Shenggen Fan’s Official Notes for his Meeting with Federal Republic of Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany on May 8, 2012
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Shenggen Fan’s Official Notes for his Meeting with Federal Republic of Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany on May 8, 2012

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Shenggen Fan’s Official Notes for his Meeting with Federal Republic of Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany on May 8, 2012 Shenggen Fan’s Official Notes for his Meeting with Federal Republic of Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany on May 8, 2012 Document Transcript

  • Sustaining the Momentum to Enhance Global Food and Nutrition Security Shenggen Fan Director General, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Dialogue with Chancellor Merkel at the Federal Chancellery, Berlin, May 8, 2012 Severe food and nutrition insecurity continues to persist and the current economic crisis is further worsening the situation. According to IFPRI’s 2011 Global Hunger Index, more than 50 countries are experiencing “extremely alarming,” “alarming,” or “serious” levels of hunger, with Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia continuing to be major hot spots. Ensuring food and nutrition security will become even more difficult due to the growing complexity of global challenges, such as population growth, increasing consumer demand from middle-income families in developing countries, high and volatile food prices, energy scarcity, and climate change. Against this worrisome background, development aid from donors dropped for the first time in 15 years, falling by 3 percent from 2010 to 2011. G8 commitments on global food security need to be fulfilled, particularly during times of economic crisis. The financial commitments made to global agriculture and food security at the L’Aquila Summit must translate into action. As of May 2011, it was estimated that only 22 percent of these commitments had been disbursed. While developing-country governments have also taken important steps to boost food security-related investments, support from G8 countries remains critical. G20 countries should work together to increase innovative partnerships to address food security issues. In particular, the G20 must take additional steps to rein in food price volatility. Priority actions should include reducing the competition between food and fuel, promoting free and open trade to calm food markets, and supporting regional food reserves to address food emergencies. Regarding sustainable development in a green economy, it is important not to neglect providing the poor with improved access to food, jobs, and natural resources; gender equality; and better social protection systems. Scaled-up investments in science and technology and support for improved country capacities are fundamental to accelerating progress and achieving development objectives. Technological innovations such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, and biofortification, are crucial to increasing agricultural productivity, building resilience to weather-related shocks, enhancing the nutritional value of food crops, and ensuring food safety. To achieve a sustainable bioeconomy, investments in second-generation biofuel technologies will be essential. Increased investments to strengthen national capacities for agricultural research and policy are also a must. The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) has maintained a leading role in the global agricultural research system and is well-positioned as a strategic partner. As a premium global food policy research institute, IFPRI is well-positioned to provide support to country-led strategies for strengthening food policy capacities.2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006–1002, USA | Tel: +1.202.862-5600 | Fax: +1.202.467.4439 | Email: IFPRI@cgiar.org | Skype ID: ifprihomeoffice | www.ifpri.org