Brian Campbell andBrian Campbell and
Lori FultonLori Fulton
• JournalJournal
• LogLog
• NotebookNotebook
1.1. To build science content and process skills.To build science content and process skills.
1.1. To increase student par...
Composition booksComposition books
Spiral notebooksSpiral notebooks
Three ring bindersThree ring binders
Three-prong p...
 What will students regularly write about in theirWhat will students regularly write about in their
notebook?notebook?
 ...
 Introduction: Record your prior knowledge/KWL/OWL
 Focus Question: Write the focus question being investigated
 Predic...
 Observations: Draw and label what happens
 Question/Analysis: Write what you are thinking
 Conclusion: Write what you ...
Accurate
Big
Colorful
Details
DIAGRAMSDIAGRAMS
LabelsLabels No LabelsNo Labels
FOOD WEBSFOOD WEBSENERGY PYRAMIDSENERGY PYRAMIDS
Grade 5
Real scientists use science notebooksReal scientists use science notebooks
all the time. For this reason, usingall the tim...
Theory ofTheory of
RelativityRelativity
Drawings of the
moons of Jupiter
PhotographPhotograph
Water Color byWater Color by
GalileoGalileo
1903 Flyer1903 Flyer
Vitruvian ManVitruvian Man
ElementaryElementary
Illustrations ofIllustrations of
DarwinDarwin’s Ideas’s Ideas
Table of Contents
Number the pages
Glossary
Focus Question
Prediction
Glue in Liquid Properties
observation form
Observation (7-8 mins.)
Vocabulary
Word Wall
Glossary
Authentic
3-Dimensional
Accessible to students
Contributions from teachers
and students
Not static - fluid
 Students can assess themselves
◦ Does the work show what I learned?
 Formative Assessment
◦ Use of notebooks during cla...
“Notebooks are essential components
in learning science and need to be
developed over time.”
– Brian Campbell
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation
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Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation

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2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation: An important stage of inquiry and of student science learning is the oral and written discourse. Participants will explore how to utilize science notebooks with students in their classrooms.

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  • Research-based professional development on the process and practice of using Science Notebooks an “authentic learning tool,” compiled by Tomas Medcalf, K-5 Science Resource Teachers, Curriculum Development and School Improvement, with the Palm Beach County School District. medcalft@palmbeach.k12.fl.us
  • Much of our work shared today is based off of Brian Campbell and Lori Fulton’s book, Science Notebooks: Writing About Inquiry. If you’re looking for an easy to follow guide on incoporating Notebooks into your science instruction and investigations, this is an must-have resource to build that foundational understanding.
    Primary Resource: ISBN 978-0-325-00568-3, Heinemann Publishing, www.heinemann.com
    Jody
  • What are writing Tools? More and more teachers are using writing strategies in their science classrooms. Some examples of science writing tools are journals, logs, and notebooks.
    JOURNAL – A book where students write reflections about their learning. Normally used after an activity or investigation is done and materials are put away.
    LOG – A book where students record data over time. Normally used during the procedure of an investigation but not during class discussion.
    NOTEBOOK – A book where students record notes, technical drawings, observations, data, what they think and what they have learned as they do science. Used before, during, and after science investigations and is an authentic reflection of their knowledge and skills.
    Jody
  • A notebook is an “authentic learning tool” that helps a student meet predetermined goals and standards for instruction.
    What role can science notebooks play in assessment?
    As students write, their notebooks become a running record of their learning.
    Teachers can use student notebooks as “assessments for learning” checking participation and making changes in instruction if needed.
    Sometimes, teachers may also use notebook assignments as “assessments of learning” (for practice grades), but any grades awarded should not exceed the purpose of the notebook as a learning tool.
    Jody
  • Preferences on the type of notebook that students should use varies, however, one important consideration should be which type of notebook will allow the student to keep a running record of the work and thinking they do throughout the year and will represent their growth over time. For these reasons many teachers prefer composition books.
    Jody
  • There are many decisions to consider about when and how students should use their science notebooks.
    These four considerations should come first.
    Other considerations can be added over time improving the quality and importance of the notebook to the student.
    The objective is to make the student value their science notebook as an “authentic learning tool.”
    Jody
  • The two key elements in understanding how well students are using their science notebooks are OBSERVING and LISTENING.
    As your students work, walk around the room observing their methods of recording, use of process skills, use of science terms and notes on science content.
    One of the most important roles of the teacher is to support the students’ use of notebooks as a running record of their learning experiences.
    Some teachers keep a check list on which they record how well each student understands the unifying concepts and/or uses the scientific processes.
    Then they confer with students individually to review their progress and set new expectations.
    Jody
    Observe/Wonder/Learn
  • The two key elements in understanding how well students are using their science notebooks are OBSERVING and LISTENING. As your students work, walk around the room observing their methods of recording, use of process skills, use of science terms and notes on science content. One of the most important roles of the teacher is to support the students’ use of notebooks as a running record of their learning experiences. Some teachers keep a check list on which they record how well each student understands the unifying concepts and/or uses the scientific processes. Then they met with students individually to review their progress and set new expectations.
    Jody
  • The following slides show examples of work from actual student notebooks. Some slides have additional student samples uploaded by grade level that can be interchanged if appropriate for certain audiences.
    Jody
  • Students love to draw. Many naturally provide rich detail and accuracy.
    Jody
  • Jody
  • Diagrams are more technical drawings with labels, titles, and measurements.
    Jody
  • Technical drawings are powerful ways to record observations and share information with others; they include more attention to details than typical drawings. Technical drawings are “text elements that communicate meaning; they refine, clarify, and extend” student entries. (Moline 1995, 16) In order to draw something technically, the student must observe it closely, noting every small feature and fine line, apply labels, titles, and measurements.
    Jody
  • Vary class note taking opportunities using text reading strategies, class discussion, independently work assignments and research.
    Jody
  • Concept maps help all students visualize connections.
    Jody
  • Only the most important steps of an experiment need to be recorded in a students science notebook.
    The teachers should decide ahead of time what information is the most important to student learning.
    It is important to keep the use of the notebook authentic for the learner.
    Copying purpose and procedure steps is less important then predicting, recording data, doing calculations and graphing results.
    It is more authentic to have students reflect on their learning rather then a teachers/authors purpose for a lesson/activity.
    Keep student entries meaningful.
    Keep the science real.
    Jody
  • Graphic organizers are also technical drawings. Use them and your students will learn more.
    Jody
  • Vary class note taking opportunities using text reading strategies, class discussion, independently work assignments and research.
    Jody
  • Analysis and synthesis are higher-level thinking skills. Have students analyze or ‘take apart’, and synthesis or ‘put back together in a new way’ whenever possible. Nurturing these thinking skills will only improve test scores.
    Jody
  • Provide opportunities for your students to write what they understand. Vary writing assignments (poem, song, rap, speech, etc.) to keep assignments interesting and meaningful to the learner. Provide time for sharing with peers.
    Jody
  • Reflection is the perfect writing experience after select activities (demonstrations, read aloud, student reports, short videos or DVD’s) . Provide opportunities for students to write ‘what they got’ out of these direct types of instruction.
    Jody
  • Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Print focus question on labels
    Run a glossary page for the back
    Glue sticks
    Nancy
  • Write questions on chart paper and they use these to help with
    Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Formative Assessment – bring copy
    Nancy
  • Nancy
  • Inquiry + Writing = Powerful Science by Jody Sempek & Nancy Thornblad--2014 UNOmaha K-8 MET Link conference presentation

    1. 1. Brian Campbell andBrian Campbell and Lori FultonLori Fulton
    2. 2. • JournalJournal • LogLog • NotebookNotebook
    3. 3. 1.1. To build science content and process skills.To build science content and process skills. 1.1. To increase student participation andTo increase student participation and practice in science, math, writing andpractice in science, math, writing and communicating.communicating. 1.1. To assess student achievement formatively.To assess student achievement formatively.
    4. 4. Composition booksComposition books Spiral notebooksSpiral notebooks Three ring bindersThree ring binders Three-prong paper foldersThree-prong paper folders Folded stapled paperFolded stapled paper
    5. 5.  What will students regularly write about in theirWhat will students regularly write about in their notebook?notebook?  What should be included with every student entry?What should be included with every student entry?  What organizational tools and learning strategiesWhat organizational tools and learning strategies should students use?should students use?  What experiences will provide students withWhat experiences will provide students with meaningful experiences?meaningful experiences?
    6. 6.  Introduction: Record your prior knowledge/KWL/OWL  Focus Question: Write the focus question being investigated  Prediction: Write your prediction  Materials : Identify your science tools  Vocabulary: Display authentic visuals  Procedure: Do the activity and record your data Teacher Role : Student Participation
    7. 7.  Observations: Draw and label what happens  Question/Analysis: Write what you are thinking  Conclusion: Write what you learned  Communication: Share team results with class  Reflection: Expository writing/poem/song-rap Teacher Role : Student Participation
    8. 8. Accurate Big Colorful Details
    9. 9. DIAGRAMSDIAGRAMS
    10. 10. LabelsLabels No LabelsNo Labels
    11. 11. FOOD WEBSFOOD WEBSENERGY PYRAMIDSENERGY PYRAMIDS
    12. 12. Grade 5
    13. 13. Real scientists use science notebooksReal scientists use science notebooks all the time. For this reason, usingall the time. For this reason, using science notebooks to teach is a veryscience notebooks to teach is a very “authentic learning experience.”“authentic learning experience.” Here are some real examples ofHere are some real examples of some incredible science notebooksome incredible science notebook pages.pages.
    14. 14. Theory ofTheory of RelativityRelativity
    15. 15. Drawings of the moons of Jupiter
    16. 16. PhotographPhotograph Water Color byWater Color by GalileoGalileo
    17. 17. 1903 Flyer1903 Flyer
    18. 18. Vitruvian ManVitruvian Man
    19. 19. ElementaryElementary Illustrations ofIllustrations of DarwinDarwin’s Ideas’s Ideas
    20. 20. Table of Contents Number the pages Glossary
    21. 21. Focus Question Prediction Glue in Liquid Properties observation form Observation (7-8 mins.)
    22. 22. Vocabulary Word Wall Glossary
    23. 23. Authentic 3-Dimensional Accessible to students Contributions from teachers and students Not static - fluid
    24. 24.  Students can assess themselves ◦ Does the work show what I learned?  Formative Assessment ◦ Use of notebooks during class discussions ◦ Use of notebooks during investigations ◦ Evidence of recording to show thinking & understanding
    25. 25. “Notebooks are essential components in learning science and need to be developed over time.” – Brian Campbell

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