Final report 21 10 2013

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Final report 21 10 2013

  1. 1. THE EUROPEAN UNION’S ASIA PROGRAMME FOR PAKISTAN Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Letter of Contract N°2013/319077 FINAL REPORT Prepared by Malik Khalid MEHMOOD Ghulam MUSTAFA Muhammad Khan NIAZI August 2013 The project is implemented by IBF International ConsultingThe project is financed by The European Union
  2. 2. “The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of the author and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the European Union.”
  3. 3. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 3 of 109 TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents .................................................................................................................................... 3 Abbreviations and Acronyms................................................................................................................... 4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY......................................................................................................................... 6 1 Objectives......................................................................................................................................... 6 2 Approach and field visits .................................................................................................................. 6 3 Assessment of General Eligibility Criteria ........................................................................................ 7 4 Scoring table of the DLIs.................................................................................................................. 9 5 Key issues in the education sector................................................................................................. 10 SECTION B. GOVERNANCE AND PFM .............................................................................................. 16 SECTION C. ACCESS, FACILITIES, QUALITY AND LEARNING OUTCOMES ................................. 28 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................................... 35 CONSULTATIONS................................................................................................................................ 36 List of Annexures................................................................................................................................... 38 Annexure CA 1 ...................................................................................................................................... 39 Annexure CA 2 ...................................................................................................................................... 52 Annexure CA 3 ...................................................................................................................................... 73 Annexure CA 4 ...................................................................................................................................... 97
  4. 4. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 4 of 109 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS AF Action Fiche AG ASP Auditor General Assessment and Strengthening Program AUSAID Australia Aid International Department BE Budget Estimate CDP CDS Capacity Development Program Comprehensive Development Strategy CVT Capital Value Tax CM Chief Minister CDS Comprehensive Development Strategy CPI Consumer price index cif Cost, insurance and freight CSP Country Strategy Paper DFID Department for International Department DE&SE Department of Elementary and Secondary Education DAC Departmental Accounts Committee DCTE Directorate of Curriculum and Teacher Education DG Directorate-General DLI Disbursement Linked Indicator DMG District Management Group DMOs District Monitoring Officers DSP District Strategic Plan EFA Education for All EMIS Education Management Information System ESP Education Sector Plan ESR Education Sector Reform ESRU Education Sector Reform Unit E&SED Elementary and Secondary Education Department EEF Elementary Education foundation EC European Commission EU European Union EFF Extended Fund Facility FBR Federal Board of Revenue FRA Fiduciary Risk Assessment FD Finance Department FY Financial Year FP Financing Proposal FDI Foreign Direct Investment GBS General Budget Support GST General Sales Tax GIZ German International Agency for Aid GovKP Government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa GDP Gross Domestic Product IMDCU Independent Monitoring and Data Collection Unit
  5. 5. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 5 of 109 IBP International Budget Partnership IMF International Monetary Fund KP Khyber Pakhtunkhwa MTBF Medium Term Budget Framework MoU Memorandum of Understanding MDG Millennium Development Goals MDG Millennium Development Goals M&E Monitoring and Evaluation MVT Motor Vehicles Tax NFC National Finance Commission NHP Net hydel profit NGO Non-Governmental Organization NPL Non-performing loans ODA Official development assistance OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development OBB Output Based Budget/budgeting Rs Pak Rupees PTC Parent Teacher Council P&DD Planning and Development Departments PC-1 Planning Commission - Performa 1 PBS Portfolio Budget Statement PRGF Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility PRS Poverty Reduction Strategy PRSP Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper PPP Private Public Partnership PMIU Project Management Implementation Unit PMS Provincial Management Services PAC Public Accounts Committee PEFA Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability PEM Public Expenditure Management PER Public Expenditure Review PFM Public Finance/Financial Management PSDP Public sector development programme RE Revised Estimate RM RSPN Roadmap Rural Support Programmes Network (Pakistan) SBS Sector Budget Support SBS Sector Budgetary Support SOP Standard Operating Procedure SBP State Bank of Pakistan TA TNA Technical Assistance Training Need Assessment UNDP United Nations Development Programme USAID United State Agency for International Department US United States of America UIPT Urban Immovable Property Tax WB World Bank
  6. 6. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 6 of 109 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A mission comprising three senior experts selected by the European Union Delegation (EUD), Dr. Malik Khalid Mehmood – Team Leader, Mr. Ghulam Mustafa - Education Expert, and Muhammad Khan Niazi - Public Finance and Procurement Expert, undertook a joint monitoring review to assess fulfilment of the criteria for tranche disbursement by providing a comprehensive assessment of the progress of the Education Sector Reform Programme (ESRP) in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa against the agreed disbursement linked indicators (DLIs) of the common policy matrix. This mission visited Islamabad, Peshawar and two districts of Abbotabad and Buner from 24th of June until the 11th of August 2013. 1 OBJECTIVES The specific objectives of this assignment are (1) to assist the EUD in its assessment of the payment trigger requirements for the fourth tranche of sector budget support through providing a comprehensive assessment of the progress of the education reforms against the agreed indicators of the common policy matrix; (2) to assist the EUD in its assessment of budget support eligibility related to the final tranche release; (3) to join DFID and AusAid in their KP Education 'light' review. This should result in a report with an assessment of the progress of the education reforms against the agreed indicators of the common policy matrix as well as of the budget support eligibility criteria, and an overview of issues and state of play in specific areas of the sector. In serving the terms of reference, the mission was guided by the provisions of European Union, Budget Support Guidelines, September 2012. Disbursements under EU’s budget support programmes are subject to four eligibility criteria: national/sector policies and reforms; stable macro-economic framework; sound public financial management; and transparency and oversight of the budget. Besides the general eligibility criteria, the monitoring of Education Sector Reform Plan (ESRP) progress is against the DFID/AusAid policy matrix of disbursement linked indicators which was agreed with the Government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (GovKP). As required, this assessment evaluates the relevance and credibility of the partner GovKP’s policy, strategy and performance related to each eligibility criterion. The target wise assessments are made using a dynamic approach, looking at past and recent policy performance benchmarked against reform commitments, but allowing for shocks and corrective measures and refining the objectives and targets as necessary. 2 APPROACH AND FIELD VISITS The approach consisted of a combination of desk work, meetings with GovKP officials and other stakeholders, and field study visits to districts education offices and schools with a focus on fact finding. The mission started the study with examination of the ESRP related documents, briefings by EUD staff on the budget support, and meetings with other stakeholders in Islamabad to obtain a good understanding of the context, prior data/reports, relevant variables and issues to perform the study. The experts also attended meetings relating to the DFID/AusAid’s 'light' review of their KP Education programme. Field visits focused on Peshawar, Abbottabad and Buner, where extensive consultations took place with GovKP officials, district education and concerned officials. These districts were
  7. 7. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 7 of 109 selected strategically for diverse characteristics - Abbottabad is an urban district with better educational indicators, Peshawar is urban but has weak indicators, and Buner a rural district being supported with DFID conditional grants. 3 ASSESSMENT OF GENERAL ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA1 The macroeconomic outlook is stable. Pakistan’s macroeconomic growth prospects have improved slightly in recent times. The new democratic government has settled in and there is relative political calm. The country’s medium-term macroeconomic framework envisages a gross domestic product growth of 3.4% for 2013-14 gradually rising to 7% in 2015-16. The investment environment is better, stock markets are booming and foreign direct investment is coming in. The federal government is trying to address three main issues affecting the economy: high fiscal deficit, deteriorating reserves position, and power outages. It has announced a series of policy measures in the 2013-14 budget, and is negotiating a $5.3 billion Extended Fund Facility (EFF) package of further reform measures with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). 2 The economy of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is largely agricultural and rural, and heavily depends on inputs from the rest of the country. The Government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has been attempting to address the main development challenges facing the province, viz. raising income per capita, improving human development and access to social services, exploiting natural resources, good governance and optimal utilization of the available resources. The GovKP is implementing a Public Finance Management (PFM) Reform Program to improve service delivery with the available resources which have faced the usual macroeconomic risks. The PFM Reform Program has progressed in recent years but only slowly. The strategic interventions consist of: strategic budget formulation by linking policies and budget priorities (Medium Term Budget Framework)(MTBF); credible, results oriented budgets for better service delivery (Output Based Budgeting)(OBB); introduction of business plans and annual action plans in six line departments and in districts with conditional grants; capacity building (audit, internal audit and Public Accounts Committee (PAC)); strengthening monitoring structures; and pre-budget consultation workshops. The overall PFM reform progress is positive, yet a number of weaknesses remain. Main strengths are: a well-defined budget process with both executive and legislative adhering to a schedule; budget documentation is fairly comprehensive; budget classification follows international standards; the external audit function is well-developed; transparency measures are in place for information sharing and pre budget workshops are held. Most weaknesses are in the budget execution: revenues are uncertain; capacities are weak; the processes, linking outputs to budgets and accounting results against budgets, are weak; records are poor; and financial reporting and internal controls are weak. The overall assessment of PFM reform progress is favourable. The reform strategy is relevant to the development objectives of the province in that it addresses key weaknesses in the PFM system hampering improvement of basic service delivery. The reform program is well sequenced with implementation strategy focusing on certain core interventions, building strategic planning/budgeting 1 This subsection gives the gist of details given in the four Compulsory Annexures below on assessments of Macroeconomic Framework, Public Financial Management, Budget Transparency and Accountability, and E&SE Sector Policy. 2 The proposed $6.6 billion loan has finally been agreed by the IMF Board on 4/9/13.
  8. 8. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 8 of 109 capabilities at the province and district levels. The reform is home grown and enjoys sufficient ownership from the Cabinet, target beneficiaries and a cadre of finance and planning officials at province and in districts. Budget process is reasonably transparent, oversight structures are in place, and the GovKP has been attempting to improve the budget transparency/accountability. Budget documentation is comprehensive; its format conforms to international standards, and is presented to the provincial assembly. Information on the annual budget is available – the Finance Department publishes budget documentation on its official website, e.g. Annual Budget Statement, OBB/MTBF covering budget forecast up to three years, White Paper, etc. The external audit function is well developed and being strengthened although delays in the consideration of annual audit reports are common. Similarly, the monitoring and evaluation structures for reporting results are being strengthened. But there are problems in accessing in/end-year execution and delays in audits reports. The budget preparation process can become more transparent, open and participative through repeat pre-budget consultations and making some key budget documents like mid/in-year reports, year-end financial statements and annual audit reports available. The education sector is confronted with several short term and medium term challenges. The sector finances remain short in the face of fast growing student population and the focus on increasing access to girls schooling. The non-salary budgets have shrunk and subject to rationalization cuts which have affected negatively the provision of textbooks, teachers training, and maintenance of school facilities. The financial management in the education sector is relatively poor. Some key PFM weaknesses in the Elementary and Secondary Education Department (E&SED) are: no direct linkage with performance and budgets, despite the OBB/MTBF and monitoring and reporting are in place; lack of financial and performance reporting capability at the province and district levels; poor planning and monitoring at district level in the use of non-salary resources; lack of registry information for teachers and non-teacher personnel; poor cash planning and lack of predictability in fund releases for purchase of textbooks/supplies, construction and maintenance of infrastructure. Besides the financial management issues alluded to above, there appears to be less emphasis on qualitative depth into the sector. The E&SE sector is faced with severe issues of human resources management and monitoring learning progress. There is no registry and information system that captures whether education personnel report for work, what the quality of their teaching is, and whether they are included in the AGP payroll system. Hence absenteeism is common. And no monitoring mechanism is in place to measure teaching and learning progress at school and district levels. So that it is difficult to measure how, if at all, the increased spending is improving performance in schools. The GovKP remains committed to uplift the status of education in the province. The government policy focuses on improving access to primary schools, reducing gender gap, improving quality of education, providing adequate and suitable infrastructure, providing alternative or non-formal education, encouraging public-private partnership and community involvement, and enhancing budgetary allocation for education. To achieve all these goals, the government has prepared an Education Sector Plan (ESP) which is being implemented. The Plan's strategy is to address issues in three major areas, improving E&SED’s PFM, increasing access to formal schooling, and improving the quality of education.
  9. 9. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 9 of 109 The policy measures to attract children to school include fee exemptions at secondary level for all children in government schools, free textbooks in government schools, stipends to all girl students from 6 th to 10 th grade classes in public schools, and a special focus on girls’ education by increasing the ratio of ADP share to 70:30 for girls and boys, and increasing number of girls’ secondary schools. Besides, the Government has embarked on an accelerated program for constructing new schools, additional classrooms, renovation of the existing old buildings and providing missing facilities through Parent Teacher Councils (PTCs). The improvement of quality of education is being given special attention. The Institutional Framework for Teacher Development encompasses a strategy for the improvement of teacher education and teacher professional development. Over-crowding in early childhood classes has been reduced, the curriculum has been modified, and child‐friendly teaching practices adopted. Primary schools are better supervised with designation of head teachers; quality of textbook material has been improved, and teacher management is improving. A regular year‐round system of classroom assessment of teachers and students is being introduced. Teaching and management cadres are being separated, with an appropriate share of women. Communities and parents are gradually becoming involved in school supervision and management. Overall, greater attention is being paid to outcomes at the school level. 4 S CORING TABLE OF THE DLIS The overall assessment of the DLI targets for FY 2012-13 that underpin the payment triggers is not positive, with an average achievement of 5.242 out of 12. The recapitulative table suggests that there are three DLI areas where there is no achievement at all, six DLI areas where the achievement is half or less than half of what was targeted and three DLI areas where the targets were met. Overall Assessment/Eligibility DLI No. Targets Achieved Number of Targets Average Achievement 1 1 2 0.5 2 0.5 1 0.5 3 0 3 0 4 1 1 1 5 1 3 0.333 6 1 1 1 7 0.75 2 0.375 8 0 3 0 9 2 2 1 10 0 2 0 11 0.2 1 0.2 12 1 3 0.333 Overall Assessment 5.242 Source: Section B and C. Areas where the most progress is being achieved are (1) output based budgets; (2) community level management; and (3) curriculum and implementation.
  10. 10. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 10 of 109 There is no progress in the audit system, private sector programs of Elementary Education Foundation, and students learning outcomes. More details on progress are covered in the Summary Table given below. One of the reasons for poor progress may be that the general elections during Financial Year (FY) 2012-13 distracted the GovKP’s attention to governance and other ESE reforms. The government, which had designed the ESP, faced tough competition from other political parties and finally lost the government in the May 11 elections. Also the E&SE staff including teachers performs key election duties and hence they are important stakeholders in the general elections. 5 KEY ISSUES IN THE EDUCATION SECTOR There are very significant short term and medium term challenges to the education system in KP. While resources have been allocated towards enhancing the education sector horizontally, there appears to be less emphasis on introducing qualitative depth into the sector. In addition to the limited capacity to improve revenue mobilization, financial management for whatever revenue is there is sub-standard. Poor planning at district level in the use of non-salary resources contributes to inefficient allocation of resources. Financial and performance reporting capability is particularly insufficient. These reports are required to provide substantive information that allows district officials to calculate the amount of public resources planned and used and the cost of teaching per student and other costs and whether these outputs are commensurate with the results achieved. Budget resources are not linked with outcomes. Despite the introduction of output‐based budgeting, the shifts in expenditure have been volatile, in both current and development expenditures, with no direct linkage with performance. Externally funded development projects are not reported in a consolidated manner together with operating expenses and other recurrent budgets in a consolidated format and on a regular basis. Better coordination with budget authorities is required so that reporting of donor aid flows is provided prior to the budget submission to the Provincial Assembly. Procurement of supplies and services is problematic. Release of funds is unpredictable, making cash planning impossible. As a result, programming purchases of textbooks, school supplies, infrastructure construction and maintenance pose a challenge. Laws and guidelines in the field of procurement are ineffectively implemented and enforced, even though there are well drafted regulatory and legal frameworks. Another contributing but rather structural factor influencing the effectiveness of procurement reforms in KP Province is the overcrowding of government interventions: the government’s involvement in every sector as a direct market participant is estimated at 50%, obstructing private sector entry, impeding the development of competitive markets and installing poor quality regulation. Human resource management is faced with severe issues. There is no automated registry process and information system that captures whether education personnel report for work, what the quality of their teaching is, or whether they are included in the AGP payroll system. No monitoring mechanism is in place to measure teaching and learning progress at school and district level, so it is difficult to measure how, if at all, the increased spending is improving performance in schools.
  11. 11. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 11 of 109 This having been said, the government of KP is determined to uplift the status of education in the province. Government policy focuses on improving access to primary schools and reducing the gender gap, improving quality of education, providing adequate and suitable infrastructure, providing alternative or non-formal education, encouraging public-private partnership and community involvement, and enhancing budgetary allocation for education. To achieve these goals, the government has prepared an education sector plan which is being implemented. The plan tries to address the main major issues. One of the main priorities is to increase access to formal schooling. The Government has taken many steps to attract children to schools like the fee exemption at secondary level for all children in Government schools, free textbooks in government schools, stipends to all girl students from 6 th to 10 th grade in public schools, and a special focus on girls’ education by increasing the ratio of ADP share as 70:30 for girls and boys and increasing the number of girls’ secondary schools. Government has embarked on an accelerated program for constructing new schools, additional class rooms, renovation of the existing old buildings and providing missing facilities. It has allocated more funds for missing facilities at the community level. Improvement in the quality of education is given special attention. The Institutional Framework for Teacher Development encompasses the strategy for the improvement of teacher education and teacher professional development in the province, including a capacity development strategy and the setting up of 300 operational local circle offices with staff, office budget and physical resources. In early childhood classes, over-crowding has been reduced, the curriculum has been modified and child friendly teaching practices adopted that are appropriate for children of this age. In primary schools, designated posts of head teachers of primary schools have been created, and hence there is better supervision, textbook and material quality has been improved, and teacher management is better now. A regular year round system of classroom assessment of teachers and students is being introduced. This includes a uniform centralized examination system at 5th and 8th grades to assess primary and middle level teachers and students, a system of regular and comprehensive classroom assessments in primary schools, and reformation of examinations towards more objective and cognitive based assessment. Overall, greater attention is being paid to outcomes at the school level. And critically (although very hard), communities and parents are gradually becoming involved in school supervision and management. Teaching and management cadres are being separated, with an appropriate share of women.
  12. 12. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 12 of 109 SUMMARY OF PROGRESS AGAINST DISBURSEMENT LINKED INDICATORS (DLIs) Performance Indicators Target for FY 12012-13 Progress in FY 12012-13 DLI Progress GROUP 1: GOVERNANCE & PFM DLI 1: E&SED non-salary and development budget allocation increase both in real terms and as a percentage of total education budget is protected E&SED/ GoKP to approve PC-I for Girls stipend, summary for recurrent PTC expenditures as well as summary for Monitoring function and start judicious expenditures to ensure additionally of DFID funds. Target met. The project PC-1 Girls’ stipends in FY 2012-13 was approved and implemented. Similarly, the summary for PTC expenditures in FY 2012-13 was approved and funds were released to DDOs for onward disbursement to PTCs. The E&SED set up a much stronger monitoring arrangement during the year. 1/2 E&SED actual expenditure on Non-salary & development to be at least 75% of the budget estimates (Provincial & District level). Target not met. The E&SED actual non-salary and development expenditure in FY 2012-13 is estimated at 66.5% of the budget estimate, which remains short of the prescribed threshold of 75%. DLI 2: Organizational Development Institutional analysis of ESRU, EEF and SED with a view to develop recommendations for organizational restructuring. Target partially met. The EEF’s institutional analysis was carried out and a combined institutional analysis of ESRU, ESED and its Directorates is being carried out, which is expected to be completed soon. The organizational restructuring of EEF has been agreed but the final approval is still awaited. 0.5/1 DLI 3: Audit system Internal audit charter & cell established (organizational structure approved, posts sanctioned & appointments made) at FD & similar actions taken for establishing & operationalizing the internal Audit function at E&SED. Capacity building plan designed & implemented. Target partially met. Finance Department has created posts for Internal Audit cell at ESED. Progress on the development of IA charter is in formulation stages with the TA team of DFID for the ESED program is preparing a capacity building plan.The case for establishing internal audit charter and cell is still being studied at the Finance Department, and actions for establishing and operationalizing the internal audit function at E&SED remain on hold, and the capacity building plan for the Internal Audit Cell is not in sight as yet. 1/3Internal Audit. Target partially met. Internal Audit cell established in the budget of 2013- 14,however staff for the same not yet appointed. Internal Audit Cell in E&SED has not been established; hence, there has been no internal audit of E&SED during FY 2012-13. Annual External audit of KPESP by Auditor General's office covering the flow & utilization of DFID funds along with any irregularities found during the course of audit. Target not met. The target achievement is nil. The FY 2012-13 has just ended and the provincial AG Office has not started as yet the annual external audit of KP ESP covering the flow & utilization of DFID funds during the year.
  13. 13. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 13 of 109 DLI4: Output based Budgets E&SED OBB approved with improved targets & indicators. OBB rolled out to at least 6 Districts. Target met taking a dynamic approach based on the GovKP's commitment. While the provincial level OBBs have been implemented with improving indicators and targets and are well grounded, the district level OBBs have yet not started. However, some background works, like staff training and preparation of strategic plans, at district level have been undertaken. These plans combined with staff mentoring from the provincial Departments may finally translate into district level OBBs. Thus there are weaknesses which need to be made up. The implementing of a fully functional OBB/MTBF at all levels of government is ambitious, which may be considered as a long term objective. 1/1 GROUP 2: ACCESS & FACILITIES DLI 5: Girls Stipends 100% girls who meet attendance criterion receive stipends in time according to the on-going programme. Target met. In order to attract girl students to continue their studies after primary school, a monthly stipend of Rs. 200/- per month is given to every girl student from Grade 6 to 10. This has a direct impact on the retention of girl students in the school and had helped them to complete their studies up to 10th Grade. The disbursement is made through money orders by the Pakistan Post. The parents and the children are appreciative of the stipend program. The head mistresses attribute the increase in enrolment to this facility which in some cases was about 30%. 1/3 Branchless banking pilot initiated for stipends delivery in 4 Districts Target not met. To bring more transparency and to further facilitate the students the Government has agreed with the donors to initiate the disbursement of stipends through Branchless banking. The process is yet to start. Analytical work to re-design the programme through improved targeting, benefit structure and attendance verification completed. Target not met. The work on analytical work to re-design the programme through improved targeting, benefit structure and attendance verification is yet to start DLI 6 : Community Level Management Without overlap with OBB Districts & in line with recommendations of TPV on PTCs in KP, PTCs policy, financial & procurement rules improved & notified with a continuous capacity development programme (CCDP) developed. Target met. There is a comprehensive policy on training of PTC executives, their capacity development, PTCs’ role and functions, school improvement program, planning, budgeting and procurement, PTC meeting, decisions and records, communication with stakeholders, etc. The PTC’s Continuous Capacity Development Plan, February 2013 – April 2014 has been prepared. PTC Guide has been prepared and training of PTC members has been started. A third party validation (TPV) has been conducted. The report is favourable despite some perverse indications. 1/1
  14. 14. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 14 of 109 DLI 7: Low Cost Private Sector Establish a comprehensive strategy for public private partnership (PPP) in education facilitating the low cost private sector with setting out clear standards for quality. Target partially met, and GovKP is working in the right direction. A study of the low cost private school sector in KP was started in March 2013, which will decide the definition of ‘low cost private institution’ and other matters. 0.75/2Analyze (using EMIS data & through EEF) location & viability of low cost private sector primary & secondary schools & draw partnership proposal Target not met. To analyze (using EMIS data & through EEF) location & viability of low cost private sector primary & secondary schools & draw partnership proposed to the Department. No such analysis of location and viability of low cost private sector schools, both primary and secondary, for public-private partnerships have been carried out. It will be carried out in the light of the study on Low Cost Private Schools cited above. DLI 8: Elementary Education Foundation (EEF) Return to learn second chance education for children & training opportunities for women designed by EEF in conjunction with all stakeholders & clear proposals agreed with DFID. Target not met. A scheme for return to learn second chance education for children & training opportunities for women was designed by EEF in conjunction with all stakeholders and clear proposals agreed with DFID. For this purpose a case for a scheme for literacy and skills on the pattern of ‘Literacy for All’ was prepared for setting up 2000 centers and submitted to the E&SED vide EEF MD office No. 345 dated 26/3/2012. Since then, there has been no further action or follow up. 0/3Second chance return to learn opportunities provided to primary & secondary aged out of school children according to the agreed proposal & as validated by TPV Target not met. The issue of learning opportunities for the out-of-school children at the primary & secondary school ages will be covered under the above mentioned scheme for establishment of centers of literacy and skills. Literacy & skills trainings provided to illiterate women according to the agreed proposal & as validated by TPV Target not met. The literacy and skill trainings for the illiterate women will be covered under the above mentioned scheme for establishment of centers of literacy and skills. GROUP 3: QUALITY & LEARNING OUTCOMES DLI 9: Curriculum Implementation Establish joint steering committee comprising of (BISE, PEAS, KPTBB & DCTE) to execute the curriculum implementation framework. Target met. A joint steering committee, comprising BISE, PEAS, KPTBB & DCTE, to execute the curriculum implementation framework has been set up. A notification has been issued to this effect. The committee has held its first meeting. 2/2 Adapting the Punjab lesson plans to contextual realities of KP, utilize lesson plans for teaching all subjects at primary level in at least 10 Districts. Target met. Primary level lesson plans on the pattern of Punjab have been aligned with the new curriculum. The lesson plans are being printed which will be implemented in all 25 districts. In the 1st phase training of Lead Trainers have been completed.
  15. 15. Monitoring of Education Sector Reform Programme in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan Page 15 of 109 DLI 10: Students Learning Outcomes Develop a home grown strategy for systematically measuring & improving students learning outcomes in KP. Target not met. As informed by the ASI team, this DLI target is to be revised. 0/2 Development of effective reading instruction strategies as part of GPE Reading Action Plan. Target not met. As informed by the ASI team, this DLI target is to be revised. DLI 11: Improving School Performance School report cards developed & tested in at least 25% of primary & secondary schools in 5 Districts. Target partially met. The scheme of school report cards has been piloted in 2 out of 3 sub-divisions of District Swab, Lahore and Swabi, while the third sub- division Topi has not been included. According to a DEO (F) in Swabi, about 25% of schools have been included in the scheme. The related trainings of PTCs along with the Head Teachers have been conducted in these schools. The work on the scheme is in progress. 0.2/1 DLI 12: Improving Teachers Management Minimum classroom level performance standards for teachers established. Target not met. The DFID TA Team has drafted and shared the concept note of Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs) with E&SED. The E&SED is in the process of forming a working group who will be involved in reviewing and adapting the National Professional Standards for teachers in KP context. The TA team expects that these PSTs will be established by the end of August, 2013. 1/3 Establish a teachers professional development framework. Target not met. The DFID TA team drafted the concept note for a Continuous Professional Development Framework and shared it with the E&SED during the year. Some meetings with DCTE, PITE and DE&SE were also scheduled in May and June 2013 in Abbottabad to discuss the concept of CPD Framework and to identify capacity needs of institutions. However, the DCTE officials informed this consultant team that these meeting were not held. An exposure trip to DSD Lahore was also planned for the E&SED officials to see the Punjab model of CPD as well as some field visits to districts. This exposure trip has however not materialized. The CPD framework is expected to be developed by end Aug 2013. Strategy developed for rationalizing teaching posts at school level based on school needs including enrolment. Target met. The notified policy about teachers’ availability is that the students- teacher ratio will be 40:1, and the E&SED is in the process of ‘rationalization’ of teachers in the province with regard to students-teacher ratio. The Director E&SE informed the consultants' team that he has directed all DEOs to carryout rationalization of teachers based on the prescribed standards of students- teacher ratios in their respective districts. Furthermore, the role of PTC has been changed, and now they can hire temporary teachers out of the PTC funds on need basis. Source: Section B and C.
  16. 16. 16 SECTION B. GOVERNANCE AND PFM Macroeconomy The macroeconomic outlook is stable. Pakistan’s macroeconomic growth prospects have improved slightly recently. The new democratic government has settled in and there is relative political calm. The country’s medium-term macroeconomic framework envisages a gross domestic product growth of 3.4% for 2013-14 gradually rising to 7% in 2015-16. Inflation has tapered down to 7.5% by the end of 2012-13 compared with being in double digits over the last few years. Investment environment is better, stock markets are booming and foreign direct investment is coming in. The federal government is trying to address three main issues affecting the economy; high fiscal deficit, deteriorating reserves, and power outages. It has announced a series of policy measures in the 2013-14 budget for controlling the fiscal deficit and resolving the energy crisis. In addition, negotiations are on- going with the International Monetary Fund over an Extended Fund Facility (EFF) package. This will consist of further tax revenue and expenditure control measures and a comprehensive energy policy to control electricity load shedding. If the negotiations are successful, the agreement will not only provide access to the funds (tentative figures is $6.6 billion) 3 but also send a positive signal to other donors. The KP economy is largely agricultural and rural, and heavily depends on inputs from the rest of the country. The industrial sector is small, mostly restricted to small scale and mineral based industries. The province is rich in minerals and has a vast potential for hydroelectric power generation and tourism industry. It is located at the crossroads of important international trading routes; hence trade and service sectors constitute a large part of its economy. The province’s socio-economic development has been adversely affected by the conflict that has been going on along the Afghanistan border. Presently, KP houses about 25 million people, of which about 38% live below poverty line, and the province’s social indicators are very poor, e.g. unemployment rate is over 7%, maternal mortality 275/1000 and under-five mortality 100/1000 4 The Government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has been attempting to address the main development challenges, viz. raising income per capita, improving human development and access to social services, exploiting natural resources, good governance and optimal utilization of the available resources. GovKP’s Expenditures - Key Focus Areas The Constitution assigns the government expenditure on education, health, law and order and municipal administration to provinces. The key focus areas of the GovKP, as presented in the 2013-2014 budget, are established so as to address the province’s socio-economic development:  Education has been declared a priority – improving participation rate at primary and secondary levels, enhancing quality of education and removing gender/ethnic disparities. 3 The proposed $6.6billion EFF package has finally been agreed by the IMF Board on 4/9/13. 4 UNICEF, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2008.
  17. 17. 17  Health: improve public access to healthcare facilities, immunization and preventive health programs, achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), encourage community health programs, health insurance, etc.  Law and order: the province adjoins the western border volatile tribal areas; hence the law and order situation is very poor in the province and public order and safety affairs takes a substantial amount, 14.2%, of the revenue budget.  Urban development: plans for main cities covering public services such as water, sanitation, drainage, streets and public infrastructure to accommodate private services in transport, agriculture and trade, and a road transport network for Peshawar City. Overall, the urban sector is relatively small.  Energy and power: to take full advantage of the province’s hydro-electric, thermal and solar potential.  Infrastructure: improve and expand the road network, increase resources for road maintenance.  Economic Management of agriculture and industry o Agriculture development: to shift from conventional to high value crops, fruit and vegetables, efficient use of water, minimize environmental risks, and reform the agricultural marketing. o Industrial development: an Industrial Estate Management Company has been set up with an aim to improve the investment and business climate, facilitate private sector development, and improve technical education. Uncertainty surrounds GovPK revenues The GovKP’s revenues are highly dependent on federal transfers. These transfers accounted for 90% of the total provincial revenues in financial year 2012-2013. The 7 th National Finance Commission award has raised the provincial share of revenues in the federal divisible pool, to 57.5% from 47.5%. The divisible pool mainly consists of Federal Board of Revenue revenues, and with stagnant economic growth and mal-governance, this Board has been missing its revenue targets, e.g. the estimated shortfall in actual collections in financial year 2012-2013 was 14%. Hydro-electric profits are another significant source but its proceeds are uncertain. There have been problems in settling these profits according to the original methodology due to the differences of opinion about the computation of Hydel profits. Pending full settlement, the GovKP has:  received regularly a flat sum of Rs 6 billion per annum;  received a sum of Rs 110 billion in past arrears up to financial year 2005 in the four years, 2009- 2014;  requested payment of Rs. 101.59 billion in the outstanding arrears for the last 8 years (July 2005 - June 2013);  requested full payment of the Hydel profit every year in future. The province's own tax bases are generally weak, except for the recently devolved sales tax on services. The KP’s economy is largely agriculture and informal.Besides, the provincial economic outlook has been vulnerable due to the poor law-and order situation and stubborn energy outages. Nevertheless, the GovKP has been attempting to increase the province’s own collections with insignificant yields. In the coming years, the GovKP plans to: establish its Revenue Authority and enact a provincial Sales Tax on Services Act to administer the sales tax on services; expand the tax net and revise old tax rates; attempt better tax enforcement and simplification of tax laws; and carry out an independent survey for tax administration assessment and collection.
  18. 18. 18 Foreign aid inflows are quite uncertain and have largely depended on the country relations with donor countries. GovKP PFM Reforms A sound Public Finance/Financial Management system is critical to implement government policies and deliver public services. The PFM system encompasses the full budget cycle including: revenue administration, budget preparation, budget execution with cash management, procurement systems, internal controls and internal audit, accounting and reporting, external audit and scrutiny. A sound PFM system would collect the required resources from the economy, integrate them into the budget, allocate and use them in an efficient, effective, equitable and accountable manner. The GovKP has thus been implementing a comprehensive Integrated PFM Reforms Strategy. This strategy builds on the findings of the most recent Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment and Fiduciary Risk Assessment (FRA). The stated objectives of the PFM strategy are to: make the budget strategic by linking policies and priorities with budget allocations; make the budget credible and result oriented for better service delivery and accountability; improve budget execution and reporting; and build capacities of the work force involved. A good budget has to be strategic, encompassing a multi- year financial and operating plan that allocates resources on the basis of identified goals. 5 The main interventions of the GovKP’s PFM program are summarized below. Provincial OBB/MTBF: To ensure good budget characteristics, the GovKP has been implementing output based budgeting (OBB) and medium term budget framework (MTBF) for the past few years. The provincial OBB/MTBF for 2012-13 and 2013-14, giving the details of departmental outcomes, outputs and medium term (3 years) budget estimates for service delivery, are printed in the Finance Department publications, Budget Estimates for Service Delivery, 2012-15 and 2013-16. The formulation of FY 2013-14 OBBs has entailed elaborate processes all over the GovKP, including: preparing an MTBF 2013-16 to gauge the resource envelope and expenditure pressures; Budget Strategy Papers to the Cabinet for approval; determining the year’s recurrent budget ceilings for all departments; four pre-budget consultation workshops with stakeholders on sector priorities; steering of the budget preparation process by the senior management of administrative Departments to prepare budget estimates in the light of strategic priorities with appropriate performance indicators; and finally the pre- budget negotiations with the FD for resource allocations. These processes, which have been improving over the years, are expected to ensure aggregate fiscal discipline, efficient resource allocation according to the government’s policy priorities, and operational efficiency in public service delivery. E&SED OBBs: The E&SED OBBs has been prepared with improving targets and indicators. Details can be found in the documents cited above. More recently as a part of PFM reform, the DFID TA team has prepared a more elaborate E&SED Portfolio Budget Statement (PBS) for 2013-14. This PBS is a multi- dimensional consolidated budget statement of the E&SED initiatives and explanations of appropriations specified by outputs and programmes. It will be released soon after its ownership/approval of the GovKP. 5 See GovKP FD, White Paper 2013-14, pp 49-59 for a government narrative on PFM Reforms.
  19. 19. 19 District OBBs: The GovKP has also attempted to implement OBBs in Districts but this has not progressed significantly. According to the GovKP 6 , the OBB was extended during the year 2011-12 to two Districts, D.I Khan and Buner, having access to conditional grants for improving service delivery in the E&SED and Health Department. Reportedly, the results were encouraging, hence the conditional grant program model was replicated in four more Districts during FY 2012-13, i.e. Lakki Marwat, Karrak, Haripur and Nowshera, for which the GovKP allocated a sum of Rs. 1 billion for PTCs. The expenditures against these conditional grants have entailed extensive discussions with stakeholders to improve service delivery and preparation of district business plans with a set of indicators and targets. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for conditional grants include development of a business plan with performance indicators, reporting and monitoring and evaluation arrangements, audits and third party validations. The district level capacities are however extremely weak. The roll out of the OBB/MTBF is planned for six Districts of Malakand Division: Swat, Malakand, Shangla, Chitral, Dir Upper and Dir Lower. This will happen under an EU funded project. 7 Business Plans: The GovKP has piloted the concept of business plans in the six provincial departments which have prepared their business plans as part of their 2013-14 budget. A business plan makes it much easier to translate it into a strategic plan/budget. It will help the provincial government achieve aggregate fiscal discipline, allocative and operational efficiency by reducing in year adjustments, i.e. re- appropriations, supplementary/excess grants and surrenders, and will help in further reducing the budget outturn variations. The concept will be extended to other departments in the coming years based on learning in the pilot phase. Internal Audit: Internal audit contributes to effective implementation of the government policies and programs and the most economic and efficient utilization of resources. GovKP has implemented the internal audit pilot in the FD in the form of an Internal Audit Unit. Reportedly, this Unit has carried out internal audit of payroll and pensions, which resulted in the identification of greater cost efficiency. The provincial government plans to extend the internal audit functionality to other line departments with adequate institutional mechanisms to ensure high quality audit in the most economic, efficient and effective manner. In this regard, the FD has recently got completed a study on internal audit (IA) , its role, modalities, best practices, etc. (3 volumes – IA Framework and two IA Toolkits for E&SE and C&W Departments) through Assessment and Strengthening Program and Rural Support Programmes Network (Pakistan ASP/RSPN/USAID and is reviewing its recommendations. PFM Reform Issues 8 The GovKP’s PFM reforms program has progressed in recent years, but only slowly. The strategic interventions in FY 2012-13 consisted of: strategic budget formulation by linking policies and budget priorities (MTBF); credible, results oriented budgets for better service delivery (OBB); introduction of business plans and annual action plans in six line departments and in districts with conditional grants; capacity building (audit, internal audit and Public Accounts Committee (PAC)); strengthening of 6 See Finance Department, 2013-14 White Paper, pp. 49-50. 7 EU’s Technical Cooperation Assistance on Public Financial Management to Selected Districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, DCI-ASIE/2012/ 295-933, For Pakistan. 8 The views in this subsection are based on PFM Eligibility Assessment given in Annexure CA 3.
  20. 20. 20 monitoring structures (an Independent Monitoring and Data Collection Unit (IMDCU), Education Management Information System (EMIS) and surveys); and pre-budget consultation workshops. The PFM reform progress is positive largely because of a credible and policy-oriented budget process. Main strengths are: a well-defined budget process with both executive and legislative adhering to a schedule; budget documentation is fairly comprehensive; budget classification follows international standards; the external audit function is well-developed; transparency measures are in place for information sharing and pre budget workshops are held. Yet a number of weaknesses remain in the operating of the PFM system. Most weaknesses are in the budget execution: revenues are uncertain; capacities are weak; the processes linking outputs to budgets and accounting results against budgets are weak, records are poor; financial reporting and internal controls are weak. Other areas where improvements are required include cash management, registry, human resources, procurement, fixed asset management, inventories, revenue administration and the dichotomy in recurrent and development budgets causing operational difficulties. The overall assessment of PFM reform progress is quite favourable despite these listed shortcomings (see Annexure CA 3), because:  The PFM reform strategy is quite relevant to the development objectives of the province in that it addresses key weaknesses in the PFM system hampering improvement of basic service delivery.  The reform strategy is home-grown, and the action plan approved by the GovKP Cabinet addresses general areas of concern.  The reform program is well sequenced with reform implementation strategy focusing on certain core interventions, building strategic planning/budgeting capabilities at the province and district levels.  The reform enjoys sufficient ownership from the Cabinet, target beneficiaries and a cadre of finance and planning officials at province and districts. The overall reform is championed by the Finance Department. Education Sector PFM Issues Several issues confront the E&SED but we shall highlight here four significant ones. 1. The sector finances have fallen short in the face of fast growing student population and the focus of increasing access to girls' schooling despite the rapid growth in education expenditure and in teacher appointments over the past ten years. 2. The non-salary budgets have shrunk and affected negatively the provision of textbooks, teacher training, and maintenance of school facilities. The recurrent budgets have been subject to various forms of rationalization cuts except for wages and salaries. 3. Expenditure priority is clearly tilted towards secondary education at the expense of primary education, a clear disconnect is pointed between sector strategy and expenditure allocation. 4. Financial management in the education sector is relatively poor. Some of the cited key PFM weaknesses in the E&SED are: 1. No direct linkage with performance and budgets, despite OBB/MTBF or monitoring and reporting, is in place. 2. Lack of financial and performance reporting capability at the province and district levels.
  21. 21. 21 3. Poor planning and monitoring at district level in the use of non-salary resources, e.g. inappropriate school locations, school infrastructures and supplies. 4. Lack of registry information for teachers and non-teacher personnel - absenteeism is thus common. 5. Poor cash planning and lack of predictability in fund releases for purchase of textbooks/supplies, construction and maintenance of infrastructure - all affecting negatively the quality of schooling services. 6. Problems in reporting of externally funded development projects together with operating expenses in recurrent budgets. Budget Transparency and Oversight 9 Budget transparency, defined as full disclosure of all relevant fiscal information, is a key element of good governance and a prerequisite for domestic accountability. With access to budgetary information, the general public and the control bodies like parliament, auditors, local authorities, civil society organizations and media, can scrutinize the budget and hold the decision makers accountable for collecting and using public funds effectively and efficiently, and call for policies that improve service delivery. A program to support national legislative and oversight bodies as well as internal control structures is necessary in order to address their capacity weaknesses. Domestic accountability mechanisms can also be strengthened by a participatory budget approach. Salient features of the GovKP policy measures to improve transparency/accountability of public resources are:  Budget documentation is comprehensive; its format conforms to international standards, and is presented to the provincial assembly.  Information on the approved annual budget is available – FD publishes budget documentation on its official website, e.g. Annual Budget Statement covers budget summary, OBB/MTBF covers budget forecast up to three years, White Paper summarizes the government plan.  The external audit function is well developed although delays in consideration of the annual audit reports are common.  Monitoring and evaluation structures for reporting on results are being strengthened. These include IMDCU, district level monitoring, Monitoring Directorate of Planning and Development Departments (P&DD), EMIS and surveys.  But there are problems in accessing in/end-year execution and delays in audits reports. In preparation of budget for FY 2013-14, the GovKP engaged the stakeholders in consultation to seek their guidance. The FD in collaboration with P&DD and with technical assistance of development partners organized four pre budget consultative workshops in May 2013. Some future initiatives include: preparing citizen’s budget; sharing budget strategy paper with citizens; and sharing budget execution reports with public, including the end of the year budget execution report. 10 9 This subsection is based on Transparency and Oversight Eligibility Assessment given in Annexure CA 4. 10 Reportedly, the present government is very sensitive on transparency, and has prepared a right of access to information bill which is about to be presented in the provincial assembly to improve the access.
  22. 22. 22 PEFA reports have been cautious and have consistently given low scores on budget transparency and oversight. The PEFA 2011 reports the following key weaknesses. Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) Framework—KP Province Indicator Description Score 2007 Score 2011 PI-6 Comprehensiveness of information included in budget documentation B B PI-10 Public access to key fiscal information C C PI-23 Availability of information on resources received by service delivery units B D PI-24 Quality and timeliness of in-year budget reports C+ C+ PI-25 Quality and timeliness of annual financial statements B B+ PI-26 Scope, nature and follow-up of external audit D+ D+ PI-27 Legislative scrutiny of the annual budget law C+ D+ Overall,  Budget preparation process can become more transparent, open and participative through repeat pre-budget consultations.  Some key budget documents are not available - budget mid/in-year reports, year-end financial statements, annual audit reports are issued but with extended delays. The availability of these reports can significantly improve budget transparency. Progress on Governance and PFM DLIs Overall Assessment The overall implementation progress on the four DLIs, 1 to 4 under Governance and PFM, is 2/4. DLI 1: E&SED non-salary and development budget allocation increase both in real terms and as a percentage of total education budgets is protected. Target 1 for year 2012-13: E&SED/GovKP to approve PC-I for Girls stipend, summary for recurrent PTC expenditures as well as summary for monitoring function and start judicious expenditures to ensure additionality of DFID funds. Target met. The GovKP approved and implemented the project PC-1 Girls’ stipends in FY 2012-13, similarly, the government approved a summary for PTC expenditures in FY 2012-13 and funds were released to DDOs for onward disbursement to PTCs, and the E&SED has been setting up a much stronger monitoring arrangement during the year. The related details are given in the following paragraphs. Girls’ stipends: The disbursement of girls’ stipends is effected from the development budget in project mode; a project PC-I for the amount to be disbursed during a financial year is prepared every year. For FY 2012-13, a project PC-1 for girls’ stipends, amounting to Rs 1 billion, was prepared and approved by
  23. 23. 23 the P&DD. This project was implemented during the year and the amount fully utilized by disbursing stipends, Rs 200/month and related cost Rs 36/stipend through Pakistan Post. The PC-1 is presented in Annex OA 1. Field visits to girl’s schools by this team and third party validation confirm the disbursements. For FY 2013-14, the E&SED has prepared a project PC-1 for girls’ stipends, amounting Rs 1.58 Bill 11 . This constitutes an increase in the budget allocation. However, P&DD is still awaiting the PC-1 but expected to approve the project soon. The draft PC-1 is placed below in Annex OA 2. Future plans regarding girl’s stipends include preparing a communication strategy and instituting branchless banking pilot in four districts. PTCs’ Expenditures: The disbursement of PTCs’ expenditures is from the recurrent budget. Administrative approval is sought from the Chief Minister (CM) for the amount to be disbursed during the financial year on a summary prepared by the E&SED and FD. The administrative approval for disbursement of PTCs’ expenditures in FY 2012-13 from the recurrent budget was given, but the funds were released by the Auditor General (AG) on the last day of the financial year (28 th June, 2013). This late release of funds was largely due to late and incomplete submission of the release bills to the AG by the E&SED, a capacity issue, which had caused pre-audit queries and time-consuming correspondence. Even the release on the last day, Rs 128 million, has been made provisionally to DDOs for onward credit to the PTCs’ bank accounts. The provision is that DDOs will submit the disbursement accounts with supporting documents within a month. The Accountant General letter is given in Annex OA 3. Although a bit late, the PTCs are expected to get these funds shortly in their accounts. Monitoring Function: Until FY 2012-13, the disbursements of monitoring function was from the recurrent budget requiring administrative approval of the CM for the amount to be spent during the financial year. This approval was given on a summary prepared by the E&SED and FD. The disbursements from the recurrent budget during the year have been small, consisting of salaries of the three Monitoring Officers working in the Education Sector Reform Unit (ESRU) and the related field monitoring expenditures. During FY 2012-13, the GovKP decided to shift the monitoring function to the development budget. Hence, a project costing Rs 650 million with the aim to set up an Internal Monitoring and Data Collection Unit under the E&SED was approved and its execution started (the project PC-1 is given in Annex OA 4). The initial staff strength proposed for the unit is 465 monitors including 165 women. These will visit all schools and report on indicators like teacher absenteeism, student assessment, text books availability, DEO visits, etc. every month. Districts will be ranked every two months on the basis of monitoring reports. The Unit has however not started the monitoring function as yet. Presently, the Unit is headed by an acting project director, its bank account has been opened, its hard/software is being procured, the monitoring indicators have been developed and recruitment of staff is in process. It is expected that the 11 The allocation in ADP 2013-14 is Rs 1000.01 million.
  24. 24. 24 recruitment process will be completed by August 2013 and the unit will be functional by September 2013. Consequently, the three positions of the existing monitors in ESRU will be abolished. Target 2 for FY 2012-13: E&SED actual expenditure on non-salary & development to be at least 75% of the budget estimates (Provincial & District level). Target not met. As can be seen in Table 1 given below, the E&SED actual non-salary and development expenditure in FY 2012-13 is estimated at 66.5% of the budget estimate, which is short of the prescribed threshold of 75%. Table 1: Elementary and Secondary Education Budget Mill Rs S.No. Head 2012-13BE 2012-13RE Budget Utilization 1=2+10 Total Expenditure - Revenue and Development 63,821 66,628 104.4% 2=6+9 Expenditure met from Recurrent Budget 46,732 56,206 120.3% 3 O/w Non-salary 1,601 2,003 125.1% 4 Provincial 681b 945b 138.8% 5 O/w Salary 462c 600e 130.0% 6=4-5 O/w Non-salary 219 345 157.3% 7 Districts 46,051d 55,261 120.0% 8 O/w Salary 44,669c 53,603f 120.0% 9=7-8 O/w Non-salary 1,382 1,658f 120.0% 10 Expenditure from Development Budget 17,089a 10,422a 61.0% Memo 11 Non-salary and Development Expenditure 18,690 12,425 66.5% 12 As % of Total Expenditure 29.3% 18.6% Source: a. ABS 2013-14 b. Demands for grants Current expenditure 2013-14, Volume III (Part H/1) c. Finance Department d. Assuming salary part is 97% e. Assuming 30% budget overrun f. Assuming 20% budget overrun DLI 2: Organizational Development Target for FY 2012-13: Institutional analysis of ESRU, EEF and SED with a view to develop recommendations for organizational restructuring. Target partially met. The EEF’s institutional analysis has been carried out and a combined institutional analysis of ESRU, ESED and its Directorates is being carried out, which is expected to be completed soon. The organizational restructuring of EEF has been agreed but the final approval is still awaited. More details on the DLI 2 progress are given below.
  25. 25. 25 EEF: DFID consultants have carried out the institutional analysis of EEF and restructuring of EEF has been approved by the EEF Board (see minutes of the Board meeting in Annex OA 5). However while approving, the EEF Board noted that additional staff of EEF will be paid from the recurrent budget, and the case for this is still pending with the FD. The restructured EEF will have a powerful 14-member Board under the CM and meet regularly every quarter. The consultants also recommended changes in organizational structure, business plan and job descriptions. They drafted EEF’s service and fund investment rules. The new EEF legislation draft is with the CM and will require approval of the PA. The restructuring changes have been agreed, but a formal approval of the FD/GovKP and subsequent notifications are required. The EEF has been operating with the endowment grant of Rs 400 million and been given an additional Rs 150 million grant in aid in the FY 2013-14 budget. ESRU: No separate institutional analysis of ESRU was carried out during FY 2012013, but that does not affect the assessment of the programme against this DLI. The ESRU had been shrinking during the year because of dwindling DFID support and shifting of the project activities into the regular E&SED activities. The existing ESRU has a Director, a Deputy Director and three Monitoring Officers. The positions of three monitors are expected to be abolished after setting up of the IMDCU in E&SED. More recently, the restructuring of ESRU is being considered along with E&SED and its Directorates for which an institutional analysis is being carried out. This study started in April 2013 and is likely to be completed by end August 2013. Although it is premature to conjecture, the ESRU is likely to be restructured along lines similar to those followed by PMIU in Punjab. The E&SED's officials want the ESRU to have flexibility and be supported outside the regular budget, to cut through government procedures and push the reforms. Donors also appreciate this idea, as it is likely to facilitate donor coordination. However, the unit should be staffed by competent people, selected on open merit from the government and private sectors. E&SED: As noted, a combined institutional analysis of ESRU, E&SED and its Directorates is being carried out to develop recommendations for organizational restructuring. The study started in April 2013 and is likely to be completed by end August 2013. DLI 3: Audit system All three given targets on audit system for FY 2012-13 were not met. The target-wise details are given in the following paragraphs. Target 1 for year 2012-13: Internal audit charter & cell established (organizational structure approved, posts sanctioned & appointments made) at FD & similar actions taken for establishing & operationalizing the internal audit function at E&SED. Capacity building plan designed & implemented. Target not met. The FD plans to initiate internal audit in all major departments for improvements in internal control and audit, leading to more reliable financial statements. Accordingly, a charter of the Internal Audit Cell in E&SED, with templates, checklists, procedures, has been approved. The Cell’s organizational structure with six posts (1 BPS-18, 2 BPS-17 and 3 Assistants) has also been sanctioned. But the appointment process has not yet started. The FD is currently thinking of an overhaul (e.g. how will
  26. 26. 26 auditors perform internal audit, how will they make up the enormous skill requirements, etc.) and reviewing the recommendations of a recent study on internal audit, its role, modalities, best practices, etc. (3 volumes – IA Framework and two IA Toolkits for E&SE and C&W Departments) completed through ASP/RSPN/USAID. Thus, the actions for establishing and operationalizing the internal audit function at E&SED remain on hold for another six months approximately, and the capacity building plan for the Internal Audit Cell is not in sight as yet. Target 2 for FY 2012-13: Internal Audit Target not met. Internal Audit Cell in E&SED has not been established; hence, there was no internal audit of E&SED during FY 2012-13. Target 3 for FY 2012-13: Annual External audit of KPESP by Auditor General's office covering the flow & utilization of DFID funds along with any irregularities found during the course of audit. Target not met. The FY 2012-13 has just ended and the provincial AG Office has not started as yet the annual external audit of KP ESP covering the flow & utilization of DFID funds during the year. A Senior Planning Officer from the E&SED, referring to a clause in the DFID-GovKP agreement, had written a letter to provincial AG’s Office (see Annex OA 6), stating that the DFID funds are subject to special audit by private auditors, thereby preempting the role of the AG. This confusion has resulted in unnecessary correspondence and delay. The AG’s Office audits all projects funded by the international community, and would like to undertake immediately the audit of the use of DFID funds. Therefore, the AG’s Office has written to the Secretary E&SED for beginning the audit of DFID funds. Thus this audit may begin soon. The provincial AG’s Office has been regular in auditing the E&SED accounts. The AG’s Office has audited the E&SED accounts up to FY 2011-12. Reportedly, there are 12 audit comments in the draft FY 2011-12 E&SED Audit Report although the Departmental Accounts Committee (DAC) under the Secretary E&SED has yet to hold a meeting to resolve some of these comments. The FY 2010-11 E&SED Audit Report was prepared by the AG’s Office and discussed in DAC meeting, but still contains a few outstanding audit comments. The full provincial FY 2010-11 Audit Report will be considered by the next PAC (yet to be constituted by the new government). The audits by the provincial AG’s Office did not cover the audit of district schools which had been devolved to District Audit Offices. DLI4: Output Based Budgets Target for year 2012-13: E&SED OBB approved with improved targets & indicators. OBB rolled out to at least 6 Districts. The related details are given below. Target met taking a dynamic approach based on the GovKP's commitment. 12 While at the provincial level OBBs are well grounded, the district level OBBs have not yet started. Some background work, like staff 12 The EU Budget Support Guidelines defines dynamic approach for satisfactory progress: it should be based on a dynamic approach, looking at past and recent policy performance benchmarked against reform commitments, but
  27. 27. 27 training and preparation of strategic plans at district level have been undertaken. These plans, combined with staff mentoring from the provincial departments, may finally translate into district level OBBs for managing results and more accountable governments. In sum, there are weaknesses which need to be made up. The implementing of a fully functional OBB/MTBF at all levels of government is ambitious, which may be considered as a long term objective. Provincial OBBs: The GovKP has been implementing a MTBF and OBB for the last few years. The OBB/MTBF was piloted in three departments in 2010-11 and extended to nine more in 2011-12. In FY 2012-13, the GovKP rolled out the OBB to all 32 provincial departments with improved targets and indicators. Full 2012-13 OBB/MTBF, giving details of the Departmental outcomes, outputs and medium term (3 years) budget estimates for service delivery, was printed in Budget Estimates For Service Delivery, 2012-15. The FY 2013-14 OBB has also been prepared along with MTBF which is printed in the Budget Estimates for Service Delivery, 2013-16. E&SED’s OBBs have also been prepared with improving targets and indicators. The details of E&SED’s OBBs are also printed in the abovementioned two documents; the 2012-13 OBB in Budget Estimates For Service Delivery, 2012-15 on pages 11-27 and the 2013-14 OBB in Budget Estimates For Service Delivery, 2013-16 on pages 12-29. District OBBs: According to the GovKP 13 , the OBB was piloted during the year 2011-12 in two Districts, D.I Khan and Buner, with conditional grants to improve service delivery in the E&SED and Health Department. Reportedly, the results were encouraging, and the conditional grant program model was replicated in four more districts during FY 2012-13, i.e. Lakki Marwat, Karrak, Haripur and Nowshera for which the GovKP allocated a sum of Rs. 1 billion for PTCs. These conditional grants have entailed extensive discussions with stakeholders to improve service delivery which led to the development of detailed district business plans with a set of indicators and targets. Some important SOPs for the execution of conditional grants are development of a business plan with performance measurement, reporting and M&E mechanisms, audits and third party validations. A sample of work undertaken under the conditional grants in District Buner is given in Annex OA 7. District level capacities are extremely weak. A visit to district Buner indicated that the OBB/MTBF concepts are yet not well understood by district officials, who are unable to relate outcomes/outputs with activities/inputs and costing them into budget line items of MTBF. The DFID consultants reviewed the progress on District OBB/MTBF and documented several weaknesses/risks. 14 The capacity building of districts officials in six Districts of Malakand Division, Swat, Malakand, Shangla, Chitral, Dir Upper and Dir Lower, is being supported by TA consultants under another EU funded allowing for shocks and corrective measures and refining the objectives and targets if necessary. See EU Budget Support Guidelines, Part I pp 4. 13 See Finance Department, 2013-14 White Paper, pp. 49-50. 14 ASI, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan: Towards a Medium-Term Program for Reform of Public Financial Management Systems with Elementary and Secondary Education Sector – A review of Conditional Grants Pilot and Output Based Budgeting and Other Systems, 31 October 2012 (see Annexure OA 14).
  28. 28. 28 project. 15 During 2012-13, these consultants developed: documentation of local government decision processes; district business plans/strategies; OBB/MTBF training modules; training of district government staff; supporting the provincial Departments to buy in their support of district government reforms. They prepared materials for the 2013-14 budget documents for the FD and facilitated four pre-budget consultative workshops. With the amendment in local government law, the district level administrative setup has become a part of the provincial government with effect from July 1, 2013. This administrative change will significantly affect the plan for application of OBB/MTBF at district level. SECTION C. ACCESS, FACILITIES, QUALITY AND LEARNING OUTCOMES Background Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is one of the least developed areas of Pakistan in terms of social indicators with 50% of the adult population illiterate, 67% of women and 32% of men. These low literacy rates are largely due to limited access and poor quality of education. The net enrolment rate at primary level is 51%, 57% for boys and 45% for girls. The year-to-year overall transition rate is 77%, 74% for girls, 79% for boys, with a drop-out rate of 45%, 53% for girls, 39% for boys, up to 5th grade, meaning that nearly half the students who start school never finish the 5th grade. 16 In Pakistan, the delivery of education services is devolved to the provinces. After the 18 th Constitutional Amendment, the responsibility for curriculum, syllabus, planning, policy, centers of excellence, and standards of education have been transferred to the provincial education departments. Only the planning and policy and standards of education beyond Grade 12 are covered under Federal Legislative List. However, the capacity of existing institutions is very weak to deliver on these tasks with acceptable quality. The government of KP is determined to uplift the status of education in the province. The government policy focuses on improving access to primary schools and reduce gender gap, Improving quality of education, providing adequate and suitable infrastructure, providing alternative or non-formal education, encouraging public-private partnership and community involvement; and enhancing budgetary allocation for education. To achieve these goals, the government has prepared an education sector plan which is being implemented. The plan tries to address the following major issues. Issues and state of play Budgetary Management: A major difficulty in achieving universal primary education in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has been due to mismatch of distribution of resources and budgetary management. The GovKP has been increasing the budget allocations for ESE sector but still has not been able to ensure 15 EU’s Technical Cooperation Assistance on Public Financial Management to Selected Districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, DCI-ASIE/2012/ 295-933, For Pakistan. 16 Pakistan Social & Living Standard Measurement Survey 2010-11, as reported in the TOR.
  29. 29. 29 100% schooling of all school-age children and address gender inequalities. A bulk of the expenditure is on salaries and the share of quality expenditure on non-salary and development budget is very low. Nonetheless, the situation is improving, albeit only slowly, because of the increased financial allocations, protection of non-salary expenditures, communities’ involvement and capacity development in the E&SE sector. Facilities in government schools: The government has embarked on an accelerated program for constructing new schools, additional class rooms, renovation of the existing old buildings and providing missing facilities. The government has also allocated more funds for PTCs for providing the missing facilities in a phased manner at the community level like boundary wall, drinking water, electricity and latrines. More suitable school environment would improve the access and quality of education. Strengthening of PTCs: As a matter of policy, the government is involving communities to further the educational process. The PTCs are being strengthened to play a more effective role in different ways. Their financial powers have been enhanced and their scope of work has been widened. The training programmes of PTC executives all over the province have started. The Government has also piloted a program of conditional grants for construction of classrooms through PTCs in two districts viz. Buner and Dera Ismail Khan. Initial reports about this program are very favourable. However, a fuller mobilization of communities is required with regard to the female education. Curriculum implementation and textbook development: A curriculum implementation committee has been formed to review the implementation process of the 2006 curriculum currently in place. A text book review committee has also been formed to review the books before students start using them. The Directorate of Curriculum and Teacher Education has been mandated under the 18 th Amendment of the Constitution to play a key role in all matters pertaining to curriculum and text books. The Text Book Board has adopted the policy of multiple text books (i.e. the TBB will ask through tender from the interested parties to write and publish text books according to the curriculum and then more than one books will be selected and approved for use by the students. The schools will be free to select any one of the approved books for their students) and publishers have been shortlisted. Availability of Teachers: The notified policy of the department about teacher availability is that the student-teacher ratio will be 40:1. The department is in the process of recruiting 4000 teachers to come up to the policy requirements. Furthermore, the E&SED is in the process of ‘rationalization’ of teachers in the province with regard to students-teacher ratio. The Director E&SE has asked all DEOs to carryout rationalization of teachers in their respective districts. However, it is a long process and many external forces may resist the move. Moreover, the role of PTC has also been revised, and now they can hire temporarily teachers out of PTC funds on a needs basis. Teacher Development: The government of KPK has taken important decisions in the pre-service trainings as well as in-service trainings. The department has adopted Associate Degree in Education and B.Ed (Hon) Elementary to provide graduate teachers to fulfil the requirements of National Education Policy 2009. A Teacher Development Strategy has been developed.
  30. 30. 30 Education Management Information System (EMIS): EMIS is one of the main tools for planning in the province. The EMIS provides information on schools, students and teachers in the public and private schools. But it does not show any information about financial matters. Moreover, it does not provide information about teacher’s trainings. The EMIS collects data on 31 st October every year, and compiles a report on/around 31 st March. Printing is not regularly budgeted and hence is dependent on donor support. Monitoring Function: The E&SED is strengthening its monitoring function for which an Internal Monitoring and Data Collection Unit is being set up as a development project. Presently, the Unit is headed by an acting project director, its hard/software is being procured, monitoring indicators have been developed, and recruitment of staff is in process. It is expected that the staff recruitment process will be completed by August 2013 and the unit will be functional by September 2013. E&SED Capacity is very weak. There are serious issues of ‘capacity’ in the E&SED. For instance, any new initiation for development in the Department, a concept paper, proposal or Memorandum of Understanding, should come from the Department and not from the donors. But Department staff does not have the required capacity to draft these documents. Technical Assistance should have capacity development as one of its main objectives. Besides, the issue may get resolved through providing more staff and equipping them with appropriate office equipment. Thus a program of restructuring, training and strengthening in all branches of the E&SED is required. Progress on Access & Facilities DLIs Overall Assessment The overall implementation progress on the four DLIs, 5 to 8 under Access & Facilities, is 1.708/4. DLI 5: Girls Stipend Target 1 for FY 2012-13: 100% girls who meet attendance criterion receive stipends in time according to the on-going programme. Target met. The process is that a PC-1 is prepared on the basis of EMIS data (for girls’ enrolment) and submitted to the P&DD. On its approval by the competent forum, the amount is allocated by the FD to each district. The DEO office submits the claim along with copies of approved PC-1, FD sanctions and the list of students is sent to the AG KP and the District Accounts offices. On acceptance of the claim, a cheque is issued to the concerned DEO who in turn deposits the cheque in her designated account. As per students’ enrolment, she issues a cheque in the name of Post Master General along with the filled-in money orders (MO) forms and list of students. The Pakistan Post issues the MOs, students receive it, and a separate record is kept in the shape of a register duly signed by the concerned teacher and countersigned by the Head Mistress. Later on, the concerned DEO reconciles these scholarship disbursements with the Pakistan Post. The consultants visited four schools in two districts, Buner and Peshawar; the findings were that this procedure was followed and all the enrolled girls received the stipends. The attendance criterion is generally followed. The parents and the children are appreciative of the stipend program. The head mistresses attribute the increase in enrolment to this facility which in some
  31. 31. 31 cases was about 30%. Target 2 for FY 2012-13: Branchless banking pilot initiated for stipends delivery in 4 districts. Target not met. The Government has agreed with the donors to initiate the disbursement of stipends through branchless banking. It has been decided to pilot the scheme in four districts viz. Peshawar, Upper Dir, Nowshera and Haripur, for which a study is being carried out to work out the details. Target 3 for FY 2012-13: Analytical work to re-design the programme through improved targeting, benefit structure and attendance verification completed Target not met. The DFID TA team of consultants is carrying out a study to re-design the programme for improved targeting, benefit structure and attendance verification. The report is yet to come. DLI 6: Community Level Management Target for FY 2012-13: Without overlap with OBB Districts & in line with recommendations of TPV on PTCs in KP, PTCs policy, financial & procurement rules improved & notified with a continuous capacity development programme (CCDP) developed. 17 Target met. There is a comprehensive policy on training of PTC executives, their capacity development, PTCs’ role and functions, school improvement program, planning, budgeting and procurement, PTC meeting, decisions and records, communication with stakeholders, etc. The PTC’s Continuous Capacity Development Plan, February 2013 – April 2014 is presented in Annexure OA - 8. In the two schools in Buner that we visited, the PTC executives confirmed that they did go through a one-day training. In one of these schools, a PTC executive had displayed some of the training material also. PTCs are supposed to have their bank accounts and government funds are directly transferred to these accounts. A PTC Guide was issued in March/April 2013 by the GovKP for the use of the members which gives the PTC policy, rules and related financial and procurement procedures. The revised PTC Guide is given Annexure OA–9. The third party validation (TPV) of PTCs conducted in 2011 is supportive overall despite some reservations. Some of the recommendations of the TPV have been implemented. A Continuous Capacity Development Plan for PTC has been developed. The training of Education Managers has started. The implementation of some other recommendations, like presence of students and teachers ought to be ensured so far PTCs have failed to control both these serious shortcomings of the system. To keep regular track of admissions and drop outs must be kept. The rest of the required actions mentioned in the TPV are being planned. The TPV done in 2011 is given in Annexure OA 10. 17 Copy of TPV annexed as Annexure ‘H’
  32. 32. 32 DLI 7: Low Cost Private School Sector Target 1 for FY 2012-13: Establish a comprehensive strategy for public private partnership (PPP) in education facilitating the low cost private sector with setting out clear standards for quality Target partially met, and GovKP is working in the right direction. A study of the low cost private school sector in KP was started in March 2013 which will decide the definition of ‘low cost private institution’ and other matters. The ToR of the study on Low Cost Private Schools is given in Annexure OA 11. The final report of the study was not available at the time of writing. Target 2 for FY 2012-13: Analyse (using EMIS data & through EEF) location & viability of low cost private sector primary & secondary schools & draw partnership propos Target not met. No analysis of location and viability of low cost private sector schools, both primary and secondary, for public-private partnerships has been carried out. It will be carried out in the light of the study on Low Cost Private Schools cited above. DLI 8: Elementary Education Foundation (EEF) Target 1 for FY 2012-13: Return to learn second chance education for children & training opportunities for women designed by EEF in conjunction with all stakeholders & clear proposals agreed with DFID. Target not met. A scheme for return to learn second chance education for children and training opportunities for women was designed by EEF in conjunction with all stakeholders and clear proposals agreed with DFID. A case for a scheme for literacy and skills on the pattern of ‘Literacy for All’ was prepared for setting up 2000 centers and submitted to the E&SED (vide EEF MD office No. 345 dated 26/3/2012). Since then, there has been no further action or follow up. Target 2 for FY 2012-13: Second chance return to learn opportunities provided to primary & secondary aged out of school children according to the agreed proposal & as validated by TPV Target not met. The issue of learning opportunities for the out-of-school children at the primary & secondary school ages will be covered under the above mentioned scheme for establishment of centers of literacy and skills. Target 3 for FY 2012-13: Literacy & skills trainings provided to illiterate women according to the agreed proposal & as validated by TPV. Target not met. The literacy and skill trainings for the illiterate women will be covered under the above mentioned scheme for establishment of centers of literacy and skills. Progress on Quality & Learning Outcomes DLIs
  33. 33. 33 Overall Assessment The overall implementation progress on the four DLIs, 9 to 12 under Quality & Learning Outcomes, is 1.533/4. DLI 9: Curriculum and Implementation Target 1 for FY 2012-13: Establish a joint steering committee comprising of BISE, PEAS, KPTBB & DCTE to execute the curriculum implementation framework. Target met. A joint steering committee has been set up, comprising BISE, PEAS, KPTBB & DCTE, with a mandate to execute the curriculum implementation framework (CIF). A notification for the constitution of Steering Committee for CIF and its TOR is presented in Annexure OA 12. The committee has held one meeting and the second could not be held due to the change in Government. Target 2 for FY 2012-13: Adapting the Punjab lesson plans to contextual realities of KP, utilize lesson plans for teaching all subjects at primary level in at least 10 Districts Target met. Primary level lesson plans are aligned with the new curriculum. The lesson plans are being printed and will be implemented in all 25 districts. DFID staff have carried out the 1 st phase of training of lead trainers. The 2 nd phase of training to prepare master trainers has not started as yet. The training manuals are ready but the funds for training have not been released by the FD. The DCTE has been assigned to conduct trainings in 12 districts (about 1850 teachers); training in the remaining 12 districts will be carried out by PITE. DLI 10: Students Learning Outcomes Target 1 for FY 2012-13: Develop a home grown strategy for systematically measuring & improving students learning outcomes in KP. Target not met. The ASI team informed the consultants that this DLI target is to be revised. Target for FY 2012-13: Development of effective reading instruction strategies as part of GPE Reading Action Plan Target not met. As informed by the ASI team, this DLI target is to be revised. DLI 11: Improving School Performance Target for FY 2012-13: School report cards developed & tested in at least 25% of primary & secondary schools in 5 Districts Target partially met. The scheme of school report cards has been piloted in 2 out of 3 sub-divisions of District Swab, Lahore and Swabi, while the third sub-division Topi has not been included. According to a
  34. 34. 34 DEO (F) in Swabi, about 25% of schools have been included in the scheme. The related training of PTCs along with the Head Teachers has been conducted in these schools. The work on the scheme is in progress. DLI 12: Improving Teachers Management Target 1 for FY 2012-13: Minimum classroom level performance standards for teachers established Target not met. The DFID TA Team has drafted and shared the concept note of Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs) with E&SED. The E&SED is in the process of forming a working group who will be involved in reviewing and adapting the National Professional Standards for teachers in KP context. Members of this working group will be taken from DCTE, PITE and DE&SE. The TA team expects that these PSTs will be established by the end of August, 2013. Target 2 for FY 2012-13: Establish a teachers’ professional development framework Target not met. The DFID TA team drafted the concept note for a Continuous Professional Development Framework and shared it with the E&SED during the year. Some meetings with DCTE, PITE and DE&SE were also scheduled in May and June 2013 in Abbottabad to discuss the concept of CPD Framework and to identify capacity needs of institutions. However, the DCTE officials informed this consultant team that these meeting were not held. An exposure trip to DSD Lahore was also planned for the E&SED officials to see the Punjab model of CPD as well as some field visits to districts. This exposure trip has however not materialized. The CPD framework is expected to be developed by end Aug 2013. Target 3 for FY 2012-13: Strategy developed for rationalizing teaching posts at school level based on school needs including enrolment Target met. The notified policy of the department about teachers’ availability is that the students-teacher ratio will be 40:1, and the E&SED is in the process of ‘rationalization’ of teachers in the province with regard to students-teacher ratio. The Director E&SE informed the consultants that he has directed all DEOs to carryout rationalization of teachers based on the prescribed standards of students-teacher ratios in their respective districts. Furthermore, the role of PTC has been changed, and now they can hire temporary teachers out of PTC funds on need basis. The Director E&SE has informed that instructions have issued to all districts to carryout rationalization based on the prescribed standards of students- teacher ratios in all schools.
  35. 35. 35 REFERENCES 1. Government of Pakistan, Finance Division, Advisor Wing, Pakistan Economic Survey, 2012-13. 2. Government of Pakistan, Pakistan Bureu of Statistics, Pakistan Social & Living Standard Measurement (PSLM) Survey 2011-12 Reports 3. GovKP, E&SED, Education Sector Plan 4. GovKP, E&SED, Teacher Education Strategy 5. GovKP, E&SED, EMIS Reports 6. GovKP, Finance Departments, 2013-14 White Paper 7. GovKP, Finance Departments, Budget Estimates for Service Delivery, 2012-13 8. GovKP, Finance Departments, Budget Estimates for Service Delivery (Green Book), 2013-14 9. GovKP, Finance Departments, Annual Budget Statement, 2013-14 10. GovKP, Finance Departments, Budget Strategy Paper, 2013-14 11. GovKP, Finance Departments, Demand for Grants Current Expenditure, 2013-14, Vol-III (Part-A) 12. GovKP, Planning and Development Departments, Comprehensive Development Strategy 2010- 2017 13. UNESCO Website 14. UNICEF, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2008. 15. European Union, Budget Support Guidelines, September 2012 16. European Union, Technical Cooperation Assistance on Public Financial Management to Selected Districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, DCI-ASIE/2012/ 295-933, For Pakistan, 14th-Bi-weekly-Report- 16-31-May-2013 on: http://eupfmta.org.pk/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/14th-Bi-weekly-Report- 16-31-May-2013.pdf
  36. 36. 36 CONSULTATIONS In GovKP, Elementary and Secondary Education Department, Peshawar 1. Joudat Ayaz, Secretary 2. Akhundzada Riaz Behar, Additional Secretary/Director ESRU 3. Jamaluddin, Chief Planning Officer 4. Hina Saeed, Monitoring Officer 5. Fauzia, Monitoring Officer 6. Noor Alam Khan, Section Officer Budget 7. Section Officer Audit In GovKP, Elementary and Secondary Education Department, Abbotabad 8. Bashir Hussain Shah, Director DCTE 9. Zulfiqar Khan, Deputy Director DCTE 10. Farid Khan, Deputy Director DCTE 11. Miss Tahira Jabeen, Asst Director Training, DCTE In GovKP, Finance Department 12. Nadeem Bashir, Additional Secretary Development At GovKP, Planning and Development Department 13. Ali Raza Khattak, Chief Foreign Aid/Director Bureau of Statistics 14. M. Nadeem, Assistant Chief Education Section Elementary Education Foundation, Peshawar 15. Ahmed Khan, Managing Director 16. Director E&SE KP In District Buner 17. Fida Muhammad Khan, DEO 18. DDEO 19. ADEO 20. Headmistress of Girls Middle School, her staff 21. PTC Chaiperson of Girls Middle School 22. Head Teacher of Boys Primary School 23. PTC Chaiperson of Boys Primary School In District Peshawar 24. DEO (F) 25. Headmistress Gilrs Middle School Peshawar Cantt 26. PTC Chairperosn and membbers, Gilrs Middle School Peshawar Cantt 27. Headmistress Gilrs High School Khyber Colony 28. PTC Chairperosn and membbers, Gilrs High School Khyber Colony In District Sawabi 29. DEO (F) Sawabi 30. SDEO (M) Topi
  37. 37. 37 Accountant General Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Peshawar 31. Farhad Khan, Accountant General 32. Onab Gul, Deputy Accountant General Auditor General Office, Peshawar 33. Dr. Fawad Khan, Director General 34. Lal Muhammad, Director At Adam Smith International, Islamabad 35. Arshad Nafees, Coordinator 36. Rehana Sheikh, Advisor 37. Izza Farrakh, Advisor 38. Shabana Bhatti, Advisor 39. Ali Salman, Advisor PFM At Adam Smith International, Peshawar 40. Khalid, Deputy Team Leader ASI Peshawar 41. Salman Ishfaq, PFM Expert 42. Sohail Reza, Monitoring Expert 43. Saleem Khan, Roadmap Expert Oxford Policy Management (OPM) Peshawar 44. Jehanzeb Pervez, PFM Expert and Team Leader At European Union Delegation Islamabad 45. Ms. Wendy Fisher, Development Advisor (Education and HRD) 46. Muhammad Siddique Bhatti, Development Advisor (Education)

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