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Visual Literacy - Design Principles

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An interactive PowerPoint that addresses the four design principles: color, balance, consistency, and legibility.

An interactive PowerPoint that addresses the four design principles: color, balance, consistency, and legibility.

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  • 1. to Visual Literacy - Design Principles instruction. This instruction is designed to: Introduce and explain “Visual Literacy”. •Introduce you to the 4 main Principles of Design •Recognize a “good” example fRom a “pooR” example Identify if principles are applied Click here to visuals effectively, and efficiently For next page
  • 2. Did you find the previous page to be very unappealing and obnoxious? It was purposely designed that way to get your attention and to demonstrate how a page could look when the Visual Design Principles are not applied. We’ll be critiquing this page at the end of this instruction applying your newly learned skills. Let’s go to the next page and start again! (click on the arrow)
  • 3. Content: to the Visual Design Principles instruction. Teacher Use Goals As teachers, you will not only be using visuals to aid in your instruction, but you will also be creating them. The goal of this instruction is to provide you with the tools and information so you can •Evaluate information presented by visual media. •Incorporate these concepts in creating your own visuals that are effective, efficient and appealing. Click on arrow to continue.
  • 4. Content: Areas covered Purpose •Introduce and explain “Visual Literacy”. •Introduce the 4 main Visual Design Principles. •Inform you on the importance of critical viewing. •Develop awareness and skills for critical viewing. •Provide examples and nonexamples.
  • 5. Visual Literacy is defined as the 1/5 learned ability to interpret visual messages accurately and to create such messages. Content: Definition Benefits Educator Goals Visual Literacy involves two strategies: Overview Critical Viewing • Helping learners to decode or “read” visuals proficiently Develop skills by practicing visual analysis skills. • Helping learners to encode or “write” visuals – to express themselves and communicate with others. In this instruction, we will only be addressing the first strategy – decoding.
  • 6. 2/5 Benefits How does this instruction in Visual Design Content: Definition Principles benefit you, a future teacher? Benefits Educator Goals Overview Critical Viewing 1. It will give you the ability to critique visuals to Develop skills determine if they are good enough quality to use. 2. It will allow you to apply your knowledge to visuals that you will create in the future. The results will be the creation of effective, efficient, and appealing visuals which allows better learning for students.
  • 7. 2/5 Educator Goals Content: Definition Benefits As an educator, the goal is to transfer information Educator Goals to our students to the best of our ability. An important Overview Critical Viewing responsibility of educators is to provide our students with Develop skills the best available learning environment and materials. That means using and providing our students with the best and most appropriate visuals to compliment words and sounds. The ultimate goal is to facilitate and enhance learning.
  • 8. 3/5 Principles of Visual Design that this instruction examines are as follows: Content: Definition •Color Benefits Educator Goals •Balance Overview •Legibility Critical Viewing Develop skills •Consistency Different sources list the Principles in a variety of ways. When reading further about Visual Design Principles, you may see them organized differently, but the content is almost identical.
  • 9. Critical Viewing is defined as the ability to 4/5 comprehend and evaluate information presented by Content: visual media. Definition Benefits Educator Goals Overview Why is this important? Critical Viewing By combining your critical viewing knowledge with the Develop skills principles of Visual Design, you will be able to select and create the best visuals for your classroom, resulting in more effective communication with your students. As educators, the primary goal is to transfer the information to the student to the best of your ability. We need to provide our students with the best materials possible so that learning is facilitated and enhanced.
  • 10. Developing skills and awareness (critical viewing) 5/5 can be learned. Becoming aware that Visual Design Principles exists is the first step. Content: Definition This is achieved by exposure to examples demonstrating Benefits Educator Goals the proper application of theories and guidelines and also by Overview viewing nonexamples where principles are applied Critical Viewing incorrectly or inappropriately. Develop skills When you have completed viewing all four Visual Design Principles, go to •Conclusion - an area for reviewing and summarizing the Visual Design Principles. (found on last slide of each principle & main menu) Once completed, go to the •Final Critique - At the end, you will critique five visuals. For three of them, you will be using a “yes/no” checklist asking if each principle has been properly applied. On the fourth visual, you will list Principle weaknesses. Lastly, you’ll create your own visual.
  • 11. As stated earlier, this instruction will deal with only four main principles in Visual Design. 1/1 Content: With each principle, the following information is included: •Definition Instruction Includes Definition •Examples - (showing proper application of theory & guidelines) Examples Nonexamples  your understanding •Nonexamples - (showing improper application of guidelines) Additional resources  •Check Your Understanding YU - an area where you can see if you have grasped the concept before continuing. Always complete before continuing onto the next slide. •Additional Resources – link found on the first slide of each principle page and main page (upper left hand corner). Are you ready? Let’s begin!
  • 12. To return to this Main menu page, click on the button located at the bottom of the screen. MAIN menu contains links to each of the Visual Content: Design Principles: Design Principle Links Conclusion Link •Color Final Critique Link •Balance Reference Link •Legibility •Consistency When you have completed all of the principles, you need to do two things. 1. Go to the Conclusion for review and summary. then 2. Go to the Final Critique in the upper right-hand corner. Here you will apply your knowledge of the principles by evaluating five different visuals. You may view the principles in the order of your choice. Note: the Home button returns to the Welcome page.
  • 13. 1/32 Color is defined as the aspect of objects and light sources that may be described in terms of hue, lightness, and saturation for objects. Content: Definition Three main areas Color will be discussed in three areas: • Color Scheme Effectiveness • Color Appeal • Color Consistency
  • 14. 2/32 Color Scheme Effectiveness Area 1 There are 2 areas involved in color scheme effectiveness. Scheme Effectiveness Content: • Figure-ground contrast • Figure/ground • Complementary colors • Avoiding intense complementary color combinations when using large amounts of text because it has a “vibrating” effect on the eyes.
  • 15. 3/32 Color Scheme Effectiveness Figure-ground contrast Area 1 Scheme Effectiveness Figure – the text or objects on a page Content: • Figure/ground Ground – the background Figure Ground Good contrast.
  • 16. In order for your objects (figures) to show up well 4/32 against the background (ground), a strong contrast Area 1 is needed. Scheme Effectiveness Content: Purple Red • Figure/ground -contrast Blue Orange Green Yellow
  • 17. Nonexample 5/32 Color Scheme Effectiveness Figure-ground contrast Area 1 Scheme Effectiveness Content: • Figure/ground -nonexample There is poor contrast in the top 2 lines of text. The dark purple in “Welcome” fades into the background. There’s not enough color difference.
  • 18. 6/32 Color Scheme Effectiveness Figure-ground contrast Area 1 Scheme Effectiveness Content: • Figure/ground -example Good Contrast Poor Contrast With strong contrast, the letters are easy to read. When the text color (figure) is similar to the background (ground), it makes reading difficult.
  • 19. Color Scheme Effectiveness 7/32 Important elements, especially wording, should Area 1 stand out in good contrast to the background. Scheme Effectiveness The simple rule of figure-ground contrast is that Content: • Overview dark figures show up best on light grounds and • Effective sets light figures show up best on dark grounds. •  Your Understanding Different color combinations provide different figure-ground contrasts. According to research conducted by Birren, 1963 the effective combinations are (shown in descending order of legibility): 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Contrast Contrast Contrast Contrast Contrast Contrast Contrast Let’s check your understanding.  Click on the button at the bottom of the page that looks like: YU  Always do YU before moving to the next slide!  YU
  • 20.  8/32 YU CYU1. Look at the following color combinations of text and backgrounds. Choose the one that is the Area 1 easiest to read by clicking on the color combination. Scheme Effectiveness Content: • Figure-ground WESTERN WESTERN WESTERN WESTERN WESTERN To continue
  • 21. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 22. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 23. 9/32 Color Scheme Effectiveness Area 1 Complementary – colors that are across from each Scheme Effectiveness other on the color wheel. Content: • Complementary When intense complementary colors are placed directly - Examples next to each other, the eye cannot focus on both at the same time, so you get an unpleasant vibrating effect. It’s okay to use these to grab attention, but avoid over-using complementary colors. Examples: and purple red and green blue and orange
  • 24. Nonexample 1 10/32 Color Scheme Effectiveness Area 1 Avoid intense complementary colors Scheme Effectiveness Content: • Intense complementary Lets Learn our Lets Learn our - Nonexample 1 A,B,C’s! A,B,C’s! A – apple A – apple B – boy B – boy C – cat C – cat D – dog D – dog E - elephant E - elephant Reading a great amount of text in color combinations like these may cause the viewer to get headaches. It’s really hard on the eyes.
  • 25. Nonexample 2 11/32 Color Scheme Effectiveness Area 1 Scheme Effectiveness Avoid intense complementary colors Content: • Intense complementary One should view these One should view these - Nonexample 2 suggestions as general suggestions as general guidelines about color guidelines about color schemes instead of schemes instead of absolute rules. In any absolute rules. In any situation. there are situation, there are many factors that will many factors that will have an impact on have an impact on whether particular whether particular colors will work well colors will work well together. together.  YU
  • 26.  YU CYU2. Which color combination appears to vibrate 12/32 and is hard on the eyes? Choose your answer by Area 1 clicking on the picture. Scheme Effectiveness Content: • Complementary Home of the Home of the St. Louis Rams St. Louis Rams Summer Training Camp Summer Training Camp Home of the St. Louis Rams Summer Training Camp
  • 27. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 28. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 29. 13/32 Color Appeal Area 2 Color Appeal Content: • Emotional response In Color Appeal, which is the second - Targeted audience area of Color, we will look at the emotional responses to color of your targeted audience.
  • 30. Color Appeal 14/32 Emotional responses Area 2 Whether you are aware or not, colors do elicit certain Color Appeal emotional responses. Content: • Emotional response - warm colors Research has been conducted in this area, and we can use - cool color this information to create visuals that help communicate more clearly and aid in keeping our audiences attention. Warm colors produce emotional responses which are active, dynamic, or a warm feeling. The cool colors elicit emotional responses of a more contemplative, thoughtful, or cool feeling. Examples of these colors can be seen on the next slide.
  • 31. The color wheel is our source for reference. It is 15/32 divided into warm colors and cool colors. Area 2 Color Appeal Content: Purple Red • Emotional response - color wheel Blue Orange Green Yellow Cool -contemplative, Warm - active, thoughtful, or dynamic, or a cool feeling warm feeling
  • 32. Example 1 Color Appeal 16/32 Emotional responses Example – Area 2 the yellows and gold's give the appearance of being hot. Color Appeal Content: • Emotional response - example 1 - nonexample 1 Nonexample – pink is not a color associated with hot. Therefore, this is an ineffective use of color.
  • 33. Example 2 Color Appeal 17/32 Emotional responses Area 2 Example: Color Appeal Content: Think about ice. It has • Emotional response the appearance of - example 2 blues and purples. - nonexample 2 Nonexample The color conflicts with the message.  YU
  • 34.  YU CYU3. Look at the two visuals below. On your 18/32 answer sheet, list the emotional response (s) Area 2 elicited from each. Color Appeal b. Content: a. • Emotional response
  • 35. Color Appeal 19/32 Targeted audience Area 2 When creating visuals, you need to know your Color Appeal audience and tailor the design towards them. Content: Is the design for a child or is it for an adult? • Targeted audience - preferences Responses to warm and cool colors seem to be related to age. In general, children seem to prefer warm colors, especially , , , and . Children also prefer brighter colors and combinations of intense colors more than adults do. With maturity, there is a preference toward cooler colors and subtler combinations.
  • 36. Example 1 Color Appeal 20/32 Targeted audience Area 2 Color Appeal adult Content: child • Targeted audience - example 1 Note the bright colors and the use of , , Note the use of toned and . down, subtler colors.
  • 37. Example 2 21/32 Color Appeal Targeted audience Area 2 Color Appeal Content: child adult • Targeted audience - example 2 Again we see the bright Toned down, muted, and subtler colors and the use of colors are used in this cover. , , and .  YU
  • 38.  22/32 YU CYU4. Look at the visuals below. Which visual is more appropriate in color appeal for the intended Area 2 audience of children? Color Appeal Click on the visual as your answer choice. Content: • Targeted audience 75c 75c
  • 39. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 40. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 41. 23/32 Color Consistency Area 3 Color Consistency In this final area of the Color principle, we look at Content: two areas. • Overview First, we’ll look at how color should support the theme of the visual. Second, we’ll discuss how the colors you choose for your text, your headings, your background or your graphics should be consistent throughout the visual.
  • 42. 24/32 Color Consistency Area 3 Use colors that support the theme or idea Color Consistency When choosing colors for a visual, careful thought needs Content: • Supports theme to be given. Choose a color that supports the theme or • Use same per group main idea. If the graphic deals with “hot,” then the colors should be the warm colors (reds, yellows, oranges) If the theme deals with “oceans,” then the colors used should be the cool colors (blues, greens, violets)
  • 43. Example 1 25/32 Use colors that support the theme or idea Area 3 Color Consistency Content: • Example 1 The colors of red, , and blue support the theme.
  • 44. Example 2 Use colors that support the theme or idea 26/32 Area 3 Color Consistency Content: • Example 2 In this Civil War poster, brown tints are used to give the poster an antique feeling which supports the history theme.  YU
  • 45.  Use colors that support the theme or idea YU 27/32 CYU5. Look at the two bulletin boards below. Which Area 3 bulletin board theme demonstrates appropriate use Color Consistency of colors? Content: Choose the correct answer by clicking on the picture. • Supports theme 1 Continue with another  YU
  • 46. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 47. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 48.  YU Use colors that support the theme or idea 28/32 CYU6. Which visual better uses color to support the Area 3 theme, goal, or main idea? Choose your answer by clicking Color Consistency on the picture. Content: •  Your Understanding Supports theme 2
  • 49. 29/32 Use the same colors in each group Area 3 Color Consistency -Headings -Text Content: - Background • Same colors per group - Graphics Once you choose a color for the headings, use that same color throughout the visual. The same goes for the text. Once you choose a text color, use the same one in the visual for all text. This same concept should also be applied to the background and the graphics.
  • 50. Example 1 30/32 Use the same colors in each group Headings, Text, Background, graphics Area 3 Color Consistency Content: • Same colors per group - example 1 In this bulletin board, notice that all the text is in black, as well as the graphics.
  • 51. Example 2 31/32 Use the same colors in each group Headings, Text, Background, graphics Area 3 Color Consistency Content: • Same colors per group - example 2 Again we see consistency is the use of color in the heads, text, background, and graphics.  YU
  • 52.  CYU7. After looking at the two visuals that were YU 32/32 designed for a brochure inviting tourists to Alaska, would you say they are consistent in the use of Area 3 Color Consistency color? Choose your answer by clicking on Content: ( Note: Carefully study prior to answering!) •  Your Understanding yes or no Experience some Experience some of natures’ most of natures’ most wondrous sites. wondrous sites. Come see Alaska’s Wildlife: Come see Alaska’s Scenery: Arctic Polar Bear Mountainous Glaciers Beautiful Landscapes Penguins 1 2 Was that your last Principle? Click here.
  • 53. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 54. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 55. Balance is defined as the psychological sense 1/18 of equilibrium. It is achieved when the “weight” of the elements is equally Content: • Definition distributed on each side of an axis, either horizontally, - Types vertically, or both. AXIS Two areas discussed in balance are : 1. Balance type 2. Balance appeal
  • 56. 3/18 Balance Types Area 1 Balance Types Content: • Formal There are 2 types of balance. - Informal 1. Formal – when the design is repeated on both sides. 2. Informal – the weight is equal but with different elements on each side.
  • 57. Formal Balance 4/18 Formal – when the same design is repeated on both sides. Area 1 Balance Types- Formal Attributes – not very interesting to the viewer. (Note: to help you see the axis in the following visuals, a has been added.) Content: - Definition - Example
  • 58. Example 1 5/18 Formal Balance Area 1 Balance Types- Formal Content: - Example 1
  • 59. Example 2 6/18 Formal Balance Area 1 Balance Types- Formal Mrs. Cranes Classroom Helpers Content: - Example 2 Paper Passer Line Leader Paper Grader Snacks • Dfis jdi • Dfis jdi • Dfis jdi • Dfis jdi • Do fii jdf • Do fii jdf • Do fii jdf • Do fii jdf • Difjsd • Difjsd • Difjsd • Difjsd • Si fjsei • Si fjsei • Si fjsei • Si fjsei • Fidjf sidf • Fidjf sidf • Fidjf sidf • Fidjf sidf
  • 60. 7/18 Informal Balance Area 1 Informal - the weight is equal but with different Balance Types- elements on each side. Informal Content: Attributes - Attributes • preferred because it is more dynamic and more --Example interesting than formal balance. • catches the viewer’s attention
  • 61. Example 1 8/18 Informal Balance Area 1 Balance Types- Informal Content: --Example 1
  • 62. Example 2 9/18 Informal Balance Area 1 Balance Types- Informal Content: --Example 2 Let’s check your understanding.  Click on the button at the bottom of the page that looks like: YU  Always do YU before moving to the next slide.  YU
  • 63. CYU8. Look at each visual. It demonstrates  YU either formal or informal balance. Click on the 2 10/18 pictures that show formal balance. Area 1 Balance Types Content: --  Your Understanding Onto another  YU
  • 64. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 65. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 66.  YU CYU9. Look at the examples of balance shown 11/18 below. Select the two that are informal. Choose Area 1 your answer by clicking on the pictures. Balance Types Content: --  Your Understanding
  • 67.  The 2nd area in Balance YU 12/18 Balance Appeal Area 2 Balance Appeal is the area around the objects or text. Content: There should be an appropriate amount of space – not too - Overview much nor too little. If too much white space is used, the objects look lost on the page. If too little white space is used, it makes viewing and understanding the visual difficult. As stated before, informal balance is preferred because of its appeal. Being more dynamic and more interesting than formal balance, it catches the viewer’s attention better.
  • 68. Nonexample 1 13/18 Balance Appeal -Too much white space Area 2 Balance Appeal VOWELS Content: - Too much white space a o - Nonexample 1 i e u Notice how the text and graphics seem to get lost in the “white space”.
  • 69. Nonexample 2 14/18 Balance Appeal - Too little white space Area 2 Balance Appeal Content: - Too little white space - Nonexample 2 Too little white space around the words looks crowded and makes it difficult to read. Using smaller letters would solve this problem.  YU
  • 70.  YU 15/18 CYU10. Study the following three visuals. Which one is the most effective? Choose your answer by Area 2 clicking on the picture. Balance Appeal Content: --  Your Understanding BASIC BASIC BASIC SHAPES BASIC BASIC SHAPES SHAPES SHAPES SHAPE
  • 71. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 72. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 73. 16/18 Balance Appeal Area 2 - Informal balance preferred Balance Appeal Content: - Informal preference As already stated, informal balance is preferred. It’s more exciting, and it’s not predictable. There’s a sense of expectancy with informal balance. Let’s take a look at some examples comparing the two types, using the same material.
  • 74. Example 1 Preference for Informal Balance 17/18 Area 2 Balance Appeal Content: - Informal preference ex. 1 Formal – not as interesting Informal – more interesting
  • 75. Example 2 Preference for Informal Balance 18/18 Area 2 Balance Appeal Content: - Informal preference ex. 2 Informal – more interesting Formal – not as interesting Was that your last Principle? Click here.
  • 76. Legibility is defined as the capacity to be 1/35 read or deciphered ; plain. Content: • Definition - KISS theory A good guideline to use is the K.I.S.S. theory. K – Keep I – It S – Super S – Simple!
  • 77. Example 1 2/35 K.I.S.S. Theory Content: - K.I.S.S. - Example 1 This bulletin board is very simple, clear, and uncluttered. It’s easy to read.
  • 78. Example 2 KISS Theory 3/35 Content: - K.I.S.S. - Example 2 This bulletin board is also very simple, clear, and uncluttered. It’s easily understood.
  • 79. Nonexample 1 KISS nonexample 4/35 Content: - K.I.S.S. - Nonexample 1 This bulletin board is cluttered. There’s too much information displayed. It could be improved by reducing the number of items.
  • 80. Nonexample 2 KISS nonexample 5/35 Content: - K.I.S.S. - Nonexample 2 This bulletin board is also cluttered. There’s too much information displayed. Again, a possible solution is reduce the items.
  • 81. 6/35 This instruction deals with four areas of the Legibility principle. Content: - Four areas 1.Typography (use of fonts, styles) 2. Flow (how it moves) 3. Proximity (the location of items) 4. Obvious Main Idea
  • 82. 1. Typography 7/35 Typography is the style, arrangement, or appearance Area 1 of typeset matter. Font size is the size of the lettering Typography or type. The higher the font size, the larger the lettering. Content: - Definition - Correct font size - Guidelines When choosing your font size, make sure that it is easy to read. Depending on the visual, the font size will vary. If the lettering is to be viewed at a distance of 30 or 40’ or more which is the case for bulletin boards or posters, then the size should be 1 ½” tall For a projected visual, the minimum font size should be 18 - 24 points. With a handout, the recommended lettering size is 12 points, and no smaller than 10.
  • 83. Example Correct usage of font size. 8/35 Area 1 Typography Content: - Correct font size - Example The holiday names are actually 2” tall. Therefore, the text could be viewed at 30’ or more. The recommended minimum size is 1½” tall.
  • 84. Nonexample Incorrect use of font size. 9/35 Area 1 Typography Content: - Correct font size - Nonexample The title size is okay, but the names of the holidays are not. They are too small and wouldn’t be able to be read from across the room.
  • 85. Distinguishing headings from text 10/35 Placement refers to the location of items on a page. Area 1 Typography - contrast Content: When you position the primary elements within a display - Placement so that they have a clear visual relationship to each other, - Heads vs. Body copy viewers expend little effort making sense out of what they are seeing. They are free to concentrate on understanding the message being conveyed. When reading a visual, the heading should look different from the body copy, or it should have contrast of some sort. This can be accomplished by using a different color, a larger font size, or even a different font.
  • 86. Example Typography - Can you tell the headings from the text? 11/35 Central Elementary Roster Area 1 FIRST GRADE Typography - contrast Roger Kerr, Robin Kimball, Randy Knight, John Launer, Pam Content: Limkemann, Donna McDonald, Deanna - Heads vs. Body copy McMillen, John Myers, Paul Myers - Example SECOND GRADE Becky Hamilton, Donna Willard, Tim Van Broker, Deb Hester, Roger Smith, Yvonne Whewell, Ron Myers, Susie Myers, Paul Neil THIRD GRADE Margaret Nelson, Kyle Nichols, Eldon Pullins, Mike Roberts, Mike Schoenherr, Rebecca Schutte, Debbie Tanner, Leah Ann Taylor It is easy to tell the headings from the text. The headings use a different font, different weight, and are in caps.
  • 87. Nonexample Typography - Can you tell the headings from the text? 12/35 Central Elementary Roster Area 1 First Grade Typography - contrast Roger Kerr, Robin Kimball, Randy Knight, John Launer, Pam Limkemann, Donna Content: McDonald, Deanna McMillen, John Myers, - Heads vs. Body copy Paul Myers - Nonexample Second Grade Becky Hamilton, Donna Willard, Tim Van Broker, Deb Hester, Roger Smith, Yvonne Whewell, Ron Myers, Susie Myers, Paul Neil Third Grade Margaret Nelson, Kyle Nichols, Eldon Pullins, Mike Roberts, Mike Schoenherr, Rebecca Schutte, Debbie Tanner, Leah Ann Taylor This example does not show contrast between the headings and the text. The headings are in the same font as the text, use the same weight and are in mixed upper and lower case like the text.
  • 88. 2. Flow 13/35 In this area of Legibility, we will look at two Area 2 different components. Flow Content:  The visual should be easy to follow. - Easy to follow - Logical order  The visual information should be presented logically.
  • 89. Flow - easy to follow 14/35 Well designed visuals are easy to follow. We refer to Area 2 this as the flow. Flow Content: Most commonly, we follow text from left to right. - Easy to follow -layouts Other ways are from top to bottom, and in different letter shapes such as Z, L, T, and U. Sometimes the layout for the flow may be in the shape of a circle, triangle, or rectangle.
  • 90. Example Flow – easy to follow 15/35 Area 2 Flow Content: - Easy to follow -layouts left to right example The visual flows left to right.
  • 91. Example 16/35 Flow – easy to follow Area 2 Flow Content: - Easy to follow -layouts top to bottom example The visual flows top to bottom.
  • 92. Example 1 Flow – easy to follow 17/35 Arrangement in the shape of the letter Z leads the viewer’s eye from the upper left to the lower right. Area 2 Flow Other letter shapes used are L, T, and U. Content: - Easy to follow -layouts Z example Z flow
  • 93. Example 2 Flow – easy to follow 18/35 This bulletin board uses a circle to present their material. The triangle and rectangle shape can also Area 2 be used. Flow Content: - Easy to follow -layouts circle example Circle flow
  • 94. Flow – presented logically 19/35 Logical - Does the material make sense? Area 2 Flow Content: Carefully consider how the material is - Present Logically -introduction presented to ensure that it is done in a logical sequence and order. In other words, does it make sense? It’s probably easier to explain ways of how NOT to present material logically. Let’s looks at some examples.
  • 95. Example 1 Flow – presented logically 20/35 Area 2 Flow E – elephant Lets Learn our Content: - Present Logically D – dog A,B,C’s! -example 1 C – cat A – apple B – boy B – boy A – apple C – cat Lets Learn our D – dog A,B,C’s! E – elephant This is NOT a logical way This is clear and easy of presenting the alphabet. to understand.
  • 96. Example 2 Flow – presented logically 21/35 Area 2 Flow Content: - Present Logically -example 2
  • 97. 3. Proximity 22/35 Proximity – placing related elements close together. Area 3 Proximity Content: - Introduction Viewers assume that elements close to each other are related and those that are far apart are unrelated. You can use this principle of proximity by putting related elements close together and moving unrelated elements apart. If this rule is broken, then confusion occurs.
  • 98. Example 1 Proximity example 23/35 Area 3 Proximity Content: - Example 1 See Taste Smell Hear Touch It’s easy to understand what word is associated with what graphic, since they are close together.
  • 99. Nonexample 1 Proximity nonexample 24/35 Area 3 Proximity Content: - Nonexample 1 Taste See Touch Hear Smell It is more difficult to understand which word is associated with which graphic, because they are not close together.
  • 100. Example 2 Proximity example 25/35 Area 3 Proximity Red Content: - Example 2 Violet Orange Blue Yellow Green The words are located close to the corresponding graphic, using effective proximity.
  • 101. Nonexample 2 Proximity nonexample 26/35 Area 3 Proximity Red Orange Content: - Nonexample 2 Violet Yellow Green Blue The words are not located close to the corresponding graphic, making it unclear which name goes to which color. Let’s check your understanding.  Click on the button at the bottom of the page that looks like: YU  Always do YU before moving to the next slide.  YU
  • 102. CYU11. After looking at the following visuals,  YU choose the one that is most effective. Choose 27/35 your answer by clicking on the picture. a. b. Area 3 Proximity Content: -  Your Understanding
  • 103. 4. Obvious Main Idea 28/35 The visual should be organized with all parts Area 4 working together. We refer to this as having unity. Obvious Main Idea Content: The last legibility area to be discussed is the need - Introduction - Unity to have the main idea of the visual very clear. - Main idea techniques - Isolation There are several ways of making the main idea obvious and one way is using a difference in size. Another way is using a contrast in color. That gives attention where you need it. The last way to make the main idea stand out is by isolation. Isolation is when there is lots of white space around it.
  • 104. Area 4 – Obvious Main Idea Example 1 Guayan Monkeys Beetles 29/35 Tigers Mosquitoes Area 4 Endangered Species Insects Obvious Main Idea Content: - Example 1 Poisonous Parakeets Frogs Amphibians Birds Toucans Tree Frogs Macaws Reptiles Mammals Monkeys Anteaters Snakes Jaguars Tapirs Sloths
  • 105. Nonexample Area 4 – Nonobvious Main Idea Area 4 30/35 9 4 30 12 Obvious Main Idea 22 7 26 Content: - Nonexample 16 20 14 24 2 10 8 6 1 3 18 28 Let’s count. Do you understand the main idea, the purpose? It says “lets count,” but how? Do we count by 2’s or by odd numbers? Are we to count in ascending or descending order? And why the “Wow! You did it!”? What purpose does it serve?  YU
  • 106.  YU CYU12. Study the two concept maps on the following 31/35 pages. There is a checklist on your answer sheet with All Areas columns titled “Yes”, “No”, and “Not Available”. Content: -  Your Understanding Place a  in the appropriate columns on your answer directions sheet. Components addressed are point size, flow, proximity, and main idea. Once completed check your answers by clicking on the Answer key linking button .  YU
  • 107.  YU Concept Map 1 32/35 Pentagon Isosceles Hexagon Right Equilateral TRIANGLES Octagon Scalene Obtuse Acute QUADRILATERALS Rectangles Parallelograms Trapezoid Square Write your answers on the answer sheet. Then click on the to check your answers.
  • 108.  YU nswer Key 33/35 Checklist  All Areas Content: Concept Map #1 - Polygons -  Your Understanding Item Yes No Don’t - Concept Map #1 Know a. Point Size Correct The lettering is way too small & Explanation:  hard to read. The title, however, is an appropriate size. b. Flow of Text is Good Explanation: It’s easy to understand the  circle layout. c. Good Proximity Explanation: Appropriate location of text  with graphics. d. Main idea is clear Explanation:“Polygon” is a larger point  size, is positioned in the center and is bold making it easy to tell the main idea.
  • 109.  YU Concept Map 2 34/35 walking Freezing rain running Elements jogging sleet blowing foggy west south Snow Raining Thunderstorms east Tornad north Partly o Cloudy Overcast Hazy sun Write your answers on the answer sheet. Then click on the to check your answers.
  • 110.  YU nswer Key 35/35 All Areas Checklist  Content: Concept Map #2 – Weather Elements -  Your Understanding Item Yes No Don’t - Concept Map #2 Know a. Point Size Correct Explanation: The lettering is easy to read.  b. Flow of Text is Good Explanation: There is no flow to the text. It’s  very confusing. c. Good Proximity Explanation: The words are not close enough to  the graphics. d. Main idea is clear Explanation: Is the main idea different weather  types or the weather elements? And what does running, jogging, and walking have to do with the theme? Was that your last Principle? Click here.
  • 111. Consistency is defined as the agreement or 1/34 harmony of parts or features to one another or a whole. Content: - Definition There are three main areas in Consistency: - Three areas 1. Typography • limited fonts • consistent size • consistent placement • compliments the visual’s theme/mood 2. Visuals • limit graphic style • consistent directionals 3. Color • visual colors consistent • text colors consistent • background colors consistent
  • 112. 1. Typography - limited fonts 2/34 Area 1 A font or typeface is a complete set of characters which Typography – limited fonts has its own design. Each design has its own name, such as Times, or Arial. For example the text you are now Content: - Font/typeface reading is typed in one style, Georgia. The heading on the - Guidelines top of this page is in Arial. - Combinations A general guideline for visuals is to use no more than 2 different fonts or typefaces. Those fonts should harmonize with each other. Two combinations that do not work well together are Old English Text with Palace Script MT. The two fonts used together are too busy.
  • 113. Example 1 Typography - limited fonts 3/34 Area 1 JOPLIN ELEMENTARY ROSTER Typography – limited fonts First Grade Roger Kerr, Robin Kimball, Randy Knight, Content: John Launer, Pam Limkemann, Donna McDonald, - Example 1 Deanna McMillen, John Myers, Paul Myers Second Grade Becky Hamilton, Donna Willard, Tim Trone, Deb Hester, Roger Smith, Yvonne Whewell, Ron Myers, Susie Myers, Paul Neil Third Grade Margaret Nelson, Kyle Nichols, Eldon Pullins, Mike Roberts, Mike Schoenherr, Rebecca Schutte, Debbie Tanner, Leah Ann Taylor This example uses 2 different fonts – Arial and Times New Roman. It adheres to the guideline of the recommended 2 fonts per visual.
  • 114. Example 2 Typography - limited fonts JOPLIN ELEMENTARY ROSTER 4/34 First Grade Area 1 Roger Kerr, Robin Kimball, Randy Knight, Typography – John Launer, Pam Limkemann, Donna McDonald, limited fonts Deanna McMillen, John Myers, Paul Myers Content: Second Grade - Example 2 Becky Hamilton, Donna Willard, Tim Trone, Deb Hester, Roger Smith, Yvonne Whewell, Ron Myers, Susie Myers, Paul Neil Third Grade Margaret Nelson, Kyle Nichols, Eldon Pullins, Mike Roberts, Mike Schoenherr, Rebecca Schutte, Debbie Tanner, Leah Ann Taylor This example uses 5 different fonts. One font for the title, a 2nd for the heading “First Grade”, a 3rd for the heading “Second Grade”, a 4th for the heading “Third Grade”, and a 5th for the class names. It does not adhere to the guideline of the recommended 2 fonts per visual. Let’s check your understanding.  Click on the button at the bottom of the page that looks like: YU  Always do YU before moving to the next slide.  YU
  • 115.  CYU13. Look at the following list. How many YU typestyle (s) are used? Click on the number below 5/34 for your answer. Area 1 Typography – INSTRUMENT FAMILIES limited fonts Brass Content: -  Your Understanding Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, - Concept Map #2 French Horn Woodwinds Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon Strings Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass Percussion Snare Drum, Timpani, Bass Drum, Xylophone, Cymbals 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  • 116. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 117. There were 5 different fonts used in this visual. 1st INSTRUMENT FAMILIES font style Goudy Handtooled Brass Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, Tuba, 4th font French Horn style 3rd Broadway Woodwinds 2nd font style Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, Oboe, Saxophone, font style *Note the headings Californian Bassoon are just bold, not a different font. Arial Strings Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass 5th font style Percussion Bauhaus Snare Drum, Timpani, Bass Drum, Xylophone, Cymbals You may return to the previous page to continue the lesson or click the next page button.
  • 118. Typography - consistent text size 6/34 Area 1 Typography – consistent size Content: Once you choose a text size for a visual, use it consistently - Introduction throughout the visual. For instance, if you choose 18 point size for the first heading, then all the headings should be in 18 point. And if 14 point size is used in the first paragraph, then all the paragraphs should be typed in 14 point.
  • 119. Example Typography - consistent text size 7/34 Area 1 Typography – consistent size Instrument Families Content: - Example Brass Woodwinds Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, Euphonium, Tuba, French Horn Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon Percussion Strings Snare Drum, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass Bass Drum, Xylophone, Cymbals This examples shows consistent use of size. The headings use one size which is larger than the text. All the text is typed in the same font size.
  • 120. Nonexample Typography - consistent text size 8/34 Area 1 Typography – Instrument Families consistent size Brass Content: Woodwinds Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, - Nonexample Euphonium, Tuba, French Horn Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon Percussion Strings Snare Drum, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass Bass Drum, Xylophone, Cymbals This example does not show consistent use of size. The headings use three different sizes. The text is typed in three different font sizes.
  • 121. Typography - consistent placement 9/34 In visuals, the placement of the type, both Area 1 Typography – headings and text should be consistently placed. consistent placement The margins should be consistent in addition to Content: horizontal alignment. The dotted line shows the - Nonexample placement or the alignment. Brass Woodwinds Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, Euphonium, Tuba, French Horn Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon Percussion Strings Snare Drum, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass Bass Drum, Xylophone, Cymbals
  • 122. Example Typography - consistent placement 10/34 Mrs. Cranes Classroom Rules The 3 R’s Area 1 Typography – consistent placement Content: - Example READY Be in your seats when the bell rings. RESPECT For your classmates, your teacher, and your school. RESPONSBILE Bring to class all your needed materials, including a pencil and pen. Note the headings are all consistently aligned vertically, as well as the text.
  • 123. Nonexample Typography - inconsistent placement 11/34 Area 1 Typography –  Love consistent placement The special feeling that makes you feel all warm & wonderful. Content: - Nonexample Respect Treating others as well as you would like to be treated. Appreciation To be grateful for all the good things that life has to offer. Happiness The full enjoyment of each moment. A smiling face! Forgiveness The ability to let things be without anger. Sharing The joy of giving without the thought of receiving. Note the inconsistent left margin of the black text.
  • 124. Typography - compliments theme 12/34 Most visuals have a theme or a mood. For instance, if Area 1 Typography – the visual was talking about the circus, the font should consistent w/ theme reflect that same theme. Content: - Explanation Clowningway is a typeface that supports the - Examples theme. It looks like: Circus If your theme was theater, then a good font to use would be Broadway. It looks like: Theater
  • 125. Example Typography - consistent with theme 13/34 Area 1 Typography – consistent w/ theme Content: - Example The font used looks old and a typical style for that time. It supports the theme nicely.
  • 126. Nonexample Typography - consistent with theme 14/34 Area 1 Typography – Mr. and Mrs. Thomas consistent w/ theme Content: Request your presence - Nonexample To witness the uniting Of their daughter, Elizabeth Marie to Michael Todd Welker This font does not have a formal appearance and is inconsistent with the formal theme of a wedding.
  • 127. 2. Graphics 15/34 Area 2 Graphics In the graphic section, we will be introducing different graphic styles and directionals. Content: - Visual purposes What purpose do visuals serve? They •Decorate •Represent •Interpret abstract information •Aid in understanding.
  • 128. Graphics - Limited style 16/34 Area 2 A graphic is a visual symbol used in a visual. Graphics – limited styles Content: - Definition This instruction breaks graphics into 2 areas: - Styles - Explanation 1. Photos 2. Clip art a. line drawing b. realistic c. stylized A visual should use only 1 type or style of graphics. Mixing the styles creates an inconsistent feel to the visual.
  • 129. Example 1 Graphics - limited style 17/34 Area 2 A photo example: Graphics – limited styles Content: - Example 1 A line drawing clip art example. A realistic clip art example: A stylized clip art example.
  • 130. Example 2 Graphics - limited style 18/34 A photo example: Area 2 Graphics – limited styles Content: - Example 2 A line drawing clip art example: A realistic clip art example: Two stylized clip art examples:  YU
  • 131.  CYU14. Look at the following visual. Is the graphic YU 19/34 style(s) appropriately used? Click on your answer below. Area 2 Graphics – limited styles Content: -  Your Understanding Yes or No
  • 132. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 133. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 134. 2. Graphics - Consistent directionals 20/34 A directional is an element used to help viewers to Area 2 “read” the display in a particular sequence or focus on Graphics – directionals some particular element. They direct attention. Content: - Definition Two directionals are: - Explanation •Arrows •Bullets Whatever style is chosen, it needs to be kept throughout the entire visual. For example, if you chose an arrow like , then you need to use that same style of arrow in the whole visual. Do not mix it with another style of arrow like .
  • 135. Example Graphics - consistent directionals 21/34 The style and color of directionals need to be consistent in the visual as this one demonstrates. Area 2 Graphics – directionals Content: - Example Primary Colors Yellow
  • 136. Nonexample Graphics - consistent directionals 22/34 As you can see, the arrow styles and colors vary. This does not use the directionals consistently. Area 2 Graphics – directionals Content: - Nonexample Primary Colors Yellow  YU
  • 137.  YU 23/34 CYU15. Area 2 A “directional” is a visual device (such as an arrow), Graphics – directionals used to direct viewers’ attention in a given direction or Content: to a specific location. -  Your Understanding Click on your chosen answer. T F
  • 138. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 139. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 140. 3. Color 24/34 Area 3 Color This is the last area of the Visual Design Principle, Content: Consistency. - Introduction The three components of Color are: a. Consistent use of visual colors b. Consistent use of text color c. Consistent use of background color The reason for consistent color use in visuals, text, and background is to create a feeling of unity or harmony.
  • 141. Example 1 Color - Graphic colors consistent 25/34 Area 3 Color – Instrument Families graphics Content: Brass Woodwinds - Example Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, Euphonium, Tuba, French Horn Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon Percussion Strings Snare Drum, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass Bass Drum, Xylophone, Cymbals The colors used in the graphics have the same color theme. Therefore, the use of colors is consistent.
  • 142. Nonexample Color - Graphic colors inconsistent 26/34 Area 3 Instrument Families Color – graphics Brass Woodwinds Content: Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Piccolo, Flute, Clarinet, - Nonexample Euphonium, Tuba, French Horn Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon Percussion Strings Snare Drum, Timpani, Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass Bass Drum, Xylophone, Cymbals The colors used in the graphics have different color themes. Therefore, the use of colors is not consistent. As you see, the visual now lacks of feeling of cohesiveness, unity, and harmony.
  • 143. Color - Text colors consistent 27/34 Area 3 Color – The reasons for color consistency are the same for text text as they were for graphics. Content: - Explanation Let’s view some examples.
  • 144. Example Color - Text colors consistent 28/34 Area 3 JOPLIN ELEMENTARY ROSTER Color – text First Grade Roger Kerr, Robin Kimball, Randy Knight, Content: John Launer, Pam Limkemann, Donna McDonald, - Example Deanna McMillen, John Myers, Paul Myers Second Grade Becky Hamilton, Donna Willard, Tim Trone, Deb Hester, Roger Smith, Yvonne Whewell, Ron Myers, Susie Myers, Paul Neil Third Grade Margaret Nelson, Kyle Nichols, Eldon Pullins, Mike Roberts, Mike Schoenherr, Rebecca Schutte, Debbie Tanner, Leah Ann Taylor Note the heading are in black, and the body copy is in blue.
  • 145. Nonexample Color - Text colors inconsistent 29/34 Area 3 JOPLIN ELEMENTARY ROSTER Color – text First Grade Roger Kerr, Robin Kimball, Randy Knight, Content: John Launer, Pam Limkemann, Donna McDonald, - Nonexample Deanna McMillen, John Myers, Paul Myers Second Grade Becky Hamilton, Donna Willard, Tim Trone, Deb Hester, Roger Smith, Yvonne Whewell, Ron Myers, Susie Myers, Paul Neil Third Grade Margaret Nelson, Kyle Nichols, Eldon Pullins, Mike Roberts, Mike Schoenherr, Rebecca Schutte, Debbie Tanner, Leah Ann Taylor Note each heading is in a different color as well as the body copy.  YU
  • 146.  YU CYU16. Look at the two visuals below. Which visual 30/34 uses the font color consistently? Click on the visual Area 3 you think is the correct answer. Color – text Content: Catch a Colorful Tropical Fish -  Your Understanding Catch a Colorful Tropical Fish Angel Fish Tetra Acura Goldfish Angel Fish Tetra Acura Goldfish
  • 147. Look again at the font colors. There are too many colors used, making it less effective than the other example. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 148. Only 2 font colors were used – black and white. It creates a feeling of harmony or unity. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 149. Color - Background colors consistent 31/34 Area 3 Color – Once you have chosen a background that does not background interfere with your content, use it throughout your entire Content: - Explanation visual. For instance, if you are creating a PowerPoint presentation, use the same background for the whole presentation. If the background is very textured or has lots of pattern, it will tend to distract from the figure material, so a subtler background or solid usually looks better.
  • 150. Example Color - Background colors consistent 32/34 Area 3 Color – background Content: - Example Line Space Shape Texture Color
  • 151. Nonexample Color - Background colors inconsistent 33/34 Area 3 Color – background Content: - Nonexample Line Space Shape Texture Color  YU
  • 152.  CYU17. Are the backgrounds consistent in this 2 page YU 34/34 brochure? Click on your answer below. Experience some of Area 3 natures’ most Color – wondrous sites. background Yes No Content: Come see Alaska’s Wildlife: -  Your Understanding Arctic Polar Bear Experience some of natures’ most wondrous sites. Penguins p.1 Come see Alaska’s Scenery: Mountainous Glaciers Beautiful Landscapes p.2 Was that your last Principle? Click here.
  • 153. Look again at the background. Notice how the colors are placed in each page of the brochure. Please return to the previous page and try again.
  • 154. Please return to the previous page to continue the lesson.
  • 155. Let’s recap the main points in the Visual Literacy - Design Principles 1/7 The goal of this instruction was to provide you with the tools and information to 1) evaluate visuals and 2) incorporate these concepts in Content: creating effective, efficient and appealing visuals. - Goals - Summary This way, you’ll be fulfilling an important educator responsibility in providing your students with the best possible visuals that will facilitate and enhance your students’ learning. This instruction : • Introduced and explained “Visual Literacy”. • Introduced the 4 main Visual Design Principles. • Provided the importance of critical viewing. • Developed awareness and skills in viewing critically. • Provided examples and nonexamples.
  • 156. Visual Design Principles 2/7 Visual Literacy is defined as the learned ability to interpret visual messages accurately and to create Content: - Visual Literacy such messages. - Design Principles - Critical Viewing The 4 main principles covered were •Color •Balance •Legibility •Consistency Critical Viewing is defined as the ability to comprehend and evaluate information presented by visual media. Here’s a summary of the key points in outline form.
  • 157. Visual Design Principles 3/7 I. Color - is defined as the aspect of objects and Design Principles light sources that may be described in terms of Content: hue, lightness, and saturation for objects. - Color effectiveness appeal a. Color Scheme Effectiveness consistency • Strong figure-ground contrast • Avoid complementary sets for large areas of text b. Color Appeal • Emotional response (passive, active) • Know target audience (child, adult) c. Color Consistency • Support the theme/mood • In headings, text, and background
  • 158. Visual Design Principles 4/7 II. Balance - the psychological sense of equilibrium. It is achieved when the “weight” of the elements is Design Principles equally distributed on each side of an axis. Content: - Balance types a. Balance Type appeal • Formal – same on both sides • Informal – different on each side b. Balance Appeal • White space - needed • Informal preferred – more interesting
  • 159. Visual Design Principles 5/7 III. Legibility - capable of being read or deciphered; plainly understood. Design Principles Content: - KISS theory - Legibility a. Typography typography flow • Correct font size for visual type proximity • Headings are discernable from text clear main idea b. Flow • Easy to follow • Presented logically c. Proximity • Text located close to graphic d. Clear main Idea (get attention by:) • Size difference • Different color • Isolation
  • 160. Visual Design Principles 6/7 IV. Consistency - is defined as the agreement Design Principles or harmony of parts or features to one another Content: or a whole. - Consistency a. Typography typography graphics • Limited fonts color • Consistent size • Consistent placement • Consistent with the visual’s theme/mood b. Graphics • Limit graphic style • Consistent directionals c. Color • Graphic colors consistent • Text colors consistent • Background colors consistent
  • 161. The many uses . . . Riddle - 7/7 Q. What do the following have in common?: •Posters Content: •Handouts - Communication clear •Overheads effective •Concept Maps - Start Final Critique •Bulletin boards •Electronic Slide Shows A. They all communicate information As an educator, you’ll either be using the above products and/or creating some of your own. You want to use and create visuals that communicate clearly and effectively so your students can learn at their fullest potential. You now have the critical viewing skills and knowledge to do so. To finish instruction, click on “Final Critique” (upper right hand corner)
  • 162. • Visual Literacy (http://sweeneyhall.sjsu.edu/edit272/vlit/) •Visual Literacy Homepage 1/2 (http://vicu.utoronto.ca/staff/branton/homep.htm) •A Plea for Visual Literacy: Writing on the Web Content: (http://www.december.com/cmc/mag/1997/jun/last.html) - Visual Literacy Computer-mediated Communications Magazine online journal articles. •Internation Visual Literacy Association (http://www.ivla.org/) Our members represent a wide range of disciplines including the arts, sciences, education, communication, business, videography, photography, instructional technology, health, and computer applications. We hope you will feel free to join us in the lively debates of our field, and we look forward to forming lasting professional and personal friendships. • The Role of Visual Literacy (http://www2.gov.pe.ca/educ/publications/apef/ela/entry- 3/role_of_visuallit.asp) Part of the curriculum for the Language Arts in the curriculum guide for Prince Edwards Island, Canada • International Visual Literacy Association Bibliography (http://www.ivla.org/news/rdocs/vlbib/index.htm) Benedict Visual Literacy Collection (http://www.asu.edu/lib/archives/bvlc.htm) More
  • 163. • Visual Design Basics (http://www.lrc.arizona.edu/facdev/Technology/vizdes.htm) 2/2 • Design and Colour Content: (http://www.johnlovett.com/test.htm) - Visual Design Principles The elements and principles of design are the building blocks used to create a work of art. The Elements of design can be thought of as the things that make up a painting, drawing, design etc. Good or bad - all paintings will contain most of if not all, the seven elements of design. The Principles of design can be thought of as what we do to the elements of design. How we apply the Principles of design determines how successful we are in creating a work of art. •Art, Design, and Visual Thinking--Language of Design (http://char.txa.cornell.edu/zbs/webdocs/) Click on the links on the side of this site for illustrations and discussion for the design principles and the visual elements. •Exploration in Hypermedia Design (http://www.fsu.edu/~lis/5916/readings/harmsen.html) Learning to construct shared information spaces.
  • 164. If not, continue viewing the 4 main Visual Design Principles by clicking on the main menu.
  • 165. On the following slides, you will see three different visuals. They are all concept maps. 1/7 Take all of your newly learned critical viewing skills and knowledge and apply them as you critique Content: the concept maps. You may return to the instruction for - Directions reference if needed. In your student manual, there is a checklist for each concept map. Each of the Visual Design Principles are addressed. Study each concept map and then place a checkmark in the appropriate field of either “yes”, “no”, or “not available”. On the next slide, is an example of the checklist.
  • 166. PRINCIPLE Yes No NA Color •Strong figure/ground contrast •Complementary colors avoided 2/7 for large amounts of text •Emotional response appropriate Content: •Target audience appropriate - Sample Checklist •Supports the theme/mood •Used same for headings, text, background Balance •Formal •Informal •Appropriate White space Legibility •KISS theory •Font size correct (partial view of checklist) •Flow – easy to follow and logical The checklist in your student manual looks like this.
  • 167. Visual #1 Overhead for Teachers’ meeting 3/7 Organize Your classroom Use a firm and consistent Familiarize discipline Self with the system. Current curriculum 1st Year Teachers Establish a good Find another rapport with the Teacher who Can help you and administration Give you valuable information Much Learning will be from trial and error!
  • 168. Concept Map #2 Visual #2 Student Handout 4/7 Pentagon Isosceles Hexagon Right Equilateral TRIANGLES Octagon Scalene Obtuse Acute QUADRILATERALS Trapezoid Rectangles Parallelograms Square
  • 169. Visual #3 Set of Three Posters 5/7 United United States United States Presidents States Presidents Presidents 5. James 1.George Washington, Monroe, 8. Martin Van Buren, 1789-1797 1837-1841 1817-1825 2. John Adams, 1797-1801 6. John Quincy Adams, 1825-1829 9. William Henry 3. Thomas Harrison, 1841 Jefferson, 1801-1809 7. Andrew Jackson, 10. John Tyler, 4. James Madison, 1841-1845 1809-1817 1829-1837
  • 170. 6/7 Do you remember that very poorly designed opening slide? As the final component of your Critique, you will be viewing the slide again and listing why it’s poorly designed. In the Student Manual you will find a sheet entitled “Opening Slide Critique”. While critiquing the opening slide, write the Visual Design Principle you are addressing in the first column on the sheet along with an explanation of why it doesn’t follow the principle in the second column.
  • 171. 7/7 to Visual Literacy - Design Principles instruction. This instruction is designed to: Introduce and explain “Visual Literacy”. •Introduce you to the 4 main Principles of Design •Recognize a “good” example fRom a “pooR” example Identify if principles are applied Click here For next to visuals effectively, and efficiently page
  • 172. Imbalance is the psychological sense of a 2/18 feeling of being “heavier” on one side. This occurs when the “weight” of the elements is not equally Content: distributed on each side of an axis, either horizontally, • Imbalance - Example vertically, or both. AXIS

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