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Presentation of WIDE project, University of Teesside, 25 January 2011

Presentation of WIDE project, University of Teesside, 25 January 2011

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  • Changes in legislation, an emphasis on widening participation and the increasing reliance on online techniques for learning and teaching have contributed to improved opportunities for students with disabilities. The aim of this work is to explore methods to provide learning materials that could be adapted to the specific needs of the learners, whether they have a disabiltiy or not. In the academic setting it is usually teaching staff who are largely responsible for the production of their own electronic resources, and while some embrace the challenge of new technologies with enthusiasm and accept the need for accessibility, other over stretched academics may regard the requirement to produce accessible online courses as a burden they have neither the skills nor the time to tackle
  • Changes in legislation, an emphasis on widening participation and the increasing reliance on online techniques for learning and teaching have contributed to improved opportunities for students with disabilities. The aim of this work is to explore methods to provide learning materials that could be adapted to the specific needs of the learners, whether they have a disabiltiy or not. In the academic setting it is usually teaching staff who are largely responsible for the production of their own electronic resources, and while some embrace the challenge of new technologies with enthusiasm and accept the need for accessibility, other over stretched academics may regard the requirement to produce accessible online courses as a burden they have neither the skills nor the time to tackle
  • We are adopting a holistic approach to accessibility that moves away from the ‘one size fits all’ approaches and models of universal accessibility that are both impractical and rigid. We believe that a solution in the challenge of adaptable learning lies in the concept that learning content can be generated from adaptable aggregation of los and media components/ Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop an adaptation service which will be able to retrieve a learning object upon user request, adapt it according to the needs of the user and deliver the adapted learning object back to the user. This research acknowledges that the complexity of multimedia learning resources and the diverse needs of disabled students require an approach that supports the adaptation of the resource at the point of delivery.
  • We are adopting a holistic approach to accessibility that moves away from the ‘one size fits all’ approaches and models of universal accessibility that are both impractical and rigid. We believe that a solution in the challenge of adaptable learning lies in the concept that learning content can be generated from adaptable aggregation of los and media components/ Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop an adaptation service which will be able to retrieve a learning object upon user request, adapt it according to the needs of the user and deliver the adapted learning object back to the user. This research acknowledges that the complexity of multimedia learning resources and the diverse needs of disabled students require an approach that supports the adaptation of the resource at the point of delivery.
  • We are adopting a holistic approach to accessibility that moves away from the ‘one size fits all’ approaches and models of universal accessibility that are both impractical and rigid. We believe that a solution in the challenge of adaptable learning lies in the concept that learning content can be generated from adaptable aggregation of los and media components/ Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop an adaptation service which will be able to retrieve a learning object upon user request, adapt it according to the needs of the user and deliver the adapted learning object back to the user. This research acknowledges that the complexity of multimedia learning resources and the diverse needs of disabled students require an approach that supports the adaptation of the resource at the point of delivery.
  • Lotti is a web based authoring tool that supports the design of pedagogically rich learning objects, with the aid of learning design patterns, supporting the designer to create and appropriately label retrievable, re-usable and adaptable learning objects The unique aspect of lotti is its accessibility wizard that prompts the designer to assign an alternative component, everytime they import a new media file LOTTI is currently employing two sets of metadata,: LOM metadata to provide descriptive metadata on the component structure of the learning object AccMD metadata to describe the accessibility of a learning resource by specifying what kind of content is being presented and whether there is an equivalent or alternative form of the content - IMS CP which is used to package the lo in order to facilitate export to a learning repository. by separating the design process into two steps; the first one consists of building a learning object template which encloses the deep general structure of the object while the second one involves adding specific learning content to the template An accessibility wizard is triggered when the learning designer imports a learning object component; prompting the designer to assign an alternative resource, outlining the limitations of the file type to the designer and suggesting predefined alternatives to these types of content to the user.
  • Lotti is a web based authoring tool that supports the design of pedagogically rich learning objects, with the aid of learning design patterns, supporting the designer to create and appropriately label retrievable, re-usable and adaptable learning objects The unique aspect of lotti is its accessibility wizard that prompts the designer to assign an alternative component, everytime they import a new media file LOTTI is currently employing two sets of metadata,: LOM metadata to provide descriptive metadata on the component structure of the learning object AccMD metadata to describe the accessibility of a learning resource by specifying what kind of content is being presented and whether there is an equivalent or alternative form of the content - IMS CP which is used to package the lo in order to facilitate export to a learning repository. by separating the design process into two steps; the first one consists of building a learning object template which encloses the deep general structure of the object while the second one involves adding specific learning content to the template An accessibility wizard is triggered when the learning designer imports a learning object component; prompting the designer to assign an alternative resource, outlining the limitations of the file type to the designer and suggesting predefined alternatives to these types of content to the user.

Transcript

  • 1. Widgets for Inclusive Distributed Environments Elaine Pearson,Voula Gkatzidou, Steve, Green, Franck Perrin Accessibility Research Centre Teesside University, UK
  • 2. Introduction
    • Partners:
      • Teesside University, TechDis, Portland College
    • Aims
      • To use a community based approach to make elearning resources accessible and inclusive to disabled students.
    • Rationale
      • To meet the needs of students with diverse needs to create an environment suitable for all students regardless of how and where they access their learning.
    • Outcomes
      • Suite of bespoke W3C standard widgets (Wookie)hosted on repository, supported by wiki with accompanying learning designs
      • experience of CoP approach
  • 3. Outline
    • Agile development methodology (Community of Practice approach)
    • Workshop experience
    • Widgets
    • Reflection
  • 4. Agile development methodology
    • Lightweight approach suitable for collaborative project
    • Based on iterative and incremental development
      • Requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration
    • Involved community of practice
      • Staff involved directly in teaching or support of disabled students
    • Informal team approach:
      • Designs formulated
        • workshop)
      • Specification outlined
        • (designs classified and prioritised, additional content identified)
      • Prototypes developed
        • ARC developers
      • Feedback illicited
        • designers
      • Amendments made
      • Widget released for evaluation, use, adaptation
  • 5. Workshops
    • Pre workshop training event
      • Project partners, accessibility advisors, techical experts
      • Feedback on methodology, identify existing work, discuss technical issues
    • Three workshops (York, Mansfield, Teesside)
      • Participants from established user communities
    • Facilitated by project team
      • Academics, researchers, developers, accessibility experts
    • Learning designs produced
      • based on previous JISC Design for Learning project
  • 6. Workshops process
    • Pre workshop training event
      • Project partners, accessibility advisors, technical experts
      • Feedback on methodology, identify existing work, discuss technical issues
    • Three workshops (York, Mansfield, Teesside)
      • Participants from established user communities
    • Facilitated by project team
      • Academics, researchers, developers, accessibility experts
    • Workshop based on previous JISC Design for Learning project
  • 7. Strengths
      • Workshops produced more ideas than we expected
      • CoP worked – feedback from everyone we’ve contacted
      • Wookie as a development platform worked well in most cases
      • Managed to develop (still ongoing) all but two of the designs:
        • Pronounce it and Spell it – because need APIs that so far we have not found for free
  • 8. Limitations
      • Timescale too short
      • Too ambitious in estimated development time
      • Need another design stage between workshop and development to confirm requirements specification
        • Some designs not clear
        • Sometimes extra content required
      • Initial feedback good but need time for through evaluation
  • 9. Widgets for Inclusive Distributed Environments Elaine Pearson,Voula Gkatzidou, Steve, Green, Franck Perrin Accessibility Research Centre Teesside University, UK