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2 Wwg2 Soil Hydrozone Irrigation
 

2 Wwg2 Soil Hydrozone Irrigation

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    2 Wwg2 Soil Hydrozone Irrigation 2 Wwg2 Soil Hydrozone Irrigation Presentation Transcript

    •  
    • Irrigation Management and Water-Wise Gardening HCC100 -- Horticultural Science, The Science of Gardening
    • 7 Principles of Water-Wise Gardening
    • Planning and designing for water conservation, beauty, and utility
    • Improving the soil
      • Add organic matter
      • Creating practical turf and non-turf areas
    • Watering efficiently with appropriate irrigation methods
      • Irrigation efficiency has greatest water savings potential for most home gardeners.
      • Selecting plant appropriate for our climate
      • AND
      • Grouping them according to their water needs ( Hydrozoning )
      • AND
      • Irrigating according to water need
    • Mulching to reduce evaporation
    • Maintaining with good horticultural practices
      • Healthy plants are more tolerant of insect and disease problems.
      • Healthy plants have fewer insect and disease problems
      • Iron chlorosis, a symptoms of springtime over-watering
    • 7 Principles of Water-Wise Gardening
      • Planning and design for water conservation, beauty, and utility
      • Improving the soil
      • Creating practical turf and non-turf areas
      • Watering efficiently with appropriate irrigation methods
      • Selecting plants and grouping them according to water need
      • Mulching to reduce evaporation
      • Maintaining with good horticultural practices
    • Planning and designing for water conservation, beauty, and utility
    • Create a base plan
      • Make a simple drawing of the property
        • Typical scale is 8-10 feet per inch
      • Show site amenities
        • Buildings
        • Hardscape features (driveways, walks, patio, deck)
        • Existing plant materials
        • Utility lines
      • Site limitations
        • Sun exposure
        • Wind patterns
        • Drainage issues
    •  
    •  
    • Landscaping on Expansive Soils
      • CSU Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet #7.236
    • Make a bubble diagram
      • Use areas (identifying irrigation needs )
        • Lawns
          • Routine, reduce, low and non-irrigated turf areas
        • Shrub, flowerbeds and ground covers with
          • Routine, reduce, low and non-irrigated areas
        • Fruit & vegetable gardens
        • Children’s play areas
        • Pet areas
        • Natural areas
        • Non-plant areas
    •  
    • Refine the landscape plan
      • Convert bubble areas to a landscape plan.
    • Planning and designing for water conservation, beauty, and utility
      • Take home message:
    • Planning and designing for water conservation, beauty, and utility
      • Take home message
        • It takes planning… water conservation, beauty, and utility does not happen by accident.
      • Selecting plant appropriate for our climate
      • AND
      • Grouping them according to their water needs ( Hydrozoning )
      • AND
      • Irrigating according to water need
    • Colorado is a semi-arid climate.
      • Select plants suitable to a semi-arid climate.
      • Plant pallet is limited, but not void, without supplemental irrigation.
    • Colorado is a semi-arid climate.
      • Suggested references
      • Xeriscape Plant Guide , by Denver Water, Fulcrum Publishing
      • Xeric Tree and Shrub List by the Community Tree Alliance , CMG Fact Sheet #T15
    • Colorado is a semi-arid climate.
      • On sites, where landscape irrigation is not desirable or possible, focus on natural growth.
    • Hydrozoning Grouping plants according to irrigation needs, AND watering according to need . Routinely irrigated flowerbed Non-irrigated naturalized area
    • Design with irrigation demand in mind. Routine Irrigation Reduced Irrigation Need Limited irrigation once established non-irrigated
    • Design with irrigation demand in mind. Routine Irrigation Reduced Irrigation Need Limited irrigation once established
    • Design with irrigation demand in mind. Garden Routine Irrigation Reduced Irrigation Need Limited irrigation once established
    • Design with irrigation demand in mind. Routine Irrigation Reduced Irrigation Need Limited irrigation once established non-irrigated
    • Hydrozoning myths
      • Xeriscaping is NOT a cacti and rock garden .
    • The objective of hydrozoning is to place low-water requiring plants together in zones that actually receive reduced to no irrigation!
    • Even xeric plant need rain/irrigation during establishment.
    • Water-wise concepts support irrigation for “people space” “ People space” at Thanksgiving Point Gardens
      • Selecting plant appropriate for our climate
      • AND
      • Grouping them according to their water needs ( Hydrozoning )
      • AND
      • Irrigating according to water need
    • Improving the soil
      • Add organic matter
    • Improving the soil
      • Sandy Soils
    • Improving the soil
      • Sandy Soils
      • Add organic matter
    • Improving the soil
      • Sandy Soils
      • Add organic matter
        • Hold 10+ times more water and nutrients than sand
    • Improving the soil
      • Loam & Clayey Soils
    • Improving the soil
      • Loam & Clayey Soils
        • Add organic matter
        • Prevent compaction
    • Improving the soil
      • Loam & Clayey Soils
        • Add organic matter
        • Prevent compaction
       large pore spaces  deep rooting  water supply
    • Improving the soil
      • Exception
      • Some native plants to the high plains and Rocky Mountain region prefer poor soils .
      • In improved soils
        • May thrive, loosing their xeric characteristics
        • Do poorly
    • Factors influencing irrigation management
      • Soil’s water holding capacity
      • Evapotranspiration, ET
      • Rooting depth
      • Plant’s ability to extract water from the soil
    • Water holding capacity
      • Pore spaces
        • Texture and structure
      • Large pore spaces
        • Air
        • Water moves down with gravitational pull
      • Small pore spaces
        • Water
        • Water moves in all directions by capillary action
    • Water holding capacity Saturation Field Capacity Wilting Point
    • Water holding capacity
    • Water holding capacity
    • Evapotranspiration, ET
      • Evapotranspiration, ET , is the rate a crop uses water for transpiration plus evaporation from the soil surface.
      • Factors influencing ET
        • Weather
          • Solar radiation
          • Temperature
          • Wind
          • Humidity
        • Stage of plant growth
    • Evapotranspiration, ET
      • Typical ET for Cool Season Turf*
      • April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct.
      • Per
      • Month 3.98” 4.9” 6.0” 6.5” 5.5” 4.0” 2.8”
      • Per
      • Day 0.13” 0.16” 0.20” 0.21” 0.18” 0.13” 0.09”
      • *Northern Colorado Front Range area
    • Rooting depth and irrigation
      • A deeper rooting system
      • Larger supply of water
      • Go longer between irrigations
      • In compacted or clayey soil
      • Low levels of soil oxygen
      • Limit rooting depth
      • Reducing supply of available water
      • Soil’s water holding capacity
      • + ET
      • + Rooting depth
      • Irrigation management
      • Sandy Loam
      • Sand Loam w/ clay
      • 12” rooting depth
      • Inches available water
      • Amount of water per irrigation
      • 0.5” 0.75” 1”
      Irrigation summary
      • Sandy Loam
      • Sand Loam w/ clay
      • 12” rooting depth
      • Inches available water
      • Amount of water per irrigation
      • 0.5” 0.75” 1”
      • Days between irrigations
      • April (at 0.13”/day) 4 6 8
      • July (at 0.20”/day) 2.5 4 5
      Irrigation summary
      • Sandy Loam
      • Sand Loam w/ clay
      • 6” rooting depth
      • Inches available water
      • Amount of water per irrigation
      • 0.25” 0.38” 0.5”
      Irrigation summary
      • Sandy Loam
      • Sand Loam w/ clay
      • 6” rooting depth
      • Inches available water
      • Amount of water per irrigation
      • 0.25” 0.38” 0.5”
      • Days between irrigations
      • April (at 0.13”/day) 2 3 4
      • July (at 0.20”/day) 1 2 2.5
      Irrigation summary
      • Sandy Loam
      • Sand Loam w/ clay
      • 24 inch rooting depth
      • Inches available water
      • Amount of water per irrigation
      • 1” 1.5” 2”
      • Days between irrigations
      • April (at 0.13”/day) 8 11.5 15
      • July (at 0.20”/day) 5 7.5 10
      Irrigation summary
      • Sandy Loam
      • Sand Loam w/ clay
      • 6 inch rooting depth
      • Amount 0.25” 0.38” 0.5”
      • Days 1 2 2.5
      • 12 inch rooting depth
      • Amount 0.5” 0.75” 1”
      • Days 2.5 4 5
      • 24 inch rooting depth
      • Amount 1” 1.5” 2”
      • Days 5 7.5 10
      Irrigation summary -- July
    • Factors influencing irrigation demand
      • Soil organic content
        • Organic matter holds 10X more water than sand.
      • Sandy Loam
      • Sand Loam w/ clay
      • 6 inch rooting depth
      • Amount 0.25” 0.38” 0.5”
      • Days 1 2 2.5
      • 12 inch rooting depth
      • Amount 0.5” 0.75” 1”
      • Days 2.5 4 5
      • 24 inch rooting depth
      • Amount 1” 1.5” 2”
      • Days 5 7.5 10
      Irrigation summary -- July
    • Factors influencing irrigation demand
      • Irrigation pattern
        • Frequent watering = shallow rooting depth
    • Factors influencing irrigation demand
      • Stage of growth
        • Water use high during blossoming and fruiting
    • Factors influencing irrigation demand
      • Water demand of plants
        • To support growth
        • To survive dry spells
    • Fine-tune the irrigation management
    • Fine-tune the irrigation management
      • In the normal June/July days
      • IF a lawn goes 5 days on 1”
    • Fine-tune the irrigation management
      • In the normal June/July days
      • IF a lawn goes 5 days on 1”
        • Apply
          • 1.0” every 5 days
            • Additional amounts would leach below root zone.
          • 0.8” every 4 days
          • 0.6” every 3 days
          • 0.4” every 2 days
          • 0.2” every day
    • Fine-tune the irrigation management
      • In the normal June/July days
      • IF a lawn goes 4 days on 0.8 ”
    • Fine-tune the irrigation management
      • In the normal June/July days
      • IF a lawn goes 4 days on 0.8 ”
        • Apply
          • 0.8” every 4 days
            • Additional amounts would leach below root zone.
          • 0.6” every 3 days
          • 0.4” every 2 days
          • 0.2” every day
    • Fine-tune the irrigation management
      • In the normal June/July days
      • IF a lawn only goes 2 days on 0.4”
    • Fine-tune the irrigation management
      • In the normal June/July days
      • IF a lawn only goes 2 days on 0.4”
        • Apply
          • 0.4” every 2 days
            • Additional amounts would leach below root zone.
          • 0.2” every day
    • Normal irrigation requirement
      • Cool season turf*
      • April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct.
      • Per
      • week 0.9” 1.1” 1.4” 1.5” 1.2” 0.9” 0.6 ”
      • 7/8” 1 1/8” 1 3/8” 1 1/2” 1 1/4” 7/8” 5/8”
      • * Northern Colorado Front Range area, based on historical ET, normal rainfall and a 70% sprinkler efficiency rating.
      • What do you advise the gardener about, “How much and how often to water the lawn?”
    • Improving the soil
      • Take home message:
      • On sandy soils, O.M improves water holding capacity
      • On clayey soils, O.M. improves soil tilth
        • Deeper rooting depth
          • Greater water supply