Eye on Nature 2014
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Eye on Nature 2014

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For 4 years, Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in cooperation with Nisqually River Education Project Chehalis Basin Education Consortium and Nisqually Reach Nature Center, have offered “Eye on ...

For 4 years, Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in cooperation with Nisqually River Education Project Chehalis Basin Education Consortium and Nisqually Reach Nature Center, have offered “Eye on Nature”, a unique, meaningful field investigation experiences. Students participate in NatureMapping citizen science activities to track the changing ecology at the Nisqually Estuary. Activities also include an ethnobotany walk and sound mapping.

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  • Thanks, Das! Best of luck with your work in West Virginia!!!
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  • I like your presentations. Stroong visuals can convey much. We are working on improving the water quality in West Virginia where there are many chemicals to be measured as well.
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    Eye on Nature 2014 Eye on Nature 2014 Presentation Transcript

    • Eye on Nature Eye On Nature– Field Investigations at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge: Gaining a better understanding of wildlife at NNWR with the help of student NatureMapping and Fostering Outdoor Observation Skills activities. Photo courtesy of Ellen Banner
    • The Nisqually Delta started forming about 15,000 years ago.
    • The Nisqually Indians were the first people to live in the area. The Nisqually people were first known as “Squally-absch”, meaning “people of the river, people of the grass”. Americans later changed the spelling to Nisqually.
    • Medicine Creek Treaty Tree Before and after the December 15, 2006 wind storm
    • Early  1900s  
    • The Brown Farm – early 1900’s
    • Many plans were proposed for the delta, including a landfill and  a  deep  water  port.  
    • Luckily, there were conservationists and activists who worked with state and federal officials to protect the Delta from development.
    • In 1974, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service established Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge to be managed as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System.
    • Saltwater Freshwater Dike Nisqually Estuary – before restoration
    • Nisqually Estuary Restoration
    • Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge Restoration Summer 2012
    • Wildlife that depend on NNWR
    • Founded in 1992 to: 18 •  Map and measure biodiversity with the help of schools and general public. “What do you see and where do you see it?” •  Integrate NatureMapping into schools so they become long-term wildlife monitors •  Help communities develop their biodiversity “report cards”
    • How does Nature Mapping help? A measure of biodiversity found at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge! We can then ask questions such as: • Are there any changes in the types of wildlife we are seeing? • Are we seeing wildlife not typical to this area? • Have migration patterns been altered by climate change?
    • Invasive species Reed Canary Grass Himalayan Blackberry Scotts broom Barred Owls
    • Data Collection Form Nature   Mapping   Nisqually     Group  #   Habitat  codes:     Name   510   Estuary   Loca?on   515   Riparian  Forest  ?dal     Date   525   Riparian  Forest     Weather   520   Freshwater  wetland   How  Obs.   H=  Hear,  S=See,  E=Evidence   415    River   Time   Species  Name   How     Observe d   How   Many   Loca?o n   Block   Habitat   Code   Notes:  Behavior  informa?on  
    • 5 Major Habitat Types #1- Freshwater Wetlands
    • 5 Major Habitat Types #2- River
    • 5 Major Habitat Types #3- Riparian Forest
    • 5 Major Habitat Types #4- Tidally Influenced Riparian Forest
    • 5 Major Habitat Types #5- Estuary
    • Most Common Species
    • Most Common Species Song Sparrow Common Merganser Cedar Wax Wing Wood Duck Mallard American Crow Red Winged Blackbird Canada Goose American Robin
    • What to expect when you visit… • Dress for the weather! • Please make sure to turn your NatureMapping data in to your teacher. Remember, the best way to see wildlife is to be very quiet and to be very observant!
    • What to expect when you visit…