Activity: Role playI. Instructions: Groupwork 3 groups (of 6 students each) will prepare a role play andpresent it infron...
Title:The Detective{usually someone intellectually superior to the ordinary person who uses logic and keenobservation to s...
Novel to FilmSince it was first published in 1901, Arthur Conan Doyles adventure has been translated into scripts andscree...
Alone but armed, Watson tracks the stranger to a circle of Neolithic huts, where he discovers to his fury that thestranger...
Plot SummaryThe Hound of the Baskervilles is one of the most famous and admireddetective stories ever written. Published i...
Before Viewing: Questions and Activities1. Some of the best-known skills of Sherlock Holmes are his powers of observation ...
depends on this interplay, have students write the words "Rationalism, Civilization,Science" on one side of a piece of pap...
film, or television show. The first section briefly traces the history of thedetective novel and Conan Doyles contribution...
in contact with, whether criminal, innocent bystander, or client."The detective and mystery stories we read and watch on t...
form about each society based on these chapters. How many of thethings on your list do you think the alien might actually ...
have changed?Fun with Mysteries1. Try writing an opening to a mystery story that will be as atmosphericand mysterious as T...
o You must not go alone. Some great misfortune will befall youif you do.o [This is] a worthy setting if the devil did desi...
the University of Edinburgh who could draw medical conclusions about hispatients simply from observing the mud on their sh...
DETAILED LESSON PLANI. OBJECTIVESAt the end of the lesson, the students should be able to:a. Differentiate active and pass...
Wow that’s good!Last meeting, I have assigned you toanswer the exercises on the book, am I right?Did you answer your assig...
She often shouted for people for nothing.He always tells the truth.Shes interested only in her own concerns.The family is ...
Alexander GrahamBell, ChefCorrect. Observe that the subjects’ students, AlexanderGraham Bell, Chef are the doers of the ac...
in the following sentences:Active Voice PassiveVoice1. The mother carried the baby. 1. The baby wascarried by the mother.2...
2. My father was given the title by the formerhead chief.3. The house was wrecked by the party and thecat was let loose by...
E. GeneralizationTherefore when can you say that a sentence is inThe active or in passive voice? How will you changeThe pa...
Doctor.5. She sponsored the education of many 5. The educationof many poor studentsPoor students. Was sponsoredby her.6. M...
…WORKSHEETQ1: Change the sentences below to the active voice.a. The house is a mess, the cat is lost, and the car has been...
this afternoon. John this afternoon.19. Doug coordinated the meeting in Paul’s 9. The meeting was coordinated byAbsence. D...
..
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  1. 1. Activity: Role playI. Instructions: Groupwork 3 groups (of 6 students each) will prepare a role play andpresent it infront of the class. Last group will wrap up the whole activity,II. Preparation time: 5 minsIII. Presentation time: 5 minsIV. Hints:NarratorTitleThe DetectiveThe Setting (characters / places)The Crime / The Victim(s) / The SuspectsThe CluesThe CaptureThe Solution
  2. 2. Title:The Detective{usually someone intellectually superior to the ordinary person who uses logic and keenobservation to see what others do not}The Setting{usually a “closed society” of some kind—a train, an isolated house—so that the criminalmust be one of the people already in the setting, not an outsider; the atmosphere is tense orfrightening}The CrimeThe Victim(s)The Suspects{a limited group, each with motive, means, and opportunity}The Clues{some, perhaps, will turn outto be false to mislead the audience or detective}The Capture{how the criminal is caught}The Solution{an explanation that brings all of the clues together}
  3. 3. Novel to FilmSince it was first published in 1901, Arthur Conan Doyles adventure has been translated into scripts andscreenplays and reinterpreted as films and stage plays numerous times. What choices do screenwritersand directors need to make? How do their choices impact the meaning and interpretation of a scene?In this scene from Masterpiece Theatres The Hound of the Baskervilles, Dr. Watson visits Merripit Housefor the first time and meets the enigmatic Beryl Stapleton.Story SynopsisOne morning, Dr. James Mortimer pays a visit to consulting detective Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John H. Watson221B Baker Street. Mortimer is concerned by the mysterious death of his old friend Sir Charles Baskerville, whiclocal folk attribute to the 200-year-old family curse: a gigantic phantom hound, a monstrous black beast withdripping jaws and glowing eyes reputed to have savaged his ancestors to death. Sir Charles lived in fear of thelegend and died with a look of abject terror on his face. There was evidence of a desperate dash for safety, but famore frightening were the distinct footprints of an enormous hound close to the corpse.Mortimer is also afraid for the new heir, Sir Henry Baskerville, who has been located in Canada and is coming toclaim his inheritance. From the moment he arrives in London, odd things start to happen. Two of his boots gomissing, anonymous warnings are delivered to his hotel and a bearded man is following him. It is beginning to loas if Sir Henrys life may be in danger too.Sir Henry is about to take up residence at his ancestral home, Baskerville Hall on Dartmoor. Unable to leave Lonfor the present, Holmes sends Watson down to Devon as his agent, with instructions to keep him fully informed oevents, however trivial. The men have learned that a violent convict has escaped from the nearby prison and is stmissing upon the moor. At Baskerville Hall, Watson encounters the bearded butler Barrymore and his wife, whilthe sound of a woman sobbing and the creak of aged floorboards rob him of his sleep.The next day while out walking on the moor, he meets the eccentric archaeologist Stapleton, who lives at MerripHouse with his beautiful sister, Beryl -- a love interest for Sir Henry. Stapleton points out the Grimpen Mire, atreacherous bog so deep it can devour a horse. Nearby are ruins of prehistoric stone dwellings. Then comes thesound of the baying of a hound.An increasingly alarmed Watson and Sir Henry stalk a prowler who disappears into thin air at Baskerville Hall.Intruder or ghost? Finding false paneling, they entrap a startled Barrymore as he signals across the moor. He claito be signalling his lover.Watson and Sir Henry join Dr. and Mrs. Mortimer for dinner at Merripet House with the Stapletons. Dr. Mortimewife, who is fascinated by the occult, agrees to lead a séance; a terrifying vision of the Hound appears. Badlyshaken, Watson and Sir Henry return to Baskerville Hall. The escaped convict Selden -- starved and desperate --broken into the kitchen. As Watson and Sir Henry give chase, they hear the eerie howling of a distant hound.Watson sees the outline of a stranger standing on the distant Tor, framed against the moon.
  4. 4. Alone but armed, Watson tracks the stranger to a circle of Neolithic huts, where he discovers to his fury that thestranger is none other than Sherlock Holmes. A cry of terror interrupts them. They race towards the sound anddiscover the body of Sir Henry, horribly mutilated, face downward on the moor. He has been savaged by anunknown beast. But, upon closer inspection, they realize it is not Sir Henry; it is the convict Selden, dressed in SiHenrys clothes.Back at Baskerville Hall, Holmes tells Mrs. Barrymore that her brother, Selden, is dead. She breaks down andconfesses that she had been feeding him (hence Barrymores signaling) and that she had given him Sir Henrysdiscarded clothes. It is obvious that he had been assumed to be Sir Henry in the attack.Through a masterly combination of detection and deduction, Holmes tells Watson that he has identified the murdas Stapleton, who is out to avenge his father, a disinherited Baskerville who died in poverty. However, they needcatch Stapleton red-handed if they are to deliver him to the hangman. Holmes also reveals that Beryl is notStapletons sister but his wife. Stapleton found it useful to use her as romantic bait to ensnare both Sir Henry andCharles.Together with Inspector Lestrade, Holmes and Watson stake out Stapletons home as he entertains Sir Henry, whhas no idea of Holmess suspicions. He is disappointed to discover that Beryl is not at home. After dinner, Sir Heleaves Merripit House and makes his way home on foot across the moor. In the gathering mist Stapleton releasesHound, priming it with the scent of Sir Henrys stolen boot. The sight of the great demonic creature, eyes ablaze,so terrifying that their nerve momentarily fails them and the animal streaks after its prey. A desperate chase ensuas Holmes and Watson race to save the unsuspecting Sir Henry. They almost arrive too late. The hound has attacbut before it goes in for the kill, they shoot it dead.Back at Merripit House, Lestrade has detained a defiant and unrepentant Stapleton, who refuses to confess. Watsfinds Beryl, bound and beaten to death. In the resultant furor, Stapleton shoots the angry Watson and makes adesperate escape. Holmes pursues Stapleton across the midnight moor, but Stapleton uses his knowledge of thetreacherous terrain to lure the detective into the infamous Grimpen Mire. As Holmes is sucked into the bog,Stapleton gloats and is about to kill him when the wounded Watson lurches out of the fog and shoots him dead.Watson drags Holmes to safety.Sir Henry will survive, Watsons wounds will heal and Holmes has solved his most difficult case yet.
  5. 5. Plot SummaryThe Hound of the Baskervilles is one of the most famous and admireddetective stories ever written. Published in 1901 and 1902, it originallyappeared in nine monthly installments in The Strand magazine. LikeDickenss serialized novels of the same era, each installment ended with asuspenseful "cliff-hanger" that kept author Arthur Conan Doyles audienceclamoring for more. (For more information about the rise of the serialnovel, see "Stay Tuned for our Next Episode...".In the story, the old and noble Baskerville family is threatened by a curse:"A great, black beast, shaped like a hound, yet larger than any hound thatever mortal eye has rested upon" terrorizes and kills any family memberwho comes to live at the Baskerville estate. As the story opens, the houndseems to have claimed his latest victim, Sir Charles Baskerville. SirCharless nephew, Henry, the new heir to the estate, is poised to take upresidence the next day. A friend of the family, Dr. Mortimer, comes toconsult the famous Sherlock Holmes in his rooms at 221b Baker Street,though he confesses he doesnt know if the case is more suitable "for adetective or a priest." The first installment of the novel originally ended asDr. Mortimer explains:"...One false statement was made by Barrymore at the inquest. He said that there were notraces upon the ground round the body. He did not observe any. But I did -- some littledistance off, but fresh and clear.""Footprints?""Footprints.""A mans or a womans?"Dr. Mortimer looked strangely at us for an instant, and his voice sank almost to a whisperas he answered: "Mr. Holmes, they were the footprints of a gigantic hound!"Into this atmosphere of lonely moors, ancient secrets, deadly threats, andghostly apparitions comes the supremely rational Sherlock Holmes -- aman described by his friend Watson as "the most perfect reasoning andobserving machine the world has ever seen." Piece by piece Holmes andWatson solve the mystery and find the culprit. In the end, they reassure thecharacters in the novel (as well as Conan Doyles Victorian readers), thatbehind the threat of a supernatural "hound of hell" is a perfectly scientificexplanation.©
  6. 6. Before Viewing: Questions and Activities1. Some of the best-known skills of Sherlock Holmes are his powers of observation anddeduction. (For example, have students read Chapter One of The Hound of theBaskervilles and note what Holmes discovers about Dr. Mortimer just from his walkingstick.) To demonstrate, ask a staff member to stop by your classroom. After a briefexchange of pleasantries, turn your back. At that moment, have the visitor borrowsomething from your desk (set this up ahead of time). A few minutes later, ask studentswhere the missing item is. When students identify the visitor as the borrower, ask them towrite a physical description of him or her. Have students read their descriptions aloud. Asa class, compare and contrast the variations in what each one observed.2. The essential plot of The Hound of the Baskervilles forms a classic story line that can befound in countless other works of fiction: Someone new comes to stay in an isolatedplace with which legends and mysteries are associated. This persons life and/or sanity isthreatened by increasingly frightening events until a perpetrator is caught. As a class,brainstorm a list of books, films, television shows, legends, myths, ghost stories, or otherstories that share this same basic setup. Ask students, Why do you think this is such anenduring premise for a story?3. The detective is a staple of popular culture. Have students list fictional detectives, frommovies, television, books, cartoons, or any other source. Then, looking over the list, havethem write a paragraph describing how the "typical" -- there may be more than one --fictional detective looks, talks, and acts as well as what he or she does and says. As aclass, compare and contrast the characteristics. After watching the film, have studentsrevisit their descriptions. How closely does it describe Sherlock Holmes? Would youagree with the scholar Ian Ousby who wrote, "Modern detective fiction abounds in directand indirect tribute to Sherlock Holmes, in pale imitations of Doyles formula, and indesperate attempts to break from it?" What "direct or indirect" tributes do students see ontheir original list of detectives?4. In a well-constructed detective story, nothing is wasted; each scene adds suspense andclues to the hunt for "whodunit." Watch the first six minutes of The Hound of theBaskervilles. (Note: The very first scene briefly shows an autopsy. Be sure to preview thefilm to make sure it is appropriate for your class.) What elements of mystery andsuspense are already in play before we even meet Sherlock Holmes? Have students usethe Detectives Log to begin compiling clues and making predictions about what theyvealready seen. Have them continue the log as they watch, stopping at the end of eachviewing day to share their ideas and make predictions about what will come next.Before Viewing: Questions and Activities1. The Hound of the Baskervilles is marked by the constant juxtaposition of the rational andscientific with the irrational and supernatural. (For example, the film begins with rapidcuts between the "civilized" setting of a courtroom and chaotic and frightening scenes ofthe wild moors and an escaped convict.) To investigate how much the tension of the story
  7. 7. depends on this interplay, have students write the words "Rationalism, Civilization,Science" on one side of a piece of paper, and on the other write "Superstition,Wilderness, the Supernatural." (You may want to help the class define these terms first.)Ask students to make a list of all the people, places, things, scenes, and ideas in TheHound of the Baskervilles that seem to fit in one category or another. On which side doesthe hound itself seem to belong? Which of the two forces triumphs at the end? Reviewthe last scene of the film and re-read the last few paragraphs of the novel to determinehow Conan Doyle informs his Victorian audience which side has the "last word."2. Who is Sherlock Holmes? No single story describes him completely. This film version ofThe Hound of the Baskervilles attempts to give viewers a more rounded picture of thegreat detective by borrowing traits and scenes from several of the stories. Ask students todescribe the Holmes of the film by listing as many adjectives as they can to describe him,then listing scenes, lines of dialogue, or anything else they observe in the film thatsupports each adjective. Do students find his traits consistent or contradictory? What dothey make of his drug use? How does he represent the rational/ irrational split that thestory explores?3. The moors in The Hound of the Baskervilles are so central to the plot that they could beconsidered as a character in the story. If you were to describe them the way youddescribe a human character, what would you say about them? Which human character inthe story do they most resemble? How?4. Giving Holmes a very ordinary sidekick, Watson, from whose point of view the tales canbe told, is noted by historians of the detective story as one of Conan Doyles mostimportant contributions. How does the fact that Watson, as Holmes says in A Scandal inBohemia, "sees but does not observe" make him a useful narrator? Ask students toconsider the second segment of the film, from when Watson arrives in Dartmoor to hisdiscovery of Holmes on the moor. How would that segment be different if Holmes werepresent?5. Richard Roxburgh, who plays Holmes, comments that Holmes and Watson, "offset oneanother, and complement one another, perfectly. The deficits in one are covered by thepluses in the other." How so? What other famous fictional pairings can students name (indetective fiction or any other genre)? Do the roles in any of these other pairingscomplement one another in the same way? How?6. Have students pretend they are part of an advertising team that wants to interest a newgeneration -- todays teens -- in The Hound of the Baskervilles. The team believes that theway to get teens to watch or read a "classic" is to show them how it relates tocontemporary works they already enjoy. Ask students to create a print, television, orradio ad for either the film or the novel that uses quotes from the piece, compares it toother works, and highlights the aspects of it they believe their peers will most enjoy.The Mystery GenreThis section is designed to be used with any mystery or detective novel, story,..
  8. 8. film, or television show. The first section briefly traces the history of thedetective novel and Conan Doyles contribution to it. It then lists questionsand activities designed to help students think about the genre and aboutformulaic literature in general. "Fun with Mysteries" invites students creativeresponse to the mystery stories they read. The Detectives Log helps studentsunderstand the basic elements of a classic mystery while keeping track ofthem as they read or watch.A Brief History of the Detective NovelCrime stories have been with us at least since Cain killed Abel in the Bible,yet Sherlock Holmes is considered the father of what is known as the classic"Golden Age" of English murder mystery. Writers such as Agatha Christie,Ellery Queen, and P.D. James went on to emulate this form, and today even acursory glance at a mystery section in a book or video store will reveal thevigorous lineage of the great detective. Although Edgar Allen Poe, WilkieCollins, and others had written mysteries before him, somehow, in thepersons of Sherlock Holmes and his humble helper, Dr. John Watson, ArthurConan Doyle captured the public imagination as no detective writer ever has.The formula Conan Doyle helped establish for the classic English mysteryusually involves several predictable elements: a "closed setting" such as anisolated house or a train; a corpse; a small circle of people who are allsuspects; and an investigating detective with extraordinary reasoning powers.As each character in the setting begins to suspect the others and the suspensemounts, it comes to light that nearly all had the means, motive, andopportunity to commit the crime. Clues accumulate, and are often revealed tothe reader through a narrator like Watson, who is a loyal companion to thebrilliant detective. The detective grasps the solution to the crime long beforeanyone else, and explains it all to the "Watson" at the end.At about the same time as the English murder mystery was establishing itself,a distinctly different school of detective fiction emerged in America. This"hard-boiled" style of fiction took hold in the 1920s, the era of Americanprohibition and gangster violence. Popularized through the accessibility of the"pulps" -- cheaply produced, gaudy magazines that featured short, violentcrime stories -- the hard-boiled American detective contrasts distinctly withthe classic English version. This detective is not a gentleman hero, but a hard-drinking, tough-talking "private eye," often an outsider to the world of upper-and middle-class values. The classic setting is not a country house but thebrutal and corrupt city, and the suspects might be anyone at all in such a vastand anonymous place. The action does not move in a series of orderly stepstoward a logical solution, but, instead, careens from place to place and sceneto scene. As Dashiell Hammett, one of the originators of the genre, explainedit, "Your private detective does not want to be an erudite solver of riddles inthe Sherlock Holmes manner; he wants to be a hard and shifty fellow, able totake care of himself in any situation, able to get the best of anybody he comes
  9. 9. in contact with, whether criminal, innocent bystander, or client."The detective and mystery stories we read and watch on television and in filmtoday can often be traced directly to one of these two original schools, orborrow from both traditions. Contemporary writers continue to reinvent thebasic formula so that, over a hundred years since readers first met the greatSherlock Holmes, the detective story is more fresh, interesting, and popularthan ever.Exploring the Genre1. Why do people like to read mystery and detective stories? Why are weso fascinated with crime, especially murder? List as many reasons asyou can. How does the fact that detective stories have a predictablestructure make them more or less enjoyable to read? Why?2. Why do many readers consider relaxing with mystery, detective, andcrime fiction a "guilty pleasure"? What is the difference between"serious literature" and mystery stories? To think about this, considerthe following questions: Why is Shakespeare not considered a crimewriter even though he often writes about murder? Is Crime andPunishment or Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone a "mystery"novel? Explain your answer.3. What would Sherlock Holmes think about the kind of detectives weare most familiar with from American television? Pretend you areHolmes and watch an episode of a series such as Law and Order,NYPD Blue, or CSI that features a contemporary American detective.If Holmes were asked to give them advice on detecting, what wouldhe tell them?4. Critic Stephen Knight claims that, "No literary figure has a strongerhold on the public imagination" than Sherlock Holmes. Research theinfluence of Sherlock Holmes on popular culture in order to debatethis statement. Consider a wide variety of formats, such as the boardgame "Clue"; childrens book series such as Nancy Drew, the HardyBoys, and Encyclopedia Brown; the films of Alfred Hitchcock;television series and characters (including Dr. Spock in Star Trek andData in Star Trek: The Next Generation); cartoons; and advertising.5. What can the history of the two mystery writing schools tell us aboutsome of the differences between England and America? Pretend youare an alien trying to research the two countries before coming to visit.If all you were given were the first chapter of any Agatha Christienovel (to represent England) and the first chapter of any RaymondChandler novel (to represent America), what conclusions might youdraw? Write a list of the assumptions and expectations this alien might
  10. 10. form about each society based on these chapters. How many of thethings on your list do you think the alien might actually observe if itcame for a visit today?6. Mystery and detective fiction is often judged by how well it satisfiesthe conventions of its genre -- that is, how well it follows theunwritten "rules" of how detectives, criminals, suspects, and clues arepresented. In the 1920s, writer Ronald Knox made a list of"commandments" that he believed must be followed in all gooddetective fiction. Since then, nearly all have been broken, but they arestill a guide for most writers of the classic English school. Some ofthese rules are listed below. Which do The Hound of the Baskervillesobey? Do todays detective stories still follow these rules? If not, whatrules would you add to or eliminate to bring a list of detective storycommandments up-to-date?o The criminal must be mentioned in the early part of the story,but must not be anyone whose thoughts the reader has beenallowed to follow.o All supernatural or preternatural agencies are ruled out as amatter of course.o Not more than one secret room or passage is allowed.o The detective himself must not commit the crime.o The detective is bound to declare any clues upon which hemay happen to light.o The friend of the detective, the Watson, must not conceal fromthe reader any thoughts which pass through his mind; hisintelligence must be slightly, but very slightly, below that ofthe average reader.7. Other genres also follow rules and conventions. Horror, romance, andscience fiction stories all use predictable structures, characters, andplots. Choose one of these genres and develop a set of"commandments" for that genre. You might also compile a list ofclassic lines from this genre (as in the first "Fun with Mysteries"activity, below), or develop a graphic organizer for watching orreading this kind of fiction based on the Detectives Log.8. Can a genres formula be exhausted? If so, can the formula bereinvented and remain fresh? Choose a genre with a formulaicapproach (mystery, detective, crime, spy, romance, horror, or sciencefiction), and compare an early classic with a contemporary example.What do the changes tell you about how the audience and our world
  11. 11. have changed?Fun with Mysteries1. Try writing an opening to a mystery story that will be as atmosphericand mysterious as The Hound of the Baskervilles. Begin with theclassic line "It was a dark and stormy night." Write for ten minuteswithout stopping. Then take turns reading your openings in a smallwriting group of your peers. What descriptive, plot, and settingtechniques seem to work best to create atmosphere? Why? If youchoose to continue your story, use the Detectives Log to keep track ofthe clues you plant and the suspects you describe.2. What real-life mysteries might make thrilling movies? Look throughtodays newspapers and history books and compile a list of murdersand other dramatic crimes from the past or present that have neverbeen turned into films. Then write the one-page pitch that wouldconvince Hollywood to "green light" your project. Include in yourpitch the actors who would be best cast in each role.3. Visit the Masterpiece Theatre Web site and test your powers ofinductive and deductive reasoning by exploring And Now Comes theMystery... You can also try your hand at solving one of the mysteriesposted on MysteryNet.com. For more mystery fun, design a detectinggame, such as a board game, a "picture mystery" laden with clues, or aschool-wide challenge using clues throughout the building.4. Each of the following lines come from the film of The Hound of theBaskervilles, but they are all such classics that any one of them couldeasily be part of many other mystery or detective stories. In smallgroups, choose two of the lines, then write and perform an originalscene that uses them in some way. For those words that are inboldface, feel free to substitute your own. (Note: Teachers may wantto assign the whole class the same two lines to see how differentlyeach small group spins a story around them.)o Its an ugly business. The more I see of it, the less I like.o As you value your life or your reason, keep away from themoor.o He was in a highly nervous state. Something was preying uponhis mind.o I dont know whether its a case for a detective or a priest.o I had no idea such a sum was involved. It is a stake for which aman might well play a desperate game.
  12. 12. o You must not go alone. Some great misfortune will befall youif you do.o [This is] a worthy setting if the devil did desire to have a handin the affairs of man.o No wonder my uncle felt as if trouble were coming in such aplace as this. Its enough to scare any man.o Did you happen to hear someone, a woman, sobbing in thenight?o Go back! Go straight back to London instantly. For Godssake, do as I ask you. Go back, and never set foot on the mooragain.o I suppose the kindest thing would be to put you out of yourmisery.Sherlock Holmes as IconThe Hound of the Baskervilles was Arthur Conan Doyles 26th SherlockHolmes story. A struggling young doctor who invented Holmes to wile awayunfilled office hours, Conan Doyle published the first Holmes story in 1887.His innovation in creating a character who would appear over and over in aseries of self-contained stories meant that Holmess popularity grew with eachinstallment. Soon the character was so beloved that people refused to believehe wasnt a real person; letters addressed to "Sherlock Holmes, ConsultingDetective" arrived daily at Baker Street and Scotland Yard, each begging himto take on a real case.Conan Doyle, meanwhile, was growing weary of Holmes and his popularity,and often threatened to kill the character off so that he could write "serious"fiction instead. In 1893, Conan Doyle published The Final Problem, in whichHolmess nemesis, Professor Moriarty, sends him to his death over theReichenbach Falls. In the days that followed, there was such an outcry thatnewspapers actually ran headlines about Holmess death, and his fans woremourning garb in the streets. Conan Doyle was forced to resurrect Holmes.The Hound of the Baskervilles was the first new Holmes story to appear afterthis, although Conan Doyle set the novel retrospectively so that he couldavoid the problem of bringing Holmes back to life.Based in part on the work of Dr. Joseph Bell, a teacher of Conan Doyles at
  13. 13. the University of Edinburgh who could draw medical conclusions about hispatients simply from observing the mud on their shoes, Holmess "method" isperhaps the best-known thing about him. In The Red headed League hefamously sums up what he has gleaned from merely looking at a visitor:"Beyond the obvious facts that he has at some time done manual labour, thathe takes snuff, that he is a Freemason, that he has been in China, and that hehas done a considerable amount of writing lately, I can deduce nothing."Questions and Activities1. Letters addressed to Sherlock Holmes at 221b Baker Street still arriveevery day, over 100 years after the character was created. Askstudents, Why do you think this is? Holmes has been described as"real in a way that only the greatest fictional characters achieve."What other characters, from books, film, television, legend, orelsewhere, can students name who are real in this way? What do theythink these characters and Sherlock Holmes have in common that hasgiven them such longevity?2. Although Holmes is often thought of as the first of the GreatDetectives, Conan Doyle actually modeled Holmes on MonsieurDupin, an inspector created by Edgar Allan Poe for his stories"Murders in the Rue Morgue" and "The Purloined Letter." Havestudents read the Poe stories, and compare Dupin to Holmes. Ask,Why do you think Holmes is a beloved and classic figure and Dupinhas been largely forgotten?3. Have students research the life of Arthur Conan Doyle to see how hehimself -- with his love of sport, adventure, and science -- embodiedthe ideals of Victorian manhood. (See Resources as well as the ConanDoyle biography.) Ask, How do you think Arthur Conan Doyle wouldhave reacted to this new version of The Hound of the Baskervilles,produced a hundred years after his own? Have students write the letteryou think he might send to the team who made this film.Sherlock Holmess great popularity can be attested to by the number ofparodies and pastiches (pieces that borrow from another source) that havebeen written about him by everyone from Mark Twain and O. Henry tocontemporary writers. Have students create their own Holmes story, orparody of a Holmes story, by following their basic formula as outlined bycritic T.J. Binyon:Holmes and Watson are at Baker Street —› A client arrives —› Holmes deduces things aboutthe client from an object or the person him or herself —› The problem is outlined —› Holmesand Watson discuss the case when the client is gone —› The investigation begins —› Holmesidentifies what happened —› Holmes explains it all to Watson back at Baker Street. A
  14. 14. DETAILED LESSON PLANI. OBJECTIVESAt the end of the lesson, the students should be able to:a. Differentiate active and passive voice;b. Identify the voice of the verb in each sentence;c. Rewrite the sentence changing the the voice from active topassive voice;d. Appreciate the lesson by showing active participation ofthe students towards the lesson.II. SUBJECT MATTERTopic: Active and Passive VoiceIII. MATERIALSMoving Ahead in English p 197-199strips of cartolina, manila paper, and picturesIV. LESSON PROPERA. ROUTINARY ACTIVITIESTeacher’s Activity Student’s ActivityEverybody stand up and let us pray.Anyone who wants to lead the prayer? Heavenlyfather….Good morning class! Good morningMrs. Monteroyo!Okay, class before we start, I want youto pick up those pieces of papers under yourchairs and arrange it properly. Are youthrough?Okay, you may take your seat nowClass, is there any absent today? None ma’am.
  15. 15. Wow that’s good!Last meeting, I have assigned you toanswer the exercises on the book, am I right?Did you answer your assignment?Group leaders collect the assignmentof your members then pass it to me. Yes ma’am.Class yesterday, we discussed about verb,right?Read the following sentences. What are theverb used?Carlos gave a speechLito plays basketball.Olive sings folk songs gave, plays, singsTherefore, what is the verb? Verb is an actionword or state ofbeing.Very good!I’m happy that you understand ourlesson yesterday, so let’s give ourselveswith a big handLets have some vocabulary drills and find out what kindperson are you. Circle the words below that represent the givencharacteristics of aperson. SENSITIVE FRUGAL SEFLISH HONESTAGGRESSIVEShe never brags about her success
  16. 16. She often shouted for people for nothing.He always tells the truth.Shes interested only in her own concerns.The family is able to stretch its monthly budget.B. MotivationOkay, class I want you to listen for a short scenario;"John saw a pretty girl. He went to talk to her.Her husband arrived. The husband hit John on the nose."1. What did the husband do? (Active voice is used in the answer.)answers may vary..2. What happened to John? (Passive voice is used in the answer.)Notice on the sentences on the board. Analyze itsdifference. It tells whether it is in the form of activeor passive voice. That is what we are going todiscuss now.C. PresentationVoice is the quality of a verb that shows whetherthe subjects is the doer or receiver of the actionThe Active VoiceActive voice is used to indicate that the subject ofthe sentence is the doer of the actionLet’s start with a very simple sentence.S V OThe boy kicked the ball.In the following sentences, note the form of the verbwhen the subject is the doer of the action.A student wrote the winning essay.Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone.The chef prepared a delicious meal.What are the subjects in the sentences? Student,
  17. 17. Alexander GrahamBell, ChefCorrect. Observe that the subjects’ students, AlexanderGraham Bell, Chef are the doers of the action.What are the verbs used? Wrote,invented, preparedVery good! Those verbs are transitive verb with directsobjects, thus when the subject of the sentence doesThe action and the verb has a direct object, we say that theverb is in the active voice.The Passive VoiceThe passive voice is created when the subjects isacted upon, this time my subjects is going to beThe ball, because the recipient of the action,What happen to the ball? The ballkicked.Good. Now who kicked the ball? The ballkicked by the boy.Very good! Now, study the following sentences:The winning essay was written by a studentsThe telephone was invented by Alexander Grahambell.A delicious meals was prepared by the chef.In each sentence above, observe that the subjects is thereceiver instead of being the doer of the action. Note that theform of the verb when the subjects is the receiver, not the doer ofthe action is made up of was+ past participle of the verb. Thus if thesubjects is acted upon, the verb is in the passive voice. Let us havean exercise.Identify the voice of the verb in each sentence.1. Raul presented an interesting report. 1.active2. Baseball was played by Joseph. 2.passive3. Martin removed the old paint. 3.active4. The national budget was approved by congress. 4.passive5. She cooked the breakfast. 5.activeExcellent!Changing the voice from active to passive. Study the changes
  18. 18. in the following sentences:Active Voice PassiveVoice1. The mother carried the baby. 1. The baby wascarried by the mother.2. Father repaired the old chair 2. An old chairwas repaired by father.3. He invented a breathing device for 3. A breathingdevice for firefightersFirefighters. was inventedby him.4. Sam explored the famous underground river. 4. The famousunderground riverWas exploredby Sam.5. She interviewed the school president. 5. The schoolpresident was interviewed By her.What happened to the subjects, verbs, andDirect object in the sentences in the active voice? The subjectmother and fatherbecame the receiver in the by- phraseIn passive voice.The action wordcarried and repaired became verbPhrases.The directobjects baby and chairBecame thesubjects in the passivevoice.Very well said!I’m glad that you understand our topic todaySo let’s give ourselves a round of applause.D. ApplicationChange the sentences below to the active voice.1. I was taught by my brother the principlesof barbecuing.
  19. 19. 2. My father was given the title by the formerhead chief.3. The house was wrecked by the party and thecat was let loose by the guests.4. The house is a mess, the cat is lost, and thecar has been stolen by Justin.5. Unfortunately, my plan was ruined by Gerald,the building superintendent.6. The roof was leaking. It had been leakingall week.7. The ball was thrown by Lucy, who had beenhiding in the bushes.8. Francesca was placed on the first flight toBoston. Her father put her there.9. “To be or not to be?” That is the question.10. A feast had been created from nothing.I was astounded.Answers:1. My brother taught me the principles ofbarbecuing.2. The former head chief gave the title to myfather.3. The party wrecked the house and the guestslet the cat loose.4. The house is a mess, the cat is lost, and Justinhas stolen the car.5. Unfortunately, Gerald, the buildingsuperintendent, ruined my plan.6. No change.7. Lucy, who had been hiding in the bushes,threw the ball.8. Francesca’s father placed her on the firstflight to Boston.9. No change.10. A feast had been created from nothing. Thisastounded me.Very good!.
  20. 20. E. GeneralizationTherefore when can you say that a sentence is inThe active or in passive voice? How will you changeThe passive from active to passive voice? A verb that ha sdirect objects is inThe active voice.If the subjects isActed upon, theverb is in the passivevoice. Inchanging a sentence fromactive to passive,the direct objectsbecomes thesubjects or doer in theby- phrase.Very well said!F. EvaluationA. Write A in the blanks before the number if the sentence is activeand P if passive.__A____1. Rommel presented an interesting report.__A____2. He submitted the annual report of the organization.__P____3. The town was destroyed by fire.__P____4. That skyscraper was built in 1934__P____5. The new product design has been finished.B. Rewrite each sentence changing the verb from active to passive.1. He wrote a novel. 1. A novel waswritten by her.2. Many people admired Ninoy Aquino. 2. Ninoy Aquinowas admired by manyPeople.3. He repaired the dripping faucet 3. The drippingfaucet was repaired byHim.4. The doctor examined the patient. 4. The patientwas examined by the
  21. 21. Doctor.5. She sponsored the education of many 5. The educationof many poor studentsPoor students. Was sponsoredby her.6. My boss made the decision yesterday. 6. The decisionwas made by myBoss yesterday.7. We proposed the change last week. 7. The changewas proposed(by us)Last week.8. John delivered the message. 8. The messagewas delivered bythis afternoon. John thisafternoon.9. Doug coordinated the meeting in Paul’s 9. The meetingwas coordinated byAbsence. Doug in Paul’sabsence.10. James collected the shells. 10. The shellswas collected byJames.V. ASSIGNMENTWrite a brief description of art that you or one of your friendscreated. Use both active and passive voice verbs. Circle each verband identify its voice.©
  22. 22. …WORKSHEETQ1: Change the sentences below to the active voice.a. The house is a mess, the cat is lost, and the car has been stolen by Justin.b. Unfortunately, my plan was ruined by Gerald, the building superintendent.c. The roof was leaking. It had been leaking all week.d. The ball was thrown by Lucy, who had been hiding in the bushes.e. Francesca was placed on the first flight tof. Boston. Her father put her there.g. I was taught by my brother the principles of barbecuing.h. My father was given the title by the former head chief.i. The house was wrecked by the party and the cat was let loose by the guests.Q2: Write A in the blanks before the number if the sentence is active and P if passive.__A____1. Rommel presented an interesting report.__A____2. He submitted the annual report of the organization.__P____3. The town was destroyed by fire.__P____4. That skyscraper was built in 1934__P____5. The new product design has been finished.Q3: Rewrite each sentence changing the verb from active to passive.11. He wrote a novel. 1. A novel was written by her.12. Many people admired Ninoy Aquino. 2. Ninoy Aquino was admired bymanyPeople.13. He repaired the dripping faucet 3. The dripping faucet was repairedbyHim.14. The doctor examined the patient. 4. The patient was examined by theDoctor.15. She sponsored the education of many 5. The education of many poorstudentsPoor students. Was sponsored by her.16. My boss made the decision yesterday. 6. The decision was made by myBoss yesterday.17. We proposed the change last week. 7. The change was proposed(by us)Last week.18. John delivered the message. 8. The message was delivered by
  23. 23. this afternoon. John this afternoon.19. Doug coordinated the meeting in Paul’s 9. The meeting was coordinated byAbsence. Doug in Paul’s absence.20. James collected the shells. 10. The shells was collected byQ1: Answers:1. My brother taught me the principles of barbecuing.2. The former head chief gave the title to my father.3. The party wrecked the house and the guests let the cat loose.4. The house is a mess, the cat is lost, and Justin has stolen the car.5. Unfortunately, Gerald, the building superintendent, ruined myplan.6. No change.7. Lucy, who had been hiding in the bushes, threw the ball.8. Francesca’s father placed her on the first flight to Boston.9. No change.10. A feast had been created from nothing. This astounded me.
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