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Chapter 9: Observation:  The Roots of Practice
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Chapter 9: Observation: The Roots of Practice

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Early Childhood Education: Learning Together

Early Childhood Education: Learning Together
by Virginia Casper and Rachel Theilheimer
(c)2009 McGraw-Hill Publishing

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Chapter 9: Observation: The Roots of Practice Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 9: Observation: The Roots of Practice Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 2. The Observer
    • Notices tone of voice
    • Notices quality of movement
    • Notices facial expressions
    • Notices language
    • Notices actions
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 3. Open-ended Activity
    • An activity that places no pressure on the child and for which there are no external expectations
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 4. Observe
    • “ To see or sense especially through analytic attention”
      • Analytic attention : the observer is concentrating in a clear and focused way on the events unfolding around her
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 5. Steps in Observation
    • Collect and record data
    • Analyze the data
    • Interpret the data
    • Collect more data
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 6. Types of Observation
    • Subjective : includes the teacher’s perspective and judgments
    • Objective : includes only what has occurred during the observation
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 7. Reflection
    • Teachers can reflect on many observations over time to gain a better understanding and appreciation for what is going on in the minds of their children
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 8. Benefits of Observation
    • Tool for understanding diversity
    • Generate knowledge about child
    • Tool for drafting “scripts for action”
    • Aid in becoming an effective decision-maker
    • Aid in planning curriculum
    • Facilitate communication with families
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 9. Goodness of Fit
    • Matching a child’s temperament with his or her environment
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 10. Curriculum Planning
    • Planning organized activities
    • Allowing time for spontaneous activities
    • Involves:
      • Scheduling
      • Setting routines
      • Defining goals and expectations
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 11. Types of Interactions to Observe
    • Peer-to-peer interactions
    • Adult-child interactions
    • Caregiving routines
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 12. Types of Communication
    • Informal communication : arises from spontaneous encounters with parents and children
    • Formal communication : planned communication between parties, such as a parent-teacher conference
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 13. Confidentiality
    • Disclosing information only to those professionals and family members involved in the situation
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 14. What to Observe
    • Their transitions to the classroom in the morning and end of day
    • Their routines – eating, sleeping, washing hands
    • Their activities and use of materials
    • Their language
    • Their interactions
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 15. Bias
    • One’s natural tendency to favor some children over others based on their characteristics, behavior style, and cultural background
    • Being aware of one’s bias can improve one’s ability to observe objectively rather than subjectively
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 16. Narrative Records
    • Running record : teacher writes down exactly what she sees for a period of time
    • Anecdotal record : teacher describes an event
    • Diary/Journal : teacher regularly records what happens and adds commentary
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 17. Observation Methods
    • Event sampling : the observation and recording of a pre-determined event
    • Checklists : formal evaluations which measure a child’s developmental performance against preset criteria
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 18. Child Study
    • A comprehensive document put together from observations of a child over a period of time
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 19. Descriptive Review
    • Use the child’s work, his efforts to stand upright and then take steps, his paintings and block buildings, or the stories he writes as a starting point for understanding his world
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  • 20. Communicating Assessment Results
    • Narrative reporting : a written description of the child’s behaviors that includes observations, assessments, and recommendations
    Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York