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WiG 2007 Alice Taylor Keynote
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WiG 2007 Alice Taylor Keynote

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Published

Alice Taylor …

Alice Taylor
VP Digital Content
Games and Public Service Media: how game spaces can be used for public diplomacy,
democracy,
entertainment,
education and experimentation
BBC Worldwide

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Transcript

  • 1.
    • You are in a room full of people looking at you. It is dimly lit. There is a computer in front of you.
    • >
  • 2.  
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8. Games and Public Service media
    • How game spaces can be used for public diplomacy, democracy, entertainment, education and experimentation.
  • 9. Or ..
    • Why games? Seriously, games ?
    • “This is public service money we’re talking about…”
  • 10. I work for the BBC
    • .. and it works for me.
    • I am a licence-fee payer. So is 98% of the UK. A “television” license fee gets me (us):
  • 11. 8 channels of national TV
    • 56 channels of radio , both national and local
    • 19 th most popular English-speaking website in the world
    • over 55% of the UK online population visiting
    • remit to “ inform, educate and entertain ”: reaching everyone with quality programming
    • (& the BBC Micro, once upon a time…)
  • 12. But something’s up ...
    • 50% of all TV-watching is no-one watching at all.
    • In US households that play MMOs...
  • 13. I don’t watch broadcast TV.
    • I don’t listen to the live radio.
    • I game, raid, party, quest, blog, PVR, download, play, read, post, comment, text, IM, tweet, skype, shuffle…
  • 14. Technologically..
    • I’m 25 . Hurray!
    • I don’t post nude pics, use Bebo, trashtalk, or wr8 lik ths lol, that would be the 15 year olds.
  • 15. “Seriously”
    • I don’t get much for my license fee.
    • The country does, and some generations do absolutely, but times they are a-changing.
  • 16. Audiences are changing
    • “ABC1” is hopeless.
    • Lots of fashionable ‘tribes’-based audience groupings..
    • .. but danah boyd ’s Life Stages is sensible and solid.
  • 17. danah’s 4 audiences
    • identity formation and role-seeking: youth, college, teens
    • integration and coupling : 20s
    • societal contribution: professional life , marriage
    • reflection and storytelling: retirement
  • 18.  
  • 19. Content is changing
    • networked consoles
    • the playful web
    • virtual worlds
    • location-aware
    • cross-media
  • 20.  
  • 21.  
  • 22. The Playful Web is
    • sites and services that use experiential mechanics :
    • learning
    • socialising
    • achieving
    • .. and repurposed game functionality to make a useful service more compelling.
  • 23.  
  • 24. … but
    • that’s a whole other presentation.
  • 25. Time defines us.
    • understanding motivation is better than understanding income or age
    • understanding life-stage (a variable) leads to understanding use of time (a constant)
  • 26. In 2005
    • the BBC did some games research in the UK
    • couldn’t find UK-specific figures
    • maps almost identically to the US
    • (uh oh?)
  • 27.  
  • 28. Takeaway:
    • “ Do you play videogames? ”
    • no extreme m/f divide*
    • no extreme income divide**
    • definitely different content preferences , by both age and gender.
  • 29. In the UK:
  • 30. What value games?
    • Only one source to my knowledge but …
    • Some younger audiences value gaming over radio and even TV
    • Other audiences value gaming more highly than we would have anticipated
  • 31. 6-10 year olds: Every day A few times a week #1 Importance Rank Playing Video Games 61 95 1 Reading Books 48 88 2 Watching TV 97 99 3 Films – DVD, Video 20 60 4 Speaking to friends on phone 13 31 5 Reading Comics/Magazines 16 45 6 Listening to Music 36 71 7 Films – Cinema 6 6 8 Internet web sites 17 65 9 Mobile – texting, games 9 27 10 Listening to Radio 26 47 11* Reading/Writing Emails 8 26 11*
  • 32. 11-15 year olds: Every day 1+ a week Average session #1 Importance Rank Playing Video Games 56 98 2.22 1 Watching TV 90 100 2.44 2 Reading Books 28 63 1.13 3 Internet – Non email 45 97 1.78 4 Music – CDS, mp3s 53 91 1.65 5 Speaking to friends on phone 34 80 0.85 6 Mobile – Non phone calls 40 74 0.89 7 Films – DVD, Video 4 56 2.21 8 Reading/Writing Emails 22 60 0.77 9 Listening to Radio 27 72 1.20 10 Reading Newspapers 10 37 0.58 11* Reading Magazines 7 50 0.82 11* Films – Cinema - 5 NA 11*
  • 33. 25-35 year olds: Every day 1+ a week Average session #1 Importance Rank Watching TV 84 97 3.07 1 Internet – Non email 87 99 2.82 2 Reading Books 25 57 1.54 3 Speaking to friends on phone 42 91 0.88 4 Playing Video Games 32 80 2.59 5 Reading/Writing Emails 75 96 1.12 6 Reading Newspapers 27 75 0.74 7 Music – CDS, mp3s 36 86 1.80 8 Films – DVD, Video 3 50 2.36 9 Mobile – Non phone calls 47 81 0.71 10 Listening to Radio 52 88 2.16 11 Films – Cinema - 5 NA 12 Reading Magazines 9 50 0.88 13
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36.  
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39. So if young people value games so much
    • .. and older audiences’ appreciation of games grows ever day,
    • are they getting everything they need ?
  • 40. OfCom Aug 2006 :
    • Communications Market Report 2005
    • “Radical Shift in Media Consumption”
  • 41. OfCom has proposed the PSP
    • the Public Service Publisher
    • designed specifically to deliver digital, interactive content : new media, web publishing and games publishing.
    • annual budget: #300m
  • 42. Public service games
    • Public service funds should be spent on content for the format and platform most relevant to the person at the other end of the license fee.
  • 43. PSGs
    • should be free to play
    • should be highest quality possible (within budgetary contraints)
    • should always strive to innovate
    • should support indies and industry
  • 44. “A World Without Oil”
    • Jane McGonigal ARG
    • commissioned by SF public broadcaster ITVS
    • funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting
  • 45. BBC’s Reithian Principles
    • education
    • information
    • entertainment
    • … so, fairly briefly:
  • 46. Education & games
    • data is everywhere
    • topical
    • keystage/curriculum
    1
  • 47. Interactive Education
    • Raph says, “fun is learning”.
    • if you’re not learning, you’re bored .
    • pattern-matching, interactive challenges, even physical play: early days but what a future for interactive education!
  • 48. Games teach.
    • Montessori is based on experiential learning
    • humans are not so good with abstracts
    • trebuchets
  • 49. ?
  • 50. Greatest myth of all:
    • “games are a waste of time”
    • playing IS learning
    • games often create public value
    • games can evoke different emotions than television or film can:
  • 51.  
  • 52. Will Wright
    • “Games often appeal to the reptilian brain – fear, action – but they have a different emotional palette. There are things you feel in games - like pride, accomplishment, guilt even! – that you’ll never feel in a movie. I felt so bad about beating my creature to death in Black & White .”
  • 53. In the future
    • we will have trouble defining “games”
    • with games comes responsibility
    • more games for learning
  • 54. Information & games
    • data is everywhere
    • democracy
    • public diplomacy
    • current affairs
    2
  • 55. Democracy
    • rich area for development
    • almost untouched subject?
    • disaffected youth?
    • if it can be done for civic planning …
  • 56.  
  • 57. Current Affairs
    • newsgaming.com
    • Darfur is Dying
    • Food Force
    • BBC Current Affairs developing a game
    • Newsnight in Second Life
  • 58. Wikipedia on public diplomacy
    • “ Film, television, music, sports, video games and other social/cultural activities are seen by public diplomacy advocates as enormously important avenues for otherwise diverse citizens to understand each other and integral to the international cultural understanding, which they state is a key goal of modern public diplomacy strategy .”
  • 59. USC’s PD challenge
    • Reinventing Public Diplomacy Through Games Competition :
    • “ PeaceMaker is a cross-cultural political video game simulation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict which can be used to promote a peaceful resolution among Israelis, Palestinians and young adults worldwide.”
  • 60. Time Magazine:
    • “ Activist video games--which use whiz-bang formats to address real-world issues--are scoring high with both kids and teachers. Given the success of the U.N.'s aid-relief game Food Force (with more than 4 million downloads in 15 months) and the MTV-affiliated Darfur Is Dying (more than 800,000 players since April), techno do-gooders are proliferating, and gamers are saving the world .”
  • 61.  
  • 62. Another whole presentation unto itself, this! Moving on…
  • 63. Machinima
    • is a creative outlet for young players.
    • often used to treat serious subjects
    • cultural language: relevant to the intended audience
  • 64.  
  • 65. In the future
    • more serious subjects achieving success
    • more ways to interact with news, or receive news
    • more challenges !
  • 66. Entertainment
    • most games are entertaining
    • surfeit of shooting, fighting, killing
    • big gaps in genres and players
    • can public service help fill those gaps, like it does with television and radio?
    3
  • 67. DTI data 2002
    • 99% of games consumed in Japan = made in Japan.
    • 65+% of games consumed in the US = made in the US.
    • 35% of games consumed in the UK = made in the UK
    • Whose digital culture are the kids growing up on?
  • 68. Time spent ..
    • avg minutes per day on MySpace: 21
    • avg minutes per day in WoW: 197
    • 2005 : TV remains the most important media* for 16-24 year olds. Gaming is in 2 nd place.
  • 69.  
  • 70. Synovate’s research
    • 25% of 18-24s in Europe use social networking sites like MySpace (up to 50%+ for under-18)
    • 19% play MMOs
    • 15% are blogging
  • 71.  
  • 72.  
  • 73.  
  • 74. On the Disney homepage:
    • 40% of traffic navigates via the Character Wheel
    • .. and 40% goes straight to the games button.
    • Since the redesign:
  • 75.  
  • 76.  
  • 77. So what about…
    • comedy?
    • romance?
    • character drama?
    • couture?
    • nature?
    • sex?
  • 78. Experimenting?
    • not using death as a failure mode?
    • games with end-dates?
    • personality-based games?
    • psychological games?
    • more zombies?
  • 79.  
  • 80. In the future
    • more genres ?
    • more choice in the non-violent market
    • more experimentation
    • PS games could help provide alternative to sequelitis
  • 81. Now then.
  • 82. Marketing is odd.
    • there’s been lots of black/green, lots of tits and for girls, lots of pink.
    • 25 years of brainwashing
    • no overnight remedy
  • 83.  
  • 84. Targeted advertising is useful
    • After The Sims out-performed all EA’s other titles by a crazy factor, for eight years, they began to advertise in Bliss and Sugar magazines.
  • 85. May 200 4 : e3
    • “ Could you get a new audience via, say, an Xbox? Can we attract women to games rather than have them vacuuming around it?”
  • 86. May 200 4 : e3
    • Gerhard: “Given the offering we currently have, it is very difficult to appeal to women. Games are not made for them, we ignore this side of the industry, the studios are dominated by men. Our one exception is The Sims, between 4-6 Sims games are in the top ten because there is no competition … the head of the studios is a lady, and the company there has more female programmers than anywhere else.”
  • 87. E3 continued:
    • “ Was it The Sims that got women in, or was it the marketing?”
    • Gerhard: “It was The Sims. It wasn’t the marketing. We weren’t that smart.”
  • 88. hello!
  • 89. hello! shiny!
  • 90. Getting there…
  • 91. The BBC
    • in case you’re curious …
  • 92.  
  • 93. TV/radio support
    • MMO for Tronji
    • ARG for upcoming radio project
    • Robin Hood
    • CDX
    • plus assorted independent ideas..
  • 94.  
  • 95.  
  • 96.  
  • 97.  
  • 98.  
  • 99. pmog
    • passively multiplayer online gaming
    • it’s an experiment
    • web literacy?
    • service?
  • 100. (No, no designer yet)
  • 101. More too coming from
    • channel 4
    • universities
    • charities
    • sponsors, bodies, trusts, etc.
  • 102. To summarise
    • PSGs have a place in the games ecology
    • there aren’t nearly enough of them
    • they could help fill major gaps in content and audiences
    • they can innovate on behalf of industry
  • 103. A last word on women in games
  • 104.  
  • 105.  
  • 106. That’s it!
    • questions ?
    • [email_address] or
    • [email_address]