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Creating Practical Turf Areas C Su
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Creating Practical Turf Areas C Su

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Transcript

  • 1.
    • Creating practical turf and non-turf areas
  • 2. Select turf based on actual use of the site.
    • Higher quality =
    • High water demand
    • Expectations?
    • Lower quality =
    • Lower water demand
  • 3. Water-wise lawn care
    • Higher quality =
    • High water demand
    • Expectations?
    • Lower quality =
    • Lower water demand
    • Routine irrigation
      • High performance Bluegrass varieties and turf-type tall fescue
    • Reduced irrigation
      • Reduced inputs Bluegrass varieties and turf-type tall fescue
    • Non-irrigated
      • Buffalograss
      • Blue Grama
  • 4. Water-wise lawn care
    • High water demand
    • Expectations?
    • Low water demand
    • Increased drought tolerance with 3”- 4” mowing height.
    • Spring fertilization decreases drought tolerance.
    • Any grass is intolerant of traffic when under water stress.
  • 5. Water-wise lawn care
    • High water demand
    • Expectations?
    • Low water demand
    During periods of water shortage, reduce expectations.
  • 6. Water-wise gardening is not anti-turf, it is about matching the expectation with the actual use of the site.
    • Grass provides significant environmental and people benefits.
  • 7.
    • Reduces surface runoff
      • An average golf course of 150 acres can absorbs 4 million gallons of water during a 1” rain.
      • Thick turf allows 15 times less runoff than a thin turf.
      • A dense turf can reduce runoff to almost zero.
    Grass protects surface water quality
  • 8.
    • Reduces surface runoff
      • On a slope with good soil tilth, dense sod can absorbs 7.6”/hour compared to 2.4/hour for a thin sod
      • When compared to a non-grass area (like a garden or field) grassy areas reduce soil erosion caused by runoff by 84 to 668 times
    Grass protects surface water quality
  • 9. To protect surface water quality, direct surface runoff onto grass areas allowing for natural filtering in this biologically active turf soil.
  • 10.
    • Traps dust and pollen
    • Reduces noise, summer heat, and glare (improving “people space”)
    • Controls soil erosion by wind
    Grass mitigates pollutions
  • 11.
    • Soil microbial activity breaks down pollutants (such as air contaminants, pesticides and pollen)
    Grass mitigates pollutions
  • 12.
    • It takes 25 square feet of actively growing turf to convert the carbon dioxide, CO 2 , into oxygen, O 2 , needed per person per day.
    Grass converts CO 2 to O 2
  • 13. Actively growing grass turf supports soil microorganism activity, which improves soil structure.
  • 14.
    • Cool, dirt-free play space for children and adults
    Turf is basic to “people space”
  • 15.
    • Element in landscape design
      • Gives unity to the landscape design elements
      • Provides a neutral background setting off flowers and shrubs
    Turf is basic to “people space”
  • 16.
    • Property value and marketability
    • Fire Control
    Other benefits of turf
  • 17. Objective: Match turf with needs of site!
    • Expectations?
  • 18. Kentucky bluegrass does NOT requires heavy irrigation.
    • Standard for high aesthetic value “people space”
      • Seasonal irrigation required = 34” water
  • 19. Kentucky bluegrass does NOT requires heavy irrigation.
    • Water use depends on the expectations, most landscapes are significantly over-watered.
  • 20. Kentucky bluegrass does NOT requires heavy irrigation.
    • Water use depends on the expectations, most landscapes are significantly over-watered.
    • Bluegrass goes dormant under water stress.
    • Makes a great reduced input lawn, allowing it go dormant in hot/dry weather.
  • 21. Kentucky bluegrass does NOT requires heavy irrigation.
    • Water use depends on the expectations, most landscapes are significantly over-watered.
    • Bluegrass goes dormant under water stress.
    • Makes a great reduced input lawn, allowing it go dormant in hot/dry weather.
    • “ Drought-tolerant varieties use 25% less water .
  • 22. Kentucky bluegrass does NOT requires heavy irrigation.
    • Water use depends on the expectations, most landscapes are significantly over-watered.
    • Bluegrass goes dormant under water stress.
    • Makes a great reduced input lawn, allowing it go dormant in hot/dry weather.
    • “ Drought-tolerant varieties use 25% less water.
  • 23. Kentucky bluegrass does NOT requires heavy irrigation.
    • Bottom line
    • It’s not the grass that demands the water, but rather the gardener!
  • 24. Turf-type tall fescue requires irrigation
    • Actual irrigation requirement depends on soil conditions, precipitation, and management style.
    • Actual water use of turf-quality tall fescue is 10% less than turf-quality bluegrass.
    • If conditions allow deeper rooting, it will maintain green color longer between irrigation.
      • Will also require longer irrigation period
    • Tall fescue does not tolerate long-term drought, as it can not go dormant.
  • 25. Turf-type tall fescue requires irrigation
    • Reduced input tall fescue
      • Makes a good reduced input lawn where top quality is not essential for the landscape design.
  • 26. Buffalograss quality is dependant on the amount of rain and irrigation it receives.
    • Turf-quality Buffalograss requires 50% less irrigation per season than bluegrass. This is partly due to being slower to green up in the spring and faster to go dormant in the fall.
    • For turf-quality Buffalograss, the summer (June-August) irrigation requirement is 1”/ week. (By comparison, bluegrass is 1.3”/week.)
    • Dormant brown from early fall to late spring
    • Bunch grass
  • 27. Comparative Annual Water Requirements 0” 5” 10” 15” 20” 25” 30” 35” Turf quality KBG (100% ET) 34”
  • 28. Comparative Annual Water Requirements 0” 5” 10” 15” 20” 25” 30” 35” Turf quality KBG (100% ET) 34” Turf quality Tall Fescue (90% ET) 31”
  • 29. Comparative Annual Water Requirements 0” 5” 10” 15” 20” 25” 30” 35” Turf quality KBG (100% ET) 34” Turf quality Tall Fescue (90% ET) 31” Turf quality Buffalo grass (50% ET) 17”
  • 30. Comparative Annual Water Requirements 0” 5” 10” 15” 20” 25” 30” 35” Turf quality KBG (100% ET) 34” Turf quality Tall Fescue (90% ET) 31” 26” “ Drought tolerant” KBG cultivars (75% ET ) Turf quality Buffalo grass (50% ET) 17”
  • 31. Comparative Annual Water Requirements Turf quality KBG (100% ET) 34” Turf quality Tall Fescue (90% ET) 31” 26” “ Drought tolerant” KBG cultivars (75% ET ) Turf quality Buffalo grass (50% ET) 17” 20” Reduced quality KBG and Tall Fescue watered at 60% ET (grass will thin) 31” Moderate quality KBG and Tall Fescue watered at 80% ET Summer dormant (June-August) KBG (40% ET) 14” 0” 5” 10” 15” 20” 25” 30” 35”
  • 32. Creating practical turf areas and non-turf areas
    • Take home message:
      • Match turf type with use of site.
  • 33.