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Choosing an Alcohol Free lifestyle.

Choosing an Alcohol Free lifestyle.

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Hw lesson 37 Hw lesson 37 Presentation Transcript

    • 1. Discuss BAC and the effects of alcohol on the body systems.
    What You’ll Learn 2. Explain ways alcohol affects decision making and increases the risk of violence and illegal behavior. 3. Discuss the effects of alcohol on a developing fetus.
    • 4. Discuss causes, health problems, and treatment of alcoholism.
    What You’ll Learn 5. Discuss how advertisements may encourage drinking. 6. Practice resistance skills to resist peer pressure to drink.
    • proof
    • blood alcohol concentration (BAC)
    • toxin
    • hazing activity
    • binge drinking
    • cirrhosis
    • blackout
    • alcoholism
    Key Terms
    • denial
    • delirium tremens syndrome
  • Alcohol and the Body
    • Alcohol is a drug that depresses the brain and nervous system.
    • Fermentation is a process in which yeast, sugar, and water are combined to produce alcohol and carbon dioxide.
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Beer
    • Beer is an alcoholic beverage that is made by fermenting barley, corn, or rye.
    • Most beers are about 4 percent alcohol.
    • Wine
    • Wine is an alcoholic beverage made by fermenting grapes or other fruits.
    • Most wines are about 12 to 14 percent alcohol.
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Liquor
    • Liquor is an alcoholic beverage that is made by distillation.
    • Distillation is a process that uses a fermented mixture to obtain an alcoholic beverage with a high alcohol content.
    • Most liquors are about 40 percent alcohol.
    • Proof is a measure of the amount of alcohol in a beverage.
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • How Alcohol Enters the Body
    • About 20 percent of the alcohol that a person drinks is absorbed into the bloodstream through the walls of the stomach.
    • A majority of the rest of the alcohol is absorbed through the walls of the intestine, where it moves quickly into the bloodstream.
    • Alcohol enters the bloodstream within minutes
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Alcohol affects every cell in the body. 
    • The effects of alcohol intensify as the concentration of alcohol in the blood increases.
    • Blood alcohol concentration, or BAC, is the amount of alcohol in a person’s blood.
    • The higher the BAC, the greater the effects of alcohol on the body.
    How Alcohol Enters the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • One-half ounce is one drink. 
    • An alcoholic beverage that contains about one-half ounce of alcohol is considered one drink of alcohol.
    • A toxin is a substance that is poisonous.
    • Alcohol is a toxin.
    • There is no way to speed alcohol through the body.
    How Alcohol Enters the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Factors That Affect BAC
    • The number of drinks people have affects their BAC while the alcohol content of each drink determines the effects of the alcohol.
    • Amount of alcohol consumed 
    • Drinking at a faster rate increases BAC, is dangerous, and can be fatal.
    • Speed at which alcohol is consumed 
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Body weight
    • People with a higher body weight have a higher volume of blood than people with less body weight.
    • The same amount of alcohol produces a greater effect on people with less body weight.
    Factors That Affect BAC
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Percentage of body fat 
    • Body fat does not absorb as much alcohol as lean body tissue; therefore, a person with the higher percentage of body fat will have a higher BAC after one drink.
    • Gender
    • BAC rises faster in females than in males.
    Factors That Affect BAC
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Feelings
    • Feelings, such as stress, anger, and fear, can affect BAC by speeding up the time it takes alcohol to enter the bloodstream.
    • Amount of food eaten 
    • Alcohol passes more quickly into the bloodstream when the stomach is empty than when it is full.
    Factors That Affect BAC
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Presence of other drugs in the bloodstream 
    • The presence of other drugs in the bloodstream increases the effects of alcohol.
    • Age
    • Elderly people are more sensitive to the effects of alcohol than are younger people.
    • The bodies of elderly people contain a lower volume of blood than younger people’s do.
    Factors That Affect BAC
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Drinking carbonated alcoholic beverages 
    • The alcohol in carbonated beverages passes into the bloodstream more quickly than the alcohol in non- carbonated drinks.
    Factors That Affect BAC
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Drinking Games and Hazing
    • A hazing activity is an activity in which a person is forced to participate in a dangerous or demeaning act to become a member of a club or group.
    • Drinking can be a hazing activity. 
    • Hazing activities are against the law in most states and violate the rules of most schools.
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Drinking games can be life-threatening.
    • Binge drinking is consuming large amounts of alcohol in a short amount of time.
    • Drinking games are dangerous and are considered binge drinking.
    Drinking Games and Hazing
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • What Happens as BAC Increases
    • People feel relaxed, may have increased social confidence, and may become talkative.
    • Thinking and decision-making abilities may be impaired.
    • BAC .02 
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • BAC .05 
    • Areas of the brain that control reasoning and judgment are impaired.
    • There is a decrease in muscular coordination, and reaction time is slowed.
    • Speech may be slurred and people may say or do things they usually would not say or do.
    What Happens as BAC Increases
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • BAC .08–.10   
    • Reasoning, judgment, self-control, muscular coordination, and reaction time are seriously impaired.
    • People no longer can make responsible decisions although they may claim not to be affected by the alcohol.
    • In most states they are considered legally drunk.
    What Happens as BAC Increases
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • BAC .12   
    • People usually become confused, disoriented, nauseous, and may have loss of control of coordination and balance.
    • BAC .20   
    • Emotions are unpredictable and may change rapidly.
    • They may pass out.
    What Happens as BAC Increases
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • BAC .30   
    • People will have little or no control.
    • BAC .40   
    • People are likely to be unconscious and death can occur.
    • BAC .50   
    • People may enter a deep coma and die.
    What Happens as BAC Increases
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • How Alcohol Affects the Body
    • Drinking impairs the brain and other parts of the nervous system, such as nerve cells.
    • Drinking alcohol can cause a general decline in all areas of mental functioning.
    • Alcohol is a leading cause of death.
    • Almost every part of the body is harmed when people drink large quantities of alcohol.
    • Nervous system
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Digestive System
    • An ulcer is an open sore on the skin or on a mucous membrane.
    • Drinking also increases the risk of developing liver disease.
    • Drinking increases the risk of developing ulcers and cancers of the mouth, esophagus, and stomach.
    How Alcohol Affects the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Digestive System
    • Cirrhosis is a disease of the liver caused by chronic damage to liver cells.
    • Alcoholic hepatitis is a condition in which the liver swells due to alcohol, resulting in serious illness or death.
    • A liver transplant is the only effective treatment for people with advanced cirrhosis.
    How Alcohol Affects the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Digestive System
    • Malnutrition is a condition in which the body does not get the nutrients required for optimal health.
    • Drinking interferes with the digestion and absorption of nutrients.
    • Heavy drinking also can cause malnutrition.
    How Alcohol Affects the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Immune System
    • Cardiovascular system 
    • Drinking depresses the function of the immune system and increases the risk of developing certain illnesses.
    • Drinking can damage the organs of the cardiovascular system and increase the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases and stroke.
    How Alcohol Affects the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Skeletal system 
    • Drinking causes the body to lose calcium, which is necessary for proper development of the skeletal system and bones.
    • Frequent, long-term use of alcohol is a risk factor for developing osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone tissue.
    How Alcohol Affects the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Urinary System
    • Reproductive system 
    • Long-term, heavy drinking can cause kidney failure.
    • Drinking can have significant effects on the reproductive system during puberty for males and females.
    How Alcohol Affects the Body
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Warning: Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause FAS.
    • Drinking alcohol at any time during pregnancy is harmful to a developing baby.
    • Early pregnancy
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Miscarriages and stillbirths 
    • Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause miscarriage and stillbirth.
    • A miscarriage is the natural ending of a pregnancy before a baby is developed enough to survive on its own.
    • A stillbirth is a baby that is born dead.
    Warning: Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause FAS.
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Low birth weight 
    • Pregnant females who have been drinking heavily during the last three months of pregnancy are more likely to have an infant with a low birth weight.
    Warning: Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause FAS.
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Newborns
    • Newborn babies with mothers who drink alcohol during the latter part of pregnancy or are alcohol-dependent may have symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.
    Warning: Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause FAS.
  • What to Know About Alcohol and the Body
    • Fetal alcohol syndrome 
    • Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the presence of severe birth defects in babies born to mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy.
    • FAS is a leading cause of mental disability.
    Warning: Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause FAS.
  • Thinking and Decision Making
    • Drinking alcohol can interfere with the simplest of tasks.
    • Alcohol can cause you to take actions that can be harmful to yourself and others.
  • How Drinking Affects Thinking and Decision Making
    • It can cause you to make wrong decisions. 
    • If you drink alcohol, you might not use the guidelines for making responsible decisions.
    • You might make a choice that you would not make if you were not under the influence of alcohol.
    • Your decisions might risk your health and safety or cause you to break laws and family guidelines.
  • How Drinking Affects Thinking and Decision Making
    • It can give you a false sense of self-confidence in social situations and interfere with your judgment. 
    • Teens never should drink alcohol in an attempt to be more social.
    • Because alcohol affects communication and reasoning, you may find out later that you did or said things that were not appropriate.
  • How Drinking Affects Thinking and Decision Making
    • It can make you feel invincible.
    • You might do something dangerous and injure yourself or others.
    • It can increase the likelihood that you will give in to negative peer pressure. 
    • If you have been drinking, you are more likely to be persuaded by peers to do things you would not normally do.
  • How Drinking Affects Thinking and Decision Making
    • It can intensify your sexual feelings and dull your reasoning. 
    • If you drink, your sexual feelings may be difficult to control.
    • The consequences of unprotected sex include unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), HIV, and emotional trauma.
  • How Drinking Affects Thinking and Decision Making
    • It slows your reaction time and affects your coordination. 
    • If you drink, you cannot respond as quickly as usual.
    • It can cause you to have aggressive behavior.
    • If you drink, you are more likely to become violent and to commit physical abuse or murder.
  • How Drinking Affects Thinking and Decision Making
    • It intensifies your emotions. 
    • If you drink, you will have more intense feelings than usual.
    • Many teen suicide attempts involve alcohol or other drugs.
    • Hangover
    • A hangover is an aftereffect of using alcohol and other drugs. It may involve headaches, nausea, fatigue, and irritability.
  • How Drinking Affects Thinking and Decision Making
    • Blackouts
    • People who drink alcohol may have blackouts.
    • A blackout is a period in which a person cannot remember what has happened.
    • People who have been drinking may do something risky, embarrassing, or violent; engage in sex; or find themselves in an unfamiliar place and not remember anything.
  • Violence and Illegal Behavior
    • A high percentage of crimes are related to the use and abuse of alcohol.
    • Any kind of crime is considered illegal behavior.
    • Some of these crimes include committing acts of violence and driving while under the influence.
  • How Drinking Increases the Risk of Violence and Illegal Behavior
    • Alcohol and violence
    • Alcohol, more than any other drug, has been linked to violence.
    • People who drink often have little regard for the feelings and safety of others, which might lead to violence and illegal behaviors.
  • How Drinking Increases the Risk of Violence and Illegal Behavior
    • Alcohol and domestic violence
    • Domestic violence is abuse used by one person in a relationship to control the other.
    • Most acts of domestic violence occur after a family member has been drinking alcohol.
    • Alcohol and suicide
    • Drinking can intensify feelings of sadness and depression and is a factor in many teen suicide attempts.
  • How Drinking Increases the Risk of Violence and Illegal Behavior
    • Alcohol and rape
    • People who have been drinking are more likely to commit rape.
    • Rape is the threatened or actual use of physical force to get someone to have sex without giving consent.
    • Acquaintance rape is rape in which the person who is raped knows the rapist.
  • How Drinking Increases the Risk of Violence and Illegal Behavior
    • Alcohol and the law
    • In all states, people must be 21 years old to purchase or possess alcohol.
    • Alcohol and school policies
    • Teens who drink alcohol during school hours or bring alcohol to school are breaking school policies and may be suspended or expelled.
  • How Drinking Increases the Risk of Violence and Illegal Behavior
    • Alcohol and driving
    • People who drink and drive may injure or kill themselves or other people.
    • Alcohol-related motor vehicle accidents are a leading cause of death and spinal injury in young people.
  • Alcoholism
    • Alcoholism is a disease in which there is a physical and psychological dependence on alcohol.
    • Alcohol dependence, another term for alcoholism, can destroy the life of an individual and the lives of those around him or her.
  • What to Know About Alcoholism
    • Difficulty controlling behavior
    • People with alcoholism have difficulty controlling their drinking.
    • Alcoholism causes people’s personalities to change and feelings of anger, paranoia, and depression to increase.
    • Denial
    • Denial is refusing to admit a problem.
    • Many people deny that there is a connection between their problems and their drinking.
  • What to Know About Alcoholism
    • Withdrawal
    • Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is the reaction of the body to the sudden stop of alcohol consumption.
    • Delirium tremens syndrome is a severe form of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in which there are hallucinations and muscle convulsions.
  • What to Know About Alcoholism
    • The family connection 
    • Alcoholism affects entire families.
    • Children whose parents abuse alcohol are more likely to have problems with alcohol.
  •  
  • Getting Help
    • Alcoholism is a disease, but like many other diseases, it can be treated.
    • The kind of treatment that is best may depend on many different factors.
    • Private counseling, admittance to a special hospital, or group meetings are some choices for treatment.
    • People with alcoholism need treatment.
    Treatment for Alcoholism
    • Treatment usually involves short- or long-term stays at a recovery facility and may involve recovery programs.
    • Some recovery programs for people who have alcoholism and their families and friends include Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), Al-Anon, Alateen, and Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOA).
    • Are You at Risk for Alcoholism?
    Treatment for Alcoholism
    • Studies have shown that there is a relationship between a person’s vulnerability to alcoholism and family history of the disease.
    • A child of a parent who has alcoholism is more likely to develop alcohol problems than is a child of a parent who does not have alcoholism.
    • Some people may have a genetic predisposition for alcoholism.
    • Genetics
    • Childhood behavior
    Treatment for Alcoholism
    • Some research has shown that children who are easily distracted and restless are more likely to develop alcoholism later in life.
    • Psychiatric disorders 
    • There appears to be a relationship between conduct problems in school, depression, and the development of alcoholism later in life.
    • People who have alcoholism also have higher rates of suicide.
    • Self-esteem
    Treatment for Alcoholism
    • Children who feel good about themselves are shown to have a reduced risk of developing alcoholism.
    • Social factors
    • There have been many studies that examine relationships and drinking behavior.
    • Children who feel rejection or are disciplined harshly or inconsistently are at increased risk to develop alcohol-related problems.
  • Alcohol Advertising
    • The alcohol beverage industry is one of the leading industries spending money to advertise its products.
    • People of all ages see these advertisements, whose purpose is to convince people to buy a specific product.
  • What to Know About Alcohol Advertising and Teens
    • Disposable income 
    • Disposable income is money that is not needed to live on for everyday needs.
    • Young people see thousands of advertisements for alcohol before they reach the legal drinking age of 21.
    • Many teens have disposable income that alcohol advertisers would want spent on their products.
  • What to Know About Alcohol Advertising and Teens
    • Loyalty
    • Many advertisers want to develop brand loyalty in young people. They believe that the earlier you see ads for a product, the more likely you are to use the product in the future.
    • Timing of ads
    • Young people can be influenced by TV ads because of the time that these ads are shown.
  • What to Know About Alcohol Advertising and Teens
    • Neighborhood
    • Billboards and other public alcohol signage put people in those neighborhoods at increased risk of developing irresponsible drinking habits.
    • Internet
    • There are numerous Web sites that promote alcohol use that people of all ages can access.
  • What to Know About Alcohol Advertising and Teens
    • Attractive people
    • Alcohol advertisements tend to show attractive people drinking and having fun.
    • Teens may think that drinking is “cool” and that they need to drink to have fun like the people in the ads.
  • Peer Pressure
    • Peer pressure is the most important factor identified by teens who drink alcohol.
    • Despite the fact that drinking is illegal for teens, most teens can obtain alcoholic beverages.
    • Use resistance skills to avoid drinking and buying alcohol.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 1. Use assertive behavior. Stand tall and look directly at the person. Say “no” in a firm and confident voice. 2. Give reasons for saying “no” to alcohol . Explain that drinking is harmful, unsafe, and illegal for teens. Drinking does not show respect for yourself and others.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 3.  Use nonverbal behavior to match verbal behavior.
    • Do not pretend to drink alcoholic beverages.
    • Do not agree to buy alcohol.
    • Do not behave in ways that indicate that you approve of drinking.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 4.  Avoid being in situations in which there will be pressure to drink alcohol.
    • If there will be alcohol in a situation, do not go.
    • Attend only alcohol-free activities and do not go into bars.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 5.  Avoid being with people who drink alcohol.
    • Choose friends who do not drink alcohol.
    • Stay away from gang members.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 5. Avoid being with people who drink alcohol.
    • Stay away from people who buy alcohol or give alcohol to minors.
    • Stay away from minors who use fake IDs to buy alcohol and get into bars.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 6. Resist pressure to engage in illegal behavior.
    • Stay away from people who break laws.
    • Stay away from parties where minors are drinking alcohol.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 7. Influence others to choose responsible behavior.
    • Encourage those who pressure you to use alcohol to change their behavior.
    • Encourage people who drink alcohol to stop by suggesting alcohol-free activities.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 7. Influence others to choose responsible behavior.
    • Know signs that indicate the presence of a drinking problem. Ask a responsible adult or a trained counselor how you might help the person.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 8. Avoid being influenced by advertisements for alcohol.
    • Realize that advertisements might incorrectly portray the use of alcohol as sexy, sophisticated, adventurous, healthful, or fun.
    • Realize that advertisements might incorrectly imply that drinking will result in success, relaxation, or romance.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 8. Avoid being influenced by advertisements for alcohol.
    • Be aware that alcohol companies pay to advertise during major sporting events.
    • Be aware that alcohol companies use the Internet to advertise their products to young people.
  • Resisting Peer Pressure 8. Avoid being influenced by advertisements for alcohol.
    • Do not wear clothing that displays beer logos or logos of other alcoholic beverages.
  • Study Guide
    • 1. Match the following terms and definitions.
    ___ distillation ___ fermentation ___ miscarriage ___ stillbirth ___ hangover A. a process in which yeast, sugar, and water are combined to produce alcohol B. an aftereffect of using alcohol and other drugs C. a baby that is born dead D. a process that uses a fermented mixture to obtain an alcoholic beverage with a high alcohol content E. the natural ending of a pregnancy before a baby is developed enough to survive on its own D A E C B 3C, 6A, 7A, 7B
  • Study Guide
    • 2. Identify the following statements as true or false.
    • _______ A high percentage of crimes are related to the use and abuse of alcohol.
    • _______ FAS is a leading cause of alcoholism.
    • _______ Pregnant females who have been drinking heavily during the last three months of pregnancy are more likely to have an infant with a high birth weight.
    • _______ The alcohol in carbonated drinks passes into the bloodstream more quickly than the alcohol in noncarbonated drinks.
    true false false true 3C, 6A, 7A, 7B
  • Study Guide
    • 3. Identify three factors that may increase a person’s risk for developing alcohol-related problems.
    Genetics, childhood behavior, psychiatric disorders, self-esteem, and social factors are all factors that might increase a person’s risk for developing alcohol-related problems. 6A, 8A
  • End of the Lesson
  • Lesson Resources tx.healthmh.com /alcohol tx.healthmh.com/health_influences tx.healthmh.com/study_guide
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