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Teacher’s module 1
 

Teacher’s module 1

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    Teacher’s module 1 Teacher’s module 1 Presentation Transcript

    • Teacher’s Module 1 Lesson Outline What is word family instruction? What does the research say about  word family instruction? What are helpful  teaching strategies?
    • Teacher’s Module 1What is word family instruction?
    • What is word family instruction?In order to understand word family instruction,one must first know the difference betweenonsets and rimes.•Onset is the first consonant(s) of a word (d)•Rime is the vowel and consonants that followthe onset (og) dog (Hines, 2009; Walton & Walton, 2002)
    • What is word family instruction? Onset-Rime Practice Can you identify the onset and rime in these words? flip boat shatterfl ip b oat sh atter
    • What is word family instruction? Word family instruction, or “onset-rime instruction” as referred to by Hines (2009) is“the analysis and substitution of word partsfrom known words to unknown ones at the onset-rime level” (p.21) Using word families, if a child can read dog, he/she can learn to read log and frog and smog too!
    • What is word family instruction? Benefits of Word Family Instruction•Breaking words in to chunks, rather than eachindividual sound•Blending is easier with onsets and rimes than itis blending each isolated sound•Less emphasis placed on differentiating shortand long vowel sounds•Successful strategy for beginning and/orstruggling readers (Hines, 2009; Walton & Walton, 2002; Whitaker, Harvey, Hassell, Linder, &Tutterow,2006)
    • Teacher’s Module 1What does the research say aboutword family instruction?
    • Research on word family instruction Hines (2009)•4 first-graders who were at risk for reading•One-on-one instructional intervention•Taught 4 short a and short e spelling patternsusing color-coded rimes •an, at, ad, am •et, en, ed, ell•“Color-coding was intended as visual support forcategorization and discrimination” (p.30)
    • Research on word family instruction Hines (2009)•Assess students ability to: •Read instructed rime words •Read new words with same instructed rime spelling pattern •Read new words with new short a and short e rimes
    • Research on word family instruction Hines (2009) Results•All four students made positive gains, especiallyin reading the instructional rime words John Tammy Arthur Maria Number of words read 4 7 12 13 before the study Words read 1 month 65 80 90 85 post study (p. 29)
    • Research on word family instruction Hines (2009) Results•Students also made gains in their ability to readnew words with same instructed rime spellingpattern•Improvements in reading new words with newshort a and short e rimes were made, howeverresults were less significant when compared tothe other groups
    • Research on word family instruction Walton & Walton (2002)•Extensive research with 92 CanadianKindergartners•Studied the effects of rime instruction onstudent’s reading skills over the course of threephases of experimental studies
    • Research on word family instruction Walton & Walton (2002)•Prior to the study, researchers tested studentsability to identify •Rhyming words •Letter-sound recognition •Reading rimes •Memory skills•Randomly assigned students to a variety oftreatment and control groups for the study
    • Research on word family instruction Walton & Walton (2002)•Treatment groups consisted of: •Small group lessons •Brief introduction to rime instruction •Collaborative learning through 16 different hands-on games to teach •Rime •Rhyme •Initial phoneme identification •Letter-sound recognition
    • Research on word family instruction Walton & Walton (2002)•Treatment Group games included matching,sorting, movement activities, but were notcompetitive in nature•Control groups were: •Read stories •Not provided with any formal instruction on reading or reading strategies
    • Research on word family instruction Walton & Walton (2002) Results•The collaborative games and lessons aided theKindergartners to develop early reading, rhymingand rime word skills.•Students in the treatment group that focused onrime, rhymes, initial phonemes and letter-soundcorrespondence demonstrated: “superior performance…compared to the other groups, especially the control group” (p. 93)
    • Research on word family instruction Juel & Minden-Cupp (2000)•Year long study, observing the current teachingpractices on word learning and reading of four 1stgrade teachers•Classroom 1 focused instruction on: •Whole word reading and initial consonant identification using a word wall •Small group reading with little differentiation for student’s ability levels
    • Research on word family instruction Juel & Minden-Cupp (2000)•Classroom 2 focused instruction on: •Onset-rime instruction with sorting word and picture cards •Differentiated instructional reading groups •All students were taught to POINT and track when reading•Classroom 3 focused instruction on: •Peer coaching to learn unknown words •Reading with trade books with little phonics instruction
    • Research on word family instruction Juel & Minden-Cupp (2000)•Classroom 4 focused instruction on: •Differentiated instructional reading groups •Explicit phonics and onset-rime instruction for low and moderate readers during the first half of the school year •All students were taught to POINT and track when reading•End of the year assessments from all 4 classroomsshowed that Classroom 4 students improved their readingabilities more than any of the other classrooms
    • Research on word family instruction Juel & Minden-Cupp (2000) Results•Average end of the year reading abilities Classroom Number Reading Levels 1 Lowest “primer level” 2 End of 1st grade level 3 Middle 2nd grade level 4 End of 2nd grade level•Most significant improvement results: “All the children in the low reading group in classroom 4 were reading at or near an end-of- first grade level in May” (p. 334)
    • Teacher’s Module 1What are helpful teaching strategies?
    • Word Family Instructional Strategy Whitaker, et al. (2006) & The FISH Strategy•The FISH Strategy can be used with studentswho have a solid understanding of letters andsounds, rhyming words, and letter substitution.•It is used to help students learn what to do whenthey reach a word they do not know how to read.
    • Word Family Instructional Strategy Whitaker, et al. (2006) & The FISH Strategy•How The FISH Strategy works Find the rime Identify a word you know that ends the same way Say the rime you know without the first sound Hook the new onset to the rime (p. 17)
    • Word Family Instructional Strategy Juel & Minden-Cupp (2000) Recommendations•Small group lessons•Direct instruction in •“chunking of words into component units such as syllables, onset/rimes, or finding little words in big ones” (p. 334) •“finger point to words as text was read” (p. 334) •“actively compare and contrast words” (p. 334) with hands-on materials•Differentiated instruction
    • Teacher’s Module 1