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Woody Plants Group 7a
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Woody Plants Group 7a

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Juniper ID
    • 2. University of Wisconsin Overlapping, scale-like foliage that wraps around the branchlets
    • 3.
      • Two types of foliage on most junipers.
      • Adult foliage is scaled – juvenile foliage is needled – in whorls of 3, similar to the common juniper we saw earlier. Usually this juvenile foliage is near the bottom of the shrub. It’s very sharp and prickley. Some people have an allergic reaction to it.
      Adult and Juvenile Foliage Pfitzer Juniper – Juniperus chinensis ‘ Pfitzeriana ’ Oregon State University
    • 4. Juniper foliage and “berries” University of Wisconsin
    • 5. Male Pollen Cones on Juniper Castlewood Canyon – photo by Linda Smith
      • Junipers are dioecious, meaning each plant is either a male plant, with pollen cones only…..,
    • 6.
      • … or it is a female plant, with female cones only. The cones of juniper look like berries…
      • But the scales of the cone are fused together and have become fleshy, not woody like other members of the cypress family.
      • Cedar waxwings love this fruit. Gin can been made from this fruit. Each ‘cone’, depending on the species, will have from 1 to 5 seeds within the cone.
      • Juniperus monosperma – one seed – upright juniper.
    • 7. Junipers don’t have buds – the new growth is produced from meristematic tissues under the “skin” of the twig.
    • 8. Another horizontal Juniper Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’ Oregon State University Rocky Mountain Juniper Juniperus scopulorum University of Connecticut
    • 9.
      • Arborvitae - L’Arbre de Vie – Tree of Life
      • In the 16 th century in the St. Lawrence Valley of NY, Cartier and his men developed scurvy. The local Indians brewed a tea from the foliage of the native arborvitae and saved their lives.
      • The oriental arborvitae’s most identifiable feature is the vertical foliage sprays. Look as though they’ve been ironed, or pressed between the pages of a book. They could be spread out and would make a carpet, whereas juniper branches are bushy, not flat, and wouldn’t make a very good carpet.
      • No buds, like juniper.
      • Fruit not as berry-like as juniper – has scales that peel back somewhat, sometimes becoming woody.
    • 10. Oriental Arborvitae Thuja orientalis Oregon State University
    • 11. Winter-kill damage on Arborvitae
    • 12. Eastern Arborvitae Thuja occidentalis University of Connecticut
      • Horizontal foliage sprays versus the vertical foliage sprays of the oriental arborvitae.
      • Home Depot and Lowe’s sell this plant a lot.
    • 13. Western Red Cedar – Thuja plicata Oregon State University
    • 14. Cedar of Lebanon Cedrus libani North Carolina State University Juniper and Arborvitae are in the Cypress Family – not Cedar. There’s only one true cedar – the Cedar of Lebanon which is in the Pine Family.
    • 15. Woody Plants Group 7a
      • Cupressus arizonica
      • Juniperus monosperma
      • Juniperus scopulorum
      • Juniperus virginiana
      • Thuja ocidentalis
      • Taxus x media
      • Arizona Cypress
      • Oneseed Juniper
      • Rocky Mountain Juniper
      • Eastern Red Cedar
      • Western Arborvitae
      • Hicks Yew
    • 16. Cupressus arizonica
    • 17. Cupressus arizonica ‘Blue Ice’
    • 18.  
    • 19. But the scales of the cone are fused together and have become fleshy, not woody like other members of the cypress family.
    • 20. ID Cupressus arizonica
      • Leaves have a silver/blue tint and come out all around the twig.
      • Very malodorous – like skunk
      • Bark is ridged and furrowed, but slightly scaly
      • Can be pyramidal or irregular depending on the seedling
    • 21. Juniperus monosperma
    • 22.  
    • 23.  
    • 24. Male flowers Junipers are dioecious, meaning each plant is either a male plant, with pollen cones only…..,
    • 25. ID Juniperus monosperma
      • Low to the ground, evergreen
      • Multi-trunk
      • tiny, yellowish-green scale-like aromatic leaves in alternate pairs
      • Hard blueish pea like berries containing one seed
    • 26. Juniperus scopulorum
    • 27. ID Juniperus scopulorum
      • scale-like leaves
      • narrow, conical growth habit
      • most have a bluish cast to needles
      • needles are opposite and closely pressed to stem
      • branches and twigs are vertical
      • blue fruits
    • 28.  
    • 29. Compare J. scopulorum and J. virginiana
      • Rocky Mountain Juniper
      • Branches definitely ascending
      • Fruit requires two years to mature
      • Foliage remains bluish green in winter
      • Point of facial needles just meeting diamond above
      • Under bark red
      • Eastern Red Cedar
      • Branches nearly horizontal
      • Fruit matures in one year
      • Foliage turns purplish-brown in winter
      • Point of facial needle entering into diamond above
      • Under bark grey
    • 30. Juniperus virginiana Eastern Red Cedar
      • Height – 30-45’ Spread – 10-15’
      • Medium water needs
      • Evergreen, conifer, scale leaves
      • Broad pyramidal shape
      • Medium green foliage turns russet in winter
      • Tough, used for windbreaks
      • Fruit – berry like cones, turn dark blue
      • Red/brown bark
    • 31.
      • ID Features
      • both scale-like and awl-like foliage
      • medium green needle color
      • bronze winter color
      • needles arranged in a 4-rank pattern
      • waxy, blue fruits; small
      • needle tips pointed
      • branches have a strong cedar scent
      • upright form
    • 32.  
    • 33.  
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    • 37.  
    • 38. Thuja occidentalis Western Arborvitae
    • 39.  
    • 40.  
    • 41.  
    • 42.  
    • 43. ID Thuja occidentalis
      • conical shape
      • dense, compact evergreen foliage
      • scale-like leaves
      • tansy-like odor emitted from crushed foliage
      • branchlets held in horizontal planes
      • small woody cone
      • often with multiple trunks
    • 44. Taxus x media Hicks Yew
      • two-ranked needles
      • red aril covered seed
      • scaly bark
      • usually massively pruned
      • blunt bud scales
      • pointed leaf apex
      • Evergreen
      • Dark green above, light green below
    • 45. Taxus x media
      • Flowers on old wood, not ornamental
      • Red covered olive brown seed
      • Scaly, flaky bark hidden by foliage
    • 46.  
    • 47.  
    • 48.  
    • 49.  
    • 50. Id from Photographs
    • 51. Entire Tree
    • 52.  
    • 53.  
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    • 55.  
    • 56.  
    • 57. Leaf
    • 58.  
    • 59.  
    • 60.  
    • 61.  
    • 62. Fruit
    • 63.  
    • 64.  
    • 65.  
    • 66.  
    • 67.  
    • 68. Bark
    • 69.