Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Colorado Master Gardener Training Post-Planting Care
Watering <ul><li>Rough estimates of water to apply to the ROOT BALL of newly planted trees: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For a 20...
Poor drainage is a major reason for death of new plants . <ul><li>Water often drains into planting hole from surrounding l...
Poor drainage is a major reason for  death of new plants. If a pipe can drain to a lower point (3+% slope) a drainpipe in ...
Polyacrylamides (hydrogels) <ul><li>Some application in tree planting </li></ul><ul><li>good as a slurry/soak for bare-roo...
Antitranspirants <ul><li>Waxes, resins, plastics, oils - clog stomates </li></ul><ul><li>OK for evergreens in winter? </li...
Mycorrhizae   more info  :  www.ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3305
Mycorrhizae ,  a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Ectomycorrhizae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Short, swollen, frequently...
Mycorrhizae ,  a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Ectomycorrhizae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Short, swollen, frequently...
Mycorrhizae,   a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Role not fully understood </li></ul><ul><li>Extends the explorat...
Mycorrhizae,  a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Practical Applications </li></ul><ul><li>Growth favored by same g...
Mycorrhizae,   a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Practical Applications </li></ul><ul><li>Soil phosphorus </li></...
Mycorrhizae,   a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Practical Applications? </li></ul><ul><li>Mycorrhizal fungi cock...
Fertilizer use at planting?
Pruning at planting slows root regeneration. Gibberellins   produced in the root  growing tips  stimulate growth in the ca...
On new plantings, keep pruning to a minimum until significant canopy growth cycle begins. <ul><ul><li>Remove damaged & bro...
“root stimulators”
Sunscald?
winter sunscald or “Southwest injury”
Sunscald prevention
Light Colored Tree Wrap  <ul><li>To shed rain, wrap from bottom up. </li></ul><ul><li>To prevent girdling, remove each spr...
Tree wrap  (Nov - Apr)
Benefits of organic mulch around trees <ul><li>Keeps soil cooler </li></ul><ul><li>slows moisture loss </li></ul><ul><li>i...
 
 
With good soil conditions, root establishment takes 1 season per inch of tree caliper. <ul><li>In hardiness zone 4-5, root...
 
 
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

6 Post Planting Care

1,132

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,132
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "6 Post Planting Care"

  1. 1. Colorado Master Gardener Training Post-Planting Care
  2. 2. Watering <ul><li>Rough estimates of water to apply to the ROOT BALL of newly planted trees: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For a 20-24” wide root ball, add 10 gallons, twice a week </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 gallon per inch of trunk diameter per day </li></ul></ul>A raised ring of soil formed around the edge of the ROOT BALL may be used for basin irrigation .
  3. 3. Poor drainage is a major reason for death of new plants . <ul><li>Water often drains into planting hole from surrounding landscape. </li></ul><ul><li>Lawn irrigation generally over-waters woody plants. </li></ul>Correcting drainage problems for the area is far better than just the planting hole.
  4. 4. Poor drainage is a major reason for death of new plants. If a pipe can drain to a lower point (3+% slope) a drainpipe in the bottom of the hole may be helpful. If a compacted layer or hardpan causes the drainage problem, drill a drain hole through the layer.
  5. 5. Polyacrylamides (hydrogels) <ul><li>Some application in tree planting </li></ul><ul><li>good as a slurry/soak for bare-root </li></ul><ul><li>health concerns http://www.cfr.washington.edu/research.mulch/myths/hydrogels.pdf </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>starch-based hydrogels as alternatives </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Antitranspirants <ul><li>Waxes, resins, plastics, oils - clog stomates </li></ul><ul><li>OK for evergreens in winter? </li></ul><ul><li>The “answer” during drought? </li></ul>
  7. 7. Mycorrhizae more info : www.ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3305
  8. 8. Mycorrhizae , a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Ectomycorrhizae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Short, swollen, frequently branched roots, usually devoid of root hairs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>almost exclusively on trees </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Endomycorrhizae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No visible signs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>90% of higher plants, including trees </li></ul></ul> none mycorrhizae (pine) close-up on pine
  9. 9. Mycorrhizae , a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Ectomycorrhizae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Short, swollen, frequently branched roots, usually devoid of root hairs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>almost exclusively on trees </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Endomycorrhizae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No visible signs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>90% of higher plants, including trees </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Found in most soils (including forest and grasslands) </li></ul><ul><li>Very host specific </li></ul> none mycorrhizae (pine) close-up on pine
  10. 10. Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Role not fully understood </li></ul><ul><li>Extends the exploration of the rooting system by some 700% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Phosphorus uptake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water uptake, increasing drought tolerance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tolerance to insects, disease and other stress factors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hardiness </li></ul>
  11. 11. Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Practical Applications </li></ul><ul><li>Growth favored by same good soil properties as plants. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Practical Applications </li></ul><ul><li>Soil phosphorus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduced colonization with phosphorus levels above 50 ppm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited to no colonization with phosphorus levels above 100 ppm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Majority of Colorado soils have adequate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>phosphorus, some >100ppm </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots <ul><li>Practical Applications? </li></ul><ul><li>Mycorrhizal fungi cocktail often added in tree plantings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Container/nursery production -- high water and fertility levels don’t support mycorrhizal fungi development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To date, mycorrhizal fungi inoculation of established trees has not been shown to promote growth. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If soil conditions favor mycorrhizal fungi, they are already active. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research data suggest that some commercial products may be contaminated or non-living </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Fertilizer use at planting?
  15. 15. Pruning at planting slows root regeneration. Gibberellins produced in the root growing tips stimulate growth in the canopy. Auxins produced in the canopy growing tips stimulate root growth .
  16. 16. On new plantings, keep pruning to a minimum until significant canopy growth cycle begins. <ul><ul><li>Remove damaged & broken branches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintain single trunk </li></ul></ul>1 year / inch of caliper
  17. 17. “root stimulators”
  18. 18. Sunscald?
  19. 19. winter sunscald or “Southwest injury”
  20. 20. Sunscald prevention
  21. 21. Light Colored Tree Wrap <ul><li>To shed rain, wrap from bottom up. </li></ul><ul><li>To prevent girdling, remove each spring and replace in fall. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Tree wrap (Nov - Apr)
  23. 23. Benefits of organic mulch around trees <ul><li>Keeps soil cooler </li></ul><ul><li>slows moisture loss </li></ul><ul><li>increases water infiltration </li></ul><ul><li>inhibits weed competition </li></ul><ul><li>encourages mycorrhizal growth </li></ul><ul><li>decomposition improves soil </li></ul><ul><li>texture </li></ul><ul><li>prevents mower/stringtrimmer </li></ul><ul><li>damage to tree trunk </li></ul>
  24. 26. With good soil conditions, root establishment takes 1 season per inch of tree caliper. <ul><li>In hardiness zone 4-5, roots grow an average of 18 inches per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Larger trees take longer for the root system to re-establish. </li></ul>

×