Sa by shekhar

1,052 views
575 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • nice.
    helped me alot.
    thanks..!!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,052
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
20
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Sa by shekhar

  1. 1. Scheduling Algorithms Presented By: Shekhar Singh Tomar
  2. 2. ContentsContents  Introduction  Scheduling Algorithms-  First Come, First Served (FCFS)  Shortest Job First (SJF)  Priority  Round Robin (RR)
  3. 3. IntroductionIntroduction CPU scheduling deals with the problem of deciding which of the processes in the ready queue is to be allocated the CPU.
  4. 4. 1- First Come, First Served (FCFS)1- First Come, First Served (FCFS) SchedulingScheduling  Implementation: As each process becomes ready, it joins the ready queue. When the current process finishes, the oldest process is selected next.  Characteristics: Simple to implement Non-preemptive
  5. 5. First-Come, First-Served (FCFS)First-Come, First-Served (FCFS) SchedulingScheduling Example- Process Burst Time P1 24 P2 3 P3 3  With FCFS, the process that requests the CPU first is allocated the CPU first  Case 1: Suppose that the processes arrive in the order: P1 , P2 , P3 The Chart for the schedule is:  Waiting time for P1 = 0; P2 = 24; P3 = 27  Average waiting time: (0 + 24 + 27)/3 = 17  Average turn-around time: (24 + 27 + 30)/3 = 27 P1 P2 P3 24 27 300
  6. 6. FCFS Scheduling (Cont.)FCFS Scheduling (Cont.)  Case 2: Suppose that the processes arrive in the order: P2 , P3 , P1  The chart for the schedule is:  Waiting time for P1 = 6; P2 = 0; P3 = 3  Average waiting time: (6 + 0 + 3)/3 = 3 (Much better than Case #1)  Average turn-around time: (3 + 6 + 30)/3 = 13 P1P3P2 63 300
  7. 7. 2-Shortest-Job-First (SJF) Scheduling2-Shortest-Job-First (SJF) Scheduling  The SJF algorithm associates with each process the length of its next CPU burst  When the CPU becomes available, it is assigned to the process that has the smallest next CPU burst (in the case of matching bursts, FCFS is used)  Two schemes: Non-preemptive – once the CPU is given to the process, it cannot be preempted until it completes its CPU burst. Preemptive – It will preempt the currently executing process. This scheme is know as the Shortest-Remaining-Time-First (SRTF)
  8. 8. SJF Scheduling…SJF Scheduling… Exponential Averaging  Estimation based on historical data  tn = length of the nth CPU burst  τn = Estimate for nth CPU burst (stores past history)  τn+1 = predicted value for n+1st or next CPU burst  α, 0 ≤ α 1≤ τn+1 = αtn + (1- α) τn 09/24/13 8
  9. 9. Process Arrival Time Burst Time P1 0.0 6 P2 0.0 4 P3 0.0 1 P4 0.0 5 SJF (non-preemptive, simultaneous arrival) Average waiting time = (0 + 1 + 5 + 10)/4 = 4 Average turn-around time = (1 + 5 + 10 + 16)/4 = 8 Example 1: Non-Preemptive SJFExample 1: Non-Preemptive SJF (simultaneous arrival)(simultaneous arrival) P1P3 P2 51 160 P4 10
  10. 10. Process Arrival Time Burst Time P1 0.0 7 P2 2.0 4 P3 4.0 1 P4 5.0 4 SJF (non-preemptive, varied arrival times) Average waiting time = ( (0 – 0) + (8 – 2) + (7 – 4) + (12 – 5) )/4 = (0 + 6 + 3 + 7)/4 = 4 Average turn-around time: = ( (7 – 0) + (12 – 2) + (8 - 4) + (16 – 5))/4 = ( 7 + 10 + 4 + 11)/4 = 8 Example 2: Non-Preemptive SJFExample 2: Non-Preemptive SJF (varied arrival times)(varied arrival times) P1 P3 P2 73 160 P4 8 12 Waiting time : sum of time that a process has spent waiting in the ready queue
  11. 11. Example 3: Preemptive SJFExample 3: Preemptive SJF (Shortest-remaining-time-first)(Shortest-remaining-time-first) Process Arrival Time Burst Time P1 0.0 7 P2 2.0 4 P3 4.0 1 P4 5.0 4 SJF (preemptive , varied arrival times) Average waiting time = ( [(0 – 0) + (11 - 2)] + [(2 – 2) + (5 – 4)] + (4 - 4) + (7 – 5) )/4 = 9 + 1 + 0 + 2)/4 = 3 Average turn-around time = (16 + 7 + 5 + 11)/4 = 9.75 P1 P3P2 42 110 P4 5 7 P2 P1 16 Waiting time : sum of time that a process has spent waiting in the ready queue
  12. 12. 3- Priority Scheduling3- Priority Scheduling  The SJF algorithm is a special case of the general priority scheduling algorithm  Each process (or class of processes) is given a priority (integer number).  The CPU is allocated to the process with the highest priority (smallest integer = highest priority)  Priority scheduling can be either preemptive or non-preemptive A preemptive approach will preempt the CPU if the priority of the newly-arrived process is higher than the priority of the currently running process A non-preemptive approach will simply put the new process (with the highest priority) at the head of the ready queue  SJF is a priority scheduling algorithm where priority is the predicted next CPU burst time.  The main problem with priority scheduling is starvation, that is, low priority processes may never execute.  A solution is aging; as time progresses, the priority of a process in the ready queue is increased
  13. 13. Example of Priority SchedulingExample of Priority Scheduling Process Burst time Priority P1 10 3 P2 1 1 P3 2 4 P4 1 5 P5 5 2 0 1 6 16 18 19 Average wating time = (6+0+16+18+1)/5=8.2 milliseconds P2 P5 P1 P3 P4
  14. 14. 4- Round-Robin Scheduling4- Round-Robin Scheduling  Developed in response to time-sharing systems.  Each process gets a small unit of CPU time (time quantum),  Each job is given control of the CPU for that time quantum. (In the range of 10-100 milliseconds.)  Control then passes to the next job (FIFO?)  Average waiting time dependent on job size, quantum size  RR scheduling algorithm is preemptive.
  15. 15. Example of RR with Time Quantum =Example of RR with Time Quantum = 44 Process Burst Time P1 24 P2 3 P3 3  The chart is:  Typically, higher average turnaround than SJF, but better response. P1 P2 P3 P1 P1 P1 P1 P1 0 4 7 10 14 18 22 26 30
  16. 16. Time Quantum and Context SwitchTime Quantum and Context Switch TimeTime
  17. 17. Thank YouThank You

×