Clean intermitent self catheterisation
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Clean Intermittent Self-Catheterisation is a technique which is used to empty the bladder at regular intervals. This is done by passing a catheter (small tube) into the bladder through the urethra ...

Clean Intermittent Self-Catheterisation is a technique which is used to empty the bladder at regular intervals. This is done by passing a catheter (small tube) into the bladder through the urethra (passage through which urine leaves the bladder). You should be taught how to do this by your continence nurse. It is not a sterile technique, but it is a clean one, so it is very important to have good hygiene standards when doing the procedure.

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Clean intermitent self catheterisation Clean intermitent self catheterisation Document Transcript

  • shinecharity.org.uk info@shinecharity.org.uk 42 Park Road Peterborough PE1 2UQ 01733 555988Clean IntermittentSelf-CatheterisationClean Intermittent Self-Catheterisation is a technique whichis used to empty the bladder at regular intervals. This is doneby passing a catheter (small tube) into the bladder through theurethra (passage through which urine leaves the bladder). Youshould be taught how to do this by your continence nurse. It isnot a sterile technique, but it is a clean one, so it is very importantto have good hygiene standards when doing the procedure.There are lots of catheters available. companies offer a home deliveryIf the catheter is “self-lubricated”, service, whereby you send theit means that after it is soaked in prescription to the company andwater for a short time it becomes they send the catheters to yourslippery enough to insert. Some home. Most catheters nowadayscatheters are pre-lubricated, which are “single use”. However, somemeans they have a slippery coating people may need to use reusableon them. With others, you will need catheters. A reusable catheterto use a lubricating jelly to ease must be rinsed, dried, and storedinsertion. Your continence nurse in a clean paper bag immediatelywill tell you how to use each type after each use. Change bags andof catheter. catheter at least once a week.Catheters are available on Your doctor or continence nurseprescription from your doctor. will tell you how many times aSome chemists will have to order day you will need to catheterisethe catheters for you, so make yourself. It can vary from once asure you have enough catheters day for some people to 4-6 times ato last while waiting for your next day for others.order to come in. Many healthcare
  • Clean IntermittentSelf-CatheterisationIf clean intermittent catheterisation Floor protectionis to be used on a child in school,make sure the school and person Very careful hygiene should beresponsible for carrying out the observed at all times.catheterisation are properly trainedto perform the procedure, and are Femalesquite clear about when and whereit should be done. Furthermore, a Collect everything you are going toschool care plan must be in place. need. Take off or loosen clothing asThe continence adviser and school necessary. Gently wash genital areanurse will help with this. from front to back. Use disposable tissue and soap or baby wipes.Most people find it easiest to Wash hands carefully, and dry themcatheterise whilst sitting on the on a towel or disposable kitchentoilet. paper.Procedure Part the labia and slide the catheter gently into the urethra, making sureList of equipment not to handle the end which enters the bladder. The other end of theCatheter catheter should be pointing into the toilet or receptacle. When theMirror – may be useful for females urine has finished draining, slowly start to pull the catheter back out.Lubricating/anaesthetic jelly for If some more urine starts to flow,males if used stop pulling the catheter and wait for the flow to stop. Continue doingDisposable tissues – or baby wipes this until the catheter is completely out. Place the used catheter inUnperfumed soap – the perfumed a disposal bag and/or sanibin. Iftype may cause irritation using a non–disposable catheter rinse it under a tap, dry on a paperTowel – kept for this purpose only towel and place in a clean paper bag for storage.Container for urine if not draineddirectly into the toilet
  • Males TipsCollect everything you are going toneed. Take off or loosen clothes as Try to avoid constipation because,necessary. Wash hands and then if the bowel is empty, it makes itwash the penis, taking care to wash easier to drain the bladder properly.under the foreskin. Dry hands and A high fibre diet can help and advicepenis carefully, using disposable leaflets are available. If you becomepaper. constipated, you may well begin wetting between catheterisations.Squeeze a little lubricating jelly Remember to drink at least 8onto a piece of paper and discard. glasses of fluid a day as this helpsSqueeze a little into the penis if to avoid constipation and urinaryusing anaesthetic jelly or on to the tract infections.tip of the catheter if lubricating jellyis used. If you are going to go on holiday abroad, it is advisable to ask yourGently pull back the foreskin and GP if you can have a letter for theslowly insert the catheter, holding Customs Officials stating that youthe penis upright. Do not touch the have catheters with you. If you areend of the catheter that is going into in doubt about the water in thethe bladder. country you are visiting, it would be best to use bottled water. AlwaysWhen the urine has finished draining, remember to take enough suppliesslowly start to pull the catheter back of catheters with you when goingout. If some more urine starts to flow, on holiday, either in this country orstop pulling the catheter and wait for abroad. Remember to put them inthe flow to stop. Continue doing this your hand luggage if you are goinguntil the catheter is completely out. on an aeroplane, as sometimes suitcases can get mislaid.Place the used catheter in disposalbag and/or sanibin. If using a non–disposable catheter rinse it under the tap, dry on a paper toweland place in a clean paper bag forstorage. View slide
  • blood thinning medications (egPotential problems warfarin). Do not stop catheterising!Urine infections Pain on catheterisingIf your urine becomes cloudy and You may feel some pain when yousmelly, you may have a urinary first begin catheterising, but thistract infection. Other signs of does stop. However, pain can alsoinfection could be generally feeling be a sign of infection. If the painunwell, headaches, and a raised persists and/or there is blood on thetemperature. Sometimes, if you are catheter when you take it out, seekwet between catheterisations, this medical advice.may also indicate an infection. Blood in the urineTake a specimen of urine to yournurse/doctor who may give you If you sometimes see blood in yoursome antibiotics to take. Drink urine, don’t worry – it could be dueplenty of fluid – at least one full to a slight irritation or infection andglass every hour (preferably not should clear within a few days. If itcoffee, coke or fizzy drinks). doesn’t, seek medical advice.Cranberry juice can help to reducethe risk of urinary tract infections. If you have any problems or questionsHowever, cranberry juice is often always ask your continence nurse,contraindicated for people taking doctor or Shine adviser.Help usShine relies on people’s generosity and support so we can help our clientswho depend on us for help and advice - people with hydrocephalus, spinabifida, their families and carers. To donate to Shine please visitwww.shinecharity.org.uk or call 01733 421329.This information has been produced by Shine’s medical advisers andapproved by Shine’s Medical Advisory Committee of senior medicalprofessionals.Shine - Registered charity no.249338To see our full range of information sheets and to find out how to donate toShine please visit www.shinecharity.org.uk View slide