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Infants, Toddlers & Caregivers Ch 1
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Infants, Toddlers & Caregivers Ch 1

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(c) McGraw-Hill 2011

(c) McGraw-Hill 2011

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Infants, Toddlers & Caregivers Ch 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 1: Principles, Practice, and CurriculumMcGraw-Hill/Irwin © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Relationships, Interactions, and the Three Rs• Relationships grow from interactions.• Caregiving routines are opportunities for three-R interactions. 1-2
  • 3. Relationships, Interactions, and the Three Rs• A Three-R Interaction is: – Respectful – Responsive – Reciprocal 1-3
  • 4. Relationships, Interactions, and the Three Rs• What are some behaviors that indicate your respect for children?• What are responsive and reciprocal interactions? 1-4
  • 5. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 1: Involve infants and toddlers in things that concern them.• Principle 2: Invest in quality time.• Principle 3: Learn each child’s unique way of communicating and teach yours.• Principle 4: Invest time and energy to build a total person. 1-5
  • 6. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 5: Respect infants and toddlers as worthy people.• Principle 6: Be honest about your feelings.• Principle 7: Model the behavior you want to teach.• Principle 8: Recognize problems as learning opportunities, and let infants and toddlers try to solve their own. 1-6
  • 7. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 9: Build security by teaching trust.• Principle 10: Be concerned about the quality of development in each stage. It will be easy to remember these principles once you start putting them into practice! 1-7
  • 8. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 1: Involve infants and toddlers in things that concern them. – Don’t provide distractions for children during caregiving routines. – Keep children involved in interactions. – Use everyday experiences for three-R interactions. 1-8
  • 9. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 2: Invest in quality time. – Focus on individual infants and toddlers. – Be totally available and fully present. – Distinguish between wants-something and wants- nothing time. 1-9
  • 10. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 2: Invest in quality time. – Wants-something quality time: • Diapering, feeding, bathing • Caregiver-initiated – Wants-nothing quality time: • Responding to children rather than initiating an interaction 1-10
  • 11. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 3: Learn each child’s unique ways of communicating and teach yours. – Children may communicate through cries, words, movements, or facial expressions. – Teach words and language in context. – Avoid needless repetition and endless chatter. – Be aware of culturally-based nonverbal communication. 1-11
  • 12. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 4: Invest time and energy to build a total person. – Don’t focus on cognitive development alone. – Cognitive development depends on other domains. – Sensory input is a stone in the foundation of cognitive development. 1-12
  • 13. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 5: Respect infants and toddlers as worthy people. – Infants and toddlers are not objects. – The best way to gain respect is to model it. – Respond to what children need, not what you think they need. 1-13
  • 14. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 6: Be honest about your feelings. – Don’t pretend to feel something you don’t. – Don’t pretend to not feel something you do. – Children need to be around real people. – It is okay to express your feelings (appropriately)! 1-14
  • 15. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 7: Model the behavior you want to teach. – “Do as I do.” – Be careful not to model the type of behavior you want to eliminate. • If you expect children to be gentle with each other, be gentle with them. 1-15
  • 16. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 8: Recognize problems as learning opportunities, and let infants and toddlers try to solve their own. – Give children time and freedom to work on their problems. – Use scaffolding to help children problem solve. 1-16
  • 17. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 8: Recognize problems as learning opportunities, and let infants and toddlers try to solve their own. – Don’t try to protect children from all problems. – Do step in when a situation is dangerous or when children are about to hurt each other. In what specific situations would you want to intervene? 1-17
  • 18. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 9: Build security by teaching trust. – Don’t be unreliable or frequently inconsistent. – Respond to children’s needs in a reasonable amount of time. – Building children’s trust doesn’t necessarily mean making them happy all the time. 1-18
  • 19. Ten PrinciplesBased on a Philosophy of Respect• Principle 10: Be concerned about the quality of development at each stage. – Children develop at different rates. – Instead of focusing on how fast a child develops, focus on the quality of development at each stage. – Appreciate each stage of development as an opportunity for children to practice what they can do instead of pushing children to do what they can’t. 1-19
  • 20. Developmentally Appropriate Practice• Developmentally Appropriate Practice is: – Practice based on research and child development principles – Practice which relates to typical development 1-20
  • 21. Individually Appropriate Practice• Individually Appropriate Practice is: – Practice which relates to all kinds of differences – Practice which meets the needs of each and every child in your care 1-21
  • 22. Culturally Appropriate Practice• Culturally Appropriate Practice is: – Practice that addresses differences related to a child’s cultural background How many cultures are represented in this room? 1-22
  • 23. Online Learning Center• See Chapter 1 of the text’s Online Learning Center for chapter quizzes, Theory Into Action activities, Video Observations, and more. 1-23