Riparian / Shoreline Plants in the Pigeon Lake Area       What’s a Wildflower?        What’s a Weed?           Part 2 of 3...
Parts, Sections & Content:         Slides1   I. Riparian / Shoreline Areas                        4 - 13    II. Native Tre...
10 Reasons to Go Wild*Landscaping with native grasses, wildflowers and woody plants can offersolutions to many of the prob...
10 Reasons to Go Wild* Continued ...6. Naturally Acclimatized – Native plants grown from locally harvested seed are well  ...
Throughout the presentation the bad, non-native, invasive plants are bordered by RED; the                                 ...
IV. Native Wild Flowers              Learn in this section about some of our                   amazing native wild flowers...
Many native riparian species flower later in                    the summer, possibly because wet soil is                  ...
Marsh RagwortAn annual or biennial, member of the Composite family. Very abundant in 2009 dueto the drought caused drawdow...
American Brooklime                     9
A low plant, creeping on mud, or rooted in mud.Several other buttercups occur in marshy places e.g. Celery-leaved Buttercu...
Celery-leaved Buttercup                          11
Golden Dock (left) and Western Dock (right)                                              12
13
Pale Persicaria (left) and Yellow Avens (right)   13
Two other common shoreline plants flower by the end of June.Philadelphia Fleabane (left), and Northern Stitchwort (right) ...
NorthernWillowherbA native plant that cangrow in suchabundance that itappears weedy.It is certainly a goodcolonizer of mud...
Silverweed (check the underside                                  of the leaves to understand the                          ...
Marsh Yellow Cress   Wild Mint   17
These native plants have similar leaf structure although the Water       Hemlock leaves are less divided and the leaflets ...
Asters are common in the marshes in the late           summer, particularly the Western Willow Aster.Purple-stemmed Aster ...
Nodding Beggar-ticksoften turns shorelinesyellow from mid to theend of August.                     20
A few Alberta Wild Flower Resources•   Wildflowers of Edmonton and Central Alberta, by France Royer and Richard    Dickins...
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Riparian plants part 2 display version

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Shorline Plants of Pigeon Lake - Shoreline health is critical for a healthy lake. This is is a 3-part presentation filled with photos from Pigeon Lake on to steward the shoreline plants.

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  • Low, creeping plant, among the earlier flowerers, through June to August.\n
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  • Like the Docks, a member of the Dock family. A similar, more robust, and less common is Water Smartweed. \n
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  • Rather similar species (differing mostly in leaf structure), and both native. \n
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  • Riparian plants part 2 display version

    1. 1. Riparian / Shoreline Plants in the Pigeon Lake Area What’s a Wildflower? What’s a Weed? Part 2 of 3 1
    2. 2. Parts, Sections & Content: Slides1 I. Riparian / Shoreline Areas 4 - 13 II. Native Trees & Shrubs for Riparian Areas 15 - 23 III. Native Grass, Reeds, Sedges & Bulrushes 23 – 342 IV. Native Wild Flowers for Riparian Areas 6 - 203 I. Weeds found in Riparian Areas 1 – 23 I. Other Resources Near End Part 3 II. Acknowledgements End of Each Part Also: 2 • Valuable & Interesting Tidbits Throughout
    3. 3. 10 Reasons to Go Wild*Landscaping with native grasses, wildflowers and woody plants can offersolutions to many of the problem areas we deal with as property ownersor caretakers. T here are several reasons to incorporate native plants into1. Aesthetics – Indigenous plants are showy, diverse, colorful, and fragrant.2. Hardiness – Native plants are more disease and pest resistant than their cultivated cousins eliminating the need for chemical interventions.    3. Vigorousness – Native plants do not require fertilizer to be vigorous growers.4. Low Maintenance – Wildflower gardens and naturalized sites require very little maintenance once established, generally needing only a seasonal debris removal and an occasional weeding.5. Water Conservation – Once established native plants have deep root systems and require little or no watering. ... Continued…* See www.wildaboutflowers.ca Wild About Flowers specialize in native Alberta wild flowers. 3
    4. 4. 10 Reasons to Go Wild* Continued ...6. Naturally Acclimatized – Native plants grown from locally harvested seed are well equipped to deal with our variable climate.7. Sustainability – Plants that are naturally occurring in an area are more easily able to reproduce and sustain themselves .8. Weed Control – Naturalizing low usage areas with a mix of native grasses and indigenous wildflowers leaves little space for unwanted plant species to move in and thrive in the tight knit complimentary root system they form together. 9. Habitat Creation – Indigenous plants are the fabric of an ecosystem and have intricate relationships with insects and animals.  Choosing to use native plant material is a great way to help support local wildlife.10. Education – Some estimates suggest barely 1% of untouched prairie still exists in North America.  Support your environment and learn about naturally occurring plant species and local wildlife by choosing to use native plants in your landscape.* See www.wildaboutflowers.ca Wild About Flowers specialize in native Alberta wild flowers. 4
    5. 5. Throughout the presentation the bad, non-native, invasive plants are bordered by RED; the Fireweed Himalayan Balsam Creeping (Canada) Thistle 5
    6. 6. IV. Native Wild Flowers Learn in this section about some of our amazing native wild flowers that grow in the riparian areas around Pigeon Lake.All but a couple of the pictures were taken at the lake.The Pigeon Lake Watershed Associationwelcomes your wild flower pictures.Post on website: 6
    7. 7. Many native riparian species flower later in the summer, possibly because wet soil is colder than dry soil. They flower after the willows, shrubs, and sedges.The next slides show a some wildflowers (or herbaceous plants)roughly in order of early summer flowering,moving to the late summer flowering. 7
    8. 8. Marsh RagwortAn annual or biennial, member of the Composite family. Very abundant in 2009 dueto the drought caused drawdown of water, creating muddy shorelines. The plantfirst forms a rosette as above, and it may overwinter in this stage. (It is not prickly– do not mistake it for a thistle rosette.) 8
    9. 9. American Brooklime 9
    10. 10. A low plant, creeping on mud, or rooted in mud.Several other buttercups occur in marshy places e.g. Celery-leaved Buttercup Yellow Water Crowfoot 10
    11. 11. Celery-leaved Buttercup 11
    12. 12. Golden Dock (left) and Western Dock (right) 12
    13. 13. 13
    14. 14. Pale Persicaria (left) and Yellow Avens (right) 13
    15. 15. Two other common shoreline plants flower by the end of June.Philadelphia Fleabane (left), and Northern Stitchwort (right) 14
    16. 16. NorthernWillowherbA native plant that cangrow in suchabundance that itappears weedy.It is certainly a goodcolonizer of mud. 15
    17. 17. Silverweed (check the underside of the leaves to understand the name) spreads over wet mud by red runners like strawberries. Arum-leaved Arrowhead (left)grows on or in very wet mud andis often partly submersed. 16
    18. 18. Marsh Yellow Cress Wild Mint 17
    19. 19. These native plants have similar leaf structure although the Water Hemlock leaves are less divided and the leaflets are narrower.Water-hemlock Water Parsnip 18
    20. 20. Asters are common in the marshes in the late summer, particularly the Western Willow Aster.Purple-stemmed Aster (left) and Western Willow Aster 19
    21. 21. Nodding Beggar-ticksoften turns shorelinesyellow from mid to theend of August. 20
    22. 22. A few Alberta Wild Flower Resources• Wildflowers of Edmonton and Central Alberta, by France Royer and Richard Dickinson, The University of Alberta Press, 1996.• GUIDELINES FOR THE PURCHASE AND USE OF WILDFLOWER SEED MIXES, Alberta Native Plant Council, www.anpc.ab.ca/assets/wildflower_seeds_guidelines.pdf• University of Alberta Vascular Plant Herbarium http://museums.ualberta.ca/vascularplants/ about.aspx 21
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