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Internet safety
Internet safety
Internet safety
Internet safety
Internet safety
Internet safety
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Internet safety
Internet safety
Internet safety
Internet safety
Internet safety
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Internet safety
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Internet safety

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Presentation to CDH parents 9/29/10

Presentation to CDH parents 9/29/10

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Commonly held beliefs about how teens and adults use the internet – but are they true? False? Or somewhere in between?
  • Mostly true, except Afterworkers & very poor
  • Not quite – three quarters do, but one quarter don’t. Some share.
  • For the top 30+%, yes. But note the 1/5th of teens who don’t text much. Teens aren’t monolithic.
  • They do, and they call pretty much just like adults, at least in NUMBER of calls. Don’t know duration.
  • True.
  • Not true.
  • Nope!
  • They used to – but do it less now.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Internet Safety<br />Sharon O’Connor<br />CDH Technology Director<br />9/29/2010<br />
    • 2. Did You Know?<br />
    • 3. How do they do that – or do they?<br />June 2010<br />3<br />Lenhart<br />
    • 4. EveryOne Uses the Internet<br />June 2010<br />4<br />
    • 5.
    • 6. 10/15/10<br />6<br />
    • 7. 10/15/10<br />7<br />
    • 8.
    • 9. EVERY TEEN & YOUNG ADULT HAS A CELL PHONE…<br />May 2010<br />9<br />
    • 10. 10/15/10<br />10<br />
    • 11. …AND THEY SEND AND RECEIVE AN UNIMAGINABLY LARGE NUMBER OF TEXTS EVERY DAY.<br />May 2010<br />11<br />
    • 12. 10/15/10<br />12<br />
    • 13. Teens No longer make phone calls.<br />May 2010<br />13<br />
    • 14. 10/15/10<br />14<br />
    • 15. 10/15/10<br />15<br />
    • 16. 10/15/10<br />16<br />
    • 17. 10/15/10<br />17<br />
    • 18. PARENTS AND SCHOOLS STRUGGLE WITH MANAGEMENT OF TEENS’ CELL PHONES<br />May 2010<br />18<br />
    • 19. 10/15/10<br />19<br />
    • 20. 10/15/10<br />20<br />
    • 21. 10/15/10<br />21<br />
    • 22. Teens & young adults have been supplanted by older adults on social networks<br />10/15/10<br />22<br />
    • 23.
    • 24.
    • 25. Teens Love Twitter<br />May 2010<br />25<br />
    • 26. Twitter <br />
    • 27. Teens create a substantial amount of content online<br />
    • 28.
    • 29. What are the dangers?<br />
    • 30. What are the dangers?<br />Pornography<br />Predators<br />Social Networking<br />Online Gaming<br />Cyberbullying<br />Sexting<br />Copyright Infringment & Plagiarism<br />Addiction<br />Gambling<br />
    • 31. Pornography<br />
    • 32. Pornography<br />
    • 33. Pornography<br />
    • 34. How?<br />Free Teaser Images<br />
    • 35. How?<br />Innocent Searches<br />
    • 36. How?<br />Misspelled Words<br />Whitehouse.gov vs. whitehouse.com<br />Facebook.com vs. faecbook.com<br />
    • 37. How?<br />Advertising<br />Banners<br />Free Flash Games<br />
    • 38. Predators<br />
    • 39. Predators<br />Reilly<br />
    • 40. Predators<br />
    • 41. Just the Facts…<br />Just The Facts About Online Youth VictimizationResearchers Present the Facts and Debunk Myths <br />Thursday, May 3, 2007<br />Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee<br />Panelist:<br />Dr. David Finkelhor, Director, Crimes against Children Research Center (CCRC), University of New Hampshire<br />
    • 42. Web 2.0<br />
    • 43. Web 2.0<br />Ciccarelli<br />
    • 44. Social Networking<br />Account Settings<br />
    • 45. Social Networking<br />Privacy Settings<br />
    • 46. Social Networking<br />Privacy<br />
    • 47. Cyberbullying<br />
    • 48. What is Cyberbullying?<br />
    • 49. Cyberbullying<br />
    • 50. Cyberbullying<br />Hinduju, Patchin, 72<br />
    • 51. Sexting<br />
    • 52. Sexting<br />
    • 53. Copyright, Plagiarism and Cheating<br />
    • 54. Cheating with technology<br />41% of teens say that storing notes on a cell phone to access during a test is a serious cheating offense, while 23% don’t think it’s cheating at all.<br />45% of teens say that texting friends about answers during tests is a serious cheating offense, while 20% say it’s not cheating at all.<br />76% of parents say that cell phone cheating happens at their teens’ schools, but only 3% believe their own teen has ever used a cell phone to cheat.<br />High-Tech Cheating<br />
    • 55. What can parents DO?<br />
    • 56. A Multifaceted, Age-Based Approach<br />http://www.loirevalleyholidayhomes.co.uk/3.html<br />
    • 57. Ways teens hide what they’re doing from parents<br />Harris Interactive-McAfee 10/2008<br />
    • 58. Educate yourself! Keep up to date!<br />
    • 59. Use virus control software and keep it updated.<br />
    • 60. Discuss your values, standards and concerns. Collaborate – they may know more about the Internet than their parents, but they probably don’t yet fully comprehend all the concerns or potential consequences of risky actions. Suggest decision-making strategies.<br />
    • 61. Keep the computer in a public are of your home, at least until about age 16.<br />
    • 62. Establish standards regarding use of the computer when you are not home, as well as late at night.<br />
    • 63. Communicate with your child electronically.<br />
    • 64. Be sure your children use privacy settings. Talk about protection of personal information.<br />
    • 65. Teach your children how to respond to cyberbullies. Watch for warning signs.<br />
    • 66. Set age-appropriate filters and parental controls for younger children. Consider moving away from this by age 16.Regardless, check your browser internet filter and cookies.<br />
    • 67. Utilize age-appropriate controls on search engines and cell phones.<br />
    • 68. www.c-dh.orgParent Quick Links<br />soconnor@c-dh.org<br />
    • 69. References and Works CitedCiccarelli, David. “Web 2.0 Definition.” Voices.com. Interactive Voices Inc., 19 Sept. 2006. Web. 28 Sept. 2010. <http://blogs.voices.com/‌thebiz/‌2006/‌09/‌web_20_definition.html>. Enough is Enough. “Internet Safety 101 DVD.” 2009. DVD file.“High-Tech Cheating: What Every Parent Needs to Know.” Common Sense Media. http://www.commonsensemedia.org/‌hi-tech-cheating, 2010. Web. 29 Sept. 2010. Hinduja, Sameer, and Justin W Patchin. Bullying: Beyond the Schoolyard. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, 2009. Print. Hughes, Donna Rice. Internet Safety 101 Workbook & Resource Guide. N.p.: U.S. Department of Justice, 2009. Print. Lenhart, Amanda. “’How do [they] even do that?’ A Pew Internet Guide to teens, mobile phones and social media.” Lawlor/‌Hardwick-Day Summer Seminar. Minneapolis, MN. June 2010. Pew Research. Web. 29 Sept. 2010. Reilly, Pete. “The Facts About Internet Sex Abuse and Schools.” Ed Tech Journal. PBWorks, June 2009. Web. 28 Sept. 2010. <http://edtechjourneys.pbworks.com/‌The-Facts-About-Internet-Sex-Abuse-and-Schools>. Willard, Nancy E. Cyberbullying and CyberThreats. Champaign, IL 61822: Research Press, 2007. Print.- -. Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, 2007. Print. “Youth and General Internet Use.” Enough is Enough. Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention, 2008. Web. 28 Sept. 2010. <http://www.enough.org/‌inside.php?tag=statistics#7>.<br />

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