Novel Projects
1. Collage
Directions: Using magazine photos create a collage of images that symbolize important ideas,
eve...
From Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor
Teacher: Kirstin Gerhold, 5th grade
Columbia Elementary, Mukilteo, Was...
4. Map
Directions:
A map makes a good extension project when a character's journey (physical, psychological,
emotional, or...
by Margaret Garrigue by Margaret Garrigue by Jeanne Watatsuki Houston
6. Create a Home Page
Directions:
Select several cha...
10. Dream Vacation
Directions:
Where do you think your character would most like to go on a vacation? Pick a spot,
describ...
10. Dream Vacation
Directions:
Where do you think your character would most like to go on a vacation? Pick a spot,
describ...
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Transcript of "Novel projects2ndtriall"

  1. 1. Novel Projects 1. Collage Directions: Using magazine photos create a collage of images that symbolize important ideas, events, or themes in your book. On the back, explain what each image symbolizes and how it draws on key material from the character's experience. 2. Characterization Discs Directions 1. Brainstorm characterization  Illustrate the appearance of the character  Show the character in action  What does the character say?  Reveal the character’s thoughts and feelings  Show how others react to the character 2. Using cups or a compass (or any circular object), trace six “larger” circles on one color of paper and twelve “smaller: circles on another color of paper. The exact sizes are not critical; the small circles should fit inside the first larger ones. Cut these out. 3. Glue a small circle to each side of each larger circle. 4. Think of a symbol to use as a border around the edge of the small circles on each disk. 5. On the first disk, write the title and author of the book inside the symbolic border. On the back write your name. 6. On the remaining five disks, create an illustration inside the symbolic border to depict each of the elements of characterization 7. On the back of each of these disks write a quote from the story that shows this element. Examples As you can see in the photos below, the discs can be strung together with yarn or string and hung on the wall or bulletin board. The example below on the left (from Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor) shows a close-up of disc segments with images on one side and illustrative quotes from the book on the other. The example on the right shows three main idea discs based on Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli, A Place to Call Home by Jackie French Coller, and Homecoming by Cynthia Voigt.
  2. 2. From Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor Teacher: Kirstin Gerhold, 5th grade Columbia Elementary, Mukilteo, Washington From three books: Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli, A Place to Call Home by Jackie French Koller, and Homecoming by Cynthia Voigt Teacher: Janine King, 6th grade St. Joseph School, Seattle, Washington 3. Design a CD Cover for the Book Directions: Design the front and the back cover for a CD to capture the theme or spirit of your book. Be sure the name of the book, plus the title of the hit single, appears on the front cover along with an appealing sketch or design. On the back, list the other songs from the CD, making sure they relate to the book and to the characters' experiences. [Adaptation: Write lyrics to the hit single.] The CD covers below include students' songs based on Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George and Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O'Dell. Teacher: Kristin McNabb, 5th grade, St. Joseph School, Seattle, Washington.
  3. 3. 4. Map Directions: A map makes a good extension project when a character's journey (physical, psychological, emotional, or spiritual) is a central component of a book. As students design their maps, they can illustrate significant events, settings, and/or themes in the character's journey. The example shown below is based on Jason's Gold by Will Hobbs. Teacher: Janine King, 6th- 8th grades, Brighton School, Lynnwood, Washington. 5. Theme images Directions: Theme images are illustrations of key concepts related to a thematic literature circle unit. Students select one word that represents a central concept important to the theme of the book. They illustrate the concept, weaving the word itself into the image in some way. Students then write an explanation of how the image and the word they've selected relate to the theme in a meaningful way. The examples below are from a literature circle unit on the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The students selected Swallowed by Injustice as the theme that tied the books together. "Relief" Based on The Eternal Spring of Mr. Ito "Peace" Based on The Eternal Spring of Mr. Ito "Darkness" Based on Return to Manzanar
  4. 4. by Margaret Garrigue by Margaret Garrigue by Jeanne Watatsuki Houston 6. Create a Home Page Directions: Select several characters and design a home page for each of them, picking out appropriate backgrounds and pictures and then creating information that would tell a viewer about your character. Create links to at least five different sites that you think your character would be interested in. The write up and post on the page an explanation of how you made the decisions you did and what you believe this tells us about the character. 7. Chat Room Conversations Directions: Imagine that your character has found other people to talk with while surfing the Internet. Describe the chat room your character was in and why your character would be drawn to the kind of group that operates the chat room. Then construct the conversation your character had with others while in the chat room. 8. Word Collage Directions: Write the title of the book in the center of a sheet of paper. Then look through magazines for words, phrases, and sentences that illustrate or tell something about your book. As you look, think in terms of the theme, setting, plot line, as well as characters. Work to get fifty such words, phrases, or sentences so the whole sheet of paper will be covered. The visual impact of the collage should tell a potential reader a lot about the book. 9. Poetry Directions: Write three poems in response to the novel. The poems can be about the characters, where the book takes place, or the themes in the book.
  5. 5. 10. Dream Vacation Directions: Where do you think your character would most like to go on a vacation? Pick a spot, describe it, and explain why he or she would want to go there or download information from the Internet on the place. Then write a day-by-day itinerary of what the character would do each day and why you think the character would enjoy this activity. 11. Tangible or intangible gifts Directions: Select a character and figure out what two or three things you believe your character most needs or wants. Draw or cut out pictures to represent these “gifts” and write to your character and explanation of why you picked these things out for him or her. 12. Point of view column Directions: Write an opinion column like those that appear on the editorial page of the newspaper. Choose a theme or topic from the novel you just read and write the column from the point of view of one of the characters. Your character might write about the importance of education or why we should accept people who are not like us. 13. A character’s fears Directions: One way we get to know characters is to think deeply about them and make inferences based on their actions and on what they and others say about them. Through a person’s actions we can learn what they fear and what they want to avoid the most. Select several characters from your novel and write a paragraph on what you believe they fear the most and what evidence you used to come to this conclusion. 14. Current events Directions: Select five current news or feature stories from television or news magazines that you think your character would be interested in. Then explain how your character would respond to each of the stories and the opinions your character would have about what was happening in the story. 15. Travel Brochure Directions: Research the climate, natural features, and history of the setting of your book. Create a travel brochure advertising the place’s attractions to visitors. Include only information that would have applied during the time period of your book.
  6. 6. 10. Dream Vacation Directions: Where do you think your character would most like to go on a vacation? Pick a spot, describe it, and explain why he or she would want to go there or download information from the Internet on the place. Then write a day-by-day itinerary of what the character would do each day and why you think the character would enjoy this activity. 11. Tangible or intangible gifts Directions: Select a character and figure out what two or three things you believe your character most needs or wants. Draw or cut out pictures to represent these “gifts” and write to your character and explanation of why you picked these things out for him or her. 12. Point of view column Directions: Write an opinion column like those that appear on the editorial page of the newspaper. Choose a theme or topic from the novel you just read and write the column from the point of view of one of the characters. Your character might write about the importance of education or why we should accept people who are not like us. 13. A character’s fears Directions: One way we get to know characters is to think deeply about them and make inferences based on their actions and on what they and others say about them. Through a person’s actions we can learn what they fear and what they want to avoid the most. Select several characters from your novel and write a paragraph on what you believe they fear the most and what evidence you used to come to this conclusion. 14. Current events Directions: Select five current news or feature stories from television or news magazines that you think your character would be interested in. Then explain how your character would respond to each of the stories and the opinions your character would have about what was happening in the story. 15. Travel Brochure Directions: Research the climate, natural features, and history of the setting of your book. Create a travel brochure advertising the place’s attractions to visitors. Include only information that would have applied during the time period of your book.

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