Blogging in library and information science teaching and learning

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This presentation identifies the uses of weblogs for learning and teaching, and specifically for teaching library and information students. The presenter describes her own experiences and identifies …

This presentation identifies the uses of weblogs for learning and teaching, and specifically for teaching library and information students. The presenter describes her own experiences and identifies examples of weblog use on teaching and in library management and marketing. Some issues for organisational and individual use of blogs are discussed. The presenter concludes by noting that weblogs do have educational value, and that LIS students also need to learn about them because they may well have to use them as part of their job. The final slides list some resources: websites, articles etc. This was presented at the CTDI2007 conference on 29th May 2007, held in Oporto, Portugal.

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  • 1. Blogging in LIS teaching and learning Sheila Webber University of Sheffield Department of Information Studies s.webber@sheffield.ac.uk May 2007 Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 2. Hello! Me Me in Second Life Photo of Sheila taken by Peter Stordy at 11.30, 29 May Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 3. Comment: This the outline of my talk. Outline I talk about what blogs are good for in education, • Blogs in education & for and specifically for library/ information students LIS I talk about 2 types • Individual blogging of blogging • Organisational blogging I give examples from my own experience, and give • Resources examples from libraries in the UK and North America “Resources” is simply a list of articles, websites etc. you may find useful. This PowerPoint can be found at http://dis.shef.ac.uk/sheila/blogging2007.ppt Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 4. Comment: These are Blogs… in general general points that I will be illustrating in the next slides and will return to later • Good for – news – things with timelines – that have a beginning and end (e.g. projects) – developing and presenting ideas • Not so good – as a reference source (though can still be useful) – as a tutorial – for fostering ongoing discussion on a range of topics Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 5. In education, blogs useful for Progress Reflecting on Projects Recording Assignments Communicating Ideas Publishing Learning Developing Comment: You can combine any of the words on the left with any of the words on the right! Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 6. For information & library students • Librarians and information managers using weblogs as part of job • Therefore useful for LIS students and practitioners to learn more about – How they work Comment: I expect Richard Wallis has – What they are good for already talked about the importance of Web 2.0 for librarians Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 7. Points made by my students • Blog useful for reflection & recording progress • Blogging dissertation: helps progress and also could avoid some of loneliness of dissertation process • Could provide place to interact and share experience about a module e.g. a systems module Comment: My students made these points on this blog which I will mention later Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 8. Points made by my students: 2 • May want to keep blog private • Students don’t want to have to use too many different tools (blogs, discussion boards etc. etc.) for their studies • Some people like blogs more than others: can’t assume that students will automatically like them Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 9. Note that: • Students (even 18 year olds) not necessarily familiar with blogs • Our 1st year undergraduate students: doing more texting, phoning, Instant messaging, using Facebook: see paper cited in next slide Comment: Sometimes it is assumed that all young people are automatically good at using all Web 2.0 tools and that they will want to use them in study. This is not true. Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 10. The next slides give examples from my own teaching experience Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 11. Comment: A blog used My experience: Teaching by teaching staff Staff team blog: teaching • Inquiry in Information team reflected on use of blogs in this module & Management (1st year discussed use of blogs in Undergraduate module) teaching generally. Paper at conference in March: Cox, A. et al. (2007) “Blogging to support Inquiry Based Learning.” Paper presented at Shock of the Social conference, Oxford Inquiry in Information Management: Staff Team University, March 2007. http://inquiry-in-im.group.shef.ac.uk/team/ http://inquiry-in- im.group.shef.ac.uk/team/f iles/2007/03/shock- paper.pdf Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 12. Comment: Blogs used My experience: Teaching by 1st year students Student blogs: • Inquiry in Information One per student group. Management (1st year Students had to post Undergraduate module) about project meetings, project progress and project results Blog is worth 25% of module mark Not sure we will use them again next year: group discussion board in Virtual Learning Environment (WebCT) could serve much of this function Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 13. Sorry! New slide My experience: Teaching Comment: Blogs used by teaching staff and students • In 2003 used a blog as a “class website” for 2 classes • I posted lecture notes etc. and used it for announcements and class exercises • I used tags (e.g. “lecture notes”) so that students could search and find e.g. all lecture notes • Was useful for alerting students to what is new • Not so useful for – giving access to course material – having online discussions • Virtual Learning Environment (e.g. WebCT, Blackboard) better Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 14. Comment: A blog used My experience: Teaching by students and teaching staff • Educational Informatics Used for 4 years (4 sets of (Postgraduate module) students) I ask students to identify where blogs could be useful in their course Their views given in previous slide – also can be read on the blog! Useful to get practice is blogging & to record and exchange ideas Educational Informatics session: http://edu-informatics.livejournal.com/ Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 15. The next slides are examples from inside and outside Sheffield University Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 16. PhD student at Sheffield Blogging the http://jin-thoughts.blogspot.com/ PhD Comment: Some PhD students find this very useful Former PhD student of mine – blogged during and after dissertation http://invisibleweblog.blogspot.com/ May 2007 Copyright: Sheila Webber,
  • 17. Educational – reflective journals for a class “Human information behavior” (Rutgers University, USA) http://jennykthelibrarian.blogspot.com/ http://dfahl.livejournal.com/ “This will be a record of my thoughts and questions during my journey through the readings for class.” “Forgive my glee but I am glad to be done all of this work and reading these academic treatises. .” Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 18. Comment: A student Blogging around an blog. This blog education theme and won a blogging prize! activity Centre for Inquiry Based Learning in the Arts and Social Sciences: Student blog Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007 http://jin-thoughts.blogspot.com/
  • 19. To repeat an earlier slide! Blogs… in general • Good for – news – things with timelines (e.g. projects, particular class activities) – developing and presenting ideas • Not so good – as a reference source e.g. lecture notes on a class website (though can still be useful) – as a tutorial – for fostering ongoing discussion on a range of topics Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 20. Types of blogging • Independent blogging (blogging for yourself) • Organisational blogging (blogging as part of the job, or for an organisation) • Will describe these 2 types, then return to some of the previous examples Comment: There are different motives and characteristics for the two types of blog Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 21. Comment: Here I give Independent blogging some benefits and motivations for blogging independently Blogging for yourself e.g. – Record & reflection on what you’ve done – Enjoyment of writing down thoughts, feelings – To get practice in content creation & design – e.g. Blogging the dissertation – e.g. For Continuing Blogging professional (CILIP) Chartership Professional Development http://blogs.warwick.ac.uk/kwiddows/ Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 22. Independent blogging, variant 2 Blogging independently, but with an audience at the front of your mind. Issues are as in the previous slide, plus – Sharing knowledge and news (personal/professional) – May be blogging to help others as much as to amuse yourself – May want to improve professional profile & extend contacts – Some people happy to drift into this kind of blog, if their blog becomes popular, others want to keep a personal blog private or anonymous Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 23. Issues for individual blogging • Would I want my students/ loved one/ future employer to stumble across this? • Is it part of of work? • Will it take over my life? Comment: Just some background thoughts! Blogging has taken over my life a bit. I am careful in what I blog, though. Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 24. My experience: Information Literacy • Independent variant 2: Information with personal Version 1: 2003-2005 Technical problems slant (photos) and an audience in mind • Aware that people use it as information source, so not too personal • Blog needs constant feeding Version 2: 2005 onwards • Given me visibility, contacts 500+ postings Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 25. My experience: Virtual • Blogging as my Second Life avatar • An amusement for me…. but also • …turning into a learning diary about using Second Life http://adventuresofyoshikawa.blogspot.com/ “Second Life is a 3-D virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents” Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 26. As seen on previous slide - Educational – reflective journals for a class “Human information behavior” (Rutgers University, USA) Students being forced to do Independent blogging – don’t always come up with results that teachers would want (though this student does, I think!) Students may not want to be forced to be “creative” or “reflective” or “playful” for the Note: Screenshots removed teacher before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 27. Organisational blogging • Part of organisational strategy – To support & create community – To support & manage activities and tasks – To communicate & create relationships with customers – To support educational goals • Definitely part of someone’s job – though may be carried out by individual bloggers who like blogging • This is where librarian may be required or encouraged to blog Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 28. Our Departmental blog http://information-studies.blogspot.com/ Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 29. This blog, shown previously, is also “organisational blogging” (blogging the class): some colleagues enjoyed it more than others! Comment: In other words, some did not enjoy it much! We also find there are some students who are not keen on blogging. Inquiry in Information Management: Staff Team http://inquiry-in-im.group.shef.ac.uk/team/ Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 30. Part of a search/teach task in one of my classes (creating a search guide to a database + a blog or Squidoo lens) Comment: Requiring students to produce an “organisational” type blog Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 31. Examples of library blogs Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 32. Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) “communities” http://communities.cilip.org.uk/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 33. Knowledge & information sharing – reference desk blog Reference at Newman Library http://referencenewman.blogspot.com/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 34. Community building & exchange http://elgg.leeds.ac.uk/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 35. Project blog http://epublications.wordpress.com/ Project blog Project blog has become service blog (at same address) Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 36. Project blog Birmingham Reusable Materials Project http://brumproject.blogspot.com/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 37. News for users and opportunity for feedback from users Charles Sturt University http://yourlibrarycsu.blogspot.com/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 38. News for users and opportunity for feedback from users Southampton Solent University http://solentlibrarynews.blogspot.com/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 39. News for users http://www2.worc.ac.uk/wordpress/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare “This blog is one of the places where you can keep up to date with any improvements and notices which will allow you to make better use of us!” Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 40. News for users – specific subject http://www.library.ohiou.edu/subjects/businessblog/ Note: Screenshots removed before publishing to slideshare Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 41. Issues for organisations Comment: These are issues to be considered by library which blog and information managers • Acceptable use & level of monitoring • Balance between personal voice/ corporate guidelines • Who allowed to see, to post, to comment • Staff: education & buy-in (see MULTA project) • If part of strategy: needs documenting, resourcing & disaster planning • If educational: is it dealing with students ethically? Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 42. Comment: This is a quotation from a librarian “Staff are now blogging regularly to communicate internally and with the public, and we consider our experiment a success. … Following the change in software we will need to customize it, create training guides, and begin training the staff on the new software. It may seem like starting over, but we're past the hurdle of demonstrating the value of internal blogging.” (Barton & Weismantel, 2006) Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 43. Comment: An Australian librarian comments on how following a Web 2.0 project has led to changes in thinking and practice. The MULTA staff development project “It has changed the way we do things in our library. We have formed a team to implement recommendations made as part of the project. We are creating blogs to communicate internally and with our users. We are using wikis for our everyday work. Now the project has finished, participants are voluntarily running education sessions for their work areas, often on demand from the people who didn't participate. We are looking at XML, APIs and mashups as part of what we do, not strange foreign acronyms.” Greenhill, K. (2006) What Kathryn said she'd do... 25 October. Murdoch University. http://multa.murdoch.edu.au/tiki-view_blog_post.php?blogId=3665&postId=3811 Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 44. Summary • Weblogs are useful in education for certain things • Skill in knowing how and when to use blogs is useful part of curriculum; students can use them in context of – Marketing – Teaching (information literacy) – Knowledge Management – Reference work • LIS students can learn by doing (blogging) • Some people just like blogging: exploit their enthusiasm! Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 45. Some resources Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 46. Articles • Barton, E. and Weismantel, A. (2006) “Ref logs now.” Library journal, 1 October. http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6373314.html (Discusses blog to support librarians in reference desk enquiry work at Michigan State University) • Educause. (2007) Blog. Educause. http://www.educause.edu/Blog/645?Parent_ID=645 (list of resources and links) • Educause. (2005) 7 things you should know about blogs. Educause. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7006.pdf Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 47. Articles 2 • HigherEdBlogCon. (2006) April 10: Blogging in libraries. http://www.higheredblogcon.com/index.php/april-10- blogging-in-libraries/ (Introduction + 3 screencasts or presentations on blogging in libraries) • Wiebrands, C. (2006) “Creating community: The blog as a networking device.” In: Click06: ALIA 2006 Biennial Conference. http://conferences.alia.org.au/alia2006/Papers/Constance_ Wiebrands.pdf Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 48. Librarian blogger discussion & posts • Anjos, J. Biblio-blogosphere: the last 25 hours http://last25.janjos.com (Last 25 hours of posts, reverse chronological order) • British Librarian Bloggers. http://groups.google.com/group/britlibblogs (discussion board) • Librariesinteract. http://librariesinteract.info/ (blog for Australian librarians, includes blog list) Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 49. Library blog wikis • Etches-Johnson, A. (Ed) Blogging libraries wiki. http://www.blogwithoutalibrary.net/links/index.php?title=Welco me_to_the_Blogging_Libraries_Wiki (wiki with links to lots of library blogs, listed by sector ) • Harper, C. and Watson, K. Libraryblogswikis. http://www.seedwiki.com/wiki/libraryblogswikis (wiki about use of blogs and wikis in Australian libraries, part of a project) • Hubbard, J. (ed) Liswiki: Weblogs. http://liswiki.org/wiki/Weblogs (wiki with links to librarian and library weblogs, divided into “individual” and “organisational”) Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 50. Learning about Library 2.0 • Bradley, P. (2007) How to Use Web 2.0 in Your Library. London: Facet Publishing. ISBN 978-1-85604-607-7 • Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County . 23 Things. http://plcmcl2-things.blogspot.com/ (Exercises you can carry out, to discover different tools) • Five weeks to a social library. http://www.sociallibraries.com/course/ (Online course that happened earlier this year) • MULTA: Murdoch University Library Thinking Aloud http://multa.murdoch.edu.au/tiki-index.php (Australian staff development project) Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 51. Goodbye! Photo of Sheila taken by Peter Stordy at 11.30, 29 May Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007
  • 52. Sheila Webber s.webber@shef.ac.uk http://information-literacy.blogspot.com/ Sheila Yoshikawa http://adventuresofyoshikawa.blogspot.com/ Copyright: Sheila Webber, May 2007