Pharaoh

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Pharaoh

  1. 1. PharaohShlomi AbirMakif Yehud High School
  2. 2. POWERFUL PERSON IN ANCIENTEGYPT?• The most powerful person in ancient Egypt was the Pharaoh.The pharaoh was the political andreligious leader of the Egyptian people, holding the titles: Lord of the Two Lands and HighPriest of Every Temple.• As Lord of the Two Lands the pharaoh was the ruler of Upper and Lower Egypt. He owned allof the land, made laws, collected taxes, and defended Egypt against foreigners.• As High Priest of Every Temple, the pharaoh represented the gods on Earth. He performedrituals and built temples to honor the gods.• Many pharaohs went to war when their land was threatened or when they wanted to controlforeign lands. If the pharaoh won the battle, the conquered people had to recognize theEgyptian pharaoh as their ruler and offer him the finest and most valuable goods from theirland.
  3. 3. • A long time ago,Ancient Egypt was a civilization ruled by pharaohs. Egyptians did not call theirruler a pharaoh, though, before 1554 BC during the 18th dynasty. Before that, pharaoh meant"Great House" in Egyptian and referred to the palace of the king. It was later added to thepharaohs name as part of his title.• The pharaoh was the high priest of all temples, the head of law and administration, and thecommander of the army.The Egyptians believed pharaohs were great people that were half-manand half-god. Since only the pharaoh and priests were allowed to enter temples,AncientEgyptians had to ask the pharaoh to speak to the gods for them.This made the pharaoh verypowerful in the minds of regular Egyptians!
  4. 4. continue• The Ancient Egyptians believed that the pharaohs spirit could live for an eternity, which meansforever.They believed that the pharaoh would become a god after he died, so pharaohs wereburied in a tomb with many treasures which could be enjoyed in their Afterlife.• Many of the statues of pharaohs have cobra heads on them. Pharaohs wore a cobra figure toprotect them from evil.• There were many different pharaohs, some woman and some men.They ruled Ancient Egypt forthousands of years.
  5. 5. RAMSES ii• Ramses II became King of Egypt when he was about 30 years old in1279 BC. He was king for 67 years until 1212 BC. He had a lot ofwives, 111 sons and 51 daughters. Ramses II was a great warrior.During his fourth year as pharaoh, Ramses II fought to regain theterritory in Africa and western Asia that had been taken by theHittites. He fought in a series of campaigns against the Hittites, avery strong enemy.The war ended when Ramses II made anagreement with the Prince of the Hittites to divide the landbetween the two groups. Egypt agreed not to trespass on theHittites territory and the Hittites agreed not to trespass onEgyptian territory.• Ramses II was also a great builder. He built many templesthroughout his empire.• He was a great builder and a famed warrior. He built many templesand monuments in Karnak, Luxor and Nubia. His Chief queen wasNefertari. He had a beautiful temple constructed for her in Nubia.
  6. 6. ozymandias• If Ramesses’ intention was to keep his name living for eternity then he succeeded mosteffectively. His enduring monuments, his statues, that other monarchs took his name, and thewritten word (ancient and modern) have all given us good reason to call his reign Great.• Ozymandias is a poem that represents a kings assumed permanence.At the same time though,it shows the ugly details of a kings demeanor and how he can be eroded and forcefullydestroyed without attention.• Then, the narrator continues:Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed. And on the pedestal these words appear: "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"• The status of the statue is described in detail in the poem in an effort to add to the theme evenfurther. Ozymandias trunkless legs, shattered visage and colossal wreck describe his currentcondition in full detail, however contradicting his permanence.Although the former tyrant iswrecked, he still remains glorious and durable because the human emotion of his magnitude still
  7. 7. ozymandias• The status of the statue is described in detail in the poem in an effort to add to the theme evenfurther. Ozymandias trunkless legs, shattered visage and colossal wreck describe his currentcondition in full detail, however contradicting his permanence.Although the former tyrant iswrecked, he still remains glorious and durable because the human emotion of his magnitude stillsurrounds his permanence.• At the same time, his legend puts his visual representation in the shade.The sculptor seems tounderstand with phrases like the "hand that mocked and heart that fed that Ozymandias hasshown sneer for those weaker than himself, yet fed his people because of a secret passion in hisheart.• The arrogant attitude reflected on kings words My name is Ozymandias, king of kings discloseslegacy.Though the monument is not in an overall good condition, these words are precise andimperishable.
  8. 8. ozymandias• And finally:• Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away• Ozymandias is broken into pieces and abandoned in an empty desert, suggesting that tyranny istemporary. Moreover, it signifies that no political leader, especially a tyrant, can expect to havelong-lasting power or real influence.The broken monument represents also the disintegration ofcivilization and culture.• However, it is obvious that no amount of decomposition, time, or distance can obliterate theeternalness of the statue, and everything it represents historically and emotionally.Thepermanence of the legend is imperative to the understanding of the poem.Thousands of yearshave passed since the construction of the monument, but still it remains.Though the lone andlevel sands stretch far away from the ruins, it is there to be seen.Though Nothing besideremains, the legacy is not ruined.
  9. 9. end
  10. 10. end

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