• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
3 15 Ipm Start Pests   Virus & Fungs
 

3 15 Ipm Start Pests Virus & Fungs

on

  • 363 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
363
Views on SlideShare
362
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    3 15 Ipm Start Pests   Virus & Fungs 3 15 Ipm Start Pests Virus & Fungs Presentation Transcript

    • Horticulture Plant: Osteospermum Term: Integrated Pest Management
    • Osteospermum “asti” African Daisy
      • Annual in Va, flowering herbaceous
      • Height: 12-18 in. Spacing: 24-36 in.
      • Hardiness: USDA Zone 10a to 11
      • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
      • Bloom Color: White, lavender, apricot
      • Bloom Time: Late Spring to Early Fall
      • New plant not a lot of growing information out on it yet .
    • IPM – Integrated Pest Management
      • Pest management is integrated into all growing practices
      • Use the safest chemicals possible and only when required
      • Focuses on preemptive strategies and cultural & biological controls
    • IPM
      • Use current information on the life cycles of pests and their interaction with the environment.
      • Manage pest damage by the most economical means
      • Least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment.
      • Avoid injury to the host & to other desirable plants & animals
    • Seven steps to IPM
      • Prevention: – an oz of prevention = a lb of cure
      • If you have damage, find what is causing it.
      • Identify the pest and research their lifecycle
      • Determine when to intervene: $$$
      • Research management options
      • Implement management strategy
      • Keep records on effectiveness of different methods.
    • Prevention
      • Use resistant plant varieties
      • Buy from a reputable dealer/grower
      • Inspect plants before bringing them into the greenhouse
      • Do not allow weeds to grow in the greenhouse or around the outside
    • Prevention
      • Be careful of “pet” plants
      • Clean thoroughly between crops
      • Use only sterile medium & containers
      • Use insect screening
      • Hose ends must be kept off of the floor at all times
    • Scouting
      • Inspect plants with a hand lens
        • – especially buds & the undersides of leaves
      • Pick 10 plants per bench
      • Use sticky cards
        • change them weekly
        • Use different color cards to attract different pests
      • Look for signs of insects
        • Honeydew - spittle
        • Black sooty powder
        • Webs or Cotton-like balls
        • Bore holes or off-color spots
    • Cultural practices
      • Keep plants healthy – more capable of defending against damage
      • Avoid watering late in the day
      • Don’t over fertilize
      • Keep crops spaced appropriately for good air circulation
      • Ventilate or heat at night to decrease humidity
    • What if you still get pests?
      • Determine the damage threshold
      • Remove heavily infested plants rather than trying to “save” them.
      • Use biological controls
        • Predator insects
        • Nematodes/parasites
        • Work better on “longer term” crops
    • If that doesn’t work?
      • Use chemical controls
        • Read the label carefully
        • Be aware of legal implications
      • Biorational Pesticides
        • Use the least toxic chemical
        • Know the mode of action of the chemical and the life-stage that it is effective against
        • Rotate chemicals to prevent resistance
    • What is a Pest?
      • Diseases
      • Insects
      • Nematodes/slugs
      • Weeds
      • Rodents/Deer
    • Disease
      • Viral – mosaic – plant resistant varieties
      • Fungal - Spores
        • Botrytis
        • Damping Off
        • Cytospora
        • Powdery Mildew
        • Phytophthora
        • Fairy Ring
    • Botrytis
      • Affects fruit plants
      • Causes serious economic damage to grapes, apples & strawberries
      • Sanitation:
        • Remove all diseased parts
        • Sterilize tools
    • Damping Off
      • Caused by Pythium fungus
      • Problem for new seedlings
      • Causes seedlings to rot at the soil line and fail.
      • Can be prevented by using sterile media and clean pots
    • Cytospora
      • Poplars, spruce, silver maple, apple, peach and cherry trees are highly susceptible
      • Sanitation:
        • Remove all diseased parts
        • Sterilize tools
      • Stressed plants are damaged the most
    • Powdery Mildew
      • Common on grapes, squashes
      • Zinnias outside have it bad
      • Does best in dry climates
      • Late summer problem
      • Increase air circulation
      • Treatments to prevent but not cure
      • Dispose of diseased foliage
    • Fairy Ring
      • Mushroom type fungus
      • Treatment
        • Aerate
        • Water & fertilize to encourage grass competition
      • Fungicides are not effective
    • Phytophthora
      • Bark fungus - dogwoods, oaks & hardwood trees & shrubs
      • Sanitation:
        • Remove all diseased parts
        • Sterilize tools
    • Types of Soils
      • Particle Size
        • Sand
        • Silt
        • Clay
      • Soil Classification
        • Sandy Soil
        • Clayey Soil
        • Loamy Soil
    • Today
      • Each table conduct tests:
      • Soil fertility: N-P-K & pH
      • Soil texture
        • Hand method
        • Suspension method
          • Largest particles (sand) sinks 1st
          • Silt layer sinks next
          • Smallest particles (clay) stays in suspension
      • Just need 2 of 3 particles to figure texture
    •