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6 Post Planting Care
 

6 Post Planting Care

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    6 Post Planting Care 6 Post Planting Care Presentation Transcript

    • Colorado Master Gardener Training Post-Planting Care
    • Watering
      • Rough estimates of water to apply to the ROOT BALL of newly planted trees:
        • For a 20-24” wide root ball, add 10 gallons, twice a week
          • OR
        • 1 gallon per inch of trunk diameter per day
      A raised ring of soil formed around the edge of the ROOT BALL may be used for basin irrigation .
    • Poor drainage is a major reason for death of new plants .
      • Water often drains into planting hole from surrounding landscape.
      • Lawn irrigation generally over-waters woody plants.
      Correcting drainage problems for the area is far better than just the planting hole.
    • Poor drainage is a major reason for death of new plants. If a pipe can drain to a lower point (3+% slope) a drainpipe in the bottom of the hole may be helpful. If a compacted layer or hardpan causes the drainage problem, drill a drain hole through the layer.
    • Polyacrylamides (hydrogels)
      • Some application in tree planting
      • good as a slurry/soak for bare-root
      • health concerns http://www.cfr.washington.edu/research.mulch/myths/hydrogels.pdf
          • starch-based hydrogels as alternatives
    • Antitranspirants
      • Waxes, resins, plastics, oils - clog stomates
      • OK for evergreens in winter?
      • The “answer” during drought?
    • Mycorrhizae more info : www.ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3305
    • Mycorrhizae , a symbiotic association with roots
      • Ectomycorrhizae
        • Short, swollen, frequently branched roots, usually devoid of root hairs
        • almost exclusively on trees
      • Endomycorrhizae
        • No visible signs
        • 90% of higher plants, including trees
      none mycorrhizae (pine) close-up on pine
    • Mycorrhizae , a symbiotic association with roots
      • Ectomycorrhizae
        • Short, swollen, frequently branched roots, usually devoid of root hairs
        • almost exclusively on trees
      • Endomycorrhizae
        • No visible signs
        • 90% of higher plants, including trees
      • Found in most soils (including forest and grasslands)
      • Very host specific
      none mycorrhizae (pine) close-up on pine
    • Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots
      • Role not fully understood
      • Extends the exploration of the rooting system by some 700%
        • Phosphorus uptake
        • Water uptake, increasing drought tolerance
        • Tolerance to insects, disease and other stress factors
      • Hardiness
    • Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots
      • Practical Applications
      • Growth favored by same good soil properties as plants.
    • Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots
      • Practical Applications
      • Soil phosphorus
        • Reduced colonization with phosphorus levels above 50 ppm
        • Limited to no colonization with phosphorus levels above 100 ppm
        • Majority of Colorado soils have adequate
        • phosphorus, some >100ppm
    • Mycorrhizae, a symbiotic association with roots
      • Practical Applications?
      • Mycorrhizal fungi cocktail often added in tree plantings
        • Container/nursery production -- high water and fertility levels don’t support mycorrhizal fungi development
        • To date, mycorrhizal fungi inoculation of established trees has not been shown to promote growth.
        • If soil conditions favor mycorrhizal fungi, they are already active.
        • Research data suggest that some commercial products may be contaminated or non-living
    • Fertilizer use at planting?
    • Pruning at planting slows root regeneration. Gibberellins produced in the root growing tips stimulate growth in the canopy. Auxins produced in the canopy growing tips stimulate root growth .
    • On new plantings, keep pruning to a minimum until significant canopy growth cycle begins.
        • Remove damaged & broken branches
        • Maintain single trunk
      1 year / inch of caliper
    • “root stimulators”
    • Sunscald?
    • winter sunscald or “Southwest injury”
    • Sunscald prevention
    • Light Colored Tree Wrap
      • To shed rain, wrap from bottom up.
      • To prevent girdling, remove each spring and replace in fall.
    • Tree wrap (Nov - Apr)
    • Benefits of organic mulch around trees
      • Keeps soil cooler
      • slows moisture loss
      • increases water infiltration
      • inhibits weed competition
      • encourages mycorrhizal growth
      • decomposition improves soil
      • texture
      • prevents mower/stringtrimmer
      • damage to tree trunk
    •  
    •  
    • With good soil conditions, root establishment takes 1 season per inch of tree caliper.
      • In hardiness zone 4-5, roots grow an average of 18 inches per year.
      • Larger trees take longer for the root system to re-establish.
    •  
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