically and respond to text. It is important for students to have opportunities to be able to analyze, judge, evaluate texts, as well as being exposed to multiple perspectives. This will help students to have a deeper understanding with texts. In addition, it is also just as important to be able to respond to text, express life experiences, make connections and to be transformed by text.
    • V. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives
      • Research
      • The critical and response perspectives of literacy instruction teaches students to think analytically about texts; to take risks and share what they are thinking with their peers; and to connect personally with the texts they are reading (Laureate Education, 2010c).
    • Reference
      • Gambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher, 49(7), 518–533.
      • Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). Analyzing and selecting texts. [Webcast]. The beginning reader, PK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.
      • Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010c). Critical perspective. [Webcast]. The beginning reader, PK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.
      • Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010b). Interactive perspective guided reading. [Webcast]. The beginning reader, PK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.
      • Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010d). Response perspective. [Webcast]. The beginning reader, PK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.
      • Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.).