Fostering Lifelong Learning through
Information Literacy education: Exploring
conceptions in different disciplines and fra...
Outline
• Lifelong Learning: OECD & UNESCO
• Lifelong Learning & the UG curricuum:
  the Candy model
• Conceptions pedagog...
Lifelong Learning:
              Tensions & Issues
Two differing approaches:   Extent of alignment
                       ...
Attributes of the lifelong learner
An inquiring mind
quot;Helicopter visionquot;
Information literacy
A sense of personal ...
(Candy et al 1994: 66)
                          Sheila Webber and
                   Bill Johnston, June 2008
Our project
Bill Johnston




                                    Stuart Boon


          Sheila Webber
                  ...
• Three-year Arts & Humanities Research Council
  (AHRC) - funded project (Nov 2002- Nov 2005)
  To explore UK academics’ ...
Information literacy?                                  Mastering a
                                                       ...
Key research questions

1. What conceptions of information literacy are
   held by UK academics?
2. What are academics’ co...
In the next slides we present the categories of pedagogy for information
literacy that we identified in our research. In t...
Marketing: Pedagogy for Information
          Literacy as…
1. Someone else‟s job
2. Upgrading students‟ information toolbo...
English academics' conceptions of
           pedagogy for IL as …
1.   Someone else's job
2.   An add-on or side-effect of...
Chemistry academics' conceptions of
       pedagogy for IL as …
1. Implicit in teaching students to understand
   chemistr...
Chemistry academics' conceptions of
     pedagogy for IL as …

3. Challenging students to respond independently,
   critic...
Civil Engineering: pedagogy for
                  Information literacy as…

1. Someone else‟s job e.g. “I don‟t teach it. ...
Civil Engineering: pedagogy for
                 Information literacy as…
3   Encouraging independent and confident critic...
Discussion points included
• The conceptions mostly (apart from English) chimed in with
  OECD views of Lifelong Learning ...
Sheila Webber
s.webber@shef.ac.uk
http://information-
   literacy.blogspot.com/
                            Second Life bl...
Bibliography
• Boon, S., Johnston, B. and Webber, S. (2007) quot;A phenomenographic
  study of English faculty's conceptio...
• Webber, S., Boon, S. and Johnston, B. (2005) “A comparison of UK
  academics‟ conceptions of information literacy in two...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Fostering Lifelong Learning through Information Literacy education: Exploring conceptions in different disciplines and framing pedagogies for lifelong learning

7,257 views

Published on

The authors of the presentation are Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston. The presentation was at the International Lifelong Learning Conference held in Yeppoon, Australia on 18th June 2008. The conference abstract was: "Information Literacy (IL) has been acknowledged as a key element of lifelong learning (Candy et al., 1994). The aim of this presentation is to explore the lifelong learning dimensions of pedagogies for IL in different disciplines. Our starting points are the categories of pedagogy for IL identified in a research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). We will look at them in relation to: a.Candy Report’s attributes and qualities of the lifelong learner in relation to the ideal structure of the undergraduate curriculum described in that report. b.The competing models of lifelong learning identified with OECD and UNESCO respectively. The AHRC project investigated conceptions of UK academics in four disciplines: Marketing, English, Chemistry and Civil Engineering. It is notable that some conceptions of teaching IL focused on the requirements for the students’ course of study, whilst others focused on supporting students both in their course and for their life beyond university. For example, in marketing one conception of pedagogy for IL was Helping students understand how information literacy is critical to them, for marketing and life whilst another was of Upgrading students’ information toolbox at an appropriate point (of the course). We will reflect how these differing approaches relate to different aspects of Candy’s model/structure. Similarly, some conceptions focused more on students’ development as people and citizens (thus with more connection to the UNESCO view), and others on students’ development as practitioners. The discussion will be augmented by evidence from the literature and the authors’ experiences of implementing IL in the University curriculum, including Webber’s work as a CILASS (Centre for Inquiry-based Learning in the Arts and Social Sciences) Fellow at the University of Sheffield.

Candy, P., Crebert, G. and OLeary, J. (1994) Developing lifelong learners through undergraduate education. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service. National Board of Employment, Education and Training Report; 28. http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/training_skills/publications_resources/profiles/nbeet/hec/ developing_lifelong_learners_through_undergraduate.htm "

Published in: Business, Education
1 Comment
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Its very nice and great sharing about learning.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
7,257
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
118
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
240
Comments
1
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Fostering Lifelong Learning through Information Literacy education: Exploring conceptions in different disciplines and framing pedagogies for lifelong learning

  1. 1. Fostering Lifelong Learning through Information Literacy education: Exploring conceptions in different disciplines and framing pedagogies for lifelong learning Sheila Webber University of Sheffield Department of Information Studies Bill Johnston, Centre for Academic Practice and Learning Enhancement, University of Strathclyde June 2008 Presented at the Lifelong Conference, Yeppoon, Australia, 18Sheila Webber and June 2008 Bill Johnston, June 2008
  2. 2. Outline • Lifelong Learning: OECD & UNESCO • Lifelong Learning & the UG curricuum: the Candy model • Conceptions pedagogy for IL: related to Candy and OECD/ UNESCO • Discussion Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  3. 3. Lifelong Learning: Tensions & Issues Two differing approaches: Extent of alignment between Undergraduate Liberation, culture and curriculum and these personal growth - UNESCO positions? 1970‟s Disciplinary differences? Varying perceptions by Global economy, academics? competitiveness and Institutional strategy? individual skills - OECD 1990s Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  4. 4. Attributes of the lifelong learner An inquiring mind quot;Helicopter visionquot; Information literacy A sense of personal agency A repertoire of learning skills Interpersonal skills & group membership (Candy, 2000; Candy et al 1994) Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  5. 5. (Candy et al 1994: 66) Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  6. 6. Our project Bill Johnston Stuart Boon Sheila Webber Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  7. 7. • Three-year Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) - funded project (Nov 2002- Nov 2005) To explore UK academics’ conceptions of, and pedagogy for, information literacy • Sheila Webber; Bill Johnston; Stuart Boon • Phenomenographic study: interviewing 20 academics in each of 4 disciplines to identify variation in conceptions (visited 26 universities to collect 80 interviews) • Marketing, English, Civil Engineering, Chemistry Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  8. 8. Information literacy? Mastering a chemist's information skill set Accessing information Creating, and incorporating quickly and easily to be Using aware of what’s going information into a information professional on knowledge base literacy to solve real- Accessing and retrieving textual world information Becoming problems confident, An essential part of Some of the autonomous the constitution/ conceptions in English, learners and construction/ Marketing, Engineering & Chemistry that our critical creation of research discovered thinkers knowledge Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  9. 9. Key research questions 1. What conceptions of information literacy are held by UK academics? 2. What are academics’ conceptions and reported practice in educating students for information literacy? 3. Do differences in conception correspond to differences in discipline? Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  10. 10. In the next slides we present the categories of pedagogy for information literacy that we identified in our research. In the actual presentation we identified how these related to Candy et al.‟s model for the undergraduate curriculum and the OECD/UNESCO definitions of lifelong learning. For example, in Marketing, the “somebody else‟s job” category was really to the left of Candy‟s models – just the discipline with no skills etc. The next two conceptions also clearly have the discipline at the centre of the curriculum, with IL seen in relation to that. With conception 4 (where the academic is explicitly encouraging students to think of skills being relevant beyond the curriculum) we are moving more towards the right hand diagram. The final conception is putting IL more centrally, though probably more interwoven with the subject etc, rather than quite so compartmentalised. In terms of Lifelong Learning – the focus is on IL being useful professionally – so more of an OECD interpretation. See Webber et al (2006) for more on the Marketing & English conceptions Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  11. 11. Marketing: Pedagogy for Information Literacy as… 1. Someone else‟s job 2. Upgrading students‟ information toolbox at an appropriate point 3. Facilitating access to a variety of resources 4. Showing students how and when to use information skills 5. Helping students understand how information literacy is critical to them, for marketing & life Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  12. 12. English academics' conceptions of pedagogy for IL as … 1. Someone else's job 2. An add-on or side-effect of teaching the subject 3. Introducing the students to sources of information 4. Engaging with students to show them the value of information and information literacy Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  13. 13. Chemistry academics' conceptions of pedagogy for IL as … 1. Implicit in teaching students to understand chemistry. “we teach them to find chemical data and structures for their assignments” (Chem 2) 2. Designing a path for students through a chemistry course “So we do make sure that we‟ve assessed them and we introduce them to all the different databases throughout the four years, em, but we will always ask them to do stuff outside of that to widen their understanding.” (Chem 4) Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  14. 14. Chemistry academics' conceptions of pedagogy for IL as … 3. Challenging students to respond independently, critically and creatively with information “… to be able to question, to disagree, to… really to have fun with information as well.” (Chem 11) Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  15. 15. Civil Engineering: pedagogy for Information literacy as… 1. Someone else‟s job e.g. “I don‟t teach it. No, mostly I assume the students can do it.” (CEng 01) 2. Providing core/fundamental information as part of an Engineering course. “A basic lecture will have a limited content. So often I will give a lecture and say, „Have a look at this website for further information.‟” “If you go for a fairly dynamic, say developmental style of lecture where students are putting ideas in and you develop them and talk about them, you run the risk of not achieving the real objectives of the lecture, which may be predefined.” (Both CEng 10) Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  16. 16. Civil Engineering: pedagogy for Information literacy as… 3 Encouraging independent and confident critical thought & work e.g. “So I… um, with the internet stuff, I don‟t have to go through all that, I can just, „Here are some things. Look at them on the internet and discuss them. Make a judgement about them.‟” (CEng 16) “those employers will be specifying certain competencies that they want and undoubtedly once of the competencies that they want is research and analysis skills, information sourcing and retrieval. And the expectation of the employer is going to be that the graduate knows how to do this and that they are self-reliant and don't need to be taken by the hand…” (CEng 04) Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  17. 17. Discussion points included • The conceptions mostly (apart from English) chimed in with OECD views of Lifelong Learning – focused more on the value of IL in future careers rather than citizenship • This shows the variation within, as well as between, disciplines, and anecdotal evidence indicates that variations may very well exist within Departments. This points to the value of discussing and agreeing Departmental frameworks for IL and LLL: different academics may contribute from different perspectives • It indicates that the “model 2” of Candy et al. (1994) has not yet been achieved Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  18. 18. Sheila Webber s.webber@shef.ac.uk http://information- literacy.blogspot.com/ Second Life blog Sheila Yoshikawa http://adventuresofyoshikawa.blogspot.com Bill Johnston b.johnston@strath.ac.uk Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  19. 19. Bibliography • Boon, S., Johnston, B. and Webber, S. (2007) quot;A phenomenographic study of English faculty's conceptions of information literacy.quot; Journal of documentation, 63 (2), 204-228. • Candy, P. (2000) “Learning and earning: graduate skills for an uncerain future.” In Appleton, K. et al. (Eds) Lifelong Lerning Conference: selected papers from the inaugural international LLC. Rockhampton: CQU. 7-19. • Candy, P., Crebert, G. and O'Leary, J. (1994) Developing lifelong learners through undergraduate education. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service. National Board of Employment, Education and Training Report; 28. http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/training_skills/publications_resources/profiles/nbeet/ hec/developing_lifelong_learners_through_undergraduate.htm Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, June 2008
  20. 20. • Webber, S., Boon, S. and Johnston, B. (2005) “A comparison of UK academics‟ conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing.” Library and information research, 29 (93), 4- 15. http://www.cilip.org.uk/specialinterestgroups/bysubject/research/ publications/journal/archive/lir93/article93b.htm • Webber, S., Boon, S. and Johnston, B. (2006) quot;Comparaison des conceptions pédagogiques de la maîtrise de l‟information chez des universitaires britanniques de différentes disciplines.“ [British academics from different disciplines: comparing their conceptions of pedagogy for information literacy] Actes des 5èmes Rencontres Formist: Lyon: 2005. Lyon: ENSSIB. http://babel.enssib.fr/document.php?id=315 (English version at: http://dis.shef.ac.uk/sheila/webber-FORMIST.pdf) • Webber, S. and Johnston, B. (2005) “Information literacy in the curriculum: selected findings from a phenomenographic study of UK conceptions of, and pedagogy for, information literacy” In: Rust, C. (Ed) Improving Student Learning: Diversity and Inclusivity: Proceedings of the 11th ISL symposium, Birmingham, 6-8 September 2004. Oxford: Oxford Brookes University. pp212-224. http://dis.shef.ac.uk/sheila/literacy/webber-johnston-isl.pdf Webber2008 Sheila Bill Johnston, June and

×