Strategies	
  to	
  avoid	
  Falls	
  and	
  Stay	
  Independent	
  
	
  
Falling	
  down	
  is	
  the	
  main	
  reason	
...
 
Fear	
  of	
  Falling	
  
Many	
  older	
  adults	
  are	
  afraid	
  of	
  falling.	
  This	
  fear	
  becomes	
  more	...
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Strategies to avoid falls and stay independent- a tool kit for seniors

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Statistics show that seniors want to remain in their homes where they are familiar with the surrounding but home is also very hazardous place. Use this document as an overview and consult with us to learn more about how to stay independent at home and live and age gracefully.

We are here to increase the Quality of Life index.

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Transcript of "Strategies to avoid falls and stay independent- a tool kit for seniors"

  1. 1. Strategies  to  avoid  Falls  and  Stay  Independent     Falling  down  is  the  main  reason  seniors  and  elderly  lose  their  independence.    Falls   are  the  number  one  cause  of  injury,  hospital  visits  due  to  trauma,  and  death  from  an   injury  among  people  age  65  and  older.    It  is  estimated  that  one  in  three  older  adults   falls  each  year.    Falls  among  older  adults  is  a  serious  issue,  but  research  has  shown   that  many  fall  risks  can  be  reduced.   There  are  many  different  factors  that  can  increase  the  risk  of  falling.    These  include:   •  Past  falls   •  Chronic  diseases   •  Hazards  in  the  home  and  community   •  Multiple  medications   •  Problems  walking   •  Poor  vision   •  Balance  problems   •  Depression   •  Weakness   •  Memory  problems   •  Improper  footwear   •  Behaviors  like  rushing     Statistics  show  that:   • More  than  40%  of  people  hospitalized  from  hip  fractures  do  not  return  home   and  are  not  capable  of  living  independently  again;   • 25%  of  those  who  have  fallen  pass  away  each  year;     The  CDC  estimates  that  the  medical  costs  of  falls  exceed  $28  billion  a  year.  A  recent   study  from  Florida  suggests  a  workshop-­‐based  community  fall  prevention  program   can  be  implemented  for  an  average  of  $325  per  completer  over  the  first  year  and   $176  the  following  year.    
  2. 2.   Fear  of  Falling   Many  older  adults  are  afraid  of  falling.  This  fear  becomes  more  common  as  people   age,  even  among  those  who  haven't  fallen.  It  may  lead  older  people  to  avoid   activities  such  as  walking,  shopping,  or  taking  part  in  social  activities.   If  you're  worried  about  falling,  talk  with  your  doctor  or  another  health  care   provider.  Your  doctor  may  refer  you  to  a  physical  therapist.  Physical  therapy  can   help  you  improve  your  balance  and  walking  and  help  build  your  walking  confidence.   Getting  rid  of  your  fear  of  falling  can  help  you  to  stay  active,  maintain  your  physical   health,  and  prevent  future  falls.       How  Can  We  Prevent  Falls?   Researchers  have  identified  that  the  most  effective  fall  prevention  programs  have   many  components.  First  a  person  needs  to  understand  what  may  put  them  at  risk   for  falling.    Some  risks  can  be  reduced.    Medical  providers  can  help  to  identify  risks   and  develop  a  plan.    Specific  physical  activity  can  target  reduce  fall  risk  by   increasing  balance  and  mobility  skills.    Also  changes  to  the  home  and  community   environment  can  reduce  hazards  and  help  support  a  person  in  completing  daily   activities.    If  you  use  an  in-­‐home  care  agency,  ask  them  to  do  a  study  on  your  house.     While  this  is  not  a  comprehensive  list  of  fall  prevention  strategies,  it’s  a  good  place   to  start:     1)  Begin  an  exercise  program  to  improve  your  leg  strength  &  balance   2)  Ask  your  doctor  or  pharmacist  to  review  your  medicines   3)  Get  annual  eye  check-­‐ups  &  update  your  eyeglasses   4)  Get  semi  annual  oral  care.    Poor  oral  care  is  linked  to  many  diseases     a)  Brush  your  mouth  twice  a  day     b)  Take  out  your  dentures  every  night  and  soak  them  in  water     c)  Clean  your  mouth  after  every  meal   5)  Make  your  home  safer  by:   a)  Removing  clutter  &  tripping  hazards   b)  Putting  railings  on  all  stairs  &  adding  grab  bars  in  the  bathroom   c)  Having  good  lighting,  especially  on  stairs   6)  There  are  many  devices  you  can  use  such  as  Canes,  walkers,  using  a  cordless   portable  phone,  and  having  an  alert  pendent  among  many  others.       Resources:   CDC   NIH   Fox  News   Helping  Solution    

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