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Chapter 1: Working with Young Children

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Early Childhood Education: Learning Together

Early Childhood Education: Learning Together
by Virginia Casper and Rachel Theilheimer
(c)2009 McGraw-Hill Publishing

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    Chapter 1: Working with Young Children Chapter 1: Working with Young Children Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 2: Children and the Worlds They Inhabit Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Globalization
      • Officially undefined
      • Refers to the shrinking of the world via technology
      • How has Globalization affected you?
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Culture
      • Different cultures promote independence or interdependence
      • What factors contribute to these differences?
      • Acculturation is the extent to which an individual adopts the beliefs and practices different from their own
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Microsystems
      • Religion
      • Peers
      • Activities
      • The immediate environment
      • Family
      • School
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Mesosystem
      • Reflects interconnections between:
        • School and Home
        • Home and Religion
        • Religion and School
        • Family and Child
        • Etc.
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Exosystem
      • Influences beyond the home
        • Extended family
        • Neighbors
        • Professional services
        • Mass Media
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Macrosystem
      • Influences of the greater culture on the individual
      • What would constitute an example of a Macrosystem influence?
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Chronosystem
      • Is comprised of the connections among one’s:
        • Microsystem
        • Mesosystem
        • Exosystem
        • Macrosystem
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Components of the Developmental Niche
      • The physical and social setting in which the child lives
      • The customs of childcare and child rearing
      • The psychology of the caretakers
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Introducing Difficult Topics to Children
      • Follow these guidelines:
        • Find out the policies of your school
        • Find your own comfort level
        • Talk with families
        • Find areas where children demonstrate interest
        • Advise both children and families that you will try to keep them safe
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Acute Stressors
      • One-time stressors:
        • Broken arm
        • Parent leaves on trip
        • First field trip
        • Getting into a fight at school
        • List other potential acute stressors
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Chronic Stressors
      • Continuing or persistent stressors:
        • Divorce
        • New teacher
        • Remarriage of a parent
        • Step-siblings
        • Bully at lunch
        • List other potential chronic stressors
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • The Stress Response
      • Allows us to:
        • Mobilize our energy
        • Focus our attention
        • Feel pain less intensely
        • Face challenges
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Mandated Reporter
      • As an educator, you must REPORT suspected physical, sexual, or emotional abuse.
      • As an educator, you must REPORT suspected neglect or a failure to meet the child’s basic needs.
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Preventing ILLNESS
      • Institute a program of hand-washing
        • Before and after meals
        • After using the restroom
        • When coming in from the outside
        • After a child blows his/her nose
        • After handling pets
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Aspects of the Anti-Bias Curriculum
      • Show people engaging in non-stereotypical activities
      • Choose language carefully
      • Address discomfort or misconception
      • Explore questions as they arise
      • Support children who are being excluded
      • Create opportunities that promote fairness in the community
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Gender Equity
      • The idea that girls and boys both receive comparable educational opportunities
      • How can you promote Gender Equity in your classroom?
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Accommodating Children with Disabilities
      • Full Inclusion: Children receive all instruction in the regular classroom
      • Partial Inclusion: The child’s needs are met by a combination of regular instruction and supplemental instruction
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Elements of Racism
      • Covert or Overt remarks or thoughts
      • Visible actions based on one’s attitudes
      • An “Us” versus “Them” mentality
      • How can a teacher promote individual differences, while not promoting racism?
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Developmental Interaction Approach (DIA)
      • Allows children to think freely
      • Draws upon their own interests
      • Links emotions with thoughts
      • Is active rather than passive
      • Allows for reflection of the experience
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
    • Making Your Voice Heard
      • Speak up at staff meetings
      • Participate in community programs
      • Meet with local politicians
      • Visit the state capital to discuss new issues
      • Maintain contact via email or phone calls
      Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York