Open and online  connections community and reality
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Slides for webinar (14/3/14. with Catherine Cronin as part of the University of Sussex open education week activities. More information available......

Slides for webinar (14/3/14. with Catherine Cronin as part of the University of Sussex open education week activities. More information available @http://rustleblog.wordpress.com/open-education-week-2014/

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  • Not connected/limited by geography, space, time... but connected by our own ideas, passion, commitment via open practices & social media. <br /> Daithi – web-based, web beings… multicultural, wholly connected. <br /> Deirdre Butler – complex communication <br /> This is one of the best definitions I’ve seen of Open Education… and its future possibilities. <br /> QUESTION: How best can I help my students to live & thrive in this world? <br /> …this informs my practice (learning, teaching, research) <br />
  • Related to everyday practice - e.g. learning, teaching, research (your role) <br />
  • https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1PZz2q3B5O5fPKv0isBbc0HZcxbOGc_3PfB0O43JOq8g/edit#slide=id.gda69e593_2_75 <br />
  • “Networked Individualism” <br /> CONTEXT = 3 Revolutions: <br /> SOCIAL NETWORKS – (more than FB!) existed for a long time… fluid changing networks, not groups, sometimes communities <br /> INTERNET… baked-in ethic of OPENNESS, freedom & innovation <br /> MOBILE… affects our sense of Time and Place… Presence… Social Connectedness… “hyperconnectivity” <br /> We (people & institutions) exist now in Information & Communication Ecologies that are strikingly different from the ones that existed just a generation ago. <br /> We live in a different media landscape than the one we lived in and were educated in. (learn anything, anywhere, any time) <br /> EXTRA: <br /> We often hear that “the network” is changing social dynamics. According to Manuel Castells, the morphology of contemporary societies is the network. What this means is that previous sociological models defined by hierarchies and one-to-many communication patterns are rendered archaic. Being a relevant social actor does not solely depend on economic power, but on social capital derived from the people you are connected to and how well you maintain those connections. This is aided by the use of information technologies, from desktop computers to mobile media. http://mobyconsulting.com/what-are-networked-publics/ <br />
  • 2006 diagram created by Alec Couros…. (when uptake of SM was much lower & mobile not as widespread). <br />
  • 81% [94%] of online teens use social networking sites (Pew, 2013) <br /> 94% [90%] use Facebook <br /> 24% [60%] use Twitter <br /> 11% [23%] use Instagram <br /> [40%] use WhatsApp <br /> [35%] use Snapchat <br />
  • So what happens when Networked Educators meet Networked Students? <br />
  • 3 main spaces where we encounter one another… <br /> Physical classrooms <br /> LMS / VLE (e.g. Blackboard, or other members-only communities) <br /> On the web, using open tools, open source, open access… e.g. social media (Twitter, Facebook, G+, Flickr), blogs, wikis, etc. <br /> Each of these spaces has particular affordances <br /> Classrooms = safe spaces for learners to develop & to share their work – with teacher, sometimes one another. <br /> Group ➔ dialogue, collaboration, community <br /> Synchronous <br /> Bodily markers <br /> BOS: <br /> Asynchronous <br /> Fewer identity markers <br /> Challenges: <br /> Private & closed <br /> We are connected, but we cannot simultaneously share our community with our networks – combine them – share our work with wider audience. <br /> MESSAGE: what we do here is separate from Life; Formal learning divorced from rather than integrated with Informal learning. <br />
  • David Wiley & John Hilton have called this the Daily Divide. <br /> The well-known phrase “digital divide” describes the gulf between individuals who have access to information technology and individuals who do not. <br /> Also a Daily Divide… <br /> Connected students may, of course, choose to “go rogue” outside of class and use technologies and their skills outside of class, <br /> but this only serves to reinforce the feeling of disconnection and disorientation on in-class exams. <br />
  • 3 main spaces where we encounter one another… <br /> Physical classrooms <br /> LMS / VLE (e.g. Blackboard, or other members-only communities) <br /> On the web, using open tools, open source, open access… e.g. social media (Twitter, Facebook, G+, Flickr), blogs, wikis, etc. <br /> Each of these spaces has particular affordances <br /> Classrooms = safe spaces for learners to develop & to share their work – with teacher, sometimes one another. <br /> Group ➔ dialogue, collaboration, community <br /> Synchronous <br /> Bodily markers <br /> BOS: <br /> Asynchronous <br /> Fewer identity markers <br /> Challenges: <br /> Private & closed <br /> We are connected, but we cannot simultaneously share our community with our networks – combine them – share our work with wider audience. <br /> MESSAGE: what we do here is separate from Life; Formal learning divorced from rather than integrated with Informal learning. <br />
  • Some educators are seeking to make this connection, to cross this boundary between formal and informal learning. This is the area of my study. <br /> Open Online Spaces or Networked Publics (= blogs, wikis, social networks such as Twitter, G+, etc.) = enable Networked or Connected Learning <br /> What are the affordances of OOS? <br /> Organising principle is the NETWORK (fleeting membership, weak ties) rather than the GROUP (designed, strong ties) <br /> Enables Cooperative networked dependencies, not just collaborative group dependencies <br /> Open, Diversity <br /> Flexibility & Nonlinearity <br /> Educators & students can share their networks. <br />
  • Visualisation of network connections around hashtag #icollab. <br /> #icollab = community of practice students & lecturers in 6 HE courses, at 6 different institutions, across 6 countries, who are studying – and creating -- mobile & social media) <br /> The tool is TAGS Explorer, created by Martin Hawksey – enables visualisation of network connections. <br />
  • Knowledge NOT= Curriculum <br /> Knowledge = “a living landscape of communities of practice that contribute in various ways” <br /> to our learning and to our identities <br /> So… HOW do we do this?! <br />
  • Being an open practitioner - what does it mean? I consider myself open by wonder how others percieve me <br />
  • My twitter network. Twitter is the friend of the distributed, home based worker <br />
  • Some of the places I have an online presence and social trace <br />
  • A mapping of my online engagement based on David White’s Visitor and Resident mapping methodology (http://howsheilaseesit.wordpress.com/2014/02/14/where-sheilas-been-this-week-digital-residency-mapping-heavandr/) <br />
  • We need to be aware of who controls, and values our networks and what influence they have on our behaviour <br />
  • I have a clear idea of my online networks, but what about my physical ones? <br />
  • Possible questions…. <br /> &gt; wondering how you think your practice impacts on others <br />

Transcript

  • 1. OpenandOnline: connections, community&reality CatherineCronin @catherinecronin & SheilaMcNeill @sheilmcn #openeducationwk UniversityofSussex 14th March2014 CCBY-SA2.0cogdog
  • 2. Who’s here? Are you... a - Lecturer b - Learning technologist c - Librarian d - Student support e - Researcher f - Other / bit of everything
  • 3. Key questions: • What makes education ‘open’? • How are digital identities enacted in open vs. bounded online spaces? • How are power relationships between educators and students negotiated in different online spaces? • How might we close the gap between the ideals and the messy realities of being networked learners, educators and researchers?
  • 4. “I don’t think education is about centralized instruction anymore; rather, it is the process [of] establishing oneself as a node in a broad network of distributed creativity.” – Joi Ito @joi Quote: Joi Ito Image: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 yobink
  • 5. about.me/catherinecronin
  • 6. How open are you? Extensive use of digital technologies Limited use of digital technologies Closed “lone academic” Open “digital scholar” Source: Jenny Mackness #FSLT13
  • 7. At its best openness is an ethos not a license. It's an approach to teaching and learning that builds a community of learners online and off. -Jim Groom
  • 8. Social Networks Internet Mobile Networked Individualism
  • 9. Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, 2005-2013 2005 2013
  • 10. Image CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Alec Couros Networked Teacher
  • 11. Networked Students too… Student Based on image CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Alec Couros
  • 12. Networked Educators Networked Students
  • 13. Networked Educators Networked Students Classroom Bounded Online Spaces Open Online Spaces
  • 14. Flickr CC images: cdessums, infidelic, sholeh!
  • 15. Individuals with abundant access to ICTs who have habits of effective use of these technologies in information-seeking and problem-solving activities are unable to make effective use of these technologies in higher education settings. David Wiley & John Hilton III (2009) The Daily Divide
  • 16. Networked Educators Networked Students Classroom Bounded Online Spaces Open Online Spaces
  • 17. Networked Students Classroom Bounded Online Spaces Open Online Spaces Networked Educators
  • 18. #icollab TAGSExplorer (thanks to @mhawksey) 153 nodes 756 edges @CT231 IT Professional Skills #ct231 ct231.wordpress.com #icollab icollab.wordpress.com
  • 19. “If institutions of learning are going to help learners with the real challenges they face... [they] will have to shift their focus from imparting curriculum to supporting the negotiation of productive identities through landscapes of practices.” CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 choconancy1 Etienne Wenger (2010)
  • 20. http://storify.com/sheilmcn/am-i-an-open-practitioner
  • 21. http://hawksey.info/tagsexplorer/?key=tOpUYKlcSYOY6BPQATeOyvA&sheet=oaw
  • 22. “ I wonder about Amazon, Google, the NSA and my University both influencing our interactions with each other through technology and mining the data to control markets, society even education. I believe that education is the key to understanding what these organisations are doing to us, but there is a worry for me around the content and the feedback being delivered through an organisation or infrastructure that influence the message.” David Sherlock : http://paddytherabbit.com/open-education/ The medium and the message: networks and control of data
  • 23. How do I visualise my institutional network? https://www.stanford.edu/dept/DLCL/networks/ http://www.hastac.org/blogs/michael-widner/2013/05/24/visualizing-networks-faculty
  • 24. Learners need to practice and experiment with different ways of enacting their identities, and adopt subject positions through different social technologies and media. These opportunities can only be supported by academic staff who are themselves engaged in digital practices and questioning their own relationship with knowledge. - Keri Facer & Neil Selwyn (2010)
  • 25. We’d love to hear your thoughts & questions.
  • 26. Thank you! CatherineCronin @catherinecronin about.me/catherinecronin & SheilaMcNeill @sheilmcn about.me/sheilmcn