Biomedical Optical Sensor

2,976 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
1 Comment
8 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Hi sherif plz send me this slide i’ll be thankful to you for this kind help
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,976
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
8
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Biomedical Optical Sensor

  1. 1. Biomedical sensors using optical fibers Presented to: Prof. Sharaf El-Din ElNahas Preaented by: Eng. Sherif Mohamed Ibrahim
  2. 2. Contents: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 2 Why Using Optical Sensor. Characteristics of FOSS . Pressure Sensor. Temperature Sensor. Blood Flow. Conclusion. References. Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  3. 3. Why Using Optical Sensors  If the electronics must be located far from the bedside.  Immunity to electromagnetic interferences generated from the electronics equipment.  They can be easily installed in areas which are difficult to reach.  Another property is the absence of crosstalk between close fibers. 3 Introduction Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  4. 4. Why Using Optical Sensors  They perform as well as or better than electric instrumentation.  Fiber-optic sensors is attractive for the measurement of a wide variety of physical and chemical parameters.  Fiber Optic Sensors (FOSS), being relatively easy to manufacture and therefore inexpensive 4 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  5. 5. Characteristics of FOSS • Flexibility. • Lightness. • Suitable material, glass or plastic. • Non-toxic and can be used for continuous measurements. • Safety for the patient, ensured by optical fiber dielectricity and by the low light power used for sensing purposes. • low-cost installation and maintenance. 5 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  6. 6. Pressure Sensor Optical Pressure Sensor System  Light Source.  Detector.  Coupler.  Sensor Head (Fabry–Perot cavity). 6 Introduction Pressure Pressure Sensor Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  7. 7. Pressure Sensor Optical Pressure Sensor System  Main measurement requirements:  a working range from −50 to 300 mmHg.  a sensitivity of at least 0.1 mmHg.  an accuracy of at least 1% 7 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  8. 8. Pressure Sensor  The Fabry–Perot cavity  Glass cube having a partially etched face.  A pressure sensitive silicon diaphragm.  Fiber Optic Coupler. 8 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  9. 9. Pressure Sensor Pressur e d Light Optical Fiber Cavity Diaphragm  The intensity of the reflected light and the phase between them provides a pressure measurement 9 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  10. 10. Pressure Sensor  Manufactured by the American company Camino Labs CAMINO V420 PRESSURE MONITOR 10 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  11. 11. Temperature Sensor  Fiber optic thermometers are used when electrical insulation and EM immunity are necessary  There are basically two approaches by means of which one can easily measure temperature. They are:  Using Phase Interference.  Using Fiber Deformation. 11 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperatur Temperature e Sensor Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  12. 12. Temperature Sensor  Using Phase Interference: By measuring the phase difference between two reflected beams of light, one can easily determine temperature. 12 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  13. 13. Temperature Sensor  Using Fiber Deformation: 13 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  14. 14. Temperature Sensor  The fiber optic thermometer commercialized by The American company Luxtron Luxtron 812 : an 2-channel fiber-optic temperature sensor. 14 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  15. 15. Blood flow  Laser Doppler Flowmetry 15 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Blood Flow Conclusion References
  16. 16. Blood flow 16 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  17. 17. Blood flow 17 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  18. 18. Blood flow 18 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  19. 19. Blood flow  An instrument that is widely used in the clinical practice is produced by The Swedish company Perimed. PeriFlux System 5000 : the instrument for fiber-optic laser Doppler flowmetry. 19 Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion References
  20. 20. Conclusion  Fiber-optic sensors is attractive for the     20 measurement of a wide variety of physical and chemical parameters. low-cost installation and maintenance. In more cases better than electric instrumentation. Lower cost. Can be easily managed by both doctors and patients. Introduction Pressure Sensor Temperature Sensor Blood Flow Conclusion Conclusion References
  21. 21. References  Papers 1. 2. 3. 4. 21 Introduction Anna Grazia Mignaniy and Francesco Baldini 1995, Biomedical sensors using optical fibres, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Onde Elettromagnetiche ‘Nello Carrara’ 64, I50127, Italy. M.Życzkowski, B.Uziębło-Życzkowska, L.Dziuda K.Różanowski 2007, BIO-MEDICAL SENSIG USING FIBER OPTIC SENSORS, Military University of Technology, Institute of Optoelectronics, Kaliskiego Str. 2, 00-908 Warsaw, Poland. Qingxu YU and Xinlei ZHOU 2011, Pressure Sensor Based on the Fiber-Optic Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116023, P.R. China. Lee C.L. Chin, William M.Whelan, and I. Alex Vitkin 2011, Optical Fiber Sensors for Biomedical Applications, Optical-Thermal Response of Laser-Irradiated Tissue, 2nd ed., Temperature DOI 10.1007/978-90-481-8831Pressure Blood Flow Conclusion References References Sensor 4_17,Sensor Physics Department, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada
  22. 22. References  Review Article 1. Dakshita Joy Vaghela, Ashish Amit Sinha 2011, Pulse oximetry and laser Doppler flowmetry for diagnosis of pulpal vitality, Departments of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics and Pedodontics, Kothiwal Dental College Research Centre and Hospital, Moradabad, India  Websites Blood Flow Meters - Young Do Medical Instruments Co.,Ltd, retrieved 2007. 2. Producer fiber optical thermometers - Optocon AG. retrieved 10 April 2012. 3. Fiber Optic Thermometers – AutomationWiki. retrieved Pressure Temperature Introduction 26 February 2013. Blood Flow Conclusion References Sensor Sensor 1. 22
  23. 23. Thank You 23

×